Criminal Justice Program Assessment Plan DeStefano and Zoller

Document Sample
Criminal Justice Program Assessment Plan DeStefano and Zoller Powered By Docstoc
					                  Criminal Justice Program Assessment Plan

BC Mission:

With its heritage as a foundation and an eye toward the future, Bakersfield College
provides the high quality education necessary for our socially and ethnically diverse
students--whether they be vocational, transfer-oriented, developmental, or some
combination of these--to thrive in a rapidly changing world. We will accomplish our
mission by:

1. Establishing strong connections with our student and business
communities
2. Understanding the needs of our diverse student population
3. Responding to student and community needs with efficiency
and flexibility
4. Honoring our long heritage of community involvement
5. Remaining vigilant in scanning our present and future environment within which
we operate
6. Promoting tolerance and patience with all our stakeholders

Program Mission:

We strive to instill a sense of ethical responsibility, civic engagement, and proactive commitment to
 life-long learning through quality instruction and meaningful assessment of student learning in our
Criminal Justice A.A. degree and transfer classes.

Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #1: (Spring 2009)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to identify, analyze, and apply the
fundamental theories and concepts underlying the American Criminal Justice system.

Introduction to Criminal Law CRIM B2
Identify the two major theoretical models underlying the American criminal law.
Define each model by focusing on its major goal and illustrate with an example of
each model’s functions within the Police, Courts, and Correctional environments.
Conclude with an analysis of the impact of each model on individual rights.

Grading Rubric (Essay):

Student correctly identified the two models of justice: Crime control and Due
process. (Items 1 and 2)

Student correctly defined the both models of justice with their respective major goal:
Due processprotection of individual rights; Crime control suppression of criminal
conduct. (Items 3 and 4)

Students provided one accurate illustration of the operational aspects of the Due
process model in Policing and the Crime control model in Policing. Numerous
examples possible (Items 5 and 6)

Students provided one accurate illustration of the operational aspects of the Crime
control model in Courts and the Due process model in the Courts. Numerous
examples possible (Items 7 and 8)

Students provided one accurate illustrations] of the operational aspects of the Due
process model in Corrections and the Crime control model in Corrections. Numerous
examples possible (Items 9 and 10)

PRE-TEST              n=117                 POST TEST             n=102

Items 1 and 2         72% correct           Items 1 and 2         93% correct

Items 3 and 4         68% correct           Items 3 and 4         91% correct

Items 5 and 6         75% correct           Items 5 and 6         94% correct

Items 7 and 8         62% correct           Items 7 and 8         79% correct

Items 9 and 10        58% correct           Items 9 and 10        73% correct

Discussion: Participants—Peggy DeStefano and Christian Zoller

Each component of the essay question revealed marked improvement in the post
test results. However, it is clear that students shared a common weakness in
analyzing the impact of the models on their constitutional protections. Some of this
may be explained by internal biases held by many of our students who identify
strongly with the police. One strategy to improve the post-test data on this portion of
the assessment would be to add more emphasis to the analysis of personal impact
through incremental written projects (one minute papers, e.g.). Apparently class
discussions on this element were not readily retained for the post-test experience.

Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #2 (Fall 2009)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to identify and describe the operational
elements of the major components comprising the American Justice system.


Introduction to Criminal Justice CRIM B1: Objective Quiz

Identify the component of the American Criminal Justice system responsible for the
following functions:

1. Provide a check on the exercise of power of other justice system agencies
2. Protect fundamental rights/freedoms of individuals
3. Protect rights/freedoms of anyone facing processing by the justice system
4. Provide emergency/related community services
5. Investigate crime
6. Rehabilitate, reform, and reintegrate convicted offenders back into the
   community
7. Require fairness throughout the justice process
8. Provide safe/humane custody/supervision of offenders
9. Determine guilt or innocence
10. Respect the legal/human rights of the convicted


PRE-TEST               n=120                 POST TEST             n=100

Item   1               63% correct           Item   1              92% correct
Item   2               58% correct           Item   2              86% correct
Item   3               55% correct           Item   3              89% correct
Item   4               100% correct          Item   4              100% correct
Item   5               100% correct          Item   5              100% correct
Item   6               92% correct           Item   6              97% correct
Item   7               72% correct           Item   7              96% correct
Item   8               88% correct           Item   8              100% correct
Item   9               100% correct          Item   9              100% correct
Item   10              78% correct           Item   10             98% correct

Discussion: Participants—Peggy DeStefano and Christian Zoller

Students seemed to have a grasp of the basic operational functions of the police at
the beginning of the semester as reflected in the 100% success rate on the police
related quiz items. They are not always clear on the police function concerning
individual rights (item #2). In addition, their general understanding of the courts and
corrections components of the system is weaker and requires reinforcement
throughout the semester as each of the components is analyzed in detail. The data
shows that students mastered the functions of each element by the conclusion of the
introductory course.

Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #3 (Spring 2010)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to identify, analyze, and apply basic legal
principles and rules to factual situations

Constitutional Criminal Procedure CRIM B4 and Forensic and Scientific
Aspects of Evidence CRIM B12—Legal Case Briefs

Working from a legal case brief format template demonstrated in class by the
instructor, students are required to read an assigned case and prepare a case brief
focusing on the principles of law and science, the admissibility of evidence, the
testimony of experts, the procedural history of the case, and the ultimate outcome of
the case.

Summative data: n=124

Grading Rubric:

Form:
The student   prepared the brief according to the template provided by the instructor.
The student   included all of the required elements in the template.
The student   submitted the case brief timely.
The student   submitted the assignment substantially free of spelling and grammatical
errors.
Content:
The student   provided a complete recitation of the critical facts in the case.
The student   accurately described the procedural history of the case
The student   accurately identified and applied the rule of the case
The student   included reference to documentary, physical, and testimonial evidence
The student   assessed the expert witness testimony on the outcome of the case.

Discussion: Participants—Peggy DeStefano and Christian Zoller

1. 93% of the students who completed the assignment submitted timely.
2. 85% of the students substantially complied with the template provided by the
instructor.
3. 78% of the students included all the pertinent information in each element of the
template.
4. 90% of the students provided a complete recitation of the critical facts of the case
5. 60% of the students accurately portrayed the procedural history of the case.
6. 75% of the students accurately identified and applied the rule of the case
7. 88% of the students included reference to documentary, physical, and testimonial
evidence
8. 96% of the students assessed the impact of expert witness testimony (if
applicable) on the outcome of the case.
9. 83% of the students submitted the assignment substantially free of spelling and
grammatical errors

Students are initially very fearful of written assignments where form and content are
specifically responsive to a template, a common feature in all legal writing. The
prospect of having to follow directions to the letter presents a challenge to many
students lacking the discipline to recognize the convenience of templates. In this
assignment, our students substantially complied with the requirements excepting the
complexity of following the procedural history of the case.

Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #4 (Fall 2010)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to identify and implement the principles and
procedures utilized in legitimate scientific and criminal investigation.

Introduction to Evidence CRIM B3 and Special Topics: Criminal Profiling
CRIM B55—Case Study: Admissibility of Scientific Evidence

Summative data: n=102

Students were given an in-class writing assignment which required them to identify
the rules for the admission of scientific evidence regarding insanity and competence
to stand trial. Students were further required to apply the rules to a hypothetical
situation in which a judge must decide whether or not to admit scientific evidence.

Grading Rubric:

1.The student accurately identified and described the applicable rules for the
admissibility of scientific evidence for the jurisdiction.
2. The student applied the appropriate rule to the factual situation in the hypothetical
case.
3. The student stated the appropriate judicial ruling for the case based on the rules,
the facts, and the evidence presented in the hypothetical.

Discussion: Participants--Peggy DeStefano and Christian Zoller

95% of the students accurately identified and described the applicable rules for the
admissibility of scientific evidence for the jurisdiction.
83% of the students applied the appropriate rule to the factual situation in the
hypothetical case.
81% of the students stated the appropriate judicial ruling for the case based on the
rules, the facts, and the evidence presented in the hypothetical.

Students were very successful in identifying and describing the appropriate rules on
the admissibility of scientific evidence. Students seem to be less certain about how to
apply the rules to the facts, although a significant number performed that task
successfully. Our findings were similar for the portion of the question that required
students to select the appropriate judicial ruling.


Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #5 (Spring 2011)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to demonstrate multicultural awareness and
respect for constitutional and human rights.

Introduction to Criminal Justice CRIM B1 and Constitutional Criminal
Procedure CRIM B4-- Sultaana Freeman Case

Summative data: n=108

Students read a file containing transcripts and a judicial order concerning Sultaana
Freedman, a Florida case involving a Muslim woman who refused to be photographed
by the DMV without her hajib. Students were required to identify the three sources
of law relied upon by the plaintiff whose license was revoked for failing to comply
with the photographic requirement. Then they were required to articulate three
specific factual arguments made by the plaintiff to support her request to have her
license reinstated. Finally, students were required to argue in favor of the plaintiff’s
First Amendment claim to be photographed for the DMV with her hajib.

Grading Rubric:

1. The student accurately identified the three sources of law relied upon by the
plaintiff Freeman in her claim.
2. The student accurately articulated three factual arguments proffered by the
plaintiff freeman in her claim.
3. The student provided a plausible First Amendment argument supporting the
plaintiff’s claim.

Discussion: Participants-- Peggy DeStefano and Christian Zoller

66% of the students accurately identified the three sources of law relied upon by the
plaintiff Freeman in her claim.
92% of the students accurately articulated three factual arguments proffered by the
plaintiff freeman in her claim.
96% of the students provided a plausible First Amendment argument supporting the
plaintiff’s claim.

Students struggled with the sources of law element of the question. This topic
traditionally challenges students. However, students were extremely successful and
sensitive to the factual arguments offered by the plaintiff in her attempt to retain her
hajib for the DMV photograph. Finally, students were most masterful in discussion
the First Amendment’ freedom of religion protection that was an integral part of this
case.

Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #6 (Fall 2011)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to identify, analyze, and apply the ethical
components of discretionary decision-making in the three major components of the
criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections.

Community Relations CRIM B5 and Criminal Investigation CRIM B8
Ethical Problem Scenarios: *Assessment TBA

PRE-TEST              n=                     POST TEST             n=

Item 1                % correct              Items 1 and 2         % correct

Item 2                % correct              Items 3 and 4         % correct

Item 3                % correct              Items 5 and 6         % correct

Item 4                % correct              Items 7 and 8         % correct

Item 5                % correct              Items 9 and 10        % correct



Discussion:
Participants—Peggy DeStefano, Christian Zoller, and Mark Graf
Criminal Justice Program Level SLO #7 (Spring 2012)

A student who successfully completes the course requirements in Criminal Justice
with a grade of C or better will be able to demonstrate respect for the dignity and
humanity of victims, perpetrators, and wrongfully convicted persons.

CRIM B9 and CRIM B10—Wrongful Convictions Cases: *Assessment TBA

PRE-TEST              n=                    POST TEST             n=

Item   1              %   correct           Item   1              %   correct
Item   2              %   correct           Item   2              %   correct
Item   3              %   correct           Item   3              %   correct
Item   4              %   correct           Item   4              %   correct
Item   5              %   correct           Item   5              %   correct
Item   6              %   correct           Item   6              %   correct
Item   7              %   correct           Item   7              %   correct
Item   8              %   correct           Item   8              %   correct
Item   9              %   correct           Item   9              %   correct
Item   10             %   correct           Item   10             %   correct

Discussion: Participants—Christian Zoller and Peggy DeStefano

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:9/13/2012
language:English
pages:7