plan fund motivating people by y9wX3ZT

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									                               ICT PLANNING FOR SCHOOLS


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Activity 7B - Fundraising

Motivating Stakeholders Plan

School Stakeholder Group        Suggested Fundraising Strategy to   Why I think this Strategy will Work Well with this
                                Motivate Stakeholders               Stakeholder Group(s)
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12 Steps to Planning a Fundraising Event

The Need to Involve People in the Process.

While the goal of a fundraising event is to raise money for a particular priority area that a school
has, you want the people involved in the initiative to succeed. If a fundraising event is carried off
successfully, stakeholders are more likely to continue to support the school when other income-
generating initiatives are called for, as income collected from school fees is often insufficient to
cater for all the needs at a school. When people in the school community are involved
successfully in running income-generating projects, they are likely to be your best publicity. They
can spread the word to friends and relatives and rally further support for the school.

Making Decisions about the Process.

Planning a fundraising event requires you and other members of your fundraising team to make
decisions about how the event will be organized. By systematically asking a number of questions
about the nature of the fundraising event, the reasons for it, etc., a fundraising team can begin the
process of effectively planning for a fundraising event.

Step 1: Why is the additional income needed?

Step 2 How much money does the school need to make?

Step 3: What will the school do to raise money for this priority area?

Step 4: Who will you involve to raise money for this priority area?

Step 5 When will the fundraising event take place?

Step 6: Where will the activity be done?

Step 7: What incentives are there for people to participate in and/or contribute towards the
fundraising activity? What will people gain? What does the school gain?

Step 8: How will the event be publicized to attract the greatest number of contributors to
this effort?

Step 9: What specific steps need to be carried out to ensure the success of the event?

Step 10: Who will be responsible for which steps?

Step 11: Post the actual fundraising event, are there additional things that the fundraising
team needs to do? If so, what are these?

Step 12: What are the lessons learned from this fundraising activity?
Step 1: Why is the additional income needed?
The first step is to identify why additional income at the school is needed.

       What is the priority area that the school is seeking to address?
       Why is it important to raise money for this priority area?


Step 2 How much money does the school need to make?
To address the needs in this priority area the school needs to ask the following question:

                    How much money does the school need to make?
                     If you only need to raise a small amount of money you will probably choose
                     very different activities from those you would choose if you had to raise a
                     large sum of money for an ICT-related priority area.


Step 3: What will the school do to raise money for this priority area?
The questions your fundraising team needs to answer here include:

                    What resources (time, money, people) do we have available within the
                     school community?
                     If you need money for your ICT-related priority area in a hurry, you will not
                     want to organize an event that is big and complicated.

                     If you have no money at all for your ICT-related priority area, you won’t be
                     able to hire a hall or buy prizes. However, you may be able to source
                     donated prizes. Most fundraising events require some up-front expenditure
                     before additional income can be collected, so your team needs to create a
                     budget and allocate money for its fund-raising activities.

                     An important question to ask is the following:

                     On a cost benefit level, can the school afford to hold this event as proposed,
                     keeping costs to a minimum?

Step 4: Who will you involve to raise money for this priority area?

The questions here include:

                    Can parents be involved in the ICT-related fundraising activity?
                     How?
                     Wherever possible, parents should be involved in fundraising activities,
                     alongside learners. The more involved the learners are, the more likely it is
                     that parents will also get involved.
                    Can any other members of the school community be involved?
                     If you are having a fundraising event that involves the serving of food, you
                     might want to involve local shopkeepers and ask them for donations. You
                     could also request that they supply ingredients at cost and put up advertising
                     posters on their shop walls and/or leave flyers which advertise the event on
                     their shop counters. If they too can be motivated to support this event, they
                     will begin to think of the event as ‘theirs’. This attitude may well spread to the
                     rest of the community, if other members of the community follow their lead.
                    Will people in the area be able to afford to participate in the activity?
                     It is no use organizing an event where participant tickets cost R50 each, if
                     many parents at the school are unemployed.
Step 5: When will the fundraising event take place?

The questions here include:

                  On which date will we hold the planned fundraising event for our ICT-
                   related priority area?
                   If you are organizing something really big like a school fête, you may need to
                   set the date a year in advance to give you sufficient time to prepare for it. A
                   school jumble sale, on the other hand, would require much less preparation
                   time.

                  At what time of the day will we hold our fundraising event?
                   If you want working people to be able to attend the fundraising event, set the
                   date for the evening, over a weekend or on a public holiday.

                   After deciding at what time the fundraising event will take place, make sure
                   that there is transport for people at this time. This consideration may require
                   additional logistical arrangements to be made by the school team organizing
                   the fundraising event.

                   If there is scope for the school to generate additional income from attendees
                   to the fundraising function by selling a meal, for example, there is no point in
                   ending the function before 11.30 a.m. or before 4 p.m.


Step 6: Where will the activity be done?

The questions here include:

                  What venue will be suitable?
                   The venue for the fundraising activity should address a number of
                   considerations. It should be large enough to accommodate the numbers of
                   expected attendees. It should be accessible by public transport and,
                   importantly, the venue you want should be available at the time you need it.
                  Is the venue easy to find?
                   If you are expecting a lot of people at your fundraising event, you may want
                   to ask the traffic department to assist you in directing traffic. Sometimes, the
                   AA (Automobile Association) can be called on to put up their black and
                   yellow signs. These can help to direct people to the event venue.


Step 7: What incentives are there for people to participate in and/or contribute towards the
fundraising activity? What will people gain? What does the school gain?

The questions here include:

                  Will you offer refreshments at your fundraising activity?
                   Will refreshments be offered free or will you sell them? If you are going to
                   offer refreshments free of charge, look for a sponsor who will donate food
                   and drinks. If you are unsuccessful here, find a supplier who might partly
                   `subsidize’ (or reduce) costs, so that food and drinks can be bought cheaply.
                   Bare in mind that certain kinds of food and drink are appropriate for different
                   times in the day. As well, different members of your school community may
                   have certain dietary restrictions, because of their religious beliefs. You will
                   not want to hold a school picnic and braai meat during the fasting period of
                   Ramadaan, if a large number of your learners are Moslem, for example.

                  Will we have place where small children will be cared for?
                   Sometimes, you can make extra money by providing a safe place at your
                   fundraising venue, where adults can leave their children, while they enjoy
                   themselves.

                  What does the school gain from this activity?
               The school stands to gain a great deal if school stakeholders participate fully in
               the events that the school holds. This is a gain that goes beyond the amount of
               income that the school is able to generate through the activity. For example, an
               enthusiastic stakeholder who knows about the fundraising event and the
               particular ICT-related needs of the school, may not donate money, but may
               donate labour in building and/or setting up a computer lab, for example.


Step 8: How will the event be publicized to attract the greatest number of contributors to
this effort?

The questions here include:

                  What kinds of publicity will we use to attract the largest number of
                   attendees to our fundraising event?

                   Depending on the kind of fundraising event you are holding, pamphlets,
                   posters, banners and/or stickers may be appropriate forms of media for
                   telling people about the fundraising. However, if a large portion of your
                   school community cannot read and write, announcements on a local,
                   community radio station may be more appropriate.

                   If your fundraising is going to be a big event, newspapers, as well as the
                   local radio station should be called on to provide advertising space or sound
                   byte time.

                   When using pamphlets, decide how these will be distributed. Who will design
                   the pamphlets? What kinds of costs will be expended on paper, printing and
                   design? It makes sense to send letters home with learners or to publicize the
                   event on the school website, if the school has one. Costs for paper can be
                   reduced if e-copies of pamphlets are sent to learners’ homes which have e-
                   mail addresses.

                  Where will we advertise the event?

                   When using posters, decide where these can be placed, so that large
                   numbers of people see them while they are up. If posters are set up outside
                   of school grounds, obtain permission from the local municipality to display
                   these.

                  When will we advertise the event?

                   Time your advertising announcements for the fundraising event carefully to
                   obtain the maximum impact. There is little use in distributing pamphlets a
                   month in advance or putting up posters the same day as the event!
                   How can we make our fundraising event `a media event’ that everyone
                    talks about and looks forward to attending?

                    A `media event’ is something that the media finds interesting and wants to
                    mention in their newspapers or in their broadcasts. If a well-known person is
                    going to open your fundraising event or participate in it, the local media may
                    provide the school with free advertising. A stunt like having someone arrive
                    at the fundraising by helicopter or parachute may also draw the press to your
                    event. If this is the case, the fundraising initiative of the school is publicized in
                    such a way that future events are likely to be well attended, because of the
                    interest generated by this activity.

                    Having an interesting theme for your fundraising event can also attract the
                    media to report on your event. For example, the aim of the school might be to
                    raise sufficient money to build a computer lab for the school, but at the same
                    time it decides to dedicate 5 or 10% of all proceeds to a local home for
                    HIV/AIDS orphans. The theme might then be: “Support the Children”.

Step 9: What specific steps need to be carried out to ensure the success of the event?

If you are co-ordinating a fundraising event, you and your fundraising team will need to draw up a
list of all the jobs that need to be done. Next to this, ensure that members are clear about their
responsibility for particular tasks and the agreed upon time-frames for completing them.


Important things to remember:

                               Organise a public address system if you are going to need one;
                               Check toilet facilities for any fundraising event that involves large
                                numbers of people;
                               If you are going to need electricity, make sure the venue has it;
                               If people are going to be outside on a hot, sunny day, organize
                                umbrellas or some form of protective shade for people to stand
                                and/or sit under;
                               If the fundraising event is going to be held outdoors, set out easy,
                                implementable contingency plans, in case it rains;
                               If you are going to need change, organize an adequate cash float.
                               Additional security at the fundraising event may be advisable to
                                ensure that everything goes smoothly, etc.


Step 10: Who will be responsible for which steps?

Who will you involve to raise money for this priority area? In other words, who does the work and
who is responsible for the activity among school stakeholders?

When planning a fundraising event, this is a key question. Without committed workers, who will
make essential arrangements prior to the event, no fundraising initiative will be successful. Even
if the school has a co-ordinator who will take overall responsibility for the event, there are many
smaller jobs that have to be done. Ideally, the distribution of work between those organizing the
event should be manageable. A person who is given a task load that is unmanageable, with
unrealistic time frames for delivery, is unlikely to succeed and will easily become discouraged.
When future events are organized, the person will not volunteer his or her time and/or expertise,
because the demands of the school are perceived to be too onerous.
Step 11: Post the actual fundraising event, are there additional things that the fundraising
team needs to do? If so, what are these?

                  Remember to thank the people who helped the school with its fundraising
                   initiative. In some instances, this may involve public acknowledgement,
                   individual letters or the throwing of a wrap-up party for those who worked
                   really hard.
                  Prepare a report for the SGB. This should include:
                          A financial statement describing how much money was spent and
                             how much was made;
                          A written, narrative report which describes the successes and the
                             failures and/or pitfalls of the event. This section of the report can
                             include recommendations to the SGB for future events.

Step 12: What are the lessons learned from this fundraising activity?

               When the fundraising event or activity is over, it is useful for the fundraising team
               to spend time to discuss: what went right, what went wrong and what you can do
               in future to ensure that organizing similar events go more smoothly.

               Anyone who has ever been involved in organizing a fundraising event knows that
               there are many small details that need to be accounted for. If you have a
               committed team and take the time to plan carefully, your event is likely to be a
               success.

								
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