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									        The American
Reinvestment and Recovery Act:
   SAVING AND CREATING JOBS AND REFORMING EDUCATION


 National Association of Elementar y
          School Principals

   April 5, 2009 New Or leans, LA.

          Mar shall S . Smith
   U.S . Depar tment of Education
Saving and Creating Jobs and Reforming Education

“In a global economy where the most valuable skill
you can sell is your knowledge, a good education is
no longer just a pathway to opportunity - it is a pre-
requisite. The countries that out-teach us today will
out-compete us tomorrow.”
- President Barack Obama, 2/24/09
                   Overview

 ARRA: Funds for K-12 Education: What are they?
  How Much? When are they released? Allowable uses.
 Guiding Principles for ARRA.
 ARRA and Education reform. A vision and Race to
  the Top.
 What can District Leadership and Elementary School
  Principals do with ARRA monies to improve teaching
  and learning?



                          3
           ARRA for K-12 education.

 One-time Investment:
 Over $100 billion education investment: Approx
  $70 billion for K-12 education.
 Historic opportunity to stimulate economy,
  stabilize the educational system, and improve
  education quality.
 Success depends on leadership, judgment,
  coordination, and communication
                         K-12 Education

 Four buckets of funds and programs:
   Stabilization formula program: Approximately $33 billion to
    K-12: 2/3rds released April 1, remainder within 4 months.
   Federal large formula funds:
       Title I Part A: $10 billion: ½ released April 1, remainder by 10-09
       IDEA Part B&C: $13 billion: ½ on 4/1, remainder by 10/09

     Smaller formula grants and competitive grants: $4-5 billion,
      released or awarded by 11/09: Major examples: Title I School
      Improvement ($3 billion); Technology ($650 million); Teacher
      Incentive Fund (TIF) ($200 million)
     Federal competitions: Race to the Top ($4.35 billion) to states:
      Innovation ($635 billion) to districts. (Awarded FY2010)

                                      5
         How may ARRA funds be used?

 Detailed Guidance at www.ed.gov. New material
  including waiver guidance to be posted by 4/15.
 In Brief:
    Stabilization funds: Pay salaries for any school person (e.g.
     pick up pink slips), professional development, school
     modernization, curriculum, etc. Use Impact Aid rules for
     general support.
    Title I Part A: Follow rules as usual except see guidance for
     flexibility.
    IDEA Part B: Follow rules as usual except see guidance for
     flexibility.
    Other programs: Follow general program rules.
Guiding Principles

  Spend Quickly to Save and
        Create Jobs

  Ensure Transparency and
       Accountability

Thoughtfully Invest One-time
           Funds


 Advance Effective Reforms
            Balance Speed and Effectiveness

 States should award funds to LEAs as quickly as is prudent.
 LEAs and schools should use funds quickly to stimulate economy but
  sensibly and imaginatively for improvements and reforms.
 Funds obligation timelines:
   State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF): must be OBLIGATED by
     September 30, 2011
   Title I, Part A: in absence of a waiver, 85% by Sept 30, 2010; any
     remaining by Sept 30, 2011
   IDEA, Part B: majority during school years 2008/09 and 2009/10
     and remainder by September 30, 2011
 Actual USE of funds is different from obligation: Districts may enter
  into contracts prior to 9/30/2011 that obligate funds and the funds may
  be used beyond 9/30/2011.
         Accountability and Transparency

 All ARRA funds must be tracked separately
    Quarterly reports on both financial information and how
     funds are being used
    Estimated number of jobs created
    Subcontracts and sub-grants required to comply with the
     Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act
 Reporting template being developed for use by
  States to capture required information
 Transparency allows opportunity to
  quantify/define goals and mobilize support for
  improving results for all students
               A Vision for Reform


                   New Standards
Innovation        and Assessments         Continuous
                                         Improvement


        Turnaround           Collection and
           failing            Use of Data
          Schools           Pre-K to post-sec

Transparency                              Scale
                  Teacher quality
                  and Distribution
Formula   Competitive
   SFSF Incentive Fund: “Race to Top” and “Invest in
             What Works and Innovation”

 “Race to the Top”- $4.35 billion competitive grants to
  States making most progress toward the vision: standards;
  data; teacher quality; improving failing schools; preschools,
  school-college pathways.

 “Investing in What Works and Innovation” - $650 million
  competitive grants to Districts and non-profits that have
  made significant gains in closing achievement gaps to be
  models of best practices.

 2010 grant awards will be made in two rounds - late Fall
  2009, Summer 2010
  Key questions about uses of ARRA Funds to Drive
  Long-Term Educational Reform and Improvement

 Will the proposed use of ARRA funds:

    Drive results for students?
    Increase capacity?
    Accelerate reform?
    Be sustainable beyond ARRA.
    Improve efficiency?
    Foster continuous improvement?
       Significant Impact on High Needs Schools’
                        Budgets

                           ARRA School Improvement Grants
Additional funds           ARRA IDEA
available through
ARRA over 2 years
                           ARRA Title 1

                           ARRA Stabilization

                           IDEA FY 09

                           ESEA FY 09

                           Additional State Aid

                           Basic State & Local Funding Formula
         Title I School Improvement Grants

 $3 billion to improve lowest performing schools –
  almost six-fold increase in funding
 Will be made available by Fall 2009
 States will give priority to LEAs that:
  Serve the lowest-achieving schools
  Demonstrate the greatest need for such funds
  Demonstrate the strongest commitment to ensuring that
   such funds are used to enable the lowest-achieving
   schools to meet the progress goals in school improvement
   plans
Potential Uses by districts and schools of ARRA Funds to Drive
      Long-tem Education Reform and Improvement (1)

   District and school examples for improving teacher quality
    and equitable distribution of highly qualified teachers

       Redesign the district’s or school’s professional development system
        to ensure that training addresses all students’, and especially ELL
        students, instructional needs and academic gaps. Provide extensive
        training for all teachers over two years – send a few teachers/school
        to extra training to be able to serve as teacher trainers in the future.
       Provide bonuses to highly effective teachers who transfer to low-
        performing schools. Use two year opportunity to put in place
        practices that establish supportive culture in low-performing schools
        to retain teachers.
Potential Uses by districts and schools of ARRA Funds to Drive
      Long-tem Education Reform and Improvement (2)

   District and school examples for improving teacher quality
    and equitable distribution of highly qualified teachers

       Provide an intensive, two year training program for all teachers and
        principal in a school –wide Title I school in corrective action status
        to use a new reading curriculum that focuses on improving students
        oral language competence and academic vocabulary to improve
        comprehension and address the fourth grade reading drop-off.
        Strengthen and expand early childhood education by providing
        resources to align a district-wide Title I pre-K program with State
        early learning standards and State content standards for grades K–3
        and, if there is a plan for sustainability beyond 2010–11, expanding
        high-quality Title I pre-K programs to larger numbers of young
        children.
Potential Uses by districts and schools of ARRA Funds to Drive
      Long-tem Education Reform and Improvement (3)

   District and school examples for improving teacher quality
    and equitable distribution of highly qualified teachers

       Create new opportunities for teachers in Title I school-wide
        programs be trained to use electronic whiteboards. Train some
        teachers to be trainers. Buy whiteboards for all classrooms. Buy
        insurance policy for repairs and replacement, if necessary.
       Establish a system for identifying and training highly effective
        teachers to serve as instructional leaders in Title I school-wide
        programs and modify the school schedule to allow for collaboration
        among the instructional staff.
      Potential Uses of ARRA Funds to Drive
Long-Term Educational Reform and Improvement (4)

   Establishing data systems and using data for improvement

       Train principals, teachers, guidance counselors and other staff to use
        data to identify the specific help students need to succeed, use
        formative assessment strategies to adjust classroom instruction to
        better address student strengths and weaknesses, and target
        professional development on teacher needs. (Create a school-wide
        learning environment.)

       Purchase handheld formative assessment technology that enables
        teachers to record and analyze student performance and obtain a
        real-time picture of which students need help, where they need it,
        and how the teachers can help best. Train teachers aggressively –
        create teacher trainers of a few teachers. Buy insurance policy.
      Potential Uses of ARRA Funds to Drive
Long-Term Educational Reform and Improvement (5)

   Establishing data systems and using data for improvement

       Work with trainers and others to train district and school leaders
        and teachers to develop a learning community of the entire district.
        Use the data to insure that resources are allocated to support
        teaching and learning, that all business processes are as effective as
        possible, and that experimentation and improvement can thrive
        within the district. This requires carefully constructed and used
        data systems and, in the long-run creates a continuous improvement
        systems in all schools and throughout a district. Two - three years
        are required.
          Potential Uses of ARRA Funds to Drive
    Long-Term Educational Reform and Improvement(4)

    Turning around low-performing schools: Use School
     Improvement funds among other ARRA funds.

       Create intensive summer institutes and on-going support
        for teams of principals and teachers from low-
        performing schools to analyze data and develop a specific
        action plans for improving instruction and school
        performance.
       Acquire new instructional materials, aggressive
        professional development and interactive technology to
        help English language learners meet state standards and
        become proficient in English.
          Potential Uses of ARRA Funds to Drive
    Long-Term Educational Reform and Improvement(5)

    Turning around low-performing schools: Use School
     Improvement funds among other ARRA funds.

       In a big district or county system select the bottom 1-2%
        of schools in terms of achievement level and growth.
        Commit to a dramatic restructuring of the schools,
        upgrading of all capacity (curriculum, staff, data systems,
        leadership, professional development, coaches, support
        staff), lengthen school day, and engage the neighborhood
        and parents to provide support and out-of-school
        opportunities. Use a combination of Part A funds and
        School Improvement funds (up to $750,000 – 1
        million/year).
Saving and Creating Jobs and Reforming Education

“In a global economy where the most valuable skill
you can sell is your knowledge, a good education is
no longer just a pathway to opportunity - it is a pre-
requisite. The countries that out-teach us today will
out-compete us tomorrow.”
- President Barack Obama, 2/24/09
                       More Information

 www.ed.gov and www.recovery.gov
    –  FAQs, Hot Topics, etc
   Preliminary information about each State’s IDEA allocation:
    http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/Statetables/recovery.ht
    ml
   Preliminary estimates of Title I, Part A recovery allocations to each
    State and LEA are available at:
    http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/news.html#ARRA
   SFSF Questions: State.fiscal.fund@ed.gov
   IDEA Questions: IDEArecoverycomments@ed.gov
   Title I Questions: oese@ed.gov
   Inspector General Questions: rich.rasa@ed.gov
   Independent Living and Vocational Rehabilitation Questions:
    RSARecoverActComments@ed.gov

								
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