2010 gubernatorial qa web by Y3NBqD

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									April 20, 2010

2010 SDSEO Gubernatorial Questionnaire

Here are the responses we have received from the 2010 gubernatorial candidates.
Candidates are listed in alphabetical order:

Dennis M. Daugaard

1.        What is the main motivation behind you seeking public office?

I ran for State Senate because I wanted to help people and make South Dakota an even
better place to live and work. I am running for Governor for the same reasons. It is that
same desire which led me to dedicate the past twenty years to creating a better life for
abused and neglected children at Children’s Home Society. South Dakota has given my
family and I incredible opportunities and I want to make sure future generations have
those same opportunities.

2.        Give a brief biographical of yourself. For example: What are your
          qualifications? Why are you interested in public office? Do you have any
          previous public office experience?
I believe my life experiences, education, professional experience and proven leadership
make me well-qualified to serve as Governor. I grew up on a family dairy farm between
Dell Rapids and Garretson, SD and live there now. Following graduation from Dell
Rapids High School, I attended the University of South Dakota. I worked my way
through college and, in 1975, I graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in
Government, with minors in Mathematics and Psychology. After graduating, I went to
law school at Northwestern University in Chicago.
After graduating from law school, I began work for Supena & Nyman, a small law firm
in downtown Chicago and then Shand, Morahan and Company as an underwriting
manager. By 1981, I had grown tired of “big city life” and left Chicago to return to South
Dakota, where I accepted a position as a trust officer at what is now US Bank in Sioux
Falls. From 1981 – 1990, I administered estates and trusts, and ultimately was promoted
to Vice President, responsible for trust administration and new business development for
eastern South Dakota.

While working at the bank, I began to volunteer at Children’s Home Society. In 1990, I
left the bank to work full-time as Development Director of Children’s Home Foundation,
the fund-raising arm of CHS. I worked for 12 years in this position. When I began,
unrestricted gifts to Children’s Home averaged about $38,000/year. Through special
events, mail appeals, and face-to-face solicitations, I built unrestricted gifts to
$650,000/year. Over the course of those years, I also raised $1.8 million to build a new
school at Black Hills Children’s Home, and additional funds to build a new children’s
residence – Madsen House - at Sioux Falls Children’s Home. In 1998, I launched a $10
million endowment-building campaign, which I successfully concluded four years later.
In 2002, I became Executive Director of Children’s Home Society of South Dakota
where I was responsible for over 300 employees and an annual budget of over $16
million, serving over 2,000 women and children at four locations in the Black Hills and
Sioux Falls.
Prior to serving as Lieutenant Governor, I served six years in the State Senate. I was first
elected in 1996, and was re-elected by wide margins in 1998 and 2000. My legislative
record was particularly focused on protecting children, helping the disabled, and getting
tough on crime.

3.     What do you feel are the most critical issues facing South Dakota in the
       future?
The most critical issue facing South Dakota in the near future is the economy. My first
priority as governor will be to build a stronger South Dakota – by creating jobs and
growing our economy. The fastest way to end this recession is to put people back to
work and grow our way into the future. My goal is to create a diverse economy with jobs
for everyone who is able to work. I have released a plan, available on my website (
www.daugaardforgovernor.com) that will create those opportunities. More jobs and a
growing economy will also cause more competition for workers and higher wages.
Another critical issue facing the future of our state is workforce development. As the
baby-boomer generation nears retirement, the state will have a need for many qualified
workers to fill the jobs they leave. So, we need to continue working hard to educate our
children for those jobs and to keep them in the state after they graduate.
I will also focus on maintaining and improving South Dakota’s exceptional quality of
life. I will work hard to maintain our friendly business climate, excellent education
system, low tax burden and low crime rate.

4.     Do you think the current state employee PACE (Performance and
       Compensation Equity system is an effective pay system? Would you support
       an alternative pay system?
I believe PACE is an effective pay system. I also believe PACE has been well received
by state employees for many years as a reasonable and acceptable compensation
program. The design of PACE is sound because it blends the need to raise the entire
salary structure (across-the-board increase) with the need to move salaries beyond
minimum of the range (movement to job worth) and the ability to reward long term
employees (longevity pay). Unfortunately, for this fiscal year and again next fiscal year,
the state was unable to fund the across-the-board increase and the movement to job
worth. I understand that there are frustrations with salaries and, also with PACE because
of the availability of funding.
In regard to supporting an alternative pay system, I am always open to changes in any
program and there is always room for improvement. I believe that any compensation
system must meet the following criteria:

        The system must provide recognition for both long term and newer employees
         who provide the great service that we deliver every day to our citizens.

        The system must put as much emphasis as possible on keeping salaries
         competitive with the appropriate labor market.

        The system must be sufficiently flexible to address recruitment and retention
         issues for various occupations.

        The state compensation system must be structured so that over the long term, the
         state is capable of fiscally supporting the system.

5.       Do you feel that in order to maintain a quality product from the public
         sector, state employee compensation should keep track with that of the
         private sector? What is the appropriate disparity?
Yes. Most public sector salaries should be competitive. As Governor, I will make that
goal a priority.
I do not believe elected officials and high-level administrators employed by the state
should be paid the same extraordinarily high salaries many executives in the private
sector receive. There should be more parity for lower level positions. We need to pay
state employees what they are worth or the state will lose good employees to local
government entities and the private sector.

6.       If elected, how do you plan to promote a strong public workforce?
I will promote a strong public workforce by making salaries competitive, keeping health
care costs low and maintaining existing benefits. I will also initiate better communication
with state employees in an effort to find innovative ways to improve their workplace
environment and quality of life.

7.       Access to our members is very important to SDSEO. Will your
         administration continue to allow organization materials in break areas?
Absolutely.

8.       Do you support the state employees’ right to be involved in the political
         process?
Absolutely, so long as such activity is not conducted during their work hours.
David L. “Dave” Knudson
1.     What is the main motivation behind you seeking public office?

South Dakota is now at a crossroads. We have lost 8,000 jobs in South Dakota in the past
year. For two years in a row, we have had to give zero percent increases to our state
employees and Medicaid providers. We are facing a huge deficit for fiscal 2012 and were
able to balance our fiscal year 2011 budget only with great difficulty. The challenges
ahead are clearly significant. South Dakota needs strong, active leadership to start our
economy growing again which will provide resources to balance our budget, to allow us
to provide compensation increases for state employees and Medicaid providers. We have
been ignoring our problems too long and need to get about the serious business of solving
them.


2.     Give a brief biographical of yourself. For example: What are your
       qualifications? Why are you interested in public office? Do you have any
       previous public office experience?

I have been a business lawyer for 35 years. That has given me an understanding of the
challenges facing business, big and small. As part of our law firm’s management, I am
familiar with the challenges of operating a small business with just under 100 employees
and the attendant compensation, health insurance and other benefit issues. I have served
as the Governor’s chief of staff in 1995 and 1999 so I am intimately familiar with the
actual day to day operations of the Governor’s office. For the past eight years, I have
served in the South Dakota Senate and have served as Senate Majority Leader for the past
four years. This background has given me a unique ability to understand and to know
what it takes to be a good governor and a strong leader.


3.     What do you feel are the most critical issues facing South Dakota in the
       future?

The most critical issues facing South Dakota are growing our economy and finding jobs
for out of work South Dakotans. A related issue is balancing our state’s budget.
Economic growth is clearly a key to that effort. Finally, I believe we must find an ability
to control our Medicaid costs in the future. This will involve the Department of Social
Services in an in-depth survey of case management and utilization review protocols used
in the private sector. If we are to have the resources to make progress on a number of
other problems confronting South Dakota, including fairly compensating our state
employees and Medicaid providers, we need to find a way to control the utilization of
Medicaid in South Dakota.
4.     Do you think the current state employee PACE (Performance and
       Compensation Equity) system is an effective pay system? Would you support
       an alternative pay system?

I believe the PACE system is an effective pay system. While I would be open to
discussions on alternatives, I believe what we have is working.


5.     Do you feel that in order to maintain a quality product from the public
       sector, state employee compensation should keep track with that of the
       private sector? What is the appropriate disparity?

I believe customer service and quality performance are very important for the public
sector. State employee’s compensation should be comparable to that of the private sector
for comparable positions.


6.     If elected, how do you plan to promote a strong public workforce?

With new ideas, new energy and new leadership, we can, once again, make South Dakota
state government an exciting place to work and a career to be proud of. People enjoy
being part of a team that is moving forward and making a difference. With new ideas,
energy and leadership, we can make South Dakota’s economy start growing and give the
state the necessary revenues to start solving problems and provide appropriate
compensation to state employees – the people that actually make it happen. We need to
provide more training and have better recognition programs for state employees in order
to achieve higher performance.


7.     Access to our members is very important to SDSEO. Will your
       administration continue to allow organization materials in break areas?

Yes.


8.     Do you support the state employees’ right to be involved in the political
       process?

Yes, but I do not support the current system of “encouraging “ state employees to make
“voluntary” contributions to candidates favored by the Administration.




Ken Knuppe
1.     What is the main motivation behind you seeking public office?
One of the big reasons I decided to run for the office of Governor is that I wanted to
reach out to South Dakotans, to remind you that South Dakota government is yours.
I want the people of South Dakota to remember that you have the right to be involved in
government, your opinion counts, in fact you are South Dakota government.
Another of the reasons I decided to run for governor was to bring back a conservative
viewpoint in the governor’s office. I believe our budget can be balanced with frugal
decisions and across-the-board cuts, not raising taxes. Additionally I would like to ensure
that we as a state are continually protecting individual freedoms and state’s rights.
I also wanted to grow opportunities for small businesses and provide them with the
chance to obtain affordable health insurance. While there are many reasons I would like
to serve this great state, those are probably the three most important.


2.     Give a brief biographical of yourself. For example: What are your
       qualifications? Why are you interested in public office? Do you have any
       previous public office experience?
I haven't served in the legislature before, which some people think is a good thing. I am
an ordinary person which means I can truly relate to other “ordinary” South Dakotans.
Every so often we need to elect leadership from outside the political circle so that we
keep our government in the hands of the people of this state. I have held leadership
positions including serving as the president of the state’s largest cattle organization, and
many would say the state’s most active agriculture organization – the South Dakota
Stockgrowers Association. In this capacity I oversaw a large budget and helped manage
150+ employees. I also served as their state lobbyist and have lobbied Congress
numerous times. I also own and manage my own business. I believe these experiences
make me very well qualified to serve as governor. I have real world experience in serving
people, working with large numbers of people to problem-solve, appointing people to
serve in positions and balancing a tight budget. I don’t believe that serving our state as
governor means promoting myself or getting credit for everything that goes right, I
believe it means working as a team with all South Dakotans to determine what is best for
our state and how we can accomplish that. For example, when working on education
policy, I believe it is important to work with teachers, students, parents, administrators,
etc., to come up with a workable solution, rather than coming up with my own far-fetched
ideas and forcing them on the education system.
In addition, I'm the only candidate with an ag background. With ag being the #1 industry
in the state, it's time we have a governor who knows and understands that industry.
Someone who has lived it.
Finally, I am the only candidate who has lived on both sides of the state. I've traveled this
state not just in the last year on the campaign trail, but most of my life. Friends and
family live all around the state. I've travelled thousands of miles attending meetings and
other functions in towns and communities all across South Dakota and I truly enjoy and
appreciate the entire state.


3.     What do you feel are the most critical issues facing South Dakota in the
       future?


          Keep government simple and accessible to all people.
          Strengthen the economy.
          Promote small business and enhance profitability in agriculture
          Restore individual freedoms and state’s rights.
          Capture and utilize various forms of energy.
          Insure property tax structure is fair and effective and improve education
           funding.
          Evaluate Federally Funded Programs
          Back-to-basics Education
          Budgeting
          Relying on State Employees to Provide Expertise
          Ensure the Second Amendment is followed
          Right to Life
          See my website, www.knuppeforgovernor.com for details on each of these
           issues.


4.     Do you think the current state employee PACE (Performance and
       Compensation Equity) system is an effective pay system? Would you support
       an alternative pay system?
I am not terribly familiar with the system. I understand it is a method of providing cost of
living raises. I believe that cost of living raises are necessary. I would like to discuss the
PACE system with your members and all state employees to determine if changes would
be needed.


5.     Do you feel that in order to maintain a quality product from the public
       sector, state employee compensation should keep track with that of the
       private sector? What is the appropriate disparity?

Yes, I believe that all government jobs need to keep pace with private sector jobs. Similar
work should receive similar pay, with all benefits being figured into the equation of
course.


6.     If elected, how do you plan to promote a strong public workforce?
I plan to rely on current public employees to help me decide what needs to be done to
maintain a strong workforce. You are the people who know what you are doing, how it
can be done better and more efficiently. I am very interested in what you have to say.


7.     Access to our members is very important to SDSEO. Will your
       administration continue to allow organization materials in break areas?


I am a strong believer in an “open door policy.” I believe that information is power.
While I would have to evaluate the issue further, I see no reason that I wouldn’t support
the continuance of organization materials being allowed in break areas.


8.     Do you support the state employees’ right to be involved in the political
       process?

Again, one of the reasons I ran for governor is because I support the right of
EVERYONE to be involved in the political process, no matter who your employer is. If
you have a particular private issue that you would like to take up with state government, I
urge you to do so. I have concerns with the “blue badges” because that is a different
issue. I don’t necessarily believe that state employees should be paid to argue against the
private sector. If a state employee wants to speak before a legislative committee, for
example, on his or her own time (maybe take a few hours off of work) on an issue you
are concerned with, I completely support this. But state employees should not be directed
by their superiors to spend “on the clock” time to lobby issues in the legislature.




Scott Munsterman

1.     What is the main motivation behind you seeking public office?

About four years ago I sensed a conviction to be your new Governor. I waited about a
year and when this didn’t go away I knew I need to understand why me. So I spent two
years meeting with over 150 people and researched and wrote a plan for South Dakota;
publishing it as a book entitled “A Vision for South Dakota”. This can be accessed at my
website www.munstermanforgovernor.com/vision .
This plan is based upon my experience of 25 years in small business and as a two term
mayor. I learned as a mayor that we are only as strong as our smallest community, and a
statewide strategic plan based upon this premise will grow our whole state. The fact is
2/3rds of our communities in this state are declining and we can reverse that trend. I
believe we need leadership with vision to chart the course for our future. And I am
passionate about this.
2.     Give a brief biographical of yourself. For example: What are your
       qualifications? Why are you interested in public office? Do you have any
       previous public office experience?

25 years ago I started my practice. I am a chiropractic physician by trade. My practice
developed and grew over the years into an innovative practice of a variety of health care
professionals: chiropractic and medical physicians, physical therapy, podiatrists,
neurosurgeon and others. Our group came together to focus on the patient’s needs. In
addition, I started two other health care related businesses – altogether producing 50 jobs
in South Dakota’s economy as an entrepreneur. In 2001, I was elected to the Brookings
City Council and two years later was elected as mayor, serving two terms as Mayor of the
City of Brookings. When I came on the city council, I inherited a structural deficit –
which we turned into a balanced budget without using reserves and without raising taxes.
We grew our economy creating over 3100 jobs, we quadrupled our reserves, property
development increased by 80% in valuations over the course of this time. As mayor, I
initiated regional partnerships with surrounding communities to strategically develop our
economy. As a result, a recent study released places the Brookings region 3rd in the
nation as the least economically stressed by this recession.
My 25 years of experience in clinical practice and health care will prove valuable as your
new governor at this point in the history of our state as well. With the new health care
reform measures, it will be important to have someone in the office of governor who
understands patient centered care and who has a track record of defending the rights of
patients to choose their own physician. It is our individual rights and freedoms at risk
under this new federal legislation.


3.     What do you feel are the most critical issues facing South Dakota in the
       future?

       Last year, my wife MJ and I have traveled to 165 communities putting on over
       50,000 miles. I asked people in those communities what their greatest challenges
       are. They told me they are tired of politics and want leadership with a plan. They
       cited the budget, education, jobs and health care as their top concerns.
       First of all, we must get our state back to a position of financial strength. That
       means balancing the budget without using reserves and without raising taxes. We
       need to roll back our projected sales tax revenue to 2005 levels and budget from
       that number. Setting the price of government is the first step, then bringing
       innovation into departments, through benchmarking and performance measuring
       will be key to streamlining and focusing our tax dollars into priority areas. I am
       the only candidate with elected executive experience as a two term mayor and
       have been down this road already.
       Secondly, education must be funded with some of the first dollars in the budget.
       This is our top priority as a state. But having said that, we must re-engineer our
       education process to achieve educational excellence. Recent ACT results show
       that, out of 6676 of our kids who prepared for college in our K-12 system who
       took the test, only 28% of them were deemed “college ready”. We must create
       more rigor in our education system. Please refer to my chapter on education in my
       book “A Vision for South Dakota” (www.munstermanforgovernor.com/vison ).
       Job creation and education go hand in hand. We are still educating some great
       kids only to send them out of state for their job opportunities or to stay in this
       state and be underemployed. Our economic strategy must be connected to our
       education plan. As mayor, I initiated the I29 corridor project. I met with mayors,
       city councils, county commissions, economic development experts and our
       university and tech schools to create a regional growth strategy that ties education
       into our core strengths in the business sector. By creating business and education
       partnerships, we can connect our kids – our future South Dakota taxpayers – with
       real opportunities right here in South Dakota.
       Health care will be shaped and molded in the very near future. Under this new
       law, we must do everything within our power to maintain our state’s rights and
       individual freedoms to have the health care we need for our families. In addition
       to taking care of patients and defending their rights for 25 years, my wife Mary
       Jeanne was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer nearly two years ago. She was
       able to undergo the best in medical care and by the grace of God, she is cancer
       free today. I am convinced someone in her situation would not be afforded timely,
       quality care in a single payer system. And with the recent health care law, a single
       payer system isn't far down the road. Protecting your right to health care runs
       deep in my veins.
       In addition, we need to provide solutions to our current Medicaid crisis. I have a
       plan to place more personal financial responsibility in the decision making
       process for people who qualify for Medicaid. And the dollars we save need to be
       spent on long term care – we have a growing population of loyal taxpayers who
       will need long term care services and we must prepare ourselves to be able to care
       for them in their final years. They have been missing from the debate on health
       care and will be front and center in my attempts to create a viable health care plan
       for our state.


       4.     Do you think the current state employee PACE (Performance and
              Compensation Equity) system is an effective pay system? Would you
              support an alternative pay system?

I supported and promoted a fair market system for our public employees during my terms
in office. We created a performance based system that fairly rewards our valued
employees for the work they do and this process is reviewed and tested to the market
every 5 years. I would welcome the opportunity to work with your organization to get a
much needed review and work with you to develop a plan to bring any deficiencies
identified though this process in line.
5.     Do you feel that in order to maintain a quality product from the public
       sector, state employee compensation should keep track with that of the
       private sector? What is the appropriate disparity?

There should be no disparity of what we pay employees. That is why a market analysis is
so important. It also will be important that the rate of growth of government not exceed
the rate of growth of inflation. This will mean we must rein in government spending and
retool our workforce’s efforts into our areas of priority – using benchmarking and
performance measurements. I will be excited to work with your organization on this.
Together we need to right size our workforce, but at the same time pay accordingly.


6.     If elected, how do you plan to promote a strong public workforce?

I have learned in small business and as a two term mayor that everything rises and falls
on leadership. I will provide positive leadership and will inspire people to do their best
with purpose and dignity. This means we all must be aware of and be bought into a vision
for our state. It will become the focus of our mission in life – to serve the people of this
great state. We will cultivate an enthusiastic culture of service and that will start from the
top.


7.     Access to our members is very important to SDSEO. Will your
       administration continue to allow organization materials in break areas?

Yes.

8.     Do you support the state employees’ right to be involved in the political
       process?

I believe it is wrong for a candidate or an elected official to solicit money from people
directly under their employ. I respect and acknowledge the right of state employees to be
involved in the political process, but as an ethical concern as your new Governor, I will
not accept donations from those who I directly employ.



*candidates who have not responding as of today: Scott Heidepriem, Gordon Howie

								
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