Interactive ReadThink Aloud

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Interactive ReadThink Aloud Powered By Docstoc
					Crafting in
 Reader’s
Workshop
Explicit Comprehension
   Instruction for
 Elementary Readers

   “A Day at Downtown”
Wednesday, January 30, 2007
      By Andrea Frasier
Session Objectives

 Participants will:
  Experience a full literacy block
  Build expertise of the components
   of a crafting lesson
  Participate in a crafting lesson
   that integrates science content
  Plan a crafting lesson that can be
   implemented back at your school
Reader’s Workshop

  1. Crafting
   - Shared Reading
  -Read/Think Aloud                 Reflection
                                        10
  - Modeling                         minutes
 2. Composing Meaning
    - Independent Reading   Students –                Crafting
                            Composing                  5-20
    -Invitational Groups     Meaning                  minutes
    - Guided Reading          30-45
   - Book Clubs              minutes
   -Conferences
                                     Teacher –
  3. Reflecting                 Invitational Groups
    - Share successes &           or Conferences
      challenges of
     strategy use
What is it?

 Crafting
   – a time when the teacher and whole
     class sit together while the teacher
     teaches an intention explicitly with
     the expectation that the students
     will then emulate the model. It often
     involves talking about how a student
     can think through a task.
           more details, see Toolkit
       (For
       #4.11 & 4.12)
Components of a
Crafting Lesson
    Makes a connection and provides an
     overview (What & Why)
    Demonstrates a strategy, skill or craft
     (How)
    Provides an opportunity for students to
     apply the technique: gradually release
     responsibility
    Links the technique to their reading and
     writing lives (When & Why)
    Provides sharing time (reflection) to
     consolidate learning and celebrate
     success
Gradually Release
Responsibility
    I DO — YOU WATCH
    I DO — YOU HELP
    YOU DO TOGETHER — I HELP
    YOU DO INDEPENDENTLY — I WATCH

    From the students' perspectives:
    SHOW ME — HELP ME — LET ME
 -Jeffery Wilhelm

 (*See HO -Gradual Release Model By Ellin Keene)
What Is a Think Aloud?
   Thinking Aloud is
    “eavesdropping on your
    thinking”
   It is a way of modeling, or
    “making public”, the
    thinking that goes on
    inside your head as you
    read. Tell students that
    there are really two
    voices speaking as you
    read. The voice you can
    usually hear is your actual
    voice, but there is a voice
    inside your brain, which is
    saying what it thinks
    about as you read.
    (Cunningham, Hall, &
    Cunningham, 2000).
Interactive Read Aloud

    How is it interactive?
    How is think aloud incorporated?
    What is the student role in the
     interactive read/think aloud?
Tools for the Interactive
Read Aloud
  Clipboards
  Post-it notes
  Response sheets/notebook
  Comfortable space for
   listening
  Anchor charts to make
   learning visible
Before Reading

    Revisit prior lesson. “Yesterday we…”
    Use student thinking to guide teaching
    Explain: What? Why? “Today we will…”
    Introduce the text/author
    Activate/Build any background
     knowledge necessary to understanding
     the text
    Discuss unfamiliar/challenging
     vocabulary that may pose a problem
     and/or is important to the text
During Reading

   Teacher modeling:
    Show HOW
   Explicit instruction of
    comprehension
   Guided Practice in
    discussing literature
   Assessment of
    individual learning as
    students share
   Social learning
    (Pragmatic Cueing
    System)
   Think-Pair-Share
After Reading

    Clarification of student thinking as they
     post their notes
    Anchor charts make student thinking
     visible
    Reading the notes is essential! Make
     observations about student
     understanding (information guides
     instruction/determines invitational groups)
    Link strategy to students’ reading
    Communicate WILF for composing
     meaning
Recap- Goals of the Interactive
Crafting Lesson:
      Formative Assessment
      Instruction (Explicit)
      Guided Practice
      Model “Readerly Behaviors”
      Identification/understanding of
       comprehension strategies
      Guided practice of literature discussion
       and use of strategies
      Good readers think while they are
       reading!
What Does it Feel Like?




    Have you read any other books by Thomas
     Locker? What do you know about his style,
     content, etc.?
    Why do you think he chose this title? What
     content might this book contain?
    Activate Background: water cycle
    Vocabulary
Matching Exercise

    There are 13 taglines and poems to
     match (one to correspond to each
     illustration)
    You must communicate with your
     group and connect to prior
     knowledge to come to a consensus
    Listen as I read aloud to see if you
     have matched them correctly
Visual Literacy

 Visual Thinking Strategies:
  An engaging learner-centered activity that
   combines observing, reasoning,
   questioning, inferring, and problem
   solving.
  Enhance science communication and
   thinking skills, and find meaning in visual
   art.
                        -Joanne Toft & Kathy Scoggin
Model:
Visual Thinking Strategies
  What do you     What does        What          What
  notice?         this remind      emotions do   questions
  What is         you of?          you feel as   does it raise
  going on in     (memories,       you respond   for you?
  this picture?   experiences,     to this
                  songs,           scene?
                  stories, etc.)
Squeeze the Text

 How else might this text be used for
   crafting:
  Poetry Study- free verse
  Writing- word choice (cascade,
   spiraling, plunging, gleaming,
   drench)
  Mentor Text for expository writing-
   think beyond research report!
Let’s Practice

    Work with your school teams to plan a
     crafting lesson
    Use the text and the blank planning sheet
     provided

 Read the text, decide:
  What grade level?
  What strategy?
 (NEED HELP HERE)What book, strategy,
   etc.?
Where Do I Begin?

    How to bring this into your classroom
     tomorrow:
     – Decide the comprehension strategy in which
       you will study
     – Select a text appropriate for your desired
       outcomes- know the text well!
     – Picture books are a great place to start!
       (Short articles & poems also work well!)
     – Plan your instruction through the gradual
       release of responsibility model
     – Attend to students’ oral and written
       responses to guide future lessons
     (See HO- What Books Should I use?)
     Tell me,
     I forget.

    Show me,
 I remember.

  Involve me,
I understand.

				
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