Acquisition Lesson Plan - DOC 2 by 70eaO6

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									                                                      Acquisition Lesson
                                         Plan for the Concept, Topic or Skill---Not for the Day


            Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept: An informational text has a main topic and key details

Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and
assessment to differentiate learning.

Author Name(s): Denise DiSabatino Allen, Denise Brosius, Kathy Casey, Sandra D. Meyers
Grade K                                                            Time: 3 days
Pre-requisite(s): Tell any story, real or invented.


Common Core Standard(s): RI.K.2 - With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details
of a text.
Essential Question: How can the main topic help me retell key details?

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What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?

Assessment Prompt (AP) #1: Students need to identify the main topic of a text.*
Assessment Prompt (AP) #2: Students need to locate key details related to the main topic.*
Assessment Prompt (AP) #3: Students need to retell key details of a text.*
*Suggested time frame: three days, addressing one assessment prompt per day.

Note to teacher: “The ‘main idea’ is often confused with the ‘topic’. In a book about locomotives, for instance,
the book may be about ‘locomotives,’ but the main idea is what the author wants readers to understand is
important about locomotives. …While it is relatively easy to state what a text is about, it is harder to determine
what the author thinks is important.” (Duffy, 2003)
Key details should provide the reader with information about the topic. (Goudvis and Harvey, 2000)

Activating Strategy:                                                             Key Vocabulary Words to Preview:
 Using a pocket chart, display several pictures of different                        Key details
   kinds of clothes (Attachment 1).                                                  Main topic
 Teacher asks, “What are these pictures mainly about? Is                            Retell
   there one word you can use to describe all these pictures?”
   (Attachment 1 or other classroom resources) Try to elicit
   from students the response, “clothing or clothes.” Tell the
   students that they have identified the main topic, clothing.
 Teacher says, “What do we notice about the clothes? What
   kind of clothes did we see?” (Attachment 1: dress, shirts,
   pants, etc.)
 Tell students, “These are the key details (dress, shirts, pants,
   etc.) about the main topic, clothes.” Teacher labels the
   picture with a word describing the picture.
 Display another set of pictures. Example: animals
   (Attachment 2 or other classroom resources)
        o Collaborative Pairs: “Is there one word you can use
            to describe all these pictures? What are the pictures
            mainly about?” “How do you know?”
        o Tell students they have identified the main topic,
            animals (Attachment 2 or other classroom
            resources).
        o Say, “The key details in the pictures help you
            identify the main topic.”

Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
Teaching Strategies: Collaborative Pairs, Graphic Organizer, Teacher Think Aloud, Think-Pair-Share,
Distributed Guided Practice, Stand the Line

Graphic Organizer: Main Topic and Key Details (Attachment 3)
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Instruction:
 Graphic organizer: Teacher displays large classroom graphic organizer for main topic and key details.
     (Attachment 3 or use main topic and key details graphic organizer of your choice)
 Tell students, “Today we will learn about the main topic, which is what a story selection is mostly about. We
     will also learn about the key details, which tell us the important information about the main topic.”
 Display the poem Families, Families by Dorothy and Michael Strickland.
          http://www.family-reunion-success.com/family-reunion-poems.html#defining
 Teacher Think Aloud: “As I read the title of this poem, I am thinking about the main topic, or what this poem
     is mostly about. The title is Families, Families. What do you think this poem is mostly about?” Teacher
     guides students to answer that the poem is mostly about families.
 Teacher says, “If the poem is mostly about families then we can say the main topic is families.”
 “As I read the poem, listen to find out what information the author gives us about our main topic, families.”
 Read aloud the poem.

Assessment Prompt (AS) #1: Students need to identify the main topic of a text.
 Think-Pair-Share
       o Tell the children to think what this poem is mostly about.
       o Children tell their partner what they think this poem is mostly about.
       o Selected pairs share their answer with the whole group.

Instruction
 Teacher says, “Now that we know the main topic of this poem is families. I am going to write the word
    ‘Families’ on our graphic organizer.”
 Reread aloud the first stanza of the poem.
 Teacher Think Aloud: “As I read this part of the poem, I learned some details about families.”
 “Turn to your partner and tell your partner one detail about families that you learned from the poem.”
    (Collaborative Pairs) Teacher “drops an ear” to listen to pair responses. Responses should include examples
    such as, mommies, daddies, brothers, sisters, aunties, uncles, and cousins.
 Teacher says, “We have just learned “key details” about our topic, families.” Now, I will put a picture of a
    key detail on our graphic organizer.” Teacher posts a sticky note with a drawing of a family member (e.g.,
    Mommy) on the classroom graphic organizer in the key detail box.
 Teacher says, “Let’s listen again as I read the second part of the poem to find out the key details about
    families. Remember, key details give us information about our main topic.”
 Teacher reads the second stanza.
 After reading, teacher points out one key detail from the poem such as “people who care for us.”

AP #2: (Students need to locate key details related to the main topic)
 Teacher says, “Now I’d like you to find more key details from the second stanza of the poem I just read to
   you.”
 Teacher distributes one sticky note to each student. Each student then returns to his/her seat.
 Think-Pair-Share: Teacher directs students to draw a picture of one key detail they learned about families
   from this stanza. (This is a quick activity. Limit students to a short period of time. Suggestion: Students use
   a pencil or only one crayon.)
         o   Students draw one detail on a large sticky note about “families” that they have learned from the second stanza
             (or write a word or beginning sound of a word about “families” that they have learned from the poem)
         o   Share with their partner.
         o   Partners share their detail with the whole class.
         o   Students, with support from the teacher, put their sticky notes on the classroom graphic organizer in the key
             detail boxes.

Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
         o   Teacher models retelling using key details from the graphic organizer. (Families have mommies, babies, people
             who care for us etc.) Teacher says, “I can use this graphic organizer to help me retell the key details about the
             main topic, families.”
         o   Teacher reviews the classroom graphic organizer on families as a tool for retelling.

Instruction
     Teacher says, “Now we are going to use a new graphic organizer to help us retell the key details in another
      story, Penguins, Penguins by Margaret Hillert. (Teacher posts a large, blank Graphic Organizer for Main
      Topic and Details for this instruction, Attachment 3. If available, use a document camera or white board to
      display the Graphic Organizer. )
     Teacher displays and plays the computer-based story from http://www.starfall.com/n/fiction-
      nonfiction/penguin/load.htm?f .
     Students listen to the story a second time.
     Think-Pair-Share Activity: Teacher asks, “What is the main topic of this story? Discuss with your partner
      and be ready to share with the group.”
     Teacher writes the main topic, “penguins”, on the Graphic Organizer.
     Remind the students that we used the classroom graphic organizer to show the main topic and key details of
      our poem, Families, Families.
     Teacher distributes individual graphic organizers to the students. (Attachment 3) Have students fill in their
      own Graphic Organizer by writing the word “penguin” in the box for the Main Topic. Teacher checks to
      make sure students put the word “penguin” in the correct box.
     Teacher models how to fill in the rest of the graphic organizer. (Attachment 3) Show students how to fill in
      the picture/word as they complete their graphic organizer with prompting and support, filling in the boxes
      for the main topic and key details of Penguin, Penguin. Some students may be able to work with a partner
      to complete their own graphic organizer (Attachment 3) filling in the boxes for the main topic and key
      details of Penguin, Penguin. (Students may either write or draw their responses.)

AP #3: Students need to retell key details of a text.
       Teacher says, “Now that you have completed your graphic organizers for Penguins, Penguins, you are
        going to use that graphic organizer to retell the story to your partner, just like I did with the poem, Families,
        Families.”
       Working in pairs, with teacher support, partners retell Penguins, Penguins using their individual graphic
        organizers.
       Selected pairs share their retelling with the whole group.
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Assignment: Nonfiction mini-book (Attachment 4) (Use an informational text exemplar from the Common Core
State Standards http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf page 31)




Summarizing Strategy:

Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
Stand the Line:
(Directions: Put a piece of masking tape down the center of the classroom. Students stand on either side of the
masking tape about two steps away from the line. Teacher poses a series of prompts for which students must take
a stand. Teacher directs students to take one step in toward the line if they agree or one step back from the line if
they disagree.)
 Put a piece of masking tape down the center of the classroom.
 Teacher says, “Today I am going to read the book, Things That Go by Margaret Hillert, and I want you to
     listen for the main topic and key details.
 Read aloud the book, Things That Go by Margaret Hillert. http://www.starfall.com/n/fiction-
     nonfiction/things-go/load.htm?f
 After reading the book, teacher says, “Now we are going to play a game using main topic and key details.”
 Teacher directs students to stand on either side of the masking tape, about two steps away from the line.
 Teacher explains and models the game, “Stand the Line,” to the students. (See directions above.)
 Teacher poses a series of prompts for which students must take a stand.
 Direct students to take one step in/toward the line if they agree or one step back from the line if they disagree.
 Randomly ask students why they moved in the direction they did.
 Teacher uses the following sentences for students to determine main topic and key details from the story,
     Things That Go:
          o The main topic for this book is rainbows.
          o The main topic for this book is things that go.
          o A key detail in this book is that planes go in water.
          o A key detail in this book is that you ride in a car.
          o A key detail in this book is that boats take you places.
          o A key detail in this book is that bikes are fun to ride.
          o A key detail in this book is that houses can go.
          o A key detail in this book is that dogs can run.
Resources/Citations:
         Chart paper for classroom graphic organizer (Attachment 3), masking tape, markers, crayons, pencils,
     large sticky notes
         Poem: Families, Families by Dorothy Strickland and Michael Strickland
              http://www.family-reunion-success.com/family-reunion-poems.html#defining
         http://www.starfall.com/n/fiction-nonfiction/penguin/load.htm?f , Penguins, Penguins by Margaret
     Hillert.
         http://www.starfall.com/n/fiction-nonfiction/things-go/load.htm?f , Things That Go by Margaret Hillert
         Explaining Reading: A Resource for Teaching Concepts, Skills and Strategies by Gerald Duffy, 2002
         Strategies That Work: Teaching Comprehension to Enhance Understanding by Stephanie Harvey and
     Anne Goudvis, 2000




Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
Attachment 1
Clothes




Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
Attachment 2
Animals




Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
Attachment 3
Main Topic and Key Details




Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).
Attachment 4
Non-Fiction Mini-Book




Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. Thompson, M., Thompson, J. (2011).

								
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