CAMS Guidelines

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					 2012 Capital Asset
Management Survey
    (for 2011 data)



    Guidelines




        June 2012
Contents
Overview ......................................................................................................................... 1
     Changes to the 2012 survey ................................................................................................ 1
     Source documents and data definitions .............................................................................. 1
     Entering data in the form .................................................................................................... 2
Capital Asset Management Survey ................................................................................... 2
     1.              Contact details ...................................................................................................... 2
     2.              Campus locations .................................................................................................. 2
     3.              Strategic asset management ................................................................................ 2
     4.              Total non-residential GFA ..................................................................................... 3
     5.              Total non-residential UFA ..................................................................................... 3
     6.              Space category groupings and estimated percentage use of UFA ....................... 3
     7.              Condition of non-residential buildings .................................................................. 4
     8.              Facility functionality status ................................................................................... 4
     9.              Space management: space utilisation .................................................................. 6
     10.             Space utilisation by space type ............................................................................. 6
     11.             Financial information ............................................................................................ 7
     12.             Backlog maintenance ............................................................................................ 7
     13.             Asset replacement value for insurance cover ....................................................... 8
     14.             Major capital grants ............................................................................................. 8
     15.             Major projects ....................................................................................................... 8
     16.             Other teaching and learning locations.................................................................. 8
     17.             Other information ................................................................................................. 9
Survey submission actions and processes ....................................................................... 10
     Adobe smartforms ............................................................................................................. 10
     Actions available in the form............................................................................................. 10
          Submit by email ............................................................................................................................ 10
          Print form ..................................................................................................................................... 10
          Save to my computer ................................................................................................................... 10
Glossary and definitions ................................................................................................. 12
Overview
The Capital Asset Management Survey (CAMS) is an annual survey designed to collect data on
the infrastructure used by Australian universities in the higher education sector.
The CAMS form is available for completion by all Higher Education Support Act 2003 (HESA),
Table A providers, with the exception of Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education.
The 2012 CAMS (for 2011 data) is to be completed and returned to the Department of
Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education by 17 August 20121.
The 2012 CAMS (for 2011 data) form can be downloaded here.

Changes to the 2012 survey
The 2012 CAMS survey seeks the same information as the 2011 survey. The only change of
significance relates to treatment of leased premises. The 2011 survey requested that
information be only for buildings owned and operated by the University. The 2012 survey
allows inclusion of leased space, consistent with the approach adopted by the Tertiary
Education Facilities Management Association (TEFMA) towards leased spaces.
Otherwise, these guidelines for the 2012 collection have been edited only to provide improved
clarity of advice. The amendments incorporate feedback from a data verification process,
involving seven universities, which the Department of Innovation undertook in March 2012.
The survey form includes only small changes to improve clarity and subsequent data reporting.

Source documents and data definitions
The CAMS uses terms defined by TEFMA. Terms and definitions in the CAMS have been taken
from the following sources:
   Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey, TEFMA, 2012
   ‘Facilities Audit Guideline’, TEFMA, May 2010
   ‘Space Planning Guidelines, Edition 3’, TEFMA, 2009
   ‘Benchmarking: a manual for Australian Universities’, KR McKinnon, SH Walker and D
    Davis, Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs, February 2000.
Documents produced by TEFMA are available to members from the TEFMA website
(www.tefma.com).
Please contact the Infrastructure Policy team if you would like to see copies of a document and
do not have access.




1
  Since the 2011 survey, Machinery of Government changes have seen the Higher Education Division
move from the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) to the
Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (the ‘Department of
Innovation’). Because transitional arrangements are still in train, DEEWR continues to provide most IT
services to the Higher Education Division. Therefore, CAMS links to ‘deewr.gov.au’ remain current and
should be used for the 2012 survey.



CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                       Page 1 of 16
Entering data in the form
In designing the survey the following data standards have been used.
    Mandatory questions will be displayed in the survey boxed in red. Where a question is
     mandatory it will be followed by a red asterisk (*). All mandatory questions must be
     answered before the form can be submitted successfully.
    Percentages: where the required answer to a question is a percentage, the value is to be
     entered as a decimal where 1 is 100%. The form will display the entered number as a
     percentage. All percentages will be rounded to two decimal places.
     Example: where the percentage is 18.75%, the value entered is to be 0.1875 and the field
     will display as 18.75%. If the value entered is 0.18745, the value will be displayed as 18.75%
     and saved as 0.1875.
    Money values: Values recorded for money in the form are to be rounded to the nearest
     thousand, and only the thousands ($,000) recorded.
     Example: $1,709,533 is to be rounded to $1,710,000 and then entered as $1,710.
    Specified formats and data ranges are used in the form: where invalid data is entered in a
     field an error message will display. The form cannot be submitted successfully until the
     invalid value has been fixed. Error messages for fields should provide sufficient information
     for the fault to be identified.

Where the survey asks for data previously provided to TEFMA by your university, and the
information is collated from the same list of campuses, the responses provided to TEFMA are
to be used in the survey.


Capital Asset Management Survey
1.       Contact details
Details of at least one contact officer must be recorded in the form. Providing details of a
second contact officer is recommended.
Contact officers are to be people who were involved in the preparation of the survey and who
can, if required, answer questions and provide clarification on the responses provided.

2.       Campus locations
Campus locations are to be recorded in the list where they are within Australia and used by
your university for educational purposes (ie for the conduct of teaching and learning and/or
research by the university). While it is expected that listed locations will generally be those
owned and operated by the university, leased premises may be included where they are used
by the university for teaching or research. Do not include locations which are in the categories
to be reported in the table at section 16 of the form.
The listed campuses should form the basis of the information you provide for GFA, UFA,
condition, functionality, utilisation and backlog maintenance.

3.       Strategic asset management
Please provide URL links to publicly available documents that contain information about the
strategies implemented by your university to finance, plan and manage infrastructure.



CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                  Page 2 of 16
Documents that provide information on the long term (i.e. 10 to 20 year) vision and planning
for infrastructure in your university should be provided in this section.
The types of documents that might exist are:
    capital asset management strategy or plan;
    campus master plan(s);
    documents published on your campus expansion or rationalisation;
    current or planned major projects such as new buildings (non-residential and residential),
     major refurbishments and ICT development; and
    financing strategies.
Where possible, include information on the construction of new space, refurbishment of
existing space, utilising/leasing space (e.g. space owned by or shared with TAFE or other
education providers) or an expansion of on-line or distance education services.

4.       Total non-residential GFA
The total non-residential Gross Floor Area (GFA) of non-residential buildings on the campuses
listed under section 2 of the form is to be recorded in square metres.
If your university provided data on total GFA to TEFMA in the 2011 TEFMA Benchmark Survey
(column 4) please use the same figure here.
If your university has not provided data to TEFMA, total GFA can be calculated for a building by
measuring the sum of the Fully Enclosed Covered Area (FECA) and the Unenclosed Covered
Area (UCA) in square metres (i.e. GFA = FECA + UCA).
A more detailed description of terms and space components used to calculate GFA can be
found in the Glossary and definitions section.

5.       Total non-residential UFA
The total non-residential Usable Floor Area (UFA) of non-residential buildings on the campuses
listed under Q2 is to be recorded in square metres.
If your university provided data on total UFA to TEFMA in the 2011 TEFMA Benchmark Survey
(column 5) please use the same figure here.
If your university has not provided data to TEFMA, total UFA should be calculated in
accordance with the TEFMA definition of UFA; ie. the sum of the floor areas measured at floor
level from the general inside face of walls of all spaces related to the primary function of the
building. This will normally be computed by calculating the Fully Enclosed Covered Area (FECA)
and deducting Common Use Areas, Service Areas, and Non‐habitable Areas.
A more detailed description of terms and how to calculate UFA can be found in the Glossary
and definitions section.

6.       Space category groupings and estimated percentage use of UFA
In the Type of group space table, please provide an estimate of your university’s non-
residential space (% UFA) in each listed space category grouping.
The information in the table will be complete when the sum of space type percentages equals
100%.
The space categories have been taken from the TEFMA ‘Space Planning Guidelines, Edition 3’.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                Page 3 of 16
7.         Condition of non-residential buildings
Please provide estimates, as a percentage of total GFA, of the Condition Status of your
university’s non-residential buildings.
The Condition Status scale, General Description of each status and corresponding Rating are in
the table below. They are as used in the TEFMA Facilities Audit Guideline. The table includes
equivalent Overall Condition Rating (OCR) and Facility Condition Index (FCI) for each Condition
Status. These are provided as guidance for this assessment for any university which may be
using these indicators as measures of building condition.


Condition      General Description                                         Rating    OCR          FCI
Status
Excellent      Asset has no defects; condition and appearance are as         5      4.0-5.0    0.97-1.00
               new.
Good           Asset exhibits superficial wear and tear, minor defects,      4      3.0-3.9    0.90-0.97
               minor signs of deterioration to surface finishes; does
               not require major maintenance; no major defects exist.
Fair           Asset is in average condition; deteriorated surfaces          3      2.5-2.9    0.85-0.90
               require attention; services are functional, but require
               attention; backlog maintenance work exists.
Poor           Asset has deteriorated badly; serious structural              2      2.0-2.4    0.80-0.85
               problems; general appearance is poor with eroded
               protective coatings; elements are defective, services are
               frequently failing; and a significant number of major
               defects exist.
Very poor      Asset has failed; is not operational and is unfit for         1      1.0-1.9      <0.80
               occupancy or normal use.
Source: Tables 2 and 8 - TEFMA Facilities Audit Guideline, May 2010

7(i)       Audit method
Please indicate the primary method (Desktop or Detailed) used to derive your Condition Status
percentages. The audit methods align with the TEFMA audit levels, which are described in the
Glossary and definitions section.
      Desktop audit is equivalent to the TEFMA Level One audit. A desktop audit does not
       involve floor-by-floor visual inspection of buildings and rooms: it is likely to draw on
       corporate knowledge of building condition and functionality and a variety of other
       information at hand, including building fault requests.
      Detailed audit is equivalent to the TEFMA Level Two or Level Three audit. It involves visual
       floor-by-floor inspection of at least a representative sample of campus buildings and
       rooms. It covers internal and external building elements and building services. It may
       involve inspection by an independent expert assessor.

7(ii)      Data currency
Responses provided in section 7 should be based on your latest condition audit. The
Department recognises that annual audits may not be undertaken and data may be the same
as that provided in previous surveys.

8.         Facility functionality status
Please provide estimates, as a percentage of total GFA, of the Functionality Status of your
university’s non-residential buildings.


CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                          Page 4 of 16
The Functionality Status scale, Aspects of each status and corresponding Target Rating are in
the table below. They are as used in the TEFMA Facilities Audit Guideline. The table includes
equivalent Overall Functionality Rating (OFR) and Facility Functionality Index (FFI) for each
Functionality Status. These are provided as guidance for this assessment for any institutions
which may still be using these indicators as measures of building condition.


Functionality Aspects                                                  Target     OFR          FFI
Status                                                                 Rating
    The ability of the rooms/areas to meet the identified function of business needs of the users
Excellent         The room/area functionality always meets the          S5      4.0-5.0 0.97-1.00
                     targeted spatial
                     relationships/provision/environmental conform
                     standards for the space sub-type.
                  Legislative compliance is always met.
                  Building aesthetics are excellent.
Good              The room/area functionality mostly meets the          S4      3.0-3.9 0.90-0.97
                     targeted spatial
                     relationships/provision/environmental comfort
                     standards for the space sub-type.
                  Legislative compliance is always met.
                  Building aesthetics are good
Adequate          The room/area functionality always meets the          S3      2.5-2.9 0.85-0.90
                     minimum spatial
                     relationships/provision/environmental comfort
                     standards for the space sub-type.
                  Legislative compliance is always met.
                  Building aesthetics are adequate.
Barely            The room/area functionality mostly meets the          S2      2.0-2.4 0.80-0.85
adequate             minimum spatial
                     relationships/provision/environmental comfort
                     standards for the space sub-type.
                  Legislative compliance is mostly met.
                  Building aesthetics are barely adequate.
Poor              The room/area functionality rarely meets the          S1      1.0-1.9     <0.80
                     minimum spatial
                     relationships/provision/environmental comfort
                     standards for the space sub-type.
                  Legislative compliance is rarely met.
                  Building aesthetics are poor.
Source: Tables 15 and 17 - TEFMA Facilities Audit Guideline, May 2010

8(i)     Audit method
Please indicate the primary method (Desktop or Detailed) used to derive your Functionality
Status percentages. The descriptions of desktop and detailed audit in section 7(i) of these
Guidelines also apply to functionality audit.

8(ii)    Data currency
Responses provided in section 8 should be based on your latest functionality audit. The
Department recognises that annual audits may not be undertaken and data may be the same
as that provided in previous surveys.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                   Page 5 of 16
9.        Space management: space utilisation
Please provide a brief description of your university’s approach to optimising the use of
existing space.
In your response, you may wish to make reference to whether your university has a space
management plan, the date the plan was last updated and (if relevant) whether your university
uses any of the following:
     an accurate and well‐managed database of space;
     electronic mapping of space linked to facilities management; and/or
     space norms to quantify space requirements.

10.       Space utilisation by space type
Data provided on room frequency and occupancy are to be collected and calculated in
accordance with Section 4, Space Utilisation, of the TEFMA Space Planning Guidelines
Edition 3. The TEFMA Guidelines include definitions for each space type and methodologies for
calculating room frequency and room occupancy. Advice on terms and how to calculate values
for determining utilisation can also be found in the Glossary and definitions section.
In order to ensure responses from universities for utilisation are comparable, the following
conditions must have been met for collated data reported on room frequency and occupancy:
     frequency and occupancy data must have been collected for a term/semester/trimester
      where the teaching period was longer than eleven weeks;
     the dates of the utilisation audit must conform to the following guidelines:
          The audit must have been conducted over at least one week, where a week is defined
          as being Monday to Friday or any sequential five day period excluding weekends, i.e.
          Wednesday to Friday and the following Monday and Tuesday.
          The audit must have been completed by the end of the 4th full week (Monday to
          Friday) after the published census date2 for that term/semester/trimester.
          Example: a semester at University A commenced on 1 March 2010 and teaching ended
          on 4 June 2010 (13 weeks) with a census date for all full semester subjects of 31 March.
          A survey was conducted on Friday 22 April and then from Monday 25 to Thursday 28
          April 2010, i.e. after the census day, for the minimum 5 days, and within the allowed
          period which ended on 29 April;
     data in the audit are to be reported on in two time periods:
          day sessions (8am to 5pm);
          evening sessions (5pm to 9:30pm); and
     for each space type at least 10% of the Total UFA must have been audited in order for that
      space type to be reported in the CAMS. The number of rooms audited and the percentage
      of total space type is required to confirm that a representative sample has been assessed.
Utilisation will be calculated automatically in the table for each space type as data is entered.
The formula for calculating utilisation is:
      Utilisation (%) = Room frequency (%) * Room occupancy (%).

2
 Census date (commonly known as the HECS-HELP census date) has the meaning specified in s169-25 of
the Higher Education Support Act 2003 and the Administrative Information for Providers. Where there
are multiple census dates for units of study for that term/semester/trimester, the most common date
should be used. When determining the most common date, only those units of study spanning the full
teaching period should be considered.


CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                  Page 6 of 16
If you are unable to provide information consistent with the methodology specified, please
do not complete the Space Type utilisation tables.

10(iii) Audit method
Section 10(iii) seeks information on how you collected data on room frequency and occupancy.
This may be by either physical room audit or by booked use.
A physical audit involves manually surveying the frequency with which rooms are used and
determining occupancy by counting how many seats are actually occupied. Utilisation rates are
then determined by multiplying the room frequency by seat occupancy.
A booked use audit generally involves determining the frequency of room usage by
interrogating the university’s timetabling system to determine how often a room is booked
during the audit period. Occupancy is generally determined by comparing the seating capacity
of each room with the number of student enrolled in the class being held in the room.
Utilisation rates are then determined by multiplying the frequency in which rooms were
notionally booked by the proportion of seats notionally occupied. Where you select booked
use, the form will request further information on how you collected occupancy data.

11.       Financial information
When completing the Financial Information table:
     dual sector universities should include higher education and VET information;
     values recorded for money in the form are to be rounded to the nearest thousand, and
      only the thousands ($,000) recorded;
      Example: $1,709,533 is to be rounded to $1,710,000 and then recorded as $1,710; and
     all amounts entered in the table should be consistent with information provided in your
      annual financial statements for the reporting year.
A more detailed description of terms used in the financial details table can be found in the
Glossary and definitions section.
If you received a capital grant from the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research
and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE) in 2011, you should include it as a DEEWR grant if it was
previously administered by DEEWR or as an ‘Other Commonwealth’ grant if it was previously
administered by the Department of Innovation, industry, Science and Research (DIISR).
Please do not record the Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) as a source of capital income
unless your university’s financial system allows you to specifically link actual capital and/or
capital maintenance expenditure with this funding source. If a notional amount of CGS income
is thought to have been spent on capital works, please count this as ‘Allocations from internal
sources’ (which includes CGS, HELP payments, international and domestic student fees and
other untied income sources).

12.       Backlog maintenance
Backlog maintenance includes all maintenance necessary to retain your university’s buildings
and fixed infrastructure (as defined in the glossary) in their original condition or to restore
them to their original condition. If your university provided data to TEFMA in the 2011
Benchmark Survey, you should use the same figure as you provided in column 35 of the
TEFMA Survey. Backlog maintenance does not include backlog refurbishment or other works
necessary to bring a building or service up to a new standard or alter it for a new use (including
backlog works necessary to meet changed legislative requirements).




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                  Page 7 of 16
If your university provided data on total Asset Replacement Value (ARV) to TEFMA in the 2011
Benchmark Survey (`) please use the same figure here. If your university did not provide data
to TEFMA, you should estimate the Asset Replacement Value of your buildings and fixed
infrastructure, making reference to the TEFMA definitions provided in the Glossary. If you are
using insurance values as the basis of calculating ARVs, you should exclude the costs normally
associated with Insured Value such as demolition, site clearing and provision of temporary
accommodation. If you are using information obtained from financial reports, you should
confirm that the values reflect the gross cost of facilities, not depreciated or written down
values.

12(i)     Backlog maintenance reduction plans
In the McKinnon Benchmarking Manual, Benchmark 5.10, it is stated that good practice in
asset management is to reduce the expense of remedying the backlog maintenance of facilities
to less than 3% of the ARV of those facilities.
Where either the calculated backlog maintenance percentage (BM/ARV) for the current
reporting year or future years is greater than 3.00% of ARV, you are required to provide details
of your university’s plans to reduce this backlog to an acceptable level.

13.       Asset replacement value for insurance cover
You should provide the Insured Value of your university’s buildings and fixed infrastructure.
The figure you provide should be for buildings and infrastructure only. Please refer to the
definitions of ARV Buildings and ARV Infrastructure in the Glossary and definitions section for
further guidance.

14.       Major capital grants
Capital grants received in 2011 from the Commonwealth and State/Territory governments
where the total grant amount is over $1 million are to be listed in the tables provided. Where
an Australian Government grant is directed through a State government Treasury, it should
still be reported as Commonwealth funding.

15.       Major projects
Projects to be included in this list are those that have total project funding exceeding
$5 million and have been or were under management at any stage during the reporting period.
Projects will be defined as ‘underway’ once the funding has been formally allocated and
actions to implementation the project have started.

16.       Other teaching and learning locations
This section is to collect information about locations within Australia where your university
provides higher education courses or conducts research in facilities which the university does
not own or lease for its exclusive use (and which are therefore not listed in the table at section
2 of the form).
Locations are to be listed where:
     your university has an on-going teaching and/or research presence at a shared campus
      owned by another university or Registered Training Organisation;
     your university has an on-going presence at a hospital or other location for clinical training
      and/or research; and
     your courses are provided by third party arrangements.



CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                    Page 8 of 16
These locations should not be included in the table at section 2.
In the ‘Nature of presence’ field in the table, please describe the arrangements for these
locations. This field is limited to 500 characters. Relevant information might include the name
of the organisation which owns the site, the name of the provider which is delivering courses
on your behalf, and whether the site is primarily for VET or higher education courses.

17.     Other information
This section is where additional comments can be added. You can record an explanation for
part of the survey that has not been completed, provide feedback, and record suggestions for
improving future forms.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                Page 9 of 16
Survey submission actions and processes
Adobe smartforms
The CAMS 2012 form has been developed using Adobe smartforms. The form has been created
as a dynamic PDF document.
You must have Abode Reader (V.9 or later) on your computer to access this form. If you do not
have the program installed or have an earlier version, a free download of the latest version is
available at: http://get.adobe.com/reader.

Actions available in the form
At the end of the CAMS form there are three actions available:
   Click the ‘Submit by email’ button to submit your application for processing.
   Click the ‘Print form’ button to print a copy of the survey.
   Click the ‘Save to my computer’ button to save a partially completed form on your
    computer for completion at a later date. The form will be saved as a PDF file and can be
    opened with Adobe Reader.

Submit by email
When your form is complete and has been internally reviewed the action to submit by email
can be used.
When you click on the ‘Submit by email’ button, the form will validate the entered data. If a
data error is found, the system will generate a message identifying the fault and each fault
must be fixed before the submit action will complete.
Types of errors:
   Mandatory fields: data must be recorded in fields that are boxed in red and identified with
    a red asterisks.
   Incorrect formatting: if an invalid date is recorded it must be corrected.
   Data not within a specified range: percentages in some tables must be between 0 and
    100%. If this is not corrected when the data is entered an error will display with the submit
    action.
When the submit action works successfully, an email box will open with the current version of
your form attached. The email address will be automatically populated to send to:
institutioninfrastructure@deewr.gov.au.
If you need to make corrections after you have submitted the form, you can correct and
re-submit the form. In the body of the new email clearly identify that this is a replacement for
the previously submitted version.

Print form
The print action will allow you to send the current version of your form to a printer.

Save to my computer
This action will allow you to save a local copy of your form. It is recommended that as you add
to and complete sections of the form you regularly save the changes.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                Page 10 of 16
Your locally saved version of the form can be worked on collaboratively within your
organisation. Copies of the form can be sent via email for processing and internal review.
Before you submit the completed form it is recommended that you save a copy of the final
version.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                              Page 11 of 16
Glossary and definitions
The description, acronym (if any) and definition of the term (where applicable) are listed
below. Terms which are underlined in red are terms used in definitions/descriptions of other
terms.

Asset Replacement Value    ARV
                           The Asset Replacement Value (ARV) for buildings, fixed equipment,
                           service and systems is the best estimate of current cost of designing,
                           constructing and equipping for its original use, a new facility providing
                           equal service potential as the original asset and which meets current
                           accepted standards for construction and also complies with all
                           contemporary environmental and other regulatory requirements. The
                           ARV is the sum of ARV Buildings and ARV Infrastructure.
                           Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

ARV Buildings              ARV Buildings includes the cost of all building services and associated
                           plant, finishes and built-in furniture but not the cost of relocating into
                           the building (Note: exclude the cost of loose furniture and soft
                           furnishings). The cost excludes all equipment other than that required
                           for the normal functioning of the building. Costs associated with
                           laboratory, scientific and loose equipment are not included in the cost.
                           The cost includes all fees, approvals and other incidental expenditure
                           associated with construction and initial occupation but excludes those
                           costs normally included in the Insured Value such as demolition, site
                           clearing and the provision of temporary accommodation.
                           Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

ARV Infrastructure         Infrastructure is defined as the in-ground services (ie electrical, water,
                           gas, sewage, stormwater, etc) which support normal building
                           operations plus above ground external assets such as street-lighting,
                           roads and footpaths, signage etc. Do not include infrastructure that is
                           maintained from landscaping budgets (eg sports fields, soft
                           landscaping, unsealed car parks and the like) or infrastructure
                           associated with student housing.
                           Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Backlog Maintenance        BM
                           Backlog Maintenance (BM) is maintenance which was due to be
                           carried out in the reported financial year but which was not carried out
                           because of shortage of funds or availability of parts.
                           Backlog maintenance for the year should be added to the institution's
                           Backlog Maintenance Register and carried forward.

Capital Asset Management   CAMS
Survey                     The Capital Asset Management Survey is an annual data collection
                           managed by the Higher Education Division of the Department of
                           Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

Capital expenditure        Capital expenditure is the expenditure by the university for the
                           purchase or improvement of capital assets.

Capital income             Capital income is the funds received for the purchase, sale or disposal
                           of a capital item.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                     Page 12 of 16
Capital maintenance            Capital maintenance expenditure is expenditure used to preserve the
expenditure                    investment in capital.

Common Use Areas               Common Use Areas include corridors which are defined by partitions
                               but do not include passages and secondary circulation areas which are
                               part of open plan spaces.
                               Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Facilities audit (TEFMA)       The TEFMA categorisations of levels of audit detail are described
                               below. All three levels will provide results for condition and function to
                               varying levels of detail.

                               Level One - Desktop Review (Desktop)
                               Conducting a Level One audit draws on data and building floor plans
                               which already exist, possibly in many places and in different forms.
                               This level can include, and benefits greatly from interviewing those
                               persons responsible for regularly maintaining the building elements.

                               Level Two - Site Assessment (Walk Through)
                               This approach is based on a visual site inspection of samples of the
                               various elements of the estate. This level would make use of available
                               building data and drawings, combined with the visual inspection of a
                               suitable sample of components of the estate. Different space types
                               may require greater sample sizes depending on the variability of
                               rooms. For example, a greater number of visual inspections may be
                               required for laboratories (say 80% per floor) compared to offices (20%
                               per floor). This audit level would also involve interviewing those
                               persons responsible for regularly maintaining the building elements,
                               and by noting the comments of the building’s users.

                               Level Three - Detailed Examination (Crawl Through)
                               This level audit encompasses the Level Two site assessment, plus a
                               detailed assessment of the parts making up each building element.
                               Where the Level Two assessment only considered roofing, this level
                               includes a greater level of detail, including roof cladding, gutters,
                               downpipes and penetrations. Where the maintenance had been
                               costed for a total system (e.g. air handling), this level of inspection will
                               quantify and cost the replacement ducting, controls and motors
                               (allowing for the practicalities of available access conditions, etc.).
                               This method may require the engagement of several consultants, such
                               as engineers and building specialists.
                               Source: TEFMA Facilities Audit Guideline, May 2010

Facility Condition Index       FCI
                               The Facility Condition Index is a formula-derived measure that
                               indicates the current condition of the Asset measured relative to its
                               ‘as-new’ condition.
                               Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Facility Functionality Index   FFI
                               The Facility Functionality Index is a formula-derived measure of the
                               extent to which an institution’s facilities meet current teaching,
                               research and legislative requirements.
                               Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Fully Enclosed Covered Area    FECA



CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                          Page 13 of 16
                           Fully Enclosed Covered Area is the sum of all fully enclosed covered
                           areas at all building levels, including basements (except unexcavated
                           portions), floored roof spaces and attics, garages, penthouses,
                           enclosed porches and attached enclosed covered ways alongside
                           buildings, equipment rooms, lift shafts, vertical ducts, staircases and
                           any other fully enclosed spaces and useable areas of the building,
                           computed by measuring from the normal inside face of exterior walls
                           but ignoring any projections such as plinths, columns, piers and the like
                           which project from the normal inside face of exterior walls. It shall not
                           include open courts, light wells, connecting or isolated covered ways
                           and net open areas of upper portions of rooms, lobbies, halls,
                           interstitial spaces and the like, which extend through the storey being
                           computed.
                           Note: atriums and light wells are only measured at the base level. Do
                           not include the area of the non‐existent floor slab at upper levels.
                           Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Gross Floor Area           GFA
                           The sum of the Fully Enclosed Covered Area and the Unenclosed
                           Covered Area.
                                                                  2
                           Unit of measure is square metres (m ).
                           Note: include all spaces owned or used by the university for university
                           purposes. Do not include space held for investment purposes or non-
                           university purposes (eg investment real estate, Shopping Centres,
                           Technology Parks [where the tenants rent space for research activities
                           not related to the institution's teaching and research activities. If you
                           share Technology Park facilities with commercial tenants you may
                           choose to include your space on a pro-rata basis provided you include
                           the commensurate operating costs]). As a general rule, space leased to
                           others should be excluded unless it is associated with the primary
                           functions of the University. Therefore, include space leased to banks,
                           post offices, cafes, bookshops, newsagents, hairdressers, food outlets,
                           etc if the primary function of these commercial operations is to
                           support teaching, research and the community service obligations of
                           the institution.
                           Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Maintenance                All actions necessary for retaining an item or asset in or restoring it to
                           its original condition. Include maintenance of locks and keys,
                           maintenance of infrastructure (eg. underground services, above
                           ground hydrants, power transformers, pumping equipment etc.),
                           roads, pathways, external swimming pools, paved areas, maintenance
                           of electronic security and access control systems, fixed external
                           furniture, retaining walls, guard rails, water features etc. and external
                           cleaning of buildings. Exclude pest control and window cleaning and
                           the cost of grounds maintenance activities. Include the cos tof cleaning
                           kitchen extraction systems/hoods and replacing filters.

Non-habitable Areas        Non‐habitable Area is the area occupied by internal columns and other
                           structural supports, internal walls and permanent partitions, service
                           ducts and the like.

Overall Condition Rating   OCR
                           Overall condition rating is an aggregated element condition rating for a
                           building. Condition ratings are assigned on an elemental basis,
                           weighted by replacement value.




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                    Page 14 of 16
Room frequency                  Room frequency is the number of hours the room is in use during the
                                audit period, divided by the number of hours that the room is available
                                for use during the audit period.
                                Room Frequency = Hours used / Hours available.

Room occupancy                  Room occupancy represents the average number of students in the
                                room when the room is in use, compared to the total room capacity.
                                Room occupancy = Total students / (Capacity * Hours used)
                                Total students = total number of students counted in the room over
                                the audit period.
                                Capacity = the maximum number of students the room can hold,
                                usually based on the number of seats in the room.
                                Hours used = the number of hours the room was in use during the
                                audit period.
                                Note: Room occupancy is independent of room frequency.

Service Areas                   Service areas are spaces for equipment to service buildings, i.e. plant
                                rooms
                                .
Tertiary Education Facilities   TEFMA
Management Association          The Australasian Tertiary Education Facilities Management Association
                                (TEFMA) was established in October 2003 as an independent
                                association of facilities managers operating in the tertiary education
                                sector of Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore.

Unenclosed Covered Area         UCA
                                Unenclosed Covered Area is the sum of all such areas at all building
                                floor levels, including roofed balconies, open verandahs, porches and
                                porticos, attached open covered ways alongside buildings, undercrofts
                                and usable space under buildings, unenclosed access galleries
                                (including ground floor) and any other trafficable covered areas of the
                                building which are not totally enclosed by full height walls, computed
                                by measuring the area between the enclosing walls or balustrade (i.e.
                                from the inside face of the UCA excluding the wall or balustrade
                                thickness). When the covering element (i.e. roof or upper floor) is
                                supported by columns, is cantilevered or is suspended, or any
                                combination of these, the measurements shall be taken to the edge of
                                the paving or to the edge of the cover, whichever is the lesser. UCA
                                shall not include eaves, overhangs, sun shading, awnings and the like
                                where these do not relate to clearly defined trafficable covered areas,
                                nor shall it include connecting or isolated covered ways.
                                                         2
                                New building space (m GFA) that comes into service during the
                                reporting period should be included in the total GFA figure.
                                                                            2
                                Unit of measurement is square metres (m ).
                                Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey

Usable Floor Area               UFA
                                Usable Floor Area will normally be computed by calculating the FECA
                                and deducting Common Use Areas, Service Areas, and Non‐habitable
                                Areas.
                                Note: in some cases the UFA may include some external covered areas
                                which relate to the Primary Function of the building. Examples: a
                                covered external play area is a Primary Functional requirement of a
                                Child Care Centre and should be included although it is not part of the
                                FECA. Similarly, an open but roofed hydraulics modeling laboratory
                                associated with Civil Engineering should be counted as part of the UFA.
                                Foyers of large lecture theatres should be treated as UFA.


CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                                        Page 15 of 16
                                              2
                       New building space (m UFA) that comes into service during the
                       reporting period should be included in the total UFA figure.
                                                                 2
                       Unit of measurement is square metres (m ).
                       Source: TEFMA Guidelines for Completing the 2011 Benchmark Survey




CAMS 2012 Guidelines                                                               Page 16 of 16

				
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