Instructional Lesson Plan by oo0261c

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									                                                   Model Instructional Lesson Plan
                                                      English Language Arts
 Grade: 11      Unit Title: Exploring Independence

 Lesson Overview
 This lesson is designed to guide students through the composing of an argument essay in response to the essential question: “Is
 independence better described as a goal or a journey?” Students assess their own level of performance on the ELA CCSS by ranking
 themselves against the Standards for Writing in the 11-12 grade-level band. (NOTE: If this lesson occurs early in the school year, the
 self-assessment should focus on standards covered in the grades 9-10 band.) Based on the results of their self-assessment, students
 set goals for their own growth in self-selected areas during this writing assignment. Students work in groups/pairs with other students
 who have set similar goals to move through a writing process which allows them to plan, draft, revise, and edit their writing with the
 support and guidance of their peers. Students use the contents of their working portfolios for this unit to provide ideas and evidence to
 support their argument. Teachers serve as facilitators for the lesson sessions, coaching and clarifying points for students while
 simultaneously monitoring student progress. To conclude this lesson, students evaluate their work using a writing rubric and reflect on
 their own growth against the areas noted in their individual writing goals.

 Teacher Planning and Preparation
  Plan with UDL in mind, e.g., create electronic versions of all documents; establish cooperative learning groups with roles and
   responsibilities for collaboration and discussion; provide alternatives to writing on paper, e.g., word processing programs.
        IMPORTANT NOTE: Consider the need for Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) and/or for captioned/described video
        when selecting texts, novels, video and/or other media for this unit. See “Sources for Accessible Media” for suggestions on
        Maryland Learning Links: http://marylandlearninglinks.org.
  Differentiate the lesson for English Language Learners. Click here for an example.
  Apply extension or enrichment strategies to differentiate the lesson for advanced/gifted and talented students, e.g., require students to
   find, analyze, and use as evidence ideas from additional texts which they locate; requires students to expand on counterclaims.
  Analyze the lesson for strategic placement of formative assessment/self-analysis of writing process. Anticipate lesson modifications
   based on formative assessments.
  Be prepared to model the use of the Self-Analysis tool (Attachment 1) and goal setting, if necessary.
  Plan a “mock response to the essay, perhaps one for each side of the argument, in order to foresee difficulties students may have. Be
   prepared to address these difficulties as students write.
  Practice/Model the Argument Organizer (Attachment 2) by planning a related essay, if necessary. Script for class use, or have class,
   as a group, plan the essay together.
  Prepare materials, including copies of all worksheets, the rubric for written argument, the writing prompt, and the P-Q-P sheet.
  Prepare materials for mini-lessons on varying syntax to achieve a desired effect.
  Organize groups of similar needs based on students’ self-analysis. Anticipate re-grouping as the lesson proceeds.
 IMPORTANT NOTE: The “Lesson Procedure” section of this plan is written to the student, an approach that may be unfamiliar to some
 teachers. Teachers should study the “Lesson Procedure” carefully so that their planning and preparation enables students to
 demonstrate the level of independence and mastery expected in the lesson.

 Essential Question
 Is independence better described as a goal or a journey?

 Unit Standards Applicable to This Lesson
 Writing
 CCSS W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and
 sufficient evidence.
 CCSS W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
 and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
 CCSS W.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing
 on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of
 Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 11–12 on page 54.)
 CCSS W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in
 response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.


R/ELA.MSDE.9/13/2012                                                                                                                       1
                                                  Model Instructional Lesson Plan
                                                     English Language Arts
 Grade: 11     Unit Title: Exploring Independence

 Unit Standards Applicable to This Lesson, cont’d
 CCSS W.11-12.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      b. Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction…
 CCSS W.11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a
 single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

 Language
 CCSS L.11-12.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
 CCSS L.11-12.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
 CCSS L.11-12.3 3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices
 for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
      a. Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte’s Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of
          syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.

 Student Outcomes
 Students will
    create a working portfolio by collecting written responses, graphic organizers, notes, and other artifacts from the reading and
     analysis of texts studied in this unit
    complete a self-assessment of their writing skills in argumentation and set goals for their own growth in this unit
    work collaboratively with other students who have set similar goals as they use a writing process to compose a well-developed
     argument
      review contents of their portfolios to develop their claims and select appropriate and effective evidence from texts
      draw evidence from the analysis of literary and literary nonfiction (informational) texts to support their claims
      analyze the significance of opposing claims while determining which claim best supports the argument
      choose, apply, and maintain a logical organizational structure which logically sequences and distinguishes claims, counterclaims,
       reasons, and evidence
      acknowledge ad refute counterclaims as appropriate
      apply rhetorical appeals as appropriate
      establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the conventions of standard written English
      develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on what is
       most significant for this assignment
      reflect on their progress toward meeting the individual goals they set at the beginning of this lesson
      project new goals and habits of mind to continue to develop and enhance writing skills

 Materials
 Each student needs
    individual student working portfolios of artifacts from prior lesson in this unit
    writing resources, print or electronic: dictionary, thesaurus, language handbook, reference tools
    a copy of or access to all attachments, including Writing Self-Analysis Checklist, Argument Organizer, Argument Peer Review
    a copy of the argument rubrics to use or to serve as models for students to create their own rubrics
    writing materials, e.g., paper, pen; or a computer

 Pre-Assessment
 DAY 1* (These class period divisions are purely arbitrary. Teachers should always proceed based upon student needs.)
 Listen as your teacher reviews and explains the Writing Self-Analysis Checklist (Attachment 1). Per your teacher’s instructions,
 individually complete the checklist to determine your strengths and weaknesses as a writer of argument.
 Based on your self-analysis, set personal goals for improving your skills as a writer of argument during this writing assignment. Record
 your goals below the checklist.
 Revisit and revise your goals as needed throughout the lesson as you strengthen your skills as a writer of argument.


R/ELA.MSDE.9/13/2012                                                                                                                        2
                                                    Model Instructional Lesson Plan
                                                       English Language Arts
 Grade: 11      Unit Title: Exploring Independence

 Lesson Procedure, cont’d
 Per your teacher’s instructions, form a group with other students who have set similar goals for this writing lesson. Share your goals in a
 group discussion and develop a strategy for meeting those goals.
 Establish group norms and procedures for ensuring productive group sessions and support. (NOTE: The teacher may adjust groups as
 identified needs change during the writing process.)

 Review the following writing prompt as directed by your teacher:
          Consider the question “Is independence better described as a goal or a journey?” Write a well-developed
          argument that states your claim in response to the question and provides evidence for that claim from
          your analysis of texts we have studied in this unit.
 Discuss the writing prompt with your group to analyze and clarify the writing task.

 With your teacher’s guidance and using the Writing Self-Analysis Checklist for ideas, come to consensus on a class rubric to evaluate the
 writing task. (NOTE: The teacher should gently guide students to attend to the critical areas that he or she wants to address in this
 assignment so that the rubric reflects those areas, e.g., varying syntax.)

 Individually, review the contents of your working portfolio by re-reading notes, graphic organizers, journal entries, and any other materials
 you have collected during this unit.
 Discuss with your group your initial thoughts about how you might respond to the writing prompt for this assignment. Cite evidence from
 the texts in this unit to support your ideas. Clarify your initial thinking based on the discussion with your group.

 HOMEWORK
 Individually, compose a working claim (thesis statement) that articulates your argument in response to the writing prompt. Be prepared to
 share your working claim with the class at the beginning of the next class period.

 DAY 2
 Listen carefully as your teacher leads a class discussion of the claims your classmates have written. Discuss the strengths and
 weaknesses of each claim. Is the claim an arguable point? Can the claim be argued logically and with evidence from the texts we read in
 this unit?

 Consider the class discussion and then revise your claim as needed. Share your revised claim with your teacher for feedback.
 With a partner, review the contents of your portfolio and the texts as necessary to select those artifacts which provide the best evidence
 to support your claim. Use these particular artifacts/points of evidence to focus your work.

 Listen and take notes as your teacher explains the Argument Organizer (Attachment 2) and reviews its components. Ask questions for
 clarifications as necessary.
 With a partner, complete the Argument Organizer as a tool to help you plan your essay. Share with members in a small group and
 consider their feedback. Make any changes or revisions necessary ensure that your organizer is thorough and complete. Submit your
 organizer to your teacher for review and feedback.

 DAY 3
 Review your teacher’s feedback on your Argument Organizer. Use this feedback to revise the organizer if needed.

 Listen as your teacher revisits the class rubric for this assignment to establish the important of varying syntax to achieve a desired effect
 in your writing.
 Listen, take notes, and complete all assigned work as your teacher leads your class through a series of activities to help you learn
 techniques for varying syntax to achieve a desired effect in your writing. (NOTE: The teacher should choose two or three techniques for
 varying syntax, e.g., coordination and subordination, loose and periodic sentences, sentence combining and expanding, etc. Review or
 direct teaching of these techniques should be accomplished through targeted mini-lessons.)



R/ELA.MSDE.9/13/2012                                                                                                                             3
                                                    Model Instructional Lesson Plan
                                                       English Language Arts
 Grade: 11      Unit Title: Exploring Independence

 Lesson Procedure, cont’d
 Choose one of these techniques that you would like to use to improve the style of your writing for this lesson. Using a piece of writing
 from your working portfolio, practice this technique by applying it to revise some of the sentences in the piece you chose. Share your
 revised writing with a partner, revise per partner feedback, and submit your work to your teacher for review and feedback

 HOMEWORK
 Using your completed Argument Organizer as well as the ideas generated from your selected portfolio artifacts and keeping in mind the
 syntax strategy you have chosen to use, compose the first draft of your essay. When you have finished, review your work and make
 some initial edits and revisions.

 DAY 4
 Per your teacher’s instructions, revisit your self-analysis checklist to evaluate your draft against what you identified as your strengths and
 weaknesses as a writer of argument. Conference with your teacher to revise your first draft in light of your goals for this assignment.

 Listen as your teacher guides the class through the application of the class rubric to a draft* of an argument essay. (*The teacher may
 use a draft from this or another class, or the teacher may compose a draft for this activity.)

 Form small groups per your teacher’s instructions. Individually, read the draft argument essays* assigned to you. As a group, apply the
 process modeled by your teacher to the drafts of the argument essay assigned to your group. Return the drafts and the peer review
 comments to your teacher. (*The teacher should pre-select and assign drafts for this activity.)

 Individually, read the peer review comments and make revisions to your draft as necessary. Choose one of the comments made by the
 peer review and explain in writing either how you revised your draft in response to the comment or why you felt that the comment was off
 target and revision was not necessary. Submit these materials to your teacher for review.

 HOMEWORK
 Compose a second draft and submit it to your teacher for feedback.

 DAY 5
 Listen, take notes, and complete all assigned work as your teacher leads the class through a series of activities to help you edit your draft
 to identify and correct errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics. (NOTE: The teacher should choose two or three areas that need
 attention, e.g., parallel structure, inappropriate shifts in voice and mood, misplaced and dangling modifiers, etc. Review or direct teaching
 of these problem areas should be accomplished through targeted mini-lessons.)

 Reread your draft to identify and correct errors in the areas your teacher has just reviewed. Consult references and work with a partner
 as necessary to correct any other errors you discover.

 As necessary, per your teacher’s instructions, form a group to use the Argument Peer Review (Attachment 3) or some other method,
 e.g., Praise-Question-Polish) to guide a peer response discussion. (NOTE: This activity should be used only with students who could
 benefit from it.)

 HOMEWORK
 Make any further edits or revisions necessary to polish and finalize your essay. Conduct a final quality review against the class rubric.
 Prepare your essay for publication and submit it to your teacher for review and evaluation.

 Lesson Closure
 Review your writing goals and consider how well you met them. Discuss with your group members how you view your progress and set
 new goals as necessary.




R/ELA.MSDE.9/13/2012                                                                                                                              4

								
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