NUTRITION AND OPTIMUM SPORT PERFORMANCE

Document Sample
NUTRITION AND OPTIMUM SPORT PERFORMANCE Powered By Docstoc
					  NUTRITION AND OPTIMUM
   SPORT PERFORMANCE

  What you need to know to: Increase energy
   levels, Perform better, & Recover faster.


Presented by:
Professor Steven P. Dion, Health and Wellness Coordinator
Salem State College - Sport, Fitness and Leisure Studies Dept.
Overview of Today’s Discussion
   Overview of the
    principles of exercise
    and training.
   Overview of Nutritional
    info.
   Carbohydrate loading
   Pre-Competition meals
   Other tips
   Comments and
    Questions
                   Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                          2
                              Performance
           Overview of the
    Principles of Exercise Training
 Overload principle: to improve, muscles
  must be stressed
 Principle of progression: overload should
  be increased gradually
 Specificity of exercise: training effect
  specific to muscles trained


                Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                       3
                           Performance
    Principles of Exercise Training
   Principle of recuperation: recovery period to adapt
    to stress
      Overtraining

      Sleep requirements – without sleep, it’s a
       gradual decline in performance.
      Decrease psychological stress levels – high
       levels of Cortisol (a stress hormone) suppresses
       the bodies ability to grow, recover and repair
   Reversibility of training effects: loss of fitness due
    to inactivity (atrophy can begin within 6 hours)
                      Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                             4
                                 Performance
              Nutritional Info
           Diet and Training / Overtraining
   How exercise intensity affects fuel use, and
    ultimately dietary choices-
           Intensity              Fuel Used
         < 30% VO2max              mainly fat
       40-60% VO2max         fat and CHO equally
     75% VO2max                     mainly CHO
        >80% VO2max              ~100% CHO
   Failure to consume adequate fuel can promote
    fatigue and an overtraining effect.
                 Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                        5
                            Performance
                Nutritional Info
   Carbohydrates (60% of diet: 40+ women ?)
     critical fuel during exercise

     increase % complex carbohydrates in
      the diet
     maintain adequate calories so CHO can
      be stored as glycogen
   Protein (10-15%)
     eat a normal well-balanced diet

     ~0.8 – 1.5 grams of protein/kg body
      weight
     increase total food intake to provide
                  Professor Dion - Nutrition and increase protein
      more calories (don’t justSport                                6
                             Performance
      intake)
               Nutritional Info
   Fats/Lipids (20-30%)
      High quality, monounsaturated fats will
       promote better health, healthier joints and
       fuel for low too moderate intensity activities.
   Vitamins (multivitamin?)
      avoid mega-dosing – eat your fruits and
       veggies
   Antioxidants
      chemicals that prevent oxygen from
       damaging cells
      supplementing vitamins A, C, E, beta-
       carotene, zinc, and selenium may be
                   Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
       beneficial             Performance
                                                        7
             Carb Loading Protocol
 When is it beneficial - Do you need to do it
  and How Does it Work?
 3 Primary Factors to Consider When Loading
    Food preference


       Digestibility of the foods

       “Psychological Set” of competition

                     Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                            8
                                Performance
               Food Preferences
   Eat what you like to eat
   Eat what you know sits and digests easily
   Don’t prepare meals that will add more stress to
    the day (high maintenance foods)
                   Digestibility
   Eliminate foods high in fat and protein on race day
   Fats and proteins digest slowly and remain in the
    digestive tract longer than carbohydrates

                   Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                          9
                              Performance
                Psychological Set
   The impact of “Stress”
   The bodies’ unconscious adaptation to stress

                     Additionally
   Your carbohydrate-rich meal should be consumed
    at least 3-4 hours prior to the race (if time allows)
   Your meal should contain 150 – 300 grams of
    carbohydrates (3-5 grams per kg of mass) in either
    solid or liquid form

                  Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                         10
                             Performance
       Pre-Competition Considerations
   The precompetition (carbohydrate rich) meal provides
    you with adequate carbohydrate energy and ensures
    optimal hydration. Breakfast and pre-race/activity
    feedings will have a definite impact on your energy and
    hydration levels.

   Although you’ll eat a comprehensive meal the night
    before, you still will lose some of your stored muscle
    glycogen in those 8-12 hours before the race.

                      Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                             11
                                 Performance
     Pre-Competition Considerations
   Therefore – your breakfast and pre-race feedings
    will assist in the constant production of energy
    during the race.
   Without breakfast and pre-race feedings you
    mostly likely will be able to finish – but your level
    of intensity will not be as high.
   Possible draw backs however = Water Retention.


                   Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                          12
                              Performance
         Additional Info - Tips
   Sport Drinks – what’s the deal and what’s
    the best?

   Ergogenic Aids – are they worth the
    money? Side effects – safe or not?

   Eating schedules – best times to eat.


                 Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                        13
                            Performance
                Sport Drinks
 To date, for post exercise glucose restoring,
  Coke Cola has not been surpassed. A quick
  handful of some candy can also be beneficial.
    After 1 hour of aerobic activity 55% of your
     glycogen stores are empty and after 2 hours
     they are just about empty.
 Most sport drinks will be beneficial during
  activities lasting 90 minutes or more.
    Otherwise – just drink water during the
     activity.
                 Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                        14
                            Performance
                  Ergogenic Aids
   There has been no concrete scientific evidence on most
    Ergogenic aids, except caffeine and carbohydrates.
   Anecdotal evidence has led me to believe that Creatine
    has benefited people with muscle development,
    strength and decrease of lactic acid impact.
   Protein shakes and powders have drawbacks as well as
    some benefits – depends on your usage & dosage.
   Various metabolism boosters should not be used
    without consulting a knowledgeable physician or
    pharmacist – heart arrhythmias etc…
                     Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                            15
                                Performance
              Eating Schedule
   When do you have your biggest meal?
      If we could design our lives around our eating

       habits – it would be best to eat dinner in the
       morning and breakfast in the evening. (say what?)
   Good idea to maintain an constant eating pattern all
    day long to assist in blood sugar regulation.
   Eating at night can/may disturb your sleeping habits,
    and ability to achieve REM.
      However, foods with tryptophan, can assist in
       falling asleep faster (meats/animal products)
                    Professor Dion - Nutrition and Sport
                                                           16
                               Performance
  Questions and Comments




        Thank You for coming
                   &

Thank Brandi and Deb for having me here

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:9/12/2012
language:English
pages:17