Judy Moody

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					WELCOME TO THIRD GRADE WITH JUDY MOODY
AUTHOR:

TANYA J. GARZA-FLORES

GRADE BAND:

2-3

ESTIMATED LESSON TIME:

12 DAYS for the entire unit

OVERVIEW:

    This lesson is meant to make children feel more welcome the first weeks of school. It
provides the teacher with the opportunity to set norms for the reading and writing
workshops. In addition, the teacher can make formal and informal assessments that will
allow him/her to get a good picture of student preparedness at the beginning of the year.
    In this lesson, students will listen to the teacher do a read-aloud of the book, Judy
Moody was in a mood. Not a good mood. A bad mood., by Megan McDonald. In this
book, Judy (the main character) has difficulty beginning a new school year. The teacher
will introduce the “think/pair/share” strategy, menus, writing strategies and Internet
research to the students. Differentiated instruction will be used to provide students with
the optimal learning experience and to motivate students to learn.

FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE:

Levy, H. M. (2008). Meeting the Needs of All Students through Differentiated
Instruction: Helping Every Child Reach and Exceed Standards. Clearing House: A
Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas. 81(4), 161-164.

         Differentiated instruction is a way to make sure that students receive the level of
          instruction that they require.
         Tiered planning for product allows the teacher to provide assessment with student
          learning abilities and interests in mind.

Wallace, R., Pearman, C., Hail, C., & Hurst, B. (2007). Writing for Comprehension.
Reading Horizons. 48(1), 41-56.
    Writing in conjunction with reading strengthens a student’s understanding.
    Writing with reading increases content learning and student achievement.
    Writing for comprehension provides opportunity to recall, clarify and even
      question what was read.
STUDENT OBJECTIVES:
   The student will learn to discuss literature.
   The student will learn to respond to literature in written form.
   The student will learn how to do Internet research.
   The student will learn how to work with menus in a differentiated instruction
     classroom.

INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN

Resources:
    Novel: Judy Moody was in a mood. Not a good mood. A bad mood. By Megan
       McDonald
    Response journal
    Timer
    Computer lab or mobile lab
    Handouts
Preparation:

   1. Obtain a copy of Judy Moody was in a mood. Not a good mood. A bad mood. By
      Megan McDonald. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the novel. You may want
      to go through and mark “think,pair,share” sections and vocabulary with post-it
      notes.
   2. Copy the required templates and assignment sheets.
   3. Provide each of your students with a journal for logging their notes and
      assignments

Instruction and Activities:

   I.      Session One
                The teacher will read aloud Chapter 1 of the novel.
                As the teacher is reading, he/she will introduce the “turn to your
                   partner and share” strategy. Students will learn to turn to another
                   student and discuss a prompt given by the teacher. Introduce this
                   concept at the end of chapter one. Ask the students to turn and share
                   with their partners the reason that they believe that Judy is not in a
                   good mood. Set a timer for 2 minutes and then ask 1 set of partners to
                   share their thoughts with the group.
                The teacher will read aloud Chapter 2 of the novel. At the end of the
                   chapter, have the students turn to their partners and discuss what
                   things Judy needs to differently to have a better day at school. Set a
                   timer for 2 minutes and then ask 1 set of partners to share their
                   thoughts with the group.
                Students will receive a T-shirt template. Students are to design a T-
                   shirt with what they did this summer. Then, students are to write a
                   paragraph in their reflective journals about the events drawn on their
                   shirts.
                         Be sure to send home the project sheet for the “Me Collage.”
                          Students will be presenting projects in Sessions 11 and 12.

     II.       Session Two
                The teacher will read Chapter 3 aloud.
                When the teacher reads the part of the chapter when Judy destroys Stink’s
                  moon rock, stop for the “pair/share.” Ask the students to turn to their
                  partners and ask how they think Stink felt when Judy did this. After 2
                  minutes, ask a pair to share with the whole group. Then, continue reading
                  the chapter.
                The teacher will read Chapter 4. At the end of the chapter, use the
                  “pair/share” idea to have students predict what will happen to Judy’s plant
                  after Stink feeds it too much hamburger meat. After 2 minutes, ask a pair
                  to share with the whole group.
                Students will then receive a bandage template to color since Judy collects
                  bandages. After completing the project sheet, students will write in their
                  reflection journals about Judy’s character. What is Judy like? Would you
                  want her to be your friend? Why or why not?

     III.      Session Three
                The teacher will read aloud Chapters 5 and 6 of the novel.
                Today, the teacher will demonstrate how to use a menu. Menus will be
                  used during reading and writing workshops to provide opportunities for
                  differentiated instruction for students. Pass out Menu 1. Explain to the
                  students that menus give them a choice. All instructions and requirements
                  will be printed on the menu. Below is an example of the menu choices the
                  students will get. Students must complete 1 menu choice today in their
                  response journal.


Choice A:                                     Choice B:                                                    Choice C:
Judy Moody gets a Venus flytrap plant.        Judy Moody’s doll gets the chicken pox. Go to the
Go to the computer. Log onto this             computer. Log onto this website:                             In your
website:                                      http://kidshealth.org/kid/ill_injure/sick/chicken_pox.html   reflection
                                              In your reflective journal, answer the following             journal, write
http://www.botany.org/bsa/misc/carn.html      questions in complete sentences.                             a story about
 Then, write 3 of your favorite facts about                                                                an adventure
the Venus flytrap. Afterwards, write a        1.) Chicken Pox is caused by a virus called what?            with a Venus
paragraph in your reflective journal                                                                       fly trap or
discussing whether this plant would make                                                                   about
a good pet. Explain why or why not.           2.) When is chicken pox most common?                         someone who
                                                                                                           gets the
                                               3.) How can someone pass the chicken pox to someone         chicken pox.
                                              else?
IV.    Session Four
        The teacher will read aloud Chapter 7. After this chapter, ask the students
          to turn to their partners and discuss if they would want to join the T.P.
          club. They should be sure to discuss their reasons. After 2 minutes, ask a
          pair to share with the whole class.
        The teacher will read aloud Chapter 8. After this chapter, ask the students
          to turn to their partners and discuss how they think Judy felt about Frank
          Pearl before she went to the party and how she felt about Frank Pearl after
          the party. After 2 minutes, ask a pair to share with the whole class.
        In a mini lesson, the teacher will explain the process of brainstorm. Using
          the novel, the teacher will make a list of all of the things that author has
          discussed: back to school, feelings, friends, parents, toys, collections,
          pets, etc.
        The students will then brainstorm ideas that they may want to write about
          this year in their reflective journal. They may “borrow” ideas from the
          author and they may come up with ideas on their own. Set the timer for
          10 minutes.
        When time is up, ask for volunteers to share their brainstorms. Explain to
          the class that they can keep coming back to these ideas throughout the
          year as needed during writing workshop.
V.     Session Five
        The teacher will read aloud Chapter 9: Definitely the Worst Thing Ever.
        The teacher will model his/her own paragraph about the same topic.
          During the teacher modeling, he/she should share how they came up with
          the topic and how they wrote the piece.
        Students will then be given an opportunity to write about “the worst thing
          ever.” Students should brainstorm and write a paragraph.
        Students will then share pieces on a voluntary basis.
VI.    Session Six
        The teacher will read aloud Chapter 10: The Funniest Thing Ever.
        After the chapter, give students two minutes to “think/pair/share” about
          how they think Stink felt when Judy played the trick on him. Tell students
          this is discussing “point of view.” After two minutes, ask a pair to share.
        The teacher will model his/her own paragraph about the same topic.
          During the teacher modeling, he/she should be sure to point out different
          points of view in the story.
        Students will then be given an opportunity to write about “the worst thing
          ever.” Students should brainstorm and write a paragraph.

          Students will then share pieces on a voluntary basis.


VII.   Session Seven
        The teacher will read aloud Chapter 11 and 12. This will finish the novel.
             The teacher will then pass out the Judy Moody project sheet. Students
              will choose one activity from each column to complete for a final project.
              A rubric is attached to the project sheet.
   VIII.   Session Eight: Student Project Work Day
   IX.     Session Nine: Student Project Work Day
   X.      Session Ten: Student Project Work Day
   XI.     Session Eleven: Me Collage presentations
   XII.    Session Twelve: Me Collage presentations

Extensions:
    Students could write their own “mood” book in which they record the various
       moods they go through in a day. Students could either create an online movie
       using Moviemaker or publish an actual book
    Students could selected their favorite part of the novel and convert it into a
       reader’s theater piece. This piece could then be performed for parents or another
       class.

Web Resources:
   Chicken Pox Information:
     http://kidshealth.org/kid/ill_injure/sick/chicken_pox.html
   Judy Moody Teacher Guide:
     http://www.judymoody.com/pdf/JM_TeachersGuide.pdf
   Megan McDonald Website: http://www.meganmcdonald.net/
   Venus Fly Trap Information: http://www.botany.org/bsa/misc/carn.html
   Virginia Information: http://www.kidscommonwealth.virginia.gov/home/
   White House Information:
     http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/White_House_101_White_House_History/


STUDENT ASSESSMENTS/REFLECTIONS:
   Informal observations of student discussions and sharing
   Reflective journal entries and assignments
   Final Judy Moody project
   AR Test over the novel

NCTE/IRA STANDARDS:
   Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding
     of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to
     acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the
     workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and
     nonfiction, classic and contemporary works
   Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and
     appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other
     readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their
     word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g.,
     sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
      Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing
       process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a
       variety of purposes.
      Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members
       of a variety of literacy communities.
      Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own
       purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of
       information).

THIRD GRADE TEKS:

English Language Arts:

3.1(B) respond appropriately and courteously to directions and questions
   (D) listen critically to interpret and evaluate
   (E) listen responsively to stories and other texts read aloud, including selections from
classic and contemporary works

3.2 Listening/speaking/culture. The student listens and speaks to gain knowledge of
his/her own culture, the culture of others, and the common elements of cultures. The
student is expected to:
   (A) connect experiences and ideas with those of others through speaking and listening
   (B) compare language and oral traditions (family stories) that reflect customs, regions,
and cultures.

3.3 Listening/speaking/audiences/oral grammar. The student speaks appropriately to
different audiences for different purposes and occasions. The student is expected to:
    (C) ask and answer relevant questions and make contributions in small or large group
discussions

3.7 Reading/variety of texts. The student reads widely for different purposes in varied
sources. The student is expected to:
    (A) read classic and contemporary works (2-8);
    (B) read from a variety of genres for pleasure and to acquire information from both
print and electronic sources (2-3)
    (C) read to accomplish various purposes, both assigned and self-selected (2-3).

3.10 Reading/literary response. The student responds to various texts. The student is
expected to:
    (A) respond to stories and poems in ways that reflect understanding and interpretation
in discussion (speculating, questioning), in writing, and through movement, music, art,
and drama (2-3);

3.12 Reading/inquiry/research. The student generates questions and conducts research
using information from various sources. The student is expected to:
   (D) use multiple sources, including print such as an encyclopedia, technology, and
experts, to locate information that addresses questions

3.14 Writing/purposes. The student writes for a variety of audiences and purposes and in
various forms. The student is expected to:
   (A) write to record ideas and reflections (K-3);

				
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