University of Canberra Compact

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University of Canberra Compact Powered By Docstoc
					Mission-Based Compact
   Between:
     The Commonwealth of Australia
     and
     University of Canberra
              CONTENTS


             Context

             Part One:         Establishment of the Compact
                               The University’s Mission

             Part Two:         Teaching and Learning
                               Performance Funding

             Part Three:       Research, Research Training and Innovation

             Part Four:        Compact Review

             Part Five:        General Provisions



              Attachments
              A.    Indicative list of Commonwealth Funding provided to the University which is
                    administered by DEEWR and relevant to this Compact.
              B.    List of Commonwealth Funding provided to the University which is
                    administered by DIISR and relevant to this Compact.
              C.    University Confidential Information1.
              D.    Terms and Conditions of Agreement between the Minister for Tertiary
                    Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations and the University about
                    Performance Funding.
              E.    Copy of Commonwealth Grant Scheme Funding agreement between the
                    Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations and the
                    University.




1
  There will be an Attachment C only where the University provides commercially sensitive material. The
published version of a Compact will indicate the existence or otherwise of an Attachment C (University
Confidential Information) but will not include the content.




                                                   Page 2
Date
This Compact is made on ____________
between
The Commonwealth of Australia (Commonwealth) represented by and acting
through both:
          The Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations
          Assisted by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace
          Relations (DEEWR)
          ABN 63 578 775 294
          Of
          50 Marcus Clarke Street
          Canberra ACT 2601

          And

          The Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
          Assisted by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
          (DIISR)
          ABN 74 599 608 295
          Of
          Industry House
          10 Binara Street
          Canberra ACT 2601


And


University of Canberra
ABN 81 633 873 422
A body corporate under the University of Canberra Act 1989 (ACT)
Of
Canberra
ACT 2601
(University)




                                Page 3
     CONTEXT
A.   The Purpose and Effect of this Compact
     This Compact is an agreement between the Commonwealth and the University.
     It demonstrates that the Commonwealth and the University have a shared and
     mutual commitment to provide students with high quality educational experiences
     and outcomes and to building research and innovation capabilities and international
     competitiveness.
     The Compact recognises that the University is an autonomous institution with a
     distinctive mission, operating within a state or territory, national and international
     higher education environment.
     The purpose of this Compact is to provide a strategic framework for the relationship
     between the Commonwealth and the University. It sets out how the University’s
     Mission aligns with the Commonwealth’s goals for higher education, research,
     research training and innovation, and includes information on funding provided by
     the Commonwealth to the University.
     Section 4 and Attachment D of this Compact together constitute the funding
     agreement, for the purpose of section 30-25 of the Higher Education Support Act
     2003 (HESA), for the grant of teaching and learning Performance Funding to the
     University. Similarly, Attachment E of this Compact contains the funding agreement,
     for the purpose of section 30-25 of HESA, for the provision of other Commonwealth
     Grant Scheme funding to the University.
     This Compact also refers to funding provided under DIISR's Collaborative Research
     Networks (CRN) funding program. Any funding provided under that program is not
     made under HESA and is separate to, but made within the framework of, this
     Compact.
     In addition, this Compact refers to a range of other funding that is provided by DIISR
     and DEEWR to the University under various legislative and/or contractual funding
     arrangements. The details of relevant DEEWR funding arrangements are set out in
     Attachment A and the details of relevant DIISR funding arrangements are set out in
     Attachment B.
     By detailing Commonwealth funding commitments and reciprocal University
     commitments, this Compact also contributes to creating a transparent and
     accountable system of administration of Commonwealth funding. To support this
     purpose, the Commonwealth and the University agree that this Compact will be
     published on Commonwealth websites and may be published on the University
     website.




                                      Page 4
B.   The Principles of Commonwealth Funding Support
     The principles under which Commonwealth funding for higher education is provided
     are:
        opportunity for all, especially for those students from groups under-represented
         in higher education;
        access to university based on merit;
        world-class teaching and learning that advances the international standing of
         Australian education;
        world class research and research training that advances knowledge, critical
         thinking and Australia’s international standing;
        responsiveness to the economic and social needs of the community, region,
         state, nation and the international community;
        a sustainable higher-education sector; and
        academic freedom and institutional autonomy.
C.   The Commonwealth’s ambitions for Higher Education and Innovation
     The Commonwealth’s vision for the higher education sector is set out in
     Transforming Australia’s Higher Education System available at
     http://www.deewr.gov.au
     Higher education is central to achieving the key objectives for the nation’s future,
     including:
        A stronger Australia – boosting Australia’s share of high skilled jobs and
         productivity growth will require a highly skilled workforce that can rapidly adapt
         to meet future challenges; and
        A fairer Australia – all Australians will benefit from widespread equitable
         access to a diverse tertiary education sector that allows each individual to
         develop and reach their potential. Society as a whole will benefit from the
         widespread application of cutting-edge research.
     In supporting these objectives, the Commonwealth's ambitions for higher education
     include:
        producing graduates with the knowledge, skills and understandings for full
         participation in society and the economy;
        providing opportunities for people from all backgrounds to participate to their full
         potential and be supported to do so;
        providing students with a stimulating and rewarding higher education
         experience;
        playing a pivotal role in the national research and innovation system through
         generation and dissemination of new knowledge and through the education,



                                      Page 5
         training and development of world class researchers across a wide range of
         intellectual disciplines; and
        being amongst the leading Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
         Development (OECD) countries in terms of participation and performance.
     The higher education system also plays a crucial role in supporting innovation. The
     Commonwealth’s policy statement, Powering Ideas - An Innovation Agenda for the
     21st Century http://innovation.gov.au is designed to build innovation skills, support
     research to create new knowledge, increase business innovation and boost
     collaboration.
     For higher education research, research training and innovation, the
     Commonwealth’s ambitions include:
        progressively increasing the number of research groups performing at world-
         class levels;
        boosting research collaboration by Australian universities;
        significantly increasing the number of students completing higher degrees by
         research over the next decade; and
        building an innovation system that promotes economic growth and well being by
         promoting linkages between Australian businesses, universities and publicly-
         funded research agencies.
D.   Structure of this Compact
     Part One provides for the establishment of the Compact, its Term and the purpose
     of the University’s Mission. Part One also contains the University’s Mission
     Statement. Part One also provides for the Commonwealth to inform the University of
     any actual or prospective changes to policy and for the University to inform the
     Commonwealth of any actual or prospective changes to its Mission and for each to
     consult the other about the possible effects of these changes.
     Part Two provides for matters related to teaching and learning, which are matters
     administered by DEEWR.
     Part Three provides for matters related to research, research training and
     innovation, which are matters administered by DIISR.
     Part Four provides for review of the Compact.
     Part Five provides for operational issues, including the general matters which the
     two Departments will administer jointly, liaison between the Departments and the
     University, privacy, confidentiality and information sharing, addresses for notices
     and how the Compact may be varied and how it may be terminated. This Part also
     includes the Dictionary.
     The Attachments A to E form part of this Compact and are referenced and explained
     in the relevant Parts of this Compact.




                                     Page 6
PART ONE

1.          ESTABLISHMENT OF THE COMPACT
The Commonwealth and the University agree:
1.1.      This Compact consists of Parts One to Five and any Attachments.
1.2.      The term of this Compact is from 1 January 2011 until 31 December 2013, unless
          terminated earlier in accordance with clause 10.7.
1.3.      In agreeing to this Compact for and on behalf of the Commonwealth each of the
          Ministers is acting only to the extent of that Minister’s powers and functions under any
          Commonwealth law, including under the terms of any relevant Appropriation.
1.4.      The University acknowledges that a policy underlying some or all of this Compact may
          be subject to review by the Commonwealth from time to time. The Commonwealth and
          the University agree that if the Commonwealth considers that it may need to change
          the Compact because of such a review, the Commonwealth will notify the University of
          this in writing and will consult with the University accordingly.
1.5.      Some or all of the funding arrangements set out in Attachments A and B may be
          updated by DEEWR and DIISR from time to time. The Commonwealth will notify the
          University of any such updates.
1.6.      Either party may propose changes to this Compact at any time. Except for any
          changes pursuant to clause 1.5 above, clause 10.5 will apply to any variation proposed
          by either party to the Compact.



2.          THE UNIVERSITY’S MISSION

2.1.        The purpose of the University’s Mission
 2.1.1.      The University's Mission sets out its values and aspirations, what it does and how
             it can best serve the interests of its students, staff and key stakeholders. The
             Commonwealth and the University recognise that the University's Mission may
             evolve.
 2.1.2.      The University and the Commonwealth recognise that the University is an
             autonomous institution which is responsible for the determination of its Mission and
             for its aspirations and strategies for their achievement.

2.2.        The University’s Mission statement

What the University is doing at present

The University’s current strategy and priorities are set out in its Strategic Plan 2008-12, known
as The Thirty-Nine Steps. Following an extensive planning process in 2007, a Statement of
Purpose was agreed as follows:



                                            Page 7
The University of Canberra is the university of the capital city. Our role is to serve Canberra, its
surrounding communities and its partners through education and research. In doing so, we
reflect the different dimensions of Canberra:
     the nation's capital and the international implications of that status;
     the seat of government and public administration;
     the home of national cultural, scientific and sporting institutions;
     a symbol of Australian identity;
     a designed and landscaped city; and
     a local community committed to a sustainable, educated, healthy, prosperous life.

We share many features of other high quality universities, but the way we reflect the dimensions
of a unique city differentiates us from all other Australian universities.

The Plan contains 39 actions to be taken by the end of 2012, grouped into 5 strategies (below),
for which $100 million of non-operating revenues need to be raised:

   1. Strengthen the foundations ($50m)

   2. Increase our student load to 9,000 EFTSL by 2013 ($20m)

   3. Perform in the top third of universities on standard educational measures by focusing
       particularly on selected scales where we currently perform below that level ($10m)

   4. Perform in the top half of universities on per capita research measures ($10m)

   5. Engage effectively with the world around us ($10m)

Three years into the current Plan, significant progress has been made on many of the 39 Steps.
Five key drivers of this progress have been:

   1. The awarding of significant Government grants under competitive and other
       schemes which have already contributed over $36 million towards the $100 million goal.

   2. Rising student numbers, such that the total student load of the University in 2010,
       excluding UC College, was 29% greater than in 2008, with a further 8% total growth
       projected for 2011.

   3. Increased access for students from low SES backgrounds through new admissions
       pathways, supported by Peer Assisted Learning, Smart Study Passport programs and
       in-discipline assistance; and increased opportunities and support for indigenous
       students through the Ngunnawal Foundation Program.

   4. An academic renewal program, including an annual Performance and Development
       Review Scheme; clear performance expectations for academic staff; early retirement
       and voluntary separation programs; and the creation of an Assistant Professor band,
       spanning Levels B and C, with accelerated incremental progression for research-active
       early career academics.




                                             Page 8
   5. Internal administrative reforms, partly funded by the Workplace Productivity Program,
       which have improved our systems, processes and business intelligence.

Our performance data are improving in education and research, as well as financially. Concerns
that our research income is being generated by too small a number of individuals, and that our
academic staff age profile is higher than for the sector as a whole, are being addressed through
the University’s Academic Renewal Program, above, which is already seeing us attract some
strong researchers from within Australia and internationally.

The University of Canberra is one of the largest non-government businesses in the ACT. It is a
major employer and purchaser of goods and services and it is a major contributor to ACT
Government revenue (payroll tax); paying far more to the ACT in each year than it receives from
it in grants or other assistance. UC is also a major exporter of international education,
contributing significantly to this, the Territory’s second largest export category (after government
services).

In recognition of its substantial economic impact, and an understanding of the role of higher
education in city and regional development, the University takes a leadership role in the
formulation and implementation of an innovation and economic development strategy built
around growth and sustainability through attraction and retention of knowledge based
businesses.

This is exercised through:

      Active membership of business organisations, including the Chamber of Commerce, the
       Canberra Convention Bureau (Research and Learning Institutes Group), Regional
       Development Australia (ACT), the Green Building Council, the ACT Property Council
       and the Canberra Business Council; the PVCD is Chair of the Business Council’s
       Economic Development Task Force, and led the development of the ACT Education
       Exports Strategy which is currently in the process of implementation.

      Sponsorship (together with the ANU) of Innovation ACT, a student-led entrepreneurship
       program which also attracts wide business interest. The University makes a substantial
       in-kind contribution to Epicorp, a highly successful business incubator.


      Participation in International Forums, such as the OECD Institutional Management in
       Higher Education Program.

What the University aspires to be

In 2011 a Re-Vision of the Strategic Plan has been prepared, which includes a restatement of
our long-range goals. In brief, the 2018 vision for the UC Group of organisations and those
ACT Government schools which have adopted “University of Canberra” in their title goes under
the banner of “UC For Life”. We will be recognised as a unique educational eco-system
providing or supporting learning at all stages of life. Our reputation around the world will be
enhanced by the way we have reconceptualised what it means to be a comprehensive
educational institution. This application of the “omniversity” idea will make UC a world-first.

The University of Canberra (UC) exists to be a research university, as that descriptor is



                                             Page 9
understood around the world, campus-based and specialising in disciplines in which it can be
distinctive and excellent and which reflect the University’s capital city positioning. UC caters for
well-qualified students of all ages who are ready for courses based on research and an
international outlook. It attracts high quality research-active staff who can build a rewarding
career. By 2018 UC will:

      be in the upper half of Australian universities in reputable institutional indices and
       performance measures, thus making it Australia’s best small university, whilst noting that
       some indices tend to measure aggregate performance and not just per capita output,
       with the consequence that this will be a major achievement for a university of our size;

      have 10,000 full-time equivalent students on campus, of whom 25% will be postgraduate
       and 25% will be international, with an average funding per student which is 20% higher
       in real terms than it was in 2008; and

      have at least 500 FTE academic staff (leading to a student:staff ratio of at worst 1:20) all
       of whom are excellent teachers and, unless specifically exempted, active in high quality
       research;

The University of Canberra Polytechnic (UCP) is to be a practice-led, higher education
institution focusing on teaching excellence and relevance to the needs of employers, with the
potential to become a university within the international movement of polytechnic universities. It
will provide new opportunities for students, including those who face barriers to enter a research
university through traditional entry points, and for students attracted by the technical and
applied nature of UCP’s sub-degree curriculum. UCP enables pre-packaged entrance into UC
with credit as appropriate. UCP attracts high quality teaching staff who are current in their
professional scholarship and who wish to make a difference by inspiring and educating the
emergent workforce of the knowledge-based global economy. By 2018, UCP will:

      have 5,000 full-time equivalent students in sub-degree programs with innovative, high-
       level academic support;

      have teaching staff who are excellent educators, current in their professional scholarship
       but not under an obligation to conduct research;

      have strategic partners also delivering employer-relevant programs under the UC
       Polytechnic umbrella, quality-assured pursuant to UC’s Academic Board requirements;
       and

      operate from premises dedicated for its purpose.

The University of Canberra College (UCC) is a pathway organisation supporting entry into UC
and UCP through the provision of English language and bridging programs. It caters for local
and international students, offering them vocational and higher education courses with
guaranteed credit into specific UC and UCP courses. It engages high quality teachers and
instructors capable of delivering effectively course content endorsed by UC and UCP. By 2018,
UCC will:

      have 1,000 full-time equivalent students in enabling, Certificate IV, English language and
       academic diploma programs; and

      operate from purpose-built premises, including state-of-the-art English language learning


                                             Page 10
       facilities.

Shared between members of the UC Group, the main campus in Bruce will:

      enjoy a vibrant cultural and recreational life, famous internationally for its musical events
       and festivals;

      have excellent sporting facilities and be home to sporting clubs from inside and outside
       the University;

      be at the heart of the Bruce Precinct, which will be a centre of innovation, education,
       research and health services, with a sustainable ecological footprint; and

      accommodate public, non-profit and private enterprises which contribute to the
       University's education and research activities and to a thriving university community in
       an Australian setting;

Also shared between members of the UC Group will be a high quality professional and general
staff body for whom a rewarding and varied career can be offered.

In relation to UC Schools, by 2018:

      UC Senior Secondary College and UC High School will be exemplars of innovative
       collaboration between government and a university, operating on a governance model
       which builds on the experience of charter schools in the USA and Academies in the UK;
       and

      Further schools will have become UC Schools, spanning early childhood, primary and
       secondary years.

Also, by 2018, UC will have a profitable community education arm, offering adult education
programs which draw on the strengths of UC, UCP and UCC.

This vision for 2018 has been developed within a particular context, including the stated aim of
the ANU not to increase its undergraduate numbers, and Memoranda of Understanding with the
ANU, the Canberra Institute of Technology and the Australian Council of Private Education and
Training. At this stage it does not incorporate the University’s Capital Region Strategy because
the outcome of its 2010 Structural Adjustment Fund application relating to Cooma and Goulburn
is not known. Nor does it include reference to an amalgamation with CIT, as recommended in
the Hawke Review “Governing The City State”, because the ACT Government’s response to the
relevant recommendation has not yet been made. The vision has also been developed after an
extensive review of research strategy (reflected below) and during an exercise to test the long-
term viability of the disciplines that UC offers. The next iteration of our Strategic Plan, for the
years 2013-17 will reflect more specifically the outcomes of these processes.




                                            Page 11
2.3.      Changes to the University's Mission
 2.3.1.    The Commonwealth acknowledges that the University may adjust its mission from
           time to time. The University agrees that it will give the Commonwealth notice in
           writing in advance of:
          a.   any significant changes that it proposes to make to the Mission during the term
               of the Compact; or
          b.   any significant changes that it intends to make to its activities that could affect
               either or both of the content and the practical application of its Mission.
 2.3.2.    If the Commonwealth receives notice from the University under clause 2.3.1 and
           considers that the proposed changes would require a change to this Compact, the
           Commonwealth will notify the University of this in writing and will consult with the
           University accordingly.




                                           Page 12
PART TWO

              The Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations, with
              assistance from DEEWR, has Commonwealth responsibility for the matters set out
              in this Part Two of the Compact.

3.            TEACHING AND LEARNING

3.1.          Quality

Quality: Commonwealth objectives
 3.1.1.        A focus on teaching and learning quality underpins the Commonwealth’s vision for
               Australia to be one of the most highly educated and skilled nations in the world.
 3.1.2.        A focus on quality is an essential element of a system where funding is driven by
               student choice, and is essential for ensuring that the Commonwealth’s participation
               and social inclusion ambitions are achieved without a risk to quality.
 3.1.3.        The Commonwealth has made a commitment to provide more autonomy to
               universities through the removal of funding caps on Commonwealth supported
               places. In turn, the Commonwealth expects the University to participate in new
               higher education quality arrangements which will be overseen by the Tertiary
               Education Quality and Standards Agency. The new arrangements are designed to
               support academic autonomy while ensuring that the achievement of minimum
               standards can be demonstrated and that there is a strong focus on enhancing the
               quality of teaching and learning while expansion of the higher education system
               meets national participation ambitions.
 3.1.4.        The University also has obligations under the quality and accountability
               requirements in Division 19 of HESA. This Compact does not change those
               obligations.

Quality: University strategies

The University of Canberra’s Education Goals

The University’s Strategy 3 is to perform in the top third of universities on standard educational
measures by focusing particularly on selected scales where we currently perform below that
level:

         Step 24: Improve students' overall satisfaction with the experience of their course, as
          measured in the Course Experience Questionnaire.

         Step 25: Improve students' satisfaction with our teaching, as measured in the Course
          Experience Questionnaire.

         Step 26: Improve students' satisfaction with the way we help them develop generic skills,
          as measured in the Course Experience Questionnaire.




                                              Page 13
      Step 27: Improve graduates' rates of further study, as measured in the Graduate
       Destinations Survey.

Other steps in the Plan are also relevant to the Compacts discussion, including:

      Step 14: Develop and implement an ambitious student equity and access agenda.

      Step 15: Provide a great student experience, appropriate to the age, stage, background
       and circumstances of a diverse student population.

      Step 16: Introduce a new curriculum from 2009 comprising courses at which we can be
       distinctively good, which are in demand and which fit with our position as Australia's
       Capital University.

      Step 17: Review our semester system and modalities of course delivery with a view to
       being attractive to new kinds of well-qualified students.

      Step 18: Make the best use of educational technologies and work-based learning
       opportunities.

In achieving these goals the University values service to our students and the wellbeing of our
staff. Its staff view education at all stages of life as a transformative experience for all people
irrespective of their origins, age and circumstances, to be used for the public good.

Education Achievements to Date

Since 2008, after a comprehensive Course and Discipline Review, the University has:

      instituted a suite of new courses reflecting the University’s position as Australia’s Capital
       University. These included courses in urban and regional planning, building and
       construction management, information studies, cultural heritage, national security, and
       occupational therapy.

      renewed its curriculum, revising over 75 courses at undergraduate and postgraduate
       levels.

      established five signature themes for its courses, namely, work integrated learning,
       research led education, internationalization, interdisciplinarity, and greater student
       access, choice and flexibility.

      launched a series of teaching quality improvement projects focused on the embedding of
       its signature themes and particularly on assessment practice.

      established new access and credit arrangements, a new pathways admissions scheme
       and a comprehensive learning support framework.

      furthered greater student choice and flexibility with a new Winter Term and better online
       and blended learning policy and practices. In 2010, the University’s first Winter Term,




                                             Page 14
           attained double the anticipated load and secured the highest unit satisfaction results to
           that point.

          redesigned its evaluative scheme and established the Course and Teaching Evaluation
           and Improvement (CATEI) System to link student satisfaction feedback to action to
           quality improvement.

In the space of two years, the University secured nearly $7m in external funds to improve online
and blended learning facilities, extend its new admissions scheme, and launch its signature
theme of work integrated learning and online and blended learning.

2009 Collaboratorium and Wireless spaces. Teaching and Learning Capital funding. $3.4m
2008 Building Better Universities Fund, Streaming and Podcasting Availability $0.9m
2008 Building Better Universities Fund, Library Learning Commons $1m
2008 Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund Regional Pathways in six regional towns
     $0.8m
2008 Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund Work Integrated Learning $0.85m

The effect of these improvements on student load has been shown elsewhere but here we
would like to show the steady improvement in student satisfaction ratings, involving both internal
and external questionnaires at national, course and unit levels.

Table 1. Australian Graduate Survey – Course Experience Questionnaire Sector Ranking

 Good Teaching            Generic Skills            Overall               Full-time Employment              Further Study
                                                  Satisfaction
 2007     2008    2009   2007   2008    2009    2007    2008     2009     2007      2008      2009    2007      2008    2009
 25       18      15     30     30       27     28       21       24       7            9      8      26         25         13

Table 2. University of Canberra Course Experience Questionnaire (UCCEQ) results 2007-2009

                   Good Teaching                   Generic Skills                  Overall Satisfaction
                 2007 2008 2009                 2007 2008 2009                     2007 2008 2009
                 62.1 68.4 76.4                 73.0 73.2 81.0                     75.6 77.0 82.2




Table 3. Semester Unit Satisfaction Survey Scores

   S1 2009 USS scores                     S2 2009 USS scores                      S1 2010 USS scores              S2 2010 USS scores
  GSS     GTS     OSS                    GSS           GTS         OSS           GSS        GTS      OSS        GSS         GTS    OSS
  71.7           69.8       75.6         72.3          70.6        75.3          73.5       71.9     76.2       74.5        72.2   75.6


Table 4. 2010 Winter Term (WT) Unit Satisfaction Scores

                 Good Teaching         Generic Skills         Overall Satisfaction
                     74.3                 72.7                        78.1

Commitments for Life of Compact




                                                                    Page 15
The University aims to continue the improvements that have led to student satisfaction
increases in the period of the Compact such that we reach the top third rank on all standard
educational national measures.

In 2010 the University has instituted a Teaching and Learning Quality Framework. To continue
to improve, the University plans development against each of the dimensions in this Framework
as listed below in sub-headings 1-10.

1. UC Key Performance Indicator framework for education will be revised to align with new
indicators at the national level. Currently we assess performance on the Course Experience
Questionnaire (CEQ) and the Graduate Destination Survey (GDS). In the period of review, the
dimensions and targets will be changed to reflect faculty attainment and development at the
national level.

2. Australian Graduate Survey (AGS) including CEQ and GDS. The target listed here in the
University’s Strategic Plan is to be in the top third on all the measures used in this
questionnaire. The University is planning to raise performance on Good Teaching, which is
currently ranked at 15th, to rank 12. The University is planning to raise performance on Graduate
rates of Further Study, currently ranked at 13th to Rank 12. Generic Skills, currently ranked at
27th and Overall Satisfaction, currently ranked at 24th will be developed further.

For Performance Category 2: Student Experience, given the extensive improvements already
made by the University, the University proposes that performance rather than participation is
rewarded. The reference point would be 2012 CEQ (2011 final year students) and the
attainment point would be 2013 CEQ (2012 final year students.

For Performance Category 3: Quality of Learning Outcomes 3A Domestic undergraduate
satisfaction with generic skills, given the extensive improvements already made by the
University, the University proposes that performance rather than participation is rewarded. The
reference point would be 2012 CEQ (2011 final year students) and the attainment point would
be 2013 CEQ (2012 final year students).

3. UC Course Experience Questionnaire (UCCEQ). This instrument assesses our internal
performance at the course level. The UCCEQ will be expanded to gather information on the
student experience at the University in line with changes at the national level. A new set of
targets will be set at the course level after review of the next national AGS CEQ data.

4. Unit Satisfaction Survey (USS) There have been nine improvement projects underway
since 2008, some externally funded (as listed above), and most focusing on work integrated
learning, research led education, generic skill development, internationalisation of the
curriculum and assessment improvement. These will be continued throughout the life of the
compact agreement. The University also plans to augment summative information gathered at
the unit level with a new formative feedback instrument at the unit level and incorporated within
our Learning Management System.

5. Australian University Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE) has been used
previously. However, the University has received poor response rates for this survey and plans,
instead, to amalgamate a student experience component into the existing UC Course
Experience Questionnaire. Planning for this process will be conducted to align with changes at
the national level.




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6. Performance, Development and Review Process (PDR). In 2009, the University
established minimum standards for educational performance in a new staff Performance
Development and Review system. The University plans to review the minimum educational
standards in this system in 2011, for implementation and ongoing monitoring in 2012 and 2013.

7. Professional Accreditation of UC courses. The extent of professional accreditation will be
reviewed in the period of the compact.

8. Five yearly course re-accreditation. The University plans to institute an internal five yearly
course reaccreditation process to replace its three year course group review process. Policy is
currently being drafted and will be circulated to key stakeholders in 2011 for implementation
later in the year.

9. External Moderation of Student Assessment. The University is currently planning to
externally moderate a sample of its assessment with Southern Cross University. High load
areas will be selected in similar fields by the two Universities for implementation in either late
2011 or 2012.

10. Engagement of Course Advisory Groups with significant external input. Deans have
been asked to establish remaining Course Advisory Groups by the end of February 2011.
Course Advisory Group Policy has been established to ensure external input and to ensure
regular feedback on all courses from stakeholders, particularly external stakeholders. The policy
requires Course Advisory Groups to be established for all coursework programs at UC. An
Advisory Group may cover a single course or a group of related courses in a faculty. Core terms
of reference, membership, activities and responsibilities are set out in the policy. Existing
groups will continue to operate within the framework of the new policy.


3.2.        Equity

Equity: Commonwealth objectives
 3.2.1.      The Commonwealth is committed to a fair and equitable higher education system
             that provides equal opportunity for people of all backgrounds to participate to their
             full potential and the support to do so.
 3.2.2.      In particular, the Commonwealth has an ambition that by 2020, 20 per cent of
             higher education enrolments at the undergraduate level will be people from low
             socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds.
 3.2.3.      The Commonwealth is also committed to enhancing participation and outcomes for
             Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in higher education.
 3.2.4.      The Commonwealth funds a range of programs to encourage and support access
             to and participation in higher education by people from low SES backgrounds,
             Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other under-represented groups,
             including the Higher Education Loan Program and Student Income Support.
 3.2.5.      The Commonwealth expects all universities to play a part in meeting the
             Commonwealth's higher education participation ambitions, consistent with the
             objectives and regulatory requirements of specific equity programs and income
             support measures.




                                             Page 17
 3.2.6.       The Commonwealth will monitor the University’s equity performance through the
              existing reporting requirements attached to individual programs. The University’s
              performance in meeting equity objectives will also be linked with teaching and
              learning Performance Funding targets, as specified in the table under paragraph
              4.14 of this Compact.
 3.2.7.       Universities have obligations under the fairness requirements in Division 19 of
              HESA. This Compact does not change those obligations.

Equity: University strategies


The University of Canberra values education as a "transformative experience for all people
irrespective of their origins, age and circumstances, to be used for the public good" (University
of Canberra Strategic Plan 2008-2012). Step 14 of the University’s Strategic Plan for 2008-2012
is to develop and implement an ambitious student equity agenda. Through a range of initiatives
and programs, the University aims to increase the access, participation, retention, success and
attainment rates of people from under-represented groups. The University remains committed to
supporting Indigenous students and students with a disability but for the period of the Compact
is particularly focusing its efforts on people from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds
and regional backgrounds. Many Indigenous people and people with a disability will fall into
either or both the low SES or regional groups. The University will continue to work to support
access for students from remote areas in NSW through initiatives undertaken in partnership with
the Country Education Foundation of Australia.

Access and participation

In order to increase access and participation of people from under-represented groups, and in
particular people from low SES and regional backgrounds, the University has introduced new
and improved outreach programs and initiatives detailed below.


 Initiative              Description

 “Aspire UC” Schools     The Aspire UC Schools Program is a new initiative of the University of
 Program                 Canberra. Twelve schools across the ACT and its surrounding region
                         have been invited to be part of the “Aspire UC” Schools Program.
                         Close links have already been developed with a number of these
                         schools and links are being developed with the remainder. The
                         program is aimed at students in Years 7-10. The aims of the Aspire
                         UC Schools’ program are to:
                         -   raise the aspirations of regional, low socio-economic and under-
                             represented students for higher education;
                         -   help students to identify and overcome barriers to tertiary
                             education;
                         -   support academic performance;
                         -   help students to identify the appropriate pathways to achieve their
                             goals;
                         -   introduce students to the university environment and available
                             programs;




                                            Page 18
                        -   inform students of online and other materials to assist in decision-
                            making regarding higher education;
                        -   provide students with information regarding the support services
                            available at UC, including financial services and scholarships; and
                        -   smooth the transition between school and university.
                        The program offers age-appropriate engagement at each year level
                        from Year 7 through 10. Some elements of the program are delivered
                        at the school and some elements are offered at the University of
                        Canberra. The program has been developed as a scaffolded program
                        with a different focus for each year group as follows:
                        Year 7: My Future, My Options
                        Year 8: Going for Goals!
                        Year 9: Pathways...where am I going and how do I get there?
                        Year 10: Expanding Horizons...from here to career!
Equity-based            The University will continue its equity-based “Student-for-a-day”
“Student-for-a-Day”     Program. The program provides an experiential learning “day” at the
Program                 University for students from under-represented groups. Many of these
                        visits are undertaken in collaboration with The Smith Family.
Equity-based            The first equity-based residential camp will take place in July 2011 for
Residential Camps       approximately 45 Year 9-10 students from regional and remote areas
                        who are from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. This camp is
                        being run collaboratively with ANU and the Country Education
                        Foundation of Australia. Equity-based residential camps are planned
                        for future years.
Indigenous              Indigenous students in Years 7-10 who are part of the ACT
Aspirations Program     Department of Education and Training’s Indigenous Aspirations
                        Program participated in some specialised “Student-for-a-day”
                        programs in 2010. This program will be further developed and
                        improved in 2011 and beyond.
School Competitions     The University of Canberra will continue its joint “School Competitions
Program                 Program” with The Smith Family. The initiative involves poetry and
                        story competitions for financially disadvantaged students in The Smith
                        Family’s Learning for Life Program across the ACT and the capital
                        region.
Parent Education        Working closely with schools and The Smith Family, the University will
Program                 continue to develop and deliver a range of programs to educate and
                        inform parents of children from low SES and regional backgrounds
                        about higher education.
U-CAN READ              U-CAN READ is a literacy intervention program dedicated to
Literacy Intervention   developing the literacy skills of students in Years 3-10 by providing
Program                 parents and carers with ideas, knowledge and support. It is a joint
                        project of the University of Canberra and ACT Department of
                        Education and Training. U-CAN READ staff members are working
                        closely with The Smith Family to further develop this program to
                        support students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds.




                                           Page 19
 A major project currently being undertaken by the University of Canberra, with
 Commonwealth financial support, is the Enhancing Regional Participation in Higher Education
 project. The project aims to improve rates of higher education participation for regional and
 low SES communities in South East NSW through the development of regional courses and
 pathways. The main population centres targeted by the program are in the Bega Valley,
 Eurobodalla, Snowy River, Cooma-Monaro Goulburn-Mulwaree and Shoalhaven Shires. The
 project is being undertaken in collaboration with Illawarra TAFE.

In addition to the above outreach programs, the University has a range of other pathways and
initiatives that support access and participation by under-represented groups. The University is
working to enhance these programs to further support access and participation by under-
represented students. The initiatives include:

 UC-CONNECT             UC-CONNECT is an enabling program offered at the University of
 Program                Canberra College to provide a pathway for school leavers and recent
                        school leavers who wish to study an undergraduate degree at the
                        University of Canberra and whose current academic qualifications do
                        not allow them direct admission to the University.
 UC-PREP Program        UC-PREP is an enabling program offered at the University of
                        Canberra College designed for students who wish to prepare for
                        higher education. UC-PREP teaches skills in report and essay writing,
                        numeracy, oral presentations, and time management. The majority of
                        student who undertake UC-PREP are successful in gaining entry to an
                        undergraduate degree program at the University of Canberra.
 Indigenous             The Ngunnawal Foundation Program provides entry to the University
 Foundation Program     for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who have not
                        successfully completed Year 12 and for those students who have
                        been away from study for many years and would like to develop the
                        communication and study skills needed for success at University.
 Bonus Points           In addition to participating in UAC’s Educational Access Scheme, the
 Scheme                 University of Canberra offers both an Indigenous and a Regional
                        bonus points’ scheme. The University is considering extending the
                        bonus points’ scheme to students from NSW “Priority Schools
                        Program” Schools.
 Principal’s            The Principal's Recommendation Scheme is an early entry initiative
 Recommendation         available for Year 12 students. The University of Canberra recognises
 Scheme                 that an ATAR is not always the best measure of a student's ability or
                        determination to succeed at University. If a school or college principal
                        recognises that a student has the aptitude to go on to higher
                        education, they can recommend that student to the University for
                        consideration.

Outcomes for students from under-represented groups, including outcomes for Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander students

To assist with positive outcomes for students from under-represented groups, the University is
committed to the continuation and improvement of support services, programs and initiatives




                                           Page 20
aimed at these groups. The University has a number of specialised support units to assist the
retention and success of students from under-represented groups. These include:

      The Ngunnawal Centre: provides support to Indigenous students, including provision of
       the Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme.
      UC AccessAbility: provides support for students with a disability.
      The Student Equity and Support Unit: provides a range of support programs and
       initiatives aimed at supporting students from under-represented groups and runs a
       number of the University’s outreach programs.
      The Academic Skills Centre: provides learning support to students, including providing
       specialised programs for financially disadvantaged students.

The University of Canberra is continually evaluating and improving its equity programs in order
to provide enhanced support to students. Examples of programs aimed at improving outcomes
for under-represented students include:
 Rural Student          This program, which is for rural student commencers, aims to increase
 Support Program        students’ sense of belongingness, foster a sense of community, and
                        assist with the retention and success of rural students. A range of
                        support is offered via the program, including the provision of a student
                        buddy for the first few weeks of semester.
 Migrant and            This program is targeted at newly commencing students on
 Refugee Student        humanitarian visas and recently-arrived domestic migrant students
 Support Program        from non-English speaking countries. The program offers a range of
                        assistance and includes one-on-one support by a senior student and
                        textbook assistance for refugee students.
 Smart Study            The Smart Study Passport program offers study skills and other
 Passport Program       support to students who require assistance in their transition to
                        University.
  “At-risk” student     The University offers a support scheme for students deemed at risk of
 support                academic failure.
 Harmony Program        This program aims to promote and facilitate discussion and action on
                        diversity issues in the University of Canberra community; it provides a
                        range of activities to support equity and diversity; and provides
                        opportunities for students to have community development
                        experiences on campus.
 Student Workshop       The student workshop program offers a range of activities and
 Program                workshops that support students from under-represented groups in
                        their adjustment to university. Workshops include: accommodation
                        matters; adjusting to university life; smart money; smart cooking; smart
                        shopping; etc.
 UC Student Loans’      This scheme is available to assist students who would not otherwise
 Scheme                 receive a loan from other lenders. The loans are provided to support
                        University study and are underwritten by the University.
 Equity Scholarships    The University provides a range of equity-based scholarships that
                        support students from under-represented groups. Accommodation
                        scholarships for financially disadvantaged students are also offered.




                                           Page 21
Indicators for measuring progress

The University of Canberra’s key participation and social inclusion focus will be improvement of
the participation rates of students from low SES backgrounds as per Performance Indicator 1A.
The University wishes to nominate regional students as its 2nd under-represented group for the
purpose of Performance Funding under Performance Indicator 1B.

Students from Low Socioeconomic Status Backgrounds:

      The University of Canberra is committed to improving access and participation rates of
       students from low SES backgrounds and to achieving the improvement targets as
       required under Performance Indicator 1A.
      The University is committed to maintaining retention and success rates at or above the
       benchmark group’s averages.
      The University is committed to continued improvement of attainment rates of students
       from low SES backgrounds.

Students from Regional Locations:

      The University of Canberra is committed to improving access and participation rates of
       regional students to bring these rates closer to the sector average. The targets for
       participation over the period of the Compact will be:
            o 2011: 14.46% (i.e. average 2008 & 2009 performance + 0.25%),
            o 2012: 14.86% (i.e. average 2008 & 2009 performance + 0.65%)
            o 2013: 15.46% (i.e. average 2008 & 2009 performance + 1.25%)
      Retention rates for regional students are already better than those of the sector or the
       benchmark group and the University is committed to maintaining good retention rates
       (ratio > 1.00).
      Success rates have traditionally been similar to or better than both the sector’s and the
       benchmark group’s rates and the University is committed to maintaining a success ratio
       of > 1.00.

Students with a Disability:

      The University of Canberra is committed to maintaining access and participation rates
       that are above those of the sector. The University will work to improve access and
       participation rates further so that they are closer to the benchmark group’s averages.
      The University will also work to bring retention and success rates closer to the
       benchmarks group’s averages.
      The University will work to maintain attainment rates at the same level as the sector’s
       average rate.

Students Identifying as Indigenous:

      The number of Indigenous people in the University of Canberra’s catchment area is very
       small. The University will nonetheless continue to try to improve the access and
       participation rates of Indigenous students over the period of the Compact.
      The University will strive to maintain retention and success rates for Indigenous students
       at or above the University’s benchmark group.
      The University will strive to improve attainment rates for Indigenous students




                                           Page 22
3.3.        Infrastructure

Infrastructure: Commonwealth objectives
 3.3.1.      The Commonwealth is committed to the development of world class higher
             education infrastructure. A contemporary, technology rich, well designed and
             equipped campus environment has a positive influence on staff and student
             performance and satisfaction.
 3.3.2.      While the responsibility for capital infrastructure development and maintenance
             rests with the University, the Commonwealth’s commitment is demonstrated
             through programs such as the Education Investment Fund. Universities also utilise
             Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding for capital works.
 3.3.3.      The Commonwealth anticipates that the University will focus not only on
             developing new University-owned and operated buildings but also on optimising
             the use of existing facilities, refurbishing and adequately maintaining existing
             infrastructure, investing in e-learning and other information and communications
             technologies (ICT), and utilising space owned by, or shared with, other education
             providers.
 3.3.4.      The Commonwealth will monitor the University's infrastructure programs, and their
             alignment with the Commonwealth's infrastructure objectives, through the
             Institutional Performance Portfolio Information Collection.

Infrastructure: University strategies


Planning and Development

In 2009 the University published the Campus Master Plan for its 118 hectare site. The master plan is
a narrative for campus development informed by the Strategic Plan 2008-2012. It includes a vision, a
strategic framework for development, an indicative precinct land-use map and planning and design
principles and guidelines. The vision for our campus is ‘a unique environment that delivers learning
as a transformative experience for all people, irrespective of their origins, age and circumstance. An
inclusive centre where learning is part of the Community way of life’.

Subsequently, urban design guidelines for three precincts within the master plan have been
prepared. In 2010 a national Campus Design Ideas Competition was conducted to build on the
Campus Master Plan. The competition focused on the University Heart precinct and
incorporated design proposals for the concourse and an overarching landscape character plan.

In 2009 a University Architect was appointed and in 2010 the former Facilities and Services was
restructured as the Campus Planning and Development unit to embrace a wider strategic
infrastructure agenda.

In October 2010 the University agreed to appoint a Project Adviser for campus development and to
establish a Campus Development Board as an ad hoc committee of the Council. The Board will
provide a robust governance framework for campus development and strategic capital works
and will provide the relevant committees of the Council with the best available advice to inform
their decisions. The Adviser will (among other things) draft a Development Agreement for the




                                             Page 23
campus between the University and the ACT Government. The Adviser and Board are expected
to be operational early in 2011.

Policy and Estate Management

Key policy work completed or underway includes a comprehensive Sustainability Strategy to
progress the University’s commitments as a signatory to the Talloires Declaration. In 2009 the
University adopted the vision of ‘A university that develops leaders who will inspire and deliver a
sustainable future’. In 2010 a Sustainability Strategy Group was established and a Sustainability
Planner was appointed. The Strategy is on track for completion early in 2011. The draft
incorporates objectives, outcomes and KPIs addressing four program areas – campus footprint,
research portfolio, community and curriculum. Actions, outcomes and targets for energy
management, water management, purchasing, recycling and waste management, and
sustainable transport are identified. A key associated initiative launched in January 2011 is the
bottled-water-free campus. The University is the first in Australia to introduce this initiative.

Other key policy projects progressed in 2010 include space management together with a
benchmarked space assessment; an accommodation strategy; a water management plan;
parking assessment and plan; cycle needs assessment; signage and way finding strategy and
plan; campus security appraisal; and an access audit to assess compliance of the campus with
the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

A comprehensive estate management plan is being prepared early in 2011 as part of a capital
management framework. Together with a 2011 building condition audit to update the 2003
audit, this will be used to inform the establishment of priorities to address the estimated backlog
maintenance as reported in the August 2010 report DEEWR-DIISR Institutional Performance
Portfolio.

The University is committed to maintaining its infrastructure assets with an estimated
expenditure of $22.5M in 2011-2013 on backlog maintenance. This is comprised of an approved
spend of $5.8M in 2011, proposed $6.7M in 2012 and $10M in 2013 (subject to borrowings). By
the end of 2013 this will reduce the UC ratio of BM to ARV from the 2009 ‘low performance’
actual of 20.92, to the McKinnon 1999 benchmark level for a ‘medium performance’ of less than
10% (as cited in the 2010 IPP). This expenditure will be augmented by an approved 2011
expenditure of $2.7M for cyclical refurbishments that will also address some backlog
maintenance to further improve this ratio.

Building on the 2010 space assessment, a long-term appraisal of space will also be completed
early in 2011 to establish a strategic growth and relocation program. This ‘space master plan’
will release existing space for additional teaching and research (including for HDR students),
academic offices and student support services.

Capital Works

Some $26m of capital works was undertaken on campus in 2009-10. All of the works align with the
Campus Master Plan. The Commonwealth funded a number of these projects. Some were
extended or enhanced with University funds to incorporate infrastructure and/or the
redevelopment of associated social areas.

The works included a new student learning commons in the Library; a significant new teaching
and learning commons in Building 1 incorporating student drop-in learning areas and




                                            Page 24
tutorial/meeting rooms; a major collaborative learning area including ‘hot house’ initiative spaces
for staff to explore new methodologies and technologies; and accommodation for the Teaching
and Learning Centre. This work was undertaken in conjunction with a major refurbishment of
the refectory and associated amenities funded by the University.

The new NATSEM building complex was completed for occupancy in 2010. This 2009 HEEF
Commonwealth funded project includes significant accommodation for research, conferences,
seminars, exhibition and other events. The building achieved a 5 star green star rating, the first
for an education building in the ACT. The building and associated landscape works are a major
addition to the University’s Innovation Precinct.

Other Commonwealth funded teaching and learning projects in existing buildings completed in
2010 include the Student Led Communication Agency; the National Media Centre; and the
Education Flight Centre.

Design was also completed for the Government funded Inspire Centre, a new building adjacent
to the Library. Construction commenced in 2010 with the building scheduled for completion in
2011.

Significant ICT enhancement is associated with all of these projects including extended wireless
access. This infrastructure supports the University’s e-learning environment.

Other general infrastructure works supporting a positive campus experience include two new
cafes on campus; new water fountains (aligned to the bottled-water free campus initiative);
designated smoking zones (aligned to the no-smoking initiative); and additional parking.

The 2010 capital works program established a new benchmark for the delivery of quality
building works on campus. Much was learnt from the experience and a streamlined process for
establishing a three-year forward program has been adopted for 2011-2013.

Strategic Projects

The University is pro-active in identifying strategic capital initiatives to strengthen its
foundations, to reposition it as Australia’s Capital University and to engage more effectively with
the world. In particular the University has focused on finding ways to diversify and extend
sources of revenue by making best use of the campus, implementing the Campus Master Plan,
and developing strategies to strengthen relations with government, the public sector, business
and industry, and the cultural, sporting and social welfare communities.

The University is also exploring ways to advance its ‘omniversity’ model, including
establishment of the polytechnic and of a regional presence.

Each of these initiatives is being considered for the potential to enhance and/or extend
opportunities for teaching and research, and/or to extend pathways for higher education to
regional and low SES populations, and to enrich the campus experience.

Targeted strategic infrastructure initiatives include:

      Student residential accommodation - the University has an urgent need to increase
       student residences with a target of an additional 1700 beds in 5 years. Current actions




                                             Page 25
          include a 2010 application under the National Rental Affordability Scheme; the augmentation
          of existing student residences on campus; and feasibility work related to residential
          development opportunities off campus with the private sector and the ACT Government.
         Optimising the use of off-campus facilities - the University is expanding the potential of its
          building assets off campus to contribute to core functions with an application for the direct
          grant of a property currently on a short-term lease from the ACT Government; the application
          for a lease variation to extend the permissible uses of an off campus University building; and
          the purchase of a 4,547 sq m building in proximity of the campus to establish a new
          administrative services centre. These actions will take pressure off and release space on
          campus for teaching, learning and research.
         Optimising on campus opportunities for engagement with industry and the community -
          the University is in confidential negotiations with a number of external agencies for
          facilities to be developed on campus that are directly aligned to its teaching and
          research directions. Proposals are also well advanced for a Sporting Commons on the
          campus in collaboration with major private and public sector sporting groups. The
          Commons would significantly improve sporting facilities on campus and extend
          community engagement.
         Australian Government funding initiatives – the University has prepared comprehensive
          bids for Commonwealth funding in the Education Investment Fund (2009-10), Structural
          Adjustment Fund (2010) and the Health and Hospital Fund (Regional Priority Round
          2010).

If successful the SAF funding would further the University’s transformation as an omniversity
with a regional presence. A regional campus would be established in Cooma and in Goulburn
and the UC Jervis Bay field station developed for the delivery of sub-degree and higher
education programs. The regional campus programs would include diplomas, advanced
diplomas and associate degrees. A teaching program connected to the Wreck Bay indigenous
community would be established at Jervis Bay.

If successful the HHF submission funding would establish The Southern Region Clinical
Training Co-operative incorporating UC student-led primary care clinics at Goulburn, Cooma
and Bega. The co-operative is a joint initiative of the University of Canberra and Greater
Southern Area Health Service and has a number of other key partners and supporters.

This collective capital infrastructure commitment provides a sound framework for maintaining and
extending the University’s capability in teaching, research and student residential accommodation
and for community and industry engagement in Canberra and the region. Facilities are optimised and
new works planned in a rational and practical way. Capital expenditure and investment is considered
in the strategic context of the University that embraces the national education agenda. The campus
experience will continue to be enriched for the University and broader community.

3.4.          Student enrolments

Commonwealth objectives
 3.4.1.         The Commonwealth is committed to the expansion of a high quality higher
                education sector, to provide opportunities for all capable people to participate to
                their full potential.
 3.4.2.         An expanded higher education sector will educate the graduates needed by an
                economy based on knowledge, skills and innovation.




                                               Page 26
 3.4.3.        The Commonwealth has announced its ambition for growth in higher education
               attainment, so that by 2025, 40 per cent of all 25 to 34 year olds will hold a
               qualification at bachelor level or above.

University student enrolment planning

The University of Canberra launched a new Undergraduate Admission Strategy in 2009. The
strategy seeks to build reputation, load and student success by means of three pathways. The
strategy guarantees all applicants with a tertiary entrance ranking an offer dependent upon
ATAR. Pathway 1 applicants are offered a ‘full’ place. Pathway 2 applicants are provided a
‘supported’ place. Pathway 2 students enrol in a “smart study passport program” the
components of which include smart study courses (generic skills support), in-discipline support,
peer assisted learning (PALS), a retention program, library rovers, and learning resource
centres in each faculty. Pathway 3 applicants are offered a place in a program at the University
of Canberra College.

The cut-offs have been adjusted in 2010 to account for the transfer to the Australian Tertiary
Admission Rank (ATAR) framework.



 Pathway     Pathway Name            Sem 1, 2009 - UAI   Sem 1, 2010 - ATAR   Sem 1, 2011 - ATAR
 Pathway 1   Guaranteed entry        UAI 75+             ATAR 75+             ATAR 75+
 Pathway 2   Guaranteed entry plus   UAI 60-74           ATAR 65-74           ATAR 65-74
 Pathway 3   UC Connect              UAI 60-             ATAR 64-             ATAR 64-


The Undergraduate Admission Strategy positions the University as a high-access, high-support
institution. Student success and retention rates at lower cut-off bands have improved as a result
of Pathway 2. The University has received positive feedback from the schools sector in
particular regarding the pathways and their communication.

The University is now planning for modest growth, post 2011. It plans to hold its commencing
Commonwealth supported load steady, though the enrolment pipeline will mean that the
University experiences a further increase beyond 2011. The University is factoring in
approximately 7,250 Commonwealth supported EFTSL for 2011. Under such a scenario the
University of Canberra would exceed its Commonwealth supported load targets by
approximately 24%. The funding cap of 110% presents a significant constraint on the
University’s ambitions to grow and to meet the Commonwealth Government’s participation rate
targets. The University expects its total EFTSL to exceed 10,000 EFTSL in 2011.

Shifts between UG and PG provision

Over the last few years the University of Canberra has exceeded its Commonwealth supported
load targets at postgraduate level. In 2009, the University enrolled 742 PG EFTSL; 237 more
than the agreed Commonwealth supported load. The University has been proactive in
transferring Commonwealth supported load to fee-paying load and is forecasting a total PG
Commonwealth supported load of approximately 632 EFTSL in 2011; though this is still above
its 2011 DEEWR target of 469 EFTSL.

While the University has been able to reduce its postgraduate Commonwealth supported load,
there are pressures to increase postgraduate Commonwealth supported load because of the




                                                     Page 27
increasing prevalence of 3+2 delivery models (3 year undergraduate degrees plus 2 year
masters degrees). The University’s architecture and design disciplines have all moved to this
model. In addition, the number of postgraduate coursework qualifications required for entry to
the professions has been on the rise; postgraduate courses in librarianship, records
management and midwifery are examples. These structural changes in professions and
disciplines make rapid reductions in postgraduate Commonwealth supported load difficult.

Changes in international student load

From 2009 to 2010 international onshore student load grew by more than 30%. Underlying this
growth was an increase in commencing onshore international student load of almost 30% in
2010.

The University is watching international markets keenly. At this stage the University is not
experiencing a significant decline in demand. The University believes this is partly because it is
not unduly exposed to the Indian student market, partly because of its location in Canberra and
partly because of its strong articulation pathways, particularly in China. In 2011, the University is
targeting 2% growth in commencing onshore international enrolments, which will result in a
further 10-15% growth in total onshore international student load (to achieve a total load nearing
2000 EFTSL). University management have recently agreed a set of enrolment composition
principles. To avoid over-exposure to international markets the University is aiming for no more
than 25% of its onshore load to consist of international students. The University expects 19% of
its total onshore load to consist of international students in 2011 (excluding University of
Canberra College enrolments).


4.          PERFORMANCE FUNDING

Commonwealth objectives
4.1        Higher education Performance Funding will provide incentives for universities to
           improve outcomes for students.
4.2        To be eligible for Performance Funding, the University must:
           (i) be a Table A provider (see paragraph 30-1(1)(a)(i) of the Act); and

           (ii) be a provider for which the Minister has allocated a number of Commonwealth
               supported places to the provider for that year under section 30-10 (see
               paragraph 30-1(1)(b) of the Act); and
           (iii) be a provider which has entered into a funding agreement with the
               Commonwealth under section 30-25 in respect of a period that includes that year
               (this being the 2011-2013 Compact).
4.3        Performance Funding has two components:
           (i) Facilitation Funding; and

           (ii) Reward Funding for achieving university performance targets




                                             Page 28
Facilitation Funding
4.4        Facilitation Funding acknowledges both the diverse missions of universities and the
           commitment to the Australian Government’s learning and teaching goals.
4.5        The Australian Government will provide Facilitation Funding to universities
           commencing in 2011.
4.6        Facilitation Funding will be paid as a formula driven share of the available funding.
           Each university’s Facilitation Funding payment will be calculated on their proportional
           share of Commonwealth Grant Scheme Basic Grant Amount (section 33-5 of the
           Act) and the Grants to Support National Institutes specified in the Other Grants
           Guidelines (item 4 of subsection 41-10 of the Act). Refer to the Performance Funding
           Technical Guidelines for further details.
4.7        As a condition of the Facilitation Funding component of Performance Funding, in
           accordance with this agreement, the University must:
           (i) inform the Australian Government of strategies and goals for achieving the
               University’s teaching and learning mission described under clauses 3.1, 3.2 and
               3.4; and
           (ii) agree to the performance targets relating to specific Australian Government
               goals contained in clause 4.14.
4.8        Once a 2011-2013 Compact has been agreed, the University will be paid the 2011
           Facilitation Funding amount, plus any indexation, each year of the Compact period.
4.9        The Commonwealth and the University agree to annual review, under Section 9 of
           this Compact, of the effectiveness of implementation of the strategies and goals for
           achieving the University’s teaching and learning mission described under clauses
           3.1, 3.2 and 3.4.
Reward Funding
4.10       From 2012, the Australian Government will introduce Reward Funding for
           universities that achieve performance targets.
4.11       As a condition of the Reward Funding component of Performance Funding, in
           accordance with this agreement, the University must:
           (i) agree performance targets as outlined in clause 4.14;

           (ii) supply performance data to the Commonwealth for relevant indicators as per the
               requirements set out in section 2 of the Performance Funding Technical
               Guidelines; and
           (iii) achieve the relevant targets as outlined in clause 4.14.

4.12       Each university’s maximum possible Reward Funding payment will be calculated on
           their proportional share of Commonwealth Grant Scheme Basic Grant Amount,
           consistent with the focus of Performance Funding being on improvement of teaching
           and learning.




                                            Page 29
HESA Funding Agreement
4.13     This section 4, together with the terms and conditions set out at Attachment D to this
         Compact, constitute the HESA Funding Agreement for the provision of Performance
         Funding to the University.

University performance targets
4.14     The University’s performance targets are in the table below.
         (i) Performance targets refer to the year of payment.

         (ii) Progress targets represent progress towards achievement of aspirational goals.
             Reward Funding for achievement against the 2014 and 2015 progress targets
             and aspirational goals would be the subject of a future Compact.




                                         Page 30
University performance categories and targets

Performance Category 1: Participation and Social Inclusion
Performance indicator 1A: Proportion of domestic undergraduates who are from a low SES
                              background.
Baseline for improvement target: 6.73% (2009 data)


                          2012                   2013                 2014                   2015
                     Reward Payment         Reward Payment       Progress target        Progress target
                      (target for 2011        (target for 2012   (target for 2013        (target for 2014
                          students)               students)          students)               students)

 Excellence Target         TBA                     TBA

 Improvement
                          6.98%                   7.38%              7.98%                   8.58%
 Target

 Outcome


Performance indicator 1B: Proportion of domestic undergraduate students who are from a
regional area
Baseline for improvement target: 16.24% (average of 2008/09 data)


                                     2012                                       2013
                                Reward Payment                             Reward Payment
                             (target for 2011 students)                 (target for 2012 students)

 Improvement
                                     16.40%                                     16.72%
 Target

 Outcome




                                               Page 31
University performance categories and targets

Performance Category 2: Student Experience
Performance indicator 2A: Domestic undergraduate satisfaction with teaching
 (Measured using data from the Australian Graduate Survey – Course Experience
 Questionnaire (CEQ) [Good Teaching Scale and Overall Satisfaction Item])

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                            N/A                     Participate in 2013 CEQ* (2012 final
                                                                  year students) to establish baseline
                                                                               performance

 Outcome                                  N/A


* the 2012 CEQ report refers to students whose final year of study was in 2011 and who participated in
the CEQ survey in 2012 and where performance was reported in 2013.


Performance indicator 2B: Domestic undergraduate experience
 (Measured using data from the University Experience Survey [UES])

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                            N/A                    Participate in the development of the
                                                                       UES to establish baseline
                                                                              performance

 Outcome                                  N/A




                                                Page 32
University performance categories and targets

Performance Category 3: Quality of Learning Outcomes
Performance indicator 3A: Domestic undergraduate satisfaction with generic skills
 (Measured using data from the Australian Graduate Survey – Course Experience
 Questionnaire (CEQ) [Generic Skills Scale])

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                            N/A                     Participate in 2013 CEQ* (2012 final
                                                                  year students) to establish baseline
                                                                               performance

 Outcome                                  N/A


* the 2012 CEQ report refers to student whose final year of study was in 2011 and who participated in
the CEQ survey in 2012 and where performance was reported in 2013.


 Performance indicator 3B: Domestic undergraduate value added generic skills
 (Measured using data from the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA))

                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                            N/A                     Participate in the development of the
                                                                        CLA to establish baseline
                                                                               performance

 Outcome                                  N/A


 Performance indicator 3C: Composite Teaching Quality Indicator (TQI)


                                        2012                                    2013
                                   Reward Payment                          Reward Payment
 Participation                            N/A                        Participate in development of
                                                                     composite indicator (including
                                                                  providing data) to establish baseline
                                                                              performance

 Outcome                                  N/A

4.15    Section 3 of the Performance Technical Funding Guidelines provides detailed
        information on the calculation and assessment of the above indicators. Section 4.2.2 of




                                                Page 33
       the Performance Funding Administrative Guidelines also provides information on
       implementation of new performance indicators.
4.16   The Australian Government undertakes to consult the higher education sector on the
       development and enhancement of indicators for the purposes of Performance Funding.




5.        COMMONWEALTH GRANT SCHEME
5.1      Attachment E contains the current HESA Funding Agreement for the provision of
         Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding to the University for the 2009 to 2011
         calendar years.
5.2      Attachment E becomes part of this Compact on execution of the Compact.
5.3      The Commonwealth anticipates that any future HESA Funding Agreements for the
         provision of Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding to the University will also form
         part of this Compact.




6.        OTHER FUNDING PROVIDED BY DEEWR
6.1      A list of key programs and funding allocations under which the Commonwealth,
         through DEEWR, provides support to the University is set out at Attachment A. This
         list may be updated from time to time, including if the University is successful in
         applying for any new and/or additional Commonwealth funding.




                                        Page 34
PART THREE

          The Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, with assistance from
          DIISR, has Commonwealth responsibility for the matters set out in this Part Three of
          the Compact.

7.        RESEARCH, RESEARCH TRAINING AND INNOVATION
          A range of research, research training and innovation performance indicators and
          targets are proposed in this section. Principal Performance Indicators are
          compulsory and institutions may voluntarily nominate Additional Performance
          Indicators and targets considered reflective of individual institutional goals.
          The Commonwealth recognises that universities have diverse missions and,
          consequently, targets and performance will vary between institutions. Universities
          should develop performance indicators and targets to reflect their individual
          performance and strategic direction.

7.1.      Research performance and research capability

Research performance and research capability: Commonwealth objectives
7.1.1.    The Commonwealth encourages excellence in research performance and the
          strengthening of research capability. Particular objectives are to:
          a.   progressively increase the number of research groups performing at world class
               levels, as measured by international performance benchmarks; and
          b.   promote collaboration, including collaboration between researchers within
               Australia and internationally.
7.1.2.    The Commonwealth, through DIISR, may provide funding to the University to assist
          the University achieve these Commonwealth research performance and research
          capability objectives, including through the Sustainable Research Excellence in
          Universities (SRE) program, the Research Infrastructure Block Grants (RIBG)
          scheme and, where relevant, the Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) program.
7.1.3.    If the University is provided with funding from DIISR under the Collaborative
          Research Networks (CRN) program, the University will be required to enter into a
          legally binding CRN funding agreement with DIISR. That legally binding agreement
          will not be made under HESA and will be separate from, but made within the
          framework of, this Compact from the date of its execution.
7.1.4.    Other Commonwealth funding to assist the University achieve these Commonwealth
          objectives may also be provided outside of this Compact by the Australian Research
          Council (ARC), the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), the
          International Science Linkages program, the Australia-India Strategic Research
          Fund, and research infrastructure funds such as the Education Infrastructure Fund,
          Super Science Initiative and the Cooperative Research Centres (CRC) program.




                                         Page 35
7.1.5.       The Commonwealth, through the ARC, will implement the Excellence in Research
             for Australia (ERA) initiative which will evaluate research undertaken at Australian
             universities against international benchmarks. ERA will be used in the future to
             assist in determining funding in some research programs (for example, the
             Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities [SRE]) administered by the
             Commonwealth.



Research performance and research capability: University strategies

Strategy 4 of the University’s Strategic Plan (2008-12) aims to have UC performing in the top
half of Australian universities on per capita research measures by 2012. A number of
strategies were devised in 2008 to support this goal. Because of the changing national research
environment, a comprehensive review of research strategy was undertaken through 2010 and
the outcome provides a comprehensive roadmap which will assist in achieving this, along with
the next strategic goal of becoming internationally recognised for high quality, high impact
research and for research-led education in strategically selected areas. The plans outlined
below relate to the University of Canberra as a distinct entity in the University of Canberra
Group.

The quality and impact of our research will be measured by both academic impact measures
(eg ERA metrics) and its impact on research-led innovation in business, government and the
community.

Research Strategy

The major elements of the road map are:

        Concentrate our research efforts under three cross-cutting themes;        Sustainable
         Environments; Effective Governance; Resilient Communities. Faculties and
         research centres will be expected to develop specific areas of research focus that align
         with these cross-cutting themes. This strategy supports the development of strong
         research capability in selected areas while allowing for the support of outstanding
         individual researchers or emerging researchers outside research centres (see below).
        Support (financially and academically) a small number (up to 4) of Research and
         Research Training Centres in areas of existing and emerging research strength. These
         centres will form the key research foci for the cross-cutting themes. A key goal of each
         centre will be to perform at least at world class standard and rigorous review will ensure
         performance or closure. This strategy will contribute to the Commonwealth goal of
         increasing the number of groups performing at world class levels. They will also serve to
         concentrate research training into areas of research excellence (see below). UC already
         has two University Research Centres which will also be expected to develop strong
         research training programs. The Institute for Applied Ecology in collaboration with two
         CRCs already provides a strong research training program and was acknowledged in
         ERA as a high performing research cluster (UC received a score of 4 for Environmental
         Sciences). NATSEM has previously focused on the provision of high quality research
         advice to government and business. With the appointment of a new Director and
         building on its current reputation, it will develop a stronger academic and research
         training presence at UC with the aim of significantly increasing its ERA profile in future




                                            Page 36
       ERA evaluations. Other Centres will be established during 2011 (see below).
      Invest Commonwealth funds strategically to develop research excellence and national
       and international collaboration. The investment framework will operate under four
       areas; people, teams, external collaboration and infrastructure. Investment in
       people will focus on excellence and on developing the next generation of research
       academics. Initiatives include; university-funded externally advertised and reviewed
       postdoctoral fellowships, enhanced support to category 1 grant holders and support for
       early career researchers. Investment in teams, such as through university-supported
       research and research training centres, will enhance internal and external collaboration
       and drive concentration and excellence. A specific emphasis is put on external
       collaboration with support for involvement in collaborative research funding bids, the
       various national and international linkage schemes and development of linkages with
       appropriate external partners. Funding the key infrastructure required for high quality
       research especially in the Science, Health and Technology areas will be a focus of the
       university in the next few years in order to provide an environment conducive to
       retention of top performing research staff. A number of schemes are already underway
       for 2011/12.
      Develop a strong research support capability within the University to underpin the
       developments above. The Research Services Office has recently undergone a major
       restructure and staff renewal in order to provide high quality services aligned with the
       needs of the research roadmap.

Collaborative Research Network (CRN) and Other Research Collaborations

UC is developing a research network integrating natural and social science research to support
evidence-based policy, resource management and sustainable rural communities around the
theme of ‘Murray Darling Basin Futures’. The multi-disciplinary network brings together existing
and emerging strengths and collaborations at UC in environmental science, social and
economic modelling, rural health, public policy and regional planning. The initiative to be funded
under the CRN crosses the boundaries of the three cross-cutting research themes and is
designed to “break down the barriers” and promote inter-disciplinary, cutting edge research. The
plan supports the development of a team(s) operating at world class, internationally recognised
levels. The CRN proposal builds partnerships with the ANU as a research-intensive university,
with Charles Sturt University and University of Southern Queensland where there are
complementary skills sets and with CSIRO, MDBA, SEWPAC, ABARE and NWC to link with
appropriate stakeholders and a wider knowledge exchange network.

The CRN proposal dovetails with the UC research strategy by (i) providing a strong focus for UC
research; (ii) building research capacity including research training and research leadership; (iii)
developing sustainable collaborations with other universities and research organisations; and
(iv) instigating a knowledge exchange network in order to ensure policy relevance and research
impact. The program will bring together a network producing research of the highest
internationally recognised quality (academic impact) and will also provide an evidence base for
developing environmental resilience through resource management and public policy (impact in
government and the community).

 In addition to the CRN collaboration described above, the University of Canberra signed an
MoU with the ANU in mid 2010 to promote collaboration in both teaching and research
activities. A number of formal collaborative research activities now exist between UC and ANU
including Capital Water, an initiative to provide professional training in all areas of water-related
expertise in the two institutions; expand and improve upon our water-related degree offerings




                                             Page 37
across multiple disciplines; and of direct relevance here, deliver world-class water research that
makes a difference in this community and beyond and Canberra Urban and Regional Futures
(CURF) providing a platform for research to find new pathways for more sustainable cities and
regions.

ERA 2010

The University of Canberra received its ERA report at the end of January 2011 and is
considering the best use of that data to further inform the research strategy as outlined above. It
is the intention of the University to analyse the ERA results and combine this information with a
discipline viability exercise that is underway within the University to identify the research
disciplines where it will specifically focus its efforts. Given the retrospective nature of the ERA
data, we will also consider the impact of the significant academic renewal program commenced
in late 2009 which has already and will continue to have a significant impact on the ERA profile
in some disciplines. The University will also use the ERA data to help identify areas of
opportunity at the national level and again to inform decisions on disciplines that will be the
focus for improvement over the next 3-5 years.

It is our intention, therefore, to be in a position to provide the Department with our ERA targets
by June 2011.




Research performance and research capability: Performance indicators and targets
7.1.6.           The purpose of the research performance and research capability performance
                 indicators and targets is to assist the University and Commonwealth monitor the
                 University's progress against the Commonwealth's objectives and the University's
                 strategies for research performance and research capability.
7.1.7.           The University will aim to meet the research performance and research capability
                 performance indicators and targets set out in the following table.

Principal Performance Indicators                                                                             Target
                                                                                   Baseline2
(Required)                                                                                                   20133

Number of disciplines, as defined by two-digit Fields of                                4^                         4
Research (FoR), performing at world standard or above (3,
4 or 5)
Number of disciplines, as defined by four-digit FoR,                                    3^                         4
performing at world standards or above (3, 4 or 5)
Disciplines the university commits to demonstrating
substantial improvement in as defined by two-digit FoR
and/or four-digit FoR


2
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income in 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
3
    Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                        Page 38
^ 2010 ERA outcome

        Principal Performance
                                                                    Progressive          Progressive               Target
              Indicators                         Baseline4
                                                                    Target 20115         Target 2012               20136
              (Required)
Category 1 income

                                               2,898,086          3,866,573             4,417,006            4,780,890
Number of joint research grants
with other universities and
research organisations
 in Australia
 overseas                                           11*                  12                    13                  14
                                                      0                   1                     1                    2
Number of jointly supervised
PhD students with other
universities and research
organisations
 in Australia                                       42*                  44                    46                  49
 overseas                                            1                   1                     2                    2

* Due to the wide variation between 2008 and 2009, an average of the two years was used as the baseline value




Additional Performance Indicators
                                                      Baseline        Progressive         Progressive              Target
     (May be proposed by the                             (2009)       Target 2011         Target 2012               2013
            University)
Per Capita Average in Research                         32,194             39,666              44,029               46,671

HERDC Research Income                                11,589,825         14,279,823         15,850,604        16,801,640
Research Only Staff FTE                                  9                 9.9                10.9              12.0
(FT/FFT & Actual Casuals)
Share of joint publications with                           45%             47%                 50%                  52%
external collaborators
Weighted Publications / Academic                           0.78            1.04                1.20                 1.26
staff FTE (excl Casuals)




4
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income in 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
5
 Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
baseline data.
6
    Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                        Page 39
7.2.         Research training

Research training: Commonwealth objectives
7.2.1.       The Commonwealth encourages excellence in the provision of research training.
             Particular objectives are to:
             a.   Support research excellence and develop an internationally competitive
                  research workforce in Australia through high quality research training; and
             b.   Significantly increase the number of students completing higher degrees by
                  research over the next decade.
7.2.2.       The Commonwealth, through DIISR, may provide funding to the University to assist
             the University achieve these Commonwealth objectives, including through the
             Research Training Scheme (RTS), Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA), and
             International Postgraduate Research Scheme (IPRS).
7.2.3.       Other Commonwealth funding to assist the University achieve these Commonwealth
             objectives may also be provided outside of this Compact by the ARC, NHMRC,
             DEEWR and DIISR, for example through the Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs)
             program.

Research training: University strategies

The University has experienced a significant increase in HDR enrolments in the past 2 years
(2009:321, 2010:360 and 2011:408 as at 11 February).

Nevertheless, average HDR EFTSL per research active academic remains low (approx half the
national average). UC has also seen a significant shift away from enrolment in Masters
programs to enrolment in PhD programs. The University has a very high proportion of part-time
and older PhD students (42% are part-time with an average age of 47 years), which creates a
significant challenge in providing a supportive intellectual environment. Indeed, the 2009 PREQ
results show a lower than average satisfaction with the intellectual climate for HDR students but
average or above satisfaction for all other measures.

Current initiatives

To address these issues and contribute to the Commonwealth goals for research training, UC
has committed to a variety of initiatives which will support HDR students, improve the quality of
the HDR experience, foster collaboration, and increase rates of retention and completion.

        The University has a goal of a 10% increase in HDR student numbers in 2011/12.
         Scholarship holder numbers will be increased by 10% through the identification of
         funding sources with research partners. These initiatives support the University and
         Commonwealth goals of increasing the number of students completing research
         degrees.

        The new or existing research centres will have a primary role in research training and will




                                             Page 40
       be referred to as Centres for Research and Research Training. This initiative supports
       the Commonwealth goal of enrolling HDR students in areas of research strength and
       supporting high quality research training. It will also help to address student concerns in
       relation to the intellectual environment.

      Processes for HDR support and professional development will continue to be improved,
       strengthening the student experience. This will support the goal of increasing retention
       and completion rates.

      Professional development for supervisors will be improved through a network with other
       ACT and regional universities which was initiated in 2010. This initiative should lead to
       improvements in the student experience and also increase collaboration with other
       universities.

      Processes for advertising, processing and managing all forms of HDR places (RTS,
       international applications, scholarships) will continue to be streamlined to support the
       plan to increase student numbers.

Future plans

There is a need to undertake a major review of research training at the University of Canberra
with a view to developing innovative programs that are aligned with world’s best practice and to
align with the needs of the current and future research workforce. The University plans to
undertake this exercise during 2011 with a view to implementing major changes in 2012 and
beyond.
Some of the considerations will be:

      A key part of the research strategy is the development of research focus into cross-
       cutting themes and research and research training centres. It is essential that these
       centres become a focus for high quality research training. We will examine the best
       mechanisms in which to focus our research training programs into these areas of
       research strength.

      A large percentage of the PhD students enrolled at UC will work in areas other than
       academia, in particular many will work in government or government agencies because
       of our location in Canberra and the nature of many of our disciplines. During 2011, we
       are planning to investigate innovate ways in which our PhD programs could be more
       closely linked with business and government and consider the inclusion of internship
       programs and other forms of professional engagement that could be offered to our
       students by external partners. This strategy links with the University’s “work integrated
       learning” educational strategy. The aim would be to provide a distinctive flavour to our
       PhD program aligned with the University aim of “educating professionals professionally”.

      Given the growing number of PhD students that are enrolled at UC and the plan to
       increase numbers further over the coming years, it is necessary to consider the most
       effective organisational structure to provide an appropriate level of support for this
       growing cohort of students. The feasibility of developing a graduate school will be
       investigated during 2011 to provide efficient administrative services, appropriate
       academic oversight and quality assurance and professional development programs for




                                           Page 41
           our research student cohort.

CRN and Research Training

As a part of its Murray Darling Basin Futures CRN UC will develop an innovative training
program which features joint supervision across universities and the ability to move between
partner institutions for periods throughout a research degree. In addition, HDR students as part
of the CRN program will be recruited in cohorts and jointly supervised and trained within project-
based teams led by senior researchers who will provide overall supervision and ensure
appropriate coordination of doctoral projects and between-student support and learning. This
program will facilitate research training collaboration with other universities and will increase the
quality of research training and the student experience.




Research training: Performance indicators and targets
7.2.4.           The purpose of the research training performance indicators and targets is to assist
                 the University and Commonwealth monitor the University's progress against the
                 Commonwealth's objectives and the University's strategies for research training.
7.2.5.           The University will aim to meet the research training performance indicators and
                 targets set out in the following table.


   Principal Performance
                                                                   Progressive           Progressive               Target
         Indicators                               Baseline7
                                                                   Target 20118          Target 2012               20139
         (Required)
HDR Student load                                     198                 218                  240                   264


HDR Student completions by level
of degree
 masters
                                                      5*                   6                    6                    7
 doctorates
                                                      24                  26                   29                   32

* Due to the wide variation between 2008 and 2009, an average of the two years was used as the baseline value




7
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income for 2009. Similarly, the
targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
8
 Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
baseline data.
9
    Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                        Page 42
        Additional Performance
               Indicators                                          Progressive          Progressive             Target
                                                 Baseline
       (May be proposed by the                                     Target 2011          Target 2012              2013
              University)
HDR Load / Academic Staff (excl                      0.6                 0.7                   0.8                0.9
Casuals)
Academic Staff With Doctorates                   44.4% **              60.8%                63.8%               67.0%
(%FTE)*

** From Academic Plan, starting in 2007, a 25% increase in total % of academic staff FTE with HDR qualifications by
end 2012. Achieved percentage in 2009 shown as baseline.

7.3.           Innovation

Innovation: Commonwealth objectives
7.3.1.         The Commonwealth encourages innovation and seeks to build an innovation system
               which contributes to economic growth and wellbeing by promoting links between
               Australian businesses, universities and publicly-funded research agencies.
7.3.2.         The Commonwealth, through DIISR, may provide funding to the University to assist
               the University achieve this Commonwealth objective, including through the Joint
               Research Engagement (JRE) program. Details of any funding provided by DIISR to
               the University to encourage innovation are set out in Attachment B.
7.3.3.         Other Commonwealth funding to assist the University to achieve this
               Commonwealth objective may also be provided outside of this Compact including
               through Commercialisation Australia, the CRC and Enterprise Connect programs,
               and by AusIndustry and the ARC.

Innovation: University strategies


The University interprets innovation as the “successful application of new ideas”. The University
of Canberra makes a major contribution to the generation of new ideas and has strategies that
support their successful transfer into adoption, application and use in commercial, collective,
and national benefit contexts.

The University takes a broad view of innovation and knowledge transfer that goes beyond the
traditional Knowledge Transfer through Commercialisation. It has been developing strategies
around three other broad categories of knowledge transfer under a framework of Knowledge
Transfer through Engagement10: These strategies cover:

        Problem solving activities : policy and strategic advice and analysis, joint publications,
         contract research, consultancy, joint research, prototyping and testing, external
         secondments, creation of physical facilities;


10
  This approach is being recognised in the UK. See for example, MOORE, B., ULRICHSEN, T. & HUGHES, A. (2009). The
Evolution of the Infrastructure of the Knowledge Exchange System: A Report to HEFCE. Cambridge, Public and Corporate
Affairs Consultants (PACEC), Centre for Business Research University of Cambridge.




                                                       Page 43
      Community based activities: public lectures, school projects, exhibitions, performing arts,
       exhibitions;

      Public space and people based activities: external lectures, participation in networks,
       membership of advisory boards, continuing professional development courses,
       curriculum development, and forums.

Whereas Knowledge Transfer Through Commercialisation is a transactional process (being the
trading of knowledge, reflected in sale, licensing and assignment of intellectual property),
Knowledge Transfer Through Engagement is a relational process—built on strong foundations
of collaboration, partnership and trust. Tangible evidence of these relationships is provided in an
extensive portfolio of Memoranda of Understanding, Partnerships, and Agreements with
Government agencies and business and community organisations. Innovation through
Engagement is a dynamic process that involves two and three way interactions between the
University, industry, government and the community at large.

Innovation and Knowledge Transfer through Commercialisation

Due to its relatively small research base, the University had not in the past had a pro-active
strategy for knowledge transfer through commercialisation. With the recent emphasis on
building research capacity this is about to change. Moreover, during 2010 the University
became concerned about possible leakage of IP and forgone opportunities to secure revenue
from licensing. A new strategy is being implemented as a component of the University’s broader
Engagement Strategy. The pace of implementation is subject to current resource constraints.

Commonwealth funding will be used to ensure improved performance in knowledge transfer
through commercialisation and by implementing an IP Management Policy that reflects UC
needs and requirements. Components of this strategy include:

      Building capacity for licensing or sale of IP (patents, trademarks, or designs).

      Promoting the formation of start up companies to commercialise the outcomes of
       research.

      Develop and stimulate a strong and consistent IP Management capability in the
       University and arrange for existing policies and procedures in these areas to be
       reviewed and renewed.

      Ensure that the University, Faculties, Staff and Students can capture returns from
       potentially commercialisable IP generated within the University.

      Ensure that staff receive appropriate rewards for knowledge transfer through
       consultancy and are supported in undertaking this work.

      Place the University at the forefront of knowledge transfer through a commercialisation
       policy for a University of its size.




                                            Page 44
Innovation and Knowledge Transfer through Engagement

The University of Canberra has a major commitment to knowledge transfer through
engagement. Key aspects of this commitment are summarised below. Commonwealth funding
will be used to build capacity and capability in these areas and create an exemplar of
knowledge transfer through engagement that is relevant and appropriate for Australia’s national
capital. The major initiatives are:

        Become a major provider of contract and commissioned research and consultancy for
         the Commonwealth and ACT Governments, business, and for international
         organisations:
         o      NATSEM, the Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE), and the Centre for Labour
                Market Studies are well established suppliers of contract and commissioned
                research and consultancy and continue to have a major impact on public policy
                development and program design particularly in the areas of social and
                environment policy
         o      Support the development of other Centres, including the ANZSOG Institute for
                Governance, the Capital Water Alliance, the Canberra Urban and Regional
                Futures consortium, and the Centre for Research and Action in Public Health
         o      Encourage University staff to participate in the provision of advice to Government
                agencies and business and community organisations as part of their performance
                plans
         o      Through the University Adjuncts Program, and the College of Adjuncts the
                University will tap into a wealth of knowledge and experience from practitioners in
                government, business and the professions.

        Build and extend the University’s commitment to Outreach and Community Service by
         showcasing knowledge and capability in the sciences, arts and creative practice. This
         includes:
         o      Public Lectures— including the high profile Aitkin Lecture and the Clare Burton
                Lecture, a Professorial Lecture Series, and the National Security Lectures.
         o      Exhibitions – support for the Gallery of Australian Design and the Belconnen Arts
                Centre that exhibit the work of staff and students.

        Encourage people from Canberra and the Region to visit and learn through campus
         based activities and events. This is approached through:
         o      Public invitations to seminars, workshops, and events hosted by faculties and
               publicised widely
         o      Participation in Knowledge Networks
         o      Membership of Advisory Boards and Committees—particularly in health
               sciences, design and the arts
         o     Public Forums - that encourage debate, interaction and exchange of knowledge.



Innovation: Performance indicators and targets
7.3.4.       The purpose of the innovation performance indicators and targets is to assist the
             University and Commonwealth monitor the University's progress against the
             Commonwealth's objectives and the University's strategies for innovation.




                                            Page 45
  7.3.5.           The University will aim to meet the innovation performance indicators and targets
                   set out in the following table.


Principal Performance Indicators                                    Progressive           Progressive             Target
                                                  Baseline11
           (Required)                                               Target 201112         Target 2012             201313
Category 3 research income                        1,989,770           2,770,882             3,233,849           3,500,262

Number of active collaborations14
and partnerships15 with industry and
other partners:
     in Australia                                     23*                 25                   28                    31
     overseas                                          0                   1                    2                     2

  *Due to the wide variation between 2008 and 2009, an average of the two years was used as the baseline value




  11
    Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
  Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income for 2009. Similarly, the
  targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
  12
    Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
  baseline data.
  13
       Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.
  14
     Collaboration involves activities where two or more parties work together and each contributes resources
  such as intellectual property, knowledge, money, personnel or equipment, to address a shared objective with
  a view of mutual benefit
  15
     Research and development collaborations with industry or other partners with a commercial intent: include active
  ongoing research projects or partnerships activated through a written agreement (eg contract or signed letter of
  intent) between the university and either Australian or overseas industry partners. Activities could include, joint
  research/development projects with industry or arrangements with firms to commercialise research outcomes, other
  non-teaching activities, or other collaborations).




                                                          Page 46
   Principal Performance Information1617
                                                                                        Baseline
                    (Required)
Number of patent and plant breeder’s rights                      Filed: n/a          Issued: n/a          Held: n/a
families filed, issued and held
Number of licences, options or assignments                       No.: n/a                     Value($): n/a
(LOAs)18 executed and income derived
Number and value of research contracts and                       No.: 1                       Value($): 150,000
consultancies executed
Investment in spin-out companies during the                      Investment ($): n/a          Value($): n/a
reporting year and nominal value of equity in
spin-outs based on last external
funding/liquidity event or entry cost
7.3.6.           The set of performance information on patents and other research
                 commercialisation activities does not require targets. Universities should advise their
                 baseline performance here. Annual reporting on future performance against these
                 indicators will be in the context of the Institutional Performance Portfolio Information
                 Collection commencing in 2011.


     Additional Performance
                                                                    Progressive            Progressive              Target
 Indicators (May be proposed by                   Baseline19
                                                                    Target 201120          Target 2012              201321
          the University)
Examples of possible indicators
include the number of contracts
and grants awarded to support
Category 2 income                                 2,395,537            3,335,937            3,893,316          4,214,056
Category 4 income                                 4,306,432            4,306,432            4,306,432          4,306,432




16
   This set of performance information does not require targets. Universities will be asked to advise their baseline
performance and will report on their future performance in the context of the Institutional Performance Portfolio
Information Collection commencing in 2011. Patent and plant breeder right family refers to a group of patent or plant
breeder rights applications or grants emanating from a single filing. Note: this question only concerns patent and
plant breeder rights families, and is not in reference to families of other forms of registered IP (ie trade marks).
17
  Please use the definition of contracts and consultancies utilised in the National Survey of Research
Commercialisation (NSRC). A copy of the survey is available at this URL:
http://www.innovation.gov.au/Section/Innovation/Pages/TheNationalSurveyofResearchCommercialisation.aspx
18
   A LICENCE agreement formalises the transfer of technology between two parties, where the owner of the
technology (licensor) grants rights to the other parties (licensee). An OPTION agreement grants the potential
licensee a time period during which it may evaluate the technology and negotiate the terms of a licence agreement.
An option agreement is not constituted by an Option clause in a research agreement that grants rights to future
inventions, until an actual invention has occurred that is subject to that Option. An ASSIGNMENT agreement
conveys all right, title and interest in and to the licensed subject matter to the named assignee.
19
  Baseline data is collected in 2010 but will generally refer to an earlier period. For example, the baseline for
Category 1 income is collected through the 2010 HERDC data collection but refers to income in 2009.
Similarly, the targets relate to the year in which the data is collected.
20
  Progressive target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of
baseline data.
21
     Target refers to data collected in the previous year. For more information, see definition of baseline data.




                                                        Page 47
8.    FUNDING FOR RESEARCH AND RESEARCH TRAINING PROVIDED BY DIISR

8.1   Attachment B sets out the University’s Commonwealth funding allocations for 2011
      from Commonwealth research and research training programs administered by
      DIISR. This list may be amended from time to time, including if the University is
      successful in applying for any new and/or additional Commonwealth funding.




                                    Page 48
PART FOUR

9.      COMPACT REVIEW
9.1     This Compact will be reviewed annually by both the Commonwealth and the
        University. This review will be a mechanism for considering progress made towards
        agreed goals outlined in this Compact. It will aim to ensure that the Commonwealth
        and the University will continue to focus on key objectives and strategies.
9.2     The review will create an opportunity to consider any developments that may have
        occurred in the previous year, and whether these may impact on the Compact or
        trigger a need to amend the Compact.
9.3     To facilitate this review the Commonwealth will produce an annual Institutional
        Performance Portfolio and the University agrees to contribute to the annual
        Institutional Performance Portfolio Information Collection (IPPIC). The
        Commonwealth will consult with the higher education sector on the information
        collection requirements and any issues arising from the IPPIC process.




                                       Page 49
PART FIVE

10.         GENERAL PROVISIONS

10.1     Administration of the Compact by the Departments
10.1.1      DEEWR will administer Part Two of this Compact and DIISR will administer Part
            Three of this Compact, in accordance with their respective Ministers’ legislative
            responsibilities under the Administrative Arrangements Orders as in force from time
            to time. The other Parts of this Compact may be administered by one or both
            departments
10.1.2      In administering the Compact, employees of each Department will make decisions in
            accordance with any relevant instruments of delegation or authorisation in force from
            time to time.

10.2     Departmental Meetings and Liaison
10.2.1      Employees of the Departments will collaborate to streamline as far as practicable the
            Commonwealth’s interactions with the University.

10.3     Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreements
10.3.1      To the extent that this Compact contains Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreements, the
            University acknowledges that each such Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreement is
            subject to specific legislative and other requirements and that the University will need
            to meet all such requirements.

10.4     Privacy, confidentiality and information sharing
10.4.1      Subject to clause 10.4.2 below, the University acknowledges and agrees that any
            information it provides to either DEEWR or DIISR for the purposes of this Compact,
            or for any Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreement contained in this Compact, may be
            accessible under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 and may also be:
            a.   published by the Commonwealth in any manner in accordance with any
                 legislative requirement;
            b.   used by a Department for any purpose of the Commonwealth, including
                 dealings with other Commonwealth agencies;
            c.   used in reporting to or answering questions from a Minister of State of the
                 Commonwealth or a House or Committee of the Parliament of the
                 Commonwealth; or
            d.   disclosed where the Commonwealth is required or permitted by law to do so.
10.4.2      The Commonwealth and the University agree to carry out their roles under this
            Compact in accordance with any obligations they have under the Privacy Act 1988 or
            any state or territory law relating to the protection of personal information.




                                            Page 50
10.4.3      The Commonwealth recognises that the University’s Confidential Information has
            commercial value to the University and may disadvantage the University if it is
            disclosed. Accordingly, the Commonwealth will not publish or otherwise disclose the
            University’s Confidential Information unless required by law to do so, or unless the
            University consents in writing prior to such disclosure.

10.5     Variation
10.5.1      Subject to clause 10.5.2 below, except for action that either the Commonwealth or
            the University is expressly authorised to take elsewhere in this Compact, any
            variation to this Compact is to be in writing and signed by the University's, and both
            of the Commonwealth’s Representatives.
10.5.2      A variation to:
            a.     any provision of Part Two only or to any Attachments to this Compact that arise
                   solely under a provision of Part Two must be in writing but needs only to be
                   signed by the Commonwealth's DEEWR Representative and the University.
            b.     any part of this Compact that forms part of a Part 2-2 HESA Funding Agreement
                   may only be made under this clause 10.5.2 if that funding agreement does not
                   contain variation provisions specific to that funding agreement;
            c.     any provision of Part Three only or to any Attachments to this Compact that
                   arise solely under a provision of Part Three must be in writing but needs only to
                   be signed by the Commonwealth's DIISR Representative and the University.
            Either DEEWR or DIISR as the case requires will send the other Department notice
            of any variation made in accordance with paragraph (a) to (c) above.

10.6     Notices
10.6.1      A party wishing to give notice under a provision of this Compact:
            a.     must do so by sending it to each of the other Representatives set out in
                   clause 10.6.3; and
            b.     must, if a response is required to the notice, set out the time in which the
                   response is to be given;
10.6.2      Notices required to be sent by the University to the Commonwealth under this
            Compact are to be sent to both the DEEWR and DIISR Representatives set out in
            clause 10.6.3.
10.6.3      The Representatives are:
            a.     University Representative
                     Vice-Chancellor
                     University of Canberra
                     ACT 2601
                     Tel: +61 2 6201 5000
                     Email: OVC@Canberra.edu.au




                                               Page 51
            b.     DEEWR Representative
                     Group Manager
                     Higher Education Group
                     Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
                     GPO Box 9880
                     Canberra ACT 2601

                     OR
                     compacts@deewr.gov.au

            c.     DIISR Representative
                     Head of Division
                     Research Division
                     Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
                     GPO Box 9839
                     Canberra ACT 2601

                     OR
                     compacts@innovation.gov.au

10.7     Termination/Transition Plan
10.7.1      If for any reason, either or both of the Commonwealth or the University reasonably
            believes that it is not possible to continue the operation of this Compact:
              a. The Commonwealth and/or the University, as the case requires, will give the
                   other notice of that belief;
              b. The Commonwealth and the University will negotiate in good faith to resolve
                   any issues in bringing this Compact to an end; and
              c. The Commonwealth and the University will implement an agreed transition out
                   plan to bring the Compact to an end.
10.7.2      Notwithstanding clause 10.7.1, if:
              a.     the University ceases to exist as a body corporate; or
              b.     the University ceases to be approved as a higher education provider under
                     HESA,
            the Commonwealth shall have the right to terminate this Compact immediately by
            giving the University Representative written notice.
10.7.3      Except to the extent of any rights the University has under a Part 2-2 HESA Funding
            Agreement contained in this Compact, the University is not entitled to compensation




                                             Page 52
            for any loss, damage or claim arising from or in connection to the early termination of
            this Compact by the Commonwealth.
10.7.4      These termination and transition out provisions are without prejudice to and do not
            alter any other rights or obligations of the Commonwealth and the University
            pursuant to their funding arrangements.
10.7.5      Rights and obligations of the Commonwealth and the University under the Funding
            Agreement at Attachment E that exist as at the date of termination of the Compact
            survive the termination of the Compact

10.8     Order of precedence
10.8.1      In this Compact:
             a. each HESA Funding Agreement contained in this Compact operates as a
                  separate agreement between the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs
                  and Workplace Relations and the University.
             b. In the event of an inconsistency between the terms of a HESA Funding
                   Agreement contained in this Compact and the Operational Provisions in this
                   Part Five, the term of the HESA Funding Agreement will prevail for the
                   purpose of that agreement.

10.9     Counterparts
10.9.1      This Compact may be signed in any number of counterparts and all counterparts
            together constitute one instrument.

10.10 Dictionary
10.10.1     In this Compact, unless the contrary intention appears:
            ‘Appropriation' means a law, or provision in a law, that authorises the expenditure of
            money by the Commonwealth.
            ‘DEEWR’ means the Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and
            Workplace Relations or any successor.
            ‘Department’ means either or both of DEEWR or DIISR as the case requires.
            ‘DIISR’ means the Commonwealth Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and
            Research or any successor.
            ‘Tertiary Education Minister’ means the Minister administering Part 2-2 of HESA.
            ‘HESA’ means the Higher Education Support Act 2003 and includes any subordinate
            legislation or Ministerial determination made under that Act.
            ‘HESA Funding Agreement' means a funding agreement:
            a.   that is made under section 30-25 of HESA by the Minister for Tertiary
                 Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations and the University for the
                 provision of a grant of funding to the University under Part 2-2 of HESA; and




                                            Page 53
b.   with which the University is required to comply under section 36-65 of HESA.
‘Institutional Performance Portfolio’ (IPP) is a report which provides an historical record of
a university's performance based on information provided by the university and an
analysis of the Higher Education Data Collections. An IPP will be prepared by the
Commonwealth for the University annually using the latest available data.
‘Institutional Performance Portfolio Information Collection’ (IPPIC) is a set of
Commonwealth instructions requesting that universities provide a submission to the
Commonwealth, endorsed by the university's chief executive, that includes student, staff,
financial and research information needed for the preparation of an Institutional
Performance Portfolio for that university.
‘Minister’ means either or both of the Tertiary Education Minister and the Research
Minister.
‘Mission’ means the University’s Mission set out at Part One of this Compact as
amended in accordance with the variation provisions in this Compact from time to
time.
‘Research Minister’ means the Minister administering the Australian Research
Council Act 2001.
‘TEQSA’ means the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency.
‘University’ means University of Canberra ABN 81 633 873 422
‘University’s Confidential Information’ means the information referred to at
Attachment C to this Compact as 'University Confidential Information' or that the
Commonwealth otherwise agrees in writing is 'University Confidential Information',
but does not include information that is or becomes public knowledge, except due to
non-compliance with this Compact.




                                  Page 54
SIGNED for and on behalf of the UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA
by

……………………………………………………..
Signature
Professor Stephen Parker
the Vice-Chancellor
In the Presence of:

.....................................................................................
WITNESS
.....................................................................................
Full name and occupation or profession of witness (Please print)

SIGNED for and on behalf of
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
by
……………………………………………………..
Signature
David de Carvalho
the Group Manager
of Higher Education Group
of the Department of Education,
Employment and Workplace Relations
a Delegate of the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations

In the Presence of:
.....................................................................................
WITNESS
.....................................................................................
Full name and occupation or profession of witness (Please print)

SIGNED for and on behalf of
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
by
……………………………………………………..
Signature
Anne Baly
the Head
of Research Division
of the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
a Delegate of the Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research

In the Presence of:

.....................................................................................
WITNESS
.....................................................................................
Full name and occupation or profession of witness (Please print)




                                                        Page 55
ATTACHMENT A    INDICATIVE LIST OF COMMONWEALTH FUNDING PROVIDED TO THE
          UNIVERSITY BY DEEWR AND RELEVANT TO THE COMPACT

DEEWR provides a range of funding to the University under various legislative and/or
contractual funding arrangements. The following is an indicative list of that funding. The
table will be updated from time to time.


Funding to be delivered during the Compact ($m)                               2011
Commonwealth Grant Scheme
 -   Cluster funding                                                                 48.116
 -   Enabling loading                                                                 0.253
 -   Transitional loading (Maths/Science)                                             2.731
 -   Advance payment for estimated over enrolment                                     5.110
 -   Facilitation Funding                                                             1.035
Higher Education Partnerships and Participation Program

 -   Participation component                                                          0.516

 -   Partnership component                                                            0.356
Disability Support Program

 -   Additional support for students with disabilities                       Not Yet Known
 -   Performance based funding                                               Not Yet Known
Indigenous Support Program                                                            0.304
Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund
                                                                                      0.300
Capital Development Pool
                                                                                      3.755
Commonwealth Scholarships Program                                                     1.417




                                             Page 56
ATTACHMENT B: LIST OF COMMONWEALTH FUNDING PROVIDED TO THE UNIVERSITY BY DIISR
            AND RELEVANT TO THE COMPACT



University of Canberra – Research Block Grant Funding for 2011
Research Training Scheme (RTS)                                              $2,758,030
Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA)                                        $1,016,384
International Postgraduate Research Scholarships (IPRS)                      $105,859
Research Infrastructure Block Grants Scheme (RIBG)                           $555,089
Joint Research Engagement (JRE)                                             $1,754,092
Commercialisation Training Program (CTS)                                           $0
Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) Base                                    $61,443
Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) Threshold 1                            $472,100
Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) Threshold 2                             $38,497
University of Canberra – Collaborative Research Networks Funding for 2011
Collaborative Research Networks (CRN)                                       $2,231,164




                                           Page 57
ATTACHMENT C      UNIVERSITY CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION


Not applicable.




                                  Page 58
ATTACHMENT D       TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF PART 2-2 HESA FUNDING AGREEMENT FOR
                   THE PROVISION OF PERFORMANCE FUNDING


Terms and Conditions of Funding Agreement between the Commonwealth and the University
for the purposes of grants in respect of Performance Funding under section 30-25 of HESA

1.   Agreement

     1.1    Pursuant to clause 4.13 of the Compact, section 4 of the Compact together with the
            terms and conditions in this Attachment D of the Compact constitute the HESA
            Funding Agreement entered into by the Minister or his or her delegate (on behalf of
            the Commonwealth) with the University under section 30-25 of HESA, for the
            provision by the Commonwealth of Performance Funding to the University.

     1.2    These terms and conditions apply only to Performance Funding and do not apply to
            any other agreement between the Commonwealth and the University entered into
            for the purposes of section 30-25 of HESA or for the purposes of any other
            legislative provision.

2.   Eligibility

     2.1    The University meets the requirements of subparagraph 30-1(1) (a)(i) or
            subparagraph 30-1(1)(a)(ii) of HESA.

     2.2    It is a precondition to funding being provided under this agreement that the
            University does and will continue to meet the requirement in paragraph 30-1(1)(b) of
            HESA in each of the Grant years during the term of this agreement.

     2.3    Entering into this agreement is a requirement under paragraph 30-1(1)(c) of HESA
            for a grant to be payable to the University under Part 2-2 of HESA for Performance
            Funding.

3.   Term and Grant years

     3.1    The term of this agreement is the same as the term of the Compact.

     3.2    This agreement is made in respect of the Grant years 2011, 2012 and 2013.

4.   Conditions additional to the HESA

     4.1    Subject to subsections 30-25 (2A) and 30-25 (2B) of HESA, this agreement
            specifies conditions to which the grant is subject that are additional to the conditions
            to which the grant is subject under Division 36 of HESA.




                                            Page 59
5.   Publication

     5.1   The Compact, of which this agreement forms part, will be tabled in Parliament in
           accordance with subsection 30-25(4) of HESA.

6.   Preconditions to receiving Performance Funding

     6.1   Facilitation Funding

     As a condition of the Facilitation Funding component of Performance Funding, in
     accordance with this agreement, the University must:
     (a) inform the Commonwealth of strategies and goals for achieving the university’s
         teaching and learning mission described under clause 4.7 of the university’s 2011-13
         Compact; and
     (b) agree to the performance targets relating to specific Commonwealth goals contained
         in clause 4.14 of the 2011-2013 Compact.

     6.2   Reward Funding

     As a condition of the Reward Funding component of Performance Funding, in accordance
     with this agreement, the University must:
     (a) agree performance targets as outlined in clause 4.14 of their 2011-2013 Compact
         agreement;
     (b) supply performance data to the Commonwealth for all indicators as per the
         requirements set out in section 2 of the Performance Funding Technical Guidelines;
         and
     (c) achieve the relevant excellence or improvement targets as outlined in clause 4.14 of
         their 2011-2013 Compact agreement.


7.   University’s Grant Amount

     7.1   Facilitation Funding

     The University’s grant amount for the Facilitation Funding component of Performance
     Funding will be calculated in accordance with the Commonwealth Grants Scheme
     Guidelines Chapter 12 as in force from time to time during the term of this Agreement.

     7.2   Reward Funding

     The University’s grant amount for the Reward Funding component of Performance
     Funding will be calculated in accordance with the Commonwealth Grant Scheme
     Guidelines as in force from time to time during the term of this Agreement.




                                          Page 60
     7.3   Performance Funding Grant Amount

     The University’s total grant amount for Performance Funding in each Grant year (that is,
     the total of the amounts in that Grant year for Facilitation Funding and for Reward
     Funding) will be the University’s ‘Performance Funding Grant Amount’ for the purposes of
     Subsection 33-1(1A) of HESA.

8.   Payment of Grant Amounts

     8.1   Facilitation Funding

     Subject to the University’s compliance with this agreement and with HESA, the
     Commonwealth will pay the Facilitation Funding Grant Amount to the University in
     accordance with the following timeframes and conditions:
     (a) Facilitation Funding will be paid to eligible universities fortnightly commencing in 2011
         and ending in December 2013, with the amount to be paid as per the calculations
         outlined in the Technical Guidelines.
     (b) In accordance with section 164-5 of the Act, Facilitation Funding payments will be
         paid in such a way as the Minister determines, and at such times as the Secretary
         determines.

     8.2   Reward Funding

     Subject to the University’s compliance with this agreement and with HESA, the
     Commonwealth will pay the Reward Funding Grant Amount to the University in
     accordance with the following timeframes and conditions:
     (a) Reward Funding will be paid to eligible universities in one instalment in the second
         half of each of 2012 and 2013, with the amount to be paid as per the calculations
         outlined in the Technical Guidelines.
     (b) In accordance with section 164-5 of the Act, Reward Funding payments will be paid in
         such a way as the Minister determines, and at such times as the Secretary
         determines.

     The University is not entitled to be paid any instalment of its Reward Funding Grant unless
     and until the Commonwealth is satisfied that the requirements for paying that instalment
     have been met.

9.   Waiver

     9.1  If either party does not exercise (or delays in exercising) any rights under this
          agreement, that failure or delay does not operate as a waiver of those rights.
     9.2 Any waiver by either the Commonwealth or the University of any provision or right
          under this Agreement:
     (a) must be in writing signed by that party’s representative;




                                           Page 61
      (b) is effective only to the extent set out in the waiver; and
      (c) does not prevent the further exercise of any right.

10.   Dispute resolution

      10.1 Subject to clause 10.3, the parties agree not to commence any legal proceedings in
           respect of any dispute arising under this agreement, which cannot be resolved by
           informal discussion, until the procedure provided by this clause 19 has been used.

      10.2 The parties agree that any dispute arising during the course of this agreement is
           dealt with as follows:

      (a) the party claiming that there is a dispute will send the other party a written notice
          setting out the nature of the dispute;
      (b) the parties will try to resolve the dispute through direct negotiation by persons who
          they have given authority to resolve the dispute;
      (c) the parties have 10 business days from the receipt of the notice to reach a resolution
          or to agree that the dispute is to be submitted to mediation or some alternative dispute
          resolution procedure; and
      if:
      (a) there is no resolution of the dispute;
      (b) there is no agreement on submission of the dispute to mediation or some alternative
          dispute resolution procedure; or
      (c) there is a submission to mediation or some other form of alternative dispute resolution
          procedure, but there is no resolution within 15 business days of the submission, or
          extended time as the parties may agree in writing before the expiration of the
          15 business days,

      then, either party may commence legal proceedings.

      10.3 This clause 10 does not apply if:

      (a) either party commences legal proceedings for urgent interlocutory relief;
      (b) action is taken by Us under clause 20; or
      (c) an authority of the Commonwealth, a State or Territory is investigating a breach or
          suspected breach of the law by the University.

      10.4 Despite the existence of a dispute, both parties must (unless requested in writing by
           the other party not to do so) continue to perform their obligations under this
           agreement.

11.   Termination for default

      11.1 The Commonwealth may immediately terminate this agreement by giving written
           notice to the University of the termination if:




                                             Page 62
      (a) the University fails to fulfil, or is in breach of any of its obligations under this
          agreement, and does not rectify the omission or breach within 10 business days of
          receiving a notice in writing from the Commonwealth to do so; or
      (b) the University is unable to pay all its debts when they become due;
12.   Notices

      12.1 Notices under this Agreement must be sent to the addresses and in accordance with
           the procedures set out at clause 10.6 of the Compact.

13.   Reports

      13.1 The University must, during the term of this agreement, provide the Commonwealth
            with the following reports by the due dates set out below:
      (a) a report on the provision of performance data by 31 December of each year.

      13.2 The University owns the intellectual property rights in the reports and grants to the
           Commonwealth (or must arrange for the grant to the Commonwealth of) a
           permanent, irrevocable, free and non-exclusive license (including a right of
           sublicense) to use, publish or disclose the reports in any of the ways set out in
           subclause 10.4.1 of the Compact.

14.   Applicable law and jurisdiction

      14.1 The laws of the Australian Capital Territory apply to the interpretation of this
           agreement.

      14.2 The parties agree to submit to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of the
           Australian Capital Territory and any courts which have jurisdiction to hear appeals
           from any of those courts in respect to any dispute under this agreement.

15.   Entire agreement, variation and severance

      15.1 This agreement records the entire agreement between the parties in relation to its
           subject matter.

      15.2 Except for action the Commonwealth is expressly authorised or required to take
           elsewhere in this agreement or HESA, no variation of this agreement is binding
           unless it is agreed in writing and signed by the parties.

      15.3 If a court or tribunal says any provision of this agreement has no effect or interprets
           a provision to reduce an obligation or right, this does not invalidate, or restrict the
           operation of, any other provision.




                                            Page 63
16.   Interpretation

      16.1 Words used in this Part D that are defined in HESA or in the Commonwealth Grants
           Scheme Guidelines have the same meaning in this Part D as they do in the
           document in which they are defined.

      16.2 In this Part D:

‘Compact’ means the Mission Based Compact between the Commonwealth and the University
of which this Attachment D forms part;

‘Grant year’ means a calendar year in respect of which the University has entered into this
agreement;




                                          Page 64
ATTACHMENT E     PART 2-2 HESA FUNDING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE COMMONWEALTH
           AND THE UNIVERSITY FOR THE PROVISION OF THE COMMONWEALTH GRANTS
           SCHEME FUNDING




                                 Page 65

				
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