Introduction

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					Revised June 2012
                                                                  Table of Contents
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................... 4
UW-Eau Claire College of Education and Human Sciences Conceptual Framework .................................... 5
                    Vision Statement of the College of Education and Human Sciences ......................................... 5
                    Mission Statement of the College of Education and Human Sciences ....................................... 5
                    Conceptual Framework of Teacher Education ........................................................................... 6
                    Mission Statement of Teacher Education ................................................................................... 6
                    Vision Statement of The UWEC Teacher Education Program ................................................... 6
                    Beliefs and Central Intellectual Processes of the Teacher Education Program .......................... 7
                    What is Collaborative Leadership………………………………………………………………..8
                    Wisconsin Teaching Standards Matched to Praxis III Criteria ................................................... 9
                    Differences Between Practicum and Student Teaching ............................................................ 13
Admission to the Professional Semester ............................................................................................................ 14
                    Filing Applications ................................................................................................................... 14
                    Deadline for Filing Applications .............................................................................................. 14
                    Regular Education Requirements Overview ............................................................................. 14
                    Special Education Requirements .............................................................................................. 15
                    Out of Area Placements / Special Requests .............................................................................. 15
Student Teaching/Intern Semester .................................................................................................................... 16
                    How to Register for the Semester ............................................................................................. 16
Praxis II Test List with Cut Scores .................................................................................................................... 17
                    Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 17
Policies of the Professional Semester ................................................................................................................. 20
                    Field Experience Office ............................................................................................................ 20
                    Tardiness & Absences .............................................................................................................. 20
                    Calendar .................................................................................................................................... 20
                    Injury ........................................................................................................................................ 21
                    Resolution of Problems ............................................................................................................ 21
                    Workload .................................................................................................................................. 21
                    Student Teaching/Intern Transportation of Students for School Event Purposes……………...21
                    Absence of the Cooperating Teacher ........................................................................................ 22
                    Long Term Absence of the Cooperating Teacher ..................................................................... 22
                    The Cooperating Teacher Leaving the Room ........................................................................... 22
                    Professional Liability ................................................................................................................ 22
                    Student Teachers/Interns as Substitute Teachers ...................................................................... 22
                    Labor Disputes.......................................................................................................................... 23
                    Removal of Student Teachers/Interns ....................................................................................... 23
                    Statement of Non-discrimination……………………………………………………………….24
                    Access and Accommodation……………………………………………………………………24
Certification & Licensure ................................................................................................................................... 25
                    Certifying Officer ..................................................................................................................... 25
                    Proof of Licensure .................................................................................................................... 25
                    Initial Wisconsin Licensure ...................................................................................................... 25
                    Points to Remember About Your Initial License ...................................................................... 26
                    Licensing in Other States (www.uky.edu/Education/TEP/usacert.html) ................................. 26
Phases of the Professional Semester .................................................................................................................. 27
                    Three Phases Comprise the Professional Semester: ................................................................. 27
                    Summary................................................................................................................................... 28
Evaluation of the Professional Semester ........................................................................................................... 29
                    Philosophy ................................................................................................................................ 29
                    Monitoring Progress ................................................................................................................. 29
                    Grading System ........................................................................................................................ 30
Academic Grievances and Appeals For Student Denied or Removed from Field Experience Courses, Student Teaching,
        or Intern/Practical Programs ................................................................................................................ 31
                    Academic Grievances ............................................................................................................... 31
                    Academic Appeals .................................................................................................................... 31
Sample Timeline for Student Teaching Activities ............................................................................................ 33
Responsibilities of Student Teachers/Interns .................................................................................................... 34
                  Student Teachers/Interns .......................................................................................................... 34
Responsibilities of Cooperating Teachers ......................................................................................................... 36
Cooperating Teacher’s Checklist ....................................................................................................................... 38
Responsibilities of University Supervisors ........................................................................................................ 39
                  Requirements for Supervisors of Student Teachers/Interns ...................................................... 39
                  Requirements for General Supervisors of Student Teachers/Interns ........................................ 39
                  Requirements for Content Supervisors of Student Teachers/Interns ........................................ 40
Field Experience Coordinator ............................................................................................................................ 41
Wisconsin Improvement Program: Internships ............................................................................................... 42
                  What is the Wisconsin Improvement Program? ....................................................................... 42
                  What is a WIP Teacher Internship? .......................................................................................... 42
                  Who is the Teacher Intern? ....................................................................................................... 42
                  What is the Intern's Role in the School District?.........................................................................43
                  What is the Role of the Cooperating Teacher?............................................................................43
                  What Legal Requirements must Cooperating Teachers Meet?....................................................43
                  What Role does the School Principal Play?.................................................................................44
                  What is the Role of the Union?............................................................................................... .....44
                  What are the Responsibilities of the Intern's College or University Supervisor?........................44
                  What is the DPI's role in the Intern Process?...............................................................................4 4
                  Making the Program Work ....................................................................................................... 45
                  Selection of Interns ................................................................................................................... 46
Wisconsin Collation Against Sexual Assault ..................................................................................................... 48
                  Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 51
                  Definition .................................................................................................................................. 51
                  Informal Procedures for Addressing Allegations of Sexual Harassment .................................. 51
Suggestions for Mental Health Issues ................................................................................................................ 53
H1N1 Guidelines.................................................................................................................................................. 55
Appendix A - Answers to Some of Your Field Experience Questions ............................................................ 56
                  When Do I apply for Student Teaching? .................................................................................. 56
                  What Are the Typical Placements for Various Majors? ........................................................... 56
                  How Do I Apply for Internships? ............................................................................................. 56
                  Are There Any Special Projects to Participate in for Student Teaching? ................................. 56
                  What is the Length of my Student Teaching Placement? ......................................................... 57
                  Can I Take a Winterim Course Before I Student Teach in Spring? .......................................... 57
                  Can I Make Special Requests Regarding My Placement for Student Teaching? ..................... 57
                  What Can the Field Experience Office Do For Me? ................................................................. 57
Appendix B - Field Experience Office ............................................................................................................... 58
Appendix C - University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire ........................................................................................... 59
Appendix D - Human Relations Cultural Diversity Requirement .................................................................. 60
Appendix E - Credentials For Teacher Candidates ......................................................................................... 62
Appendix F - Tips for Teachers: Writing Letters of Recommendation ......................................................... 64
Appendix G - Questions to Ask at the Beginning of Your Placement ............................................................ 65
Appendix H - Samples of Evaluation Sheets ES & SPED ........................................................................... 65-98
Appendix J Quick Reference License Guide .................................................................................................. 66
                                                     Introduction

    Fieldwork is an integral part of teacher education designed to integrate theory and coursework into
practice. The university collaborates with K-12 schools to provide all education students with field
placements that will develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in the ten Wisconsin Teaching
Standards of planning, organizing, instructing, evaluating, and managing a classroom of students. The
university is truly grateful to the many people who contribute to the success of our fieldwork programs.
     This handbook contains the mission, vision, goals, admissions and advancement policies, and fieldwork policies
of the teacher education program. It is written for students, cooperating teachers and administrators, university
supervisors, and associated teacher education faculty. This handbook also provides students, cooperating teachers
and administrators, and university faculty the guidelines and information needed concerning roles, responsibilities,
and procedures involved with the field experience program at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.
    UW-Eau Claire College of Education and Human Sciences fieldwork experiences are coordinated through the
Field Experience, Certification and Licensing Office in the areas of communication disorders, middle childhood-
early adolescence, early adolescence-adolescence, early childhood-adolescence, library media and special
education. Schools and agencies servicing UW-Eau Claire are within an approximate 80-90 mile radius of
Eau Claire. Placements are arranged in public/private schools, preschools, residential treatment centers, or other
agencies.
   It is our intention and commitment to provide positive field experiences for all of our students. If you have
comments, questions, or suggestions regarding the placement of field experience students, please direct them to the
Coordinator for the Field Experience, Certification and Licensing.
    Thank you to everyone who contributes to the preparation of future teachers.

    Deb
    Debra Harding, Coordinator
    Field Experience, Certification & Licensure
    715-836-5544
    hardindr@uwec.edu
             UW-Eau Claire College of Education and Human Sciences
                         Conceptual Framework
                             Collaborative Leaders for Today and Tomorrow


         Vision Statement of the College of Education and Human Sciences
    The vision of the College of Education and Human Sciences (COEHS) is to be consistently
recognized as a leading community that
    1. develops collaborative, interdisciplinary, innovative leaders;
    2. informs our practice through scholarly inquiry;
    3. develops mutually beneficial external relationships to prepare students and serve the community;
    4. promotes equity, diversity and inclusiveness.


         Mission Statement of the College of Education and Human Sciences
    The mission of the College of Education and Human Sciences (COEHS) is to prepare professionals
who value the interdependent and dynamic nature of the human condition and who perform effectively to
strengthen collaborations with community partners.
     The College’s learning community is based on core values of liberal education, collaboration, social
justice, diversity, and reflective practice.
     Liberal Education: Professionals develop dispositions, knowledge, and skills based on a sound liberal
      education.
            o Liberal education informs and enriches learning experiences embedded in
              professional education and practice.
            o The relationship between liberal education, personal fulfillment, and professional
              competence is the foundation of professional performance, citizenship, and
              individual actualization.
            o Lifelong learning and professional competence are pursuits that span each graduate’s
              entire career.
     Collaboration: Professionals collaborate to achieve a shared vision that reflects scientifically-based
      interdisciplinary practice and public policy.
            o Professional competence is achieved when students are active partners in the
              professional education programs that cross disciplines in cooperative and shared
              study, service, and research to the maximum extent possible.
     Social Justice: Professionals work to transform unjust and oppressive educational, social, economic
      policies/systems into just and non-oppressive alternatives.
     Diversity: Professionals value the unique cultural styles, interaction patterns, and beliefs of every individual
      and empower people to be socially responsible.
     Reflective Practice: Professionals cultivate a presence of mind that emphasizes continuous conscious
      analysis of values, assumptions, and strategies underlying their practice and the consequences of that practice
      on other human beings.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 5
         Conceptual Framework of Teacher Education




                                                              EXCELLENCE AS A JOURNEY




Collaborative leadership is viewed as the involvement of two or more people in a group working
toward a common vision or goal in a manner that reflects shared ownership, authorship, use, or
responsibility. A successful collaboration takes place when participants with diverse experiences and
expertise work together to solve a common problem or produce a common product. Successful
collaborations are non-jurisdictional, relationship driven and sensitive to issues of inclusion and
exclusion.


         Mission Statement of Teacher Education
    Teacher Education at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire is committed to the preparation and
    continued support of professional educators of quality.

         Vision Statement of the UWEC Teacher Education Program
    In our view, quality education emphasizes learning environments that enable individuals to change
their own circumstance. Education empowers learners to set and exceed high standards for thought,
action, and creativity.
    Toward that vision, UW-Eau Claire's Teacher Education will be identified as the premier Midwestern
Regional institution for cultivating collaborative leaders in education. Graduates of UWEC Education
programs will be sought out by employers and recognized for their contributions to changing educational
environments. Members of the UWEC School of Education community will be recognized as providing
innovative collaborative leadership in the development, integration, and application of professional
knowledge and change processes to the continual improvement of learning environments at all levels.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 6
     Beliefs and Central Intellectual Processes of the Teacher Education
Program
    Conceptually, we are committed to the notion that our beliefs about the development of educators are
enacted in programs through four central intellectual processes: The ability to reflect on their liberal arts
studies and professional growth as they Develop, Apply, and Integrate the specific knowledge, skills, and
dispositions appropriate to their professional field.


Excellence as a Journey
     Excellence is a process that changes direction as new situations or needs arise. Educators need to
strive constantly to improve the teaching/learning process. The complexities of teaching in increasingly
complex environments require highly talented and successful individuals committed to a life-long journey
of learning.
Reaching Diverse Learners
    Teachers must be prepared to reach diverse learners who come from complex cultural backgrounds
including individuals with particular exceptionalities. We believe that our candidates should acquire
knowledge, skills and dispositions to ensure human dignity, equity and social justice for all learners.
Instilling Exemplary Practices
Educational leaders are expert designers of learning environments and exemplary practices that are
grounded in the liberal arts and current research in their field, focused on the integration of theory with
practice and applied with an understanding of the balance between pedagogy and content.




                                                                                Program Evaluation
                                                           Gate 1                    Gate 2                        Gate 3
                                                                                                                   Certification
                                                                                                                   Teacher Portfolio For
                                                                                                                   Assessment of
                                                                                    Semester
                                                                                    Professional
                                                                                    Admission to
                                                                                    Portfolio for




                                       CI203
                                                          to Program
                                                          Admission
                                                          Portfolio for




                                                                                                    SEMESTER
                                                                                                    PROFESSIONAL




                                       CI210/211
               GE &
                                                                          PROGRAM




                                       SPED205
               Minor
                                      Standards
                                      Education
                                      Teacher
                                      Intro




                                                                                                                                             2 & 5-yr
               Courses                                                                                                                       surveys




                                                     Education Programs
                                                     Education Programs
                   Of Baccalaureate




                                                                                                                       The Baccalaureate
                                                                                                                       Assessment of




                                              Liberal Education Learning Goals
                     Intro Goals




                                                                                                                                              Exit
                                                    Goals of the Baccalaureate                                                             Interviews




                                              Program Assessment in Education




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 7
    What is Collaborative Leadership?


     Collaborative leadership is the intentional and skillful management of relationship that
      enables others to succeed individually while accomplishing a collective outcome.
     Collaboration is NOT the outcome of goal. Collaborations are processes that, when
      successful, align people’s actions to accomplish a goal or solve a problem.
     Collaborative leaders ably facilitate the involvement of two or more people in a group
      working toward a shared outcome in a manner that reflects collective ownership,
      authorship, use, or responsibility.
     Collaborative leaders possess knowledge, skills and dispositions that enable them to carry
      out leader-like actions such as optimizing assets, seeking new solutions, sustaining focus,
      promoting trust, or setting and monitoring goals and progress.




     Dispositions
     Strives for shared understanding
     Seeks beneficial solutions
     Accepts responsibility for self and others
     Displays perseverance for projects and interpersonal relationship management
     Demonstrates a passion for excellence




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 8
         Wisconsin Teaching Standards Matched to Praxis III Criteria


   Wisconsin Teaching               Pathwise / Praxis III
       Standards                                  Teacher Performance Assessment Criteria


Standard #1                         Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning

                                    A2. Articulating clear learning goals for the lesson that are appropriate for
Teachers know the                   the students.
subjects they are teaching.
                                A3. Demonstrating an understanding of the connections between the content
    The teacher understands that was learned previously, the current content, and the content that remains
the central concepts, tools of to be learned in the future.
inquiry, and structures of the
disciplines he or she is        A4. Creating or selecting teaching methods, learning activities, and
                                instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the students
teaching and can create
                                and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson.
learning experiences that make
these aspects of subject matter [Central concepts, tools of inquiry, structures of a specific discipline: Praxis
meaningful to pupils.           II tests]



Standard #2                         Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning

                                    A1. Becoming familiar with relevant aspects of students’ background
Teachers know how                   knowledge and experiences.
children grow.
                                    A3. Demonstrating an understanding of the connection between the content
    The teacher understands         that was learned previously, the current content, and the content that remains
how children with broad             to learned in the future.
ranges of ability learn and
provides instruction that           A4. Creating or selecting teaching methods, learning activities, and
                                    instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the students
supports their intellectual,
                                    and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson.
social, and personal
development.                        Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning

                                    B3. Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student.

                                    Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning

                                    C3. Encouraging students to extend their thinking.

                                    C5. Using instructional time effectively.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 9
Standard #3                          Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning

                                     A1. Becoming familiar with relevant aspects of students’ background
Teachers understand that             knowledge and experiences.
children learn differently.
                                   A4. Creating or selecting teaching methods, learning activities, and
    The teacher understands        instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the
how pupils differ in their         students and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson.
approaches to learning and the
barriers that impede learning      Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning
and can adapt instruction to       B3. Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student.
meet the diverse needs of
pupils, including those with       Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning
disabilities and exceptionalities.
                                   C3. Encouraging students to extend their thinking.

                                     C5. Using instructional time effectively.


Standard #4                          Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning

                                     A4. Creating or selecting teaching methods, learning activities, and
Teachers know how to                 instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the
teach.                               students and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson.

     The teacher understands         Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning
and uses a variety of
instructional strategies,            B3. Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student.
including the use of technology
                                     Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning
to encourage children’s
development of critical              C3. Encouraging students to extend there thinking
thinking, problem solving, and
performance skills.                  C5. Using instructional time effectively.



Standard #5                          Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning
Teachers know how to manage a
classroom.                    B1. Creating a climate that promotes fairness.

                                     B2. Establishing and maintaining rapport with students.
    The teacher uses an
understanding of individual and      B3. Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student.
group motivation and behavior
to create a learning                 B4. Establishing and maintaining consistent standards of classroom
environment that encourages          behavior.
positive social interaction,
                                     B5. Making the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as
active engagement in learning,       possible.
and self- motivation.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 10
Standard #6                          Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning
Teachers communicate well.
                                     B1. Creating a climate that promotes fairness.
The teacher uses effective
verbal and nonverbal                 B3. Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student.
communication techniques as
well as instructional media          B4. Establishing and maintaining consistent standards of classroom
and technology to foster             behavior.
active inquiry, collaboration,
and supportive interaction in        B5. Making the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as
the classroom.                       possible.

                                     Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning

                                     C1. Making learning goals and instructional procedures clear to students.

                                     C2. Making content comprehensible to students.



Standard #7                          Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning
Teachers are able to plan different
kinds of lessons.                 A1. Becoming familiar with relevant aspects of students’ background
                                     knowledge and experiences.
The teacher organizes and
plans systematic instruction         A4. Creating or selecting teaching methods, learning activities, and
based upon knowledge of              instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the
subject matter, pupils, the          students and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson.
community, and curriculum
goals.



Standard #8                          Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning

Teachers know how to test            A5. Creating or selecting evaluation strategies that are appropriate for the
for student progress.
                                     students and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson.
The teacher understands and
uses formal and informal             Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning
assessment strategies to
evaluate and ensure the              C4. Monitoring students’ understanding of content through a variety of
continuous intellectual,             means, providing feedback to students to assist learning, and adjusting
social, and physical                 learning activities as the situation demands.
development of the pupil.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 11
Standard #9                          Domain D: Teacher Professionalism
Teachers are able to
evaluate themselves.                 D1. Reflecting on the extent to which the learning goals were met.

                                     D2. Demonstrating a sense of efficacy.
The teacher is a reflective          D4. Communicating with parents or guardians about student learning.
practitioner who continually
evaluates the effects of his or
her choices and action on
pupils, parents, professionals
in the learning community
and others who actively seeks
out opportunities to grow
professionally.




Standard #10                         Domain D: Teacher Professionalism

Teachers are connected               D3. Building professional relationships with colleagues to share teaching
                                     insights and to coordinate learning activities for students.
with other teachers and the
community.                           D4. Communicating with parents or guardians about student learning.


The teacher fosters
relationships with school
colleagues, parents, and
agencies in the larger
community to support pupil
learning and wellbeing and
acts with integrity, fairness,
and in an ethical manner.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 12
         Differences between Practicum and Student Teaching
     The pre-student teaching practicum gives students firsthand knowledge of the classroom environment
and the role of the teacher. For many students, the practicum will be the initial encounter with the real
world of teaching. Practicum students are usually not expected to assume the degree of classroom
responsibility that occurs during student teaching. Practicum students are under the supervision of an
experienced teacher while they observe classroom activities, assist with day-to-day classroom
management tasks, interact one-to-one with students, and instruct small groups. Equally important, the
pre-student teaching practicum give students an opportunity to determine the appropriateness of teaching
as a career, and allows the cooperating teacher and university supervisor to assess the student’s readiness
for the student teaching experience.
     Student teaching, the culminating field experience is a full-time, school district semester assignment
that places a university student under the guidance of an experienced, qualified cooperating teacher.
Following an orientation period that varies in length according to the needs of the student teacher and
cooperating teacher, the student teacher becomes involved in the classroom instructional program and
gradually assumes increasing responsibilities for planning, instruction, and classroom management. As a
student teacher, the student follows the daily schedule of the cooperating teacher and the building policies
of the school, and functions as a regular staff member regarding arrival and departure times and
attendance at school events (e.g. faculty meetings, parent/teacher conferences, in-service sessions, and
team meetings.)
    The student teaching experience follows the calendar of the local school district. A fall semester
assignment will typically begin the latter part of August and end the latter part of January. A spring
semester assignment will begin the latter part of January and end the first part of June. Holiday breaks
follow the school district calendar. Students should recognize this requirement when planning for
housing, job searches, and vacations. Carrying other formal course work during the student teaching
semester is discouraged. Finally, students volunteering or working as coaches must regard student
teaching as their priority and plan accordingly.
     Therefore, there are major differences between practicum field experiences and student
teaching/interning. ALL students need to continually reflect on their role as teachers and their
         impact on kids, and the schools and agencies they work in every day.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 13
         Admission to the Professional Semester
     The “professional semester” is defined as the senior semester in which a student is enrolled in the
field experience of student teaching or internship.

         Filing Applications
    Students who plan to enter the professional semester during the fall semester of the next academic
year must file an application which is made available at a College of Education and Human Sciences
“professional semester” meeting held each November. Students who plan to enter the professional
semester during the spring semester of the next academic year must file an application at a College of
Education and Human Sciences “professional semester” meeting held in March/April. Dates for these
meetings are coordinated through and will be posted outside of Field Experience, Brewer 151.
    Students are encouraged to submit their applications as soon as possible after the meeting.
Considerable time is required to process each application—this is, to determine eligibility, to make
arrangements with schools for an appropriate field experience assignment, and to allow for introductions,
orientations, and, in some cases interviews. Students who file early will benefit by the careful
consideration that can be given to their requests; the later an application is received, the fewer
assignments and choices become available.
         Deadline for Filing Applications
    Students must apply for professional semester assignments one year in advance. Applications must
be filed by posted deadline in December for a fall semester placement or by the posted deadline in May
for a spring semester placement. Failure to file an application on time will result in a delay of the
professional semester.
Field Experience Timeline for Placements:
    Spring Student Teaching/Interning       October—Internship Application & STing placement begins
                                            November—Finalize Placements
                                            December—Post Placements/Students contact schools
    Fall Student Teaching/Interning         March—Internship Application & STing placement begins
                                            April—Finalize Placements
                                            May—Post Placements/Students contact schools


         Regular Education Requirements Overview
    1. Criteria for admission to a professional program have been met.
    2. A minimum of 90 credits completed prior to the professional semester
    3. Approval of the major and minor department(s).
    4. Resident total and professional education course GPAs of 2.75 or higher.
    5. Completion of the Human Relations Fieldwork requirement.
    6. A passing score on appropriate Praxis II content tests in certification areas. (a passing score in
         major is required; minor area has exceptions)
    7. Satisfactory scores on portfolio at Gate 2.


    A complete list of factors to be considered in the professional semester application for
individual programs are listed in the UW-Eau Claire catalog.



Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 14
         Special Education Requirements
    Applicants for student teaching/internship experience must:
    1. Have the recommendation of the Department of Special Education
    2. Earn a minimum grade of C- in Sped 200
    3. Earn a minimum grade of B- in Sped 306, 331, 401, 403, 411, 417, 421, and 431 as appropriate.
    4. Earn a GPA of 2.67 in specialization courses:
       Cognitive Disabilities, Sped 200, 205, 210, 306, 314, 331, 401, 402, 404, 416,
       417, 431, 434, and CSD 311
       SPED: Early Childhood, Sped 200, 205,220, 301,306, 324, 331 402, 403, 421,
       425, 426, 431, and one from 210, 330, or 460
       Learning Disabilities, Sped 200, 205, 306, 330, 331, 401, 402, 404, 416, 431, 434, and CSD 311
       Emotional Behavioral Disabilities, Sped 200, 205, 306, 350, 331, 401, 402, 416, 431, 434, 453,
       455, and CSD 311
    5. Completion of the Human Relations Fieldwork requirement.
    6. A passing score on appropriate Praxis II content tests in certification areas.
         All Special Education majors require the Middle Level Content Exam, ETS 20146 with the exception of the Special
         Education: Early Childhood major which requires the Elementary Education Content Exam ETS 10014.

    7. Satisfactory scores on portfolio at Gate 2.



         Out of Area Placements / Special Requests
   Schools and agencies servicing UW-Eau Claire are usually within an 80-90 mile radius of Eau Claire.
Only four situations will be considered for out of area placements:
          Spousal/Domestic Partner Relocation Situations (this is NOT to accommodate wedding plans)
          Medical/Health Related Situations
          Change to a family situation such as birth, adoption, fostering and/or elder care
            On the Job Situations (for additional certifications)
Approved out of area placements will have a fee associated with the placement that may range from
$200.00 - $1500.00 in addition to the UW-Eau Claire tuition.
    Any special request that meets the above criteria should be attached to the professional semester
application. All special requests will be reviewed by the Field Experience Council and students will be
notified of the Council’s decision.

NOTE: It is the practice of UWEC not to place student teachers at the school they recently attended.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 15
                                     Student Teaching/Intern Semester

         How to Register for the Semester

     Identify your program and register for the whole string of appropriate courses shown.
     Unless otherwise stated it does not matter what section you register for. (the Field Experience,
      Certification and Licensure Office will either make appropriate adjustments later in the semester,
      or notify students of changes they need to make)
     If you have received an Internship, register for your program classes as listed below.
      (the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Office will change you to the internship course
      number later in the semester, or notify students of the changes they need to make.)
     All Regular Education, Special Education and Music majors will register for a total of 15 credits.




                           Program                 Register for These Classes
                                     MCEA ______ ES 441; ES 445 (either quarter); ES 497

                         MCEA / LD Minor ______ ES 441 or ES 445; SPED 470; ES 497


                                      EAA ______ ES 445; ES 470 (either quarter); ES 497



                                      ECA ______ ES 441; ES 445 or ES 470; ES 497

                                     Music ______ MUED 487; ES 497



                                     ECSE ______ SPED 470 (1st half); SPED 470 (2nd half); SPED 476

                           LD, CD, LD/CD ______ SPED 470 (1st half); SPED 470 (2nd half); SPED 476

                           LD, CD / MCEA ______ ES 441; SPED 470; SPED 476




      Overseas (Global Student Teaching) ______ One ES course; ES 497; INTA 306 (a place holder w/b changed later)




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 16
                                 Praxis II Test List with Cut Scores

         Policy
    All Initial Educator Certification Students planning to student teach must receive a passing
score on their Praxis II content exam(s) prior to obtaining a student teaching placement.
    For a FALL semester placement, the last test date is the preceding January.
    For a SPRING semester placement, the last test date is the preceding August.
    A student teacher/intern must take a test for every area of certification with the exception of MCEA.
MCEA students do not need to test in their minor if the minor is math, language arts, social studies or
science. You can only take one morning and one afternoon test per day.
   To register for the exam(s) call 1-800-772-9476 or visit the website at www.ets.org/praxis.
Academic Testing is Schofield 226 has Praxis Bulletins available with complete information.
    The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction in accordance with PI 34, Wisconsin Administrative
Code, requires that all students completing a Wisconsin professional education (licensure) program and
out-of state applicants who completed their programs after August 31, 2004 take the specific Praxis II:
Subject Assessments listed below that correspond to the license(s) they will be issued.


When you register, content tests that begin with 1 or 2 indicate the sessions for taking the exam.
  1 = Session One – report at 7:30 AM, ............. testing completed by 10:30 AM
  2 = Session Two – report at 10:30 AM, .......... testing completed by 1:30 PM


                                 To Be Licensed in Wisconsin

Early Childhood
                                                                                  Test      Qualifying
   To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take
                                                                                  Code        Score
                             Elementary Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                               0014        147
                             (PDF) (Paper) (Calculator allowed.)
Early Childhood –
                             or
Regular Education
                             Elementary Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                               5014        147
                             (PDF) (Computer) (Calculator allowed.)


Early Childhood – Middle Childhood
                                                                                  Test       Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                      You Need to Take
                                                                                  Code         Score
                             Elementary Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                               0014        147
Early Childhood –            (PDF) (Paper) (Calculator allowed.)
Middle Childhood –           or
Regular Education            Elementary Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                               5014        147
                             (PDF) (Computer) (Calculator allowed.)



Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 17
Middle Childhood – Early Adolescence
                                                                         Test       Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take
                                                                         Code         Score
                             Middle School: Content Knowledge
                                                                        5146    146
Middle Childhood –           (Computer) (Calculator allowed.)
Early Adolescence –          or
Regular Education            Middle School: Content Knowledge (Paper)
                                                                        0146    146
                             (Calculator allowed.)


Special Education
                                                                                    Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take               Test Code
                                                                                      Score
                        Elementary Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                        0014        147
                        (PDF) (Paper) (Calculator allowed.)
Early Childhood –
                        or
Special Education
                        Elementary Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                        5014        147
                        (PDF) (Computer) (Calculator allowed.)
Cognitive Disabilities, Middle School: Content Knowledge
                                                                        5146        146
Cross Categorical, Deaf (Computer) (Calculator allowed.)
or Hard of Hearing,     or
Emotional Disturbance,
Learning Disabilities, Middle School: Content Knowledge (Paper)         0146        146
Visual Impairment       (Calculator allowed.)
Speech and Language
                        Speech-Language Pathology                       0330        600
Pathologist


Early Adolescence – Adolescence
                                                                                    Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take               Test Code
                                                                                      Score
                             English Language, Literature, and
Broad Field Language         Composition: Content Knowledge             5041        160
Arts, English Literature     (Computer)(available beginning May 2012)
and Composition,
                             or
Journalism, Speech
Communication                English Language, Literature, and
                                                                        0041        160
                             Composition: Content Knowledge (Paper)
Broad Field Science,
Biology, Chemistry,
Earth and Space
Science, Life &        General Science: Content Knowledge (PDF)         0435        154
Environmental Science,
Physics, Physical
Science
Broad Field Social     Social Studies: Content Knowledge
                                                                        5081        153
Studies, Economics,    (Computer)(available beginning May 2012)
Geography, History,    or

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 18
                                                                                        Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take                  Test Code
                                                                                          Score
Political Science &
Citizenship,          Social Studies: Content Knowledge (Paper)            0081        153
Psychology, Sociology
                      Mathematics: Content Knowledge (PDF)
                      (Computer)(Graphing calculator required.)            5061        135
                      (available beginning June 2012)
Mathematics
                      or
                      Mathematics: Content Knowledge (PDF)
                                                                           0061        135
                      (Graphing calculator required.)


Early Childhood – Adolescence
                                                                             Test    Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take
                                                                             Code       Score
Art                          Art: Content Knowledge (PDF)                  0134     158
English as a Second          English to Speakers of Other Languages
                                                                           0361     143
Language                     (PDF)
                             Health Education (PDF) (Computer)
                                                                           5550     610
                             (available beginning June 2012)
Health
                             or
                             Health Education (PDF) (Paper)                0550     610
                             Music: Content Knowledge (PDF)
Music                                                                      0113     150
                              (Contains listening section.)
                             Physical Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                           5091     150
                             (Computer)(available beginning August 2012)
Physical Education           or
                             Physical Education: Content Knowledge
                                                                           0091     150
                             (Paper)
Theater                      Theater (PDF)                                 0640     600


                                                                                       Qualifying
  To Be Certified in                     You Need to Take
                                                                                         Score
Foreign Language
                             ACTFL - Writing Proficiency Test (WPT)                          IH
                             ACTFL – Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) or                     IH
                             ACTFL – Oral Proficiency Interview (OPIc) –
                                                                                             IH
                             Computer based




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 19
                                     Policies of the Professional Semester

         Field Experience, Certification & Licensure Office
    The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator is responsible for locating, selecting,
and placing student teachers and interns at various sites. He/she considers the needs of the student
teachers and interns, the needs of the school districts, and available resources of the university. Student
teaching experiences and internships are arranged in cooperation with university departments,
supervisors, and cooperating school and agency officials.
    The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Office conducts the complicated and involved
placement process; THEREFORE, STUDENTS ARE NOT TO INITIATE CONTACT WITH ANY SCHOOL OR
TEACHER FOR THE PURPOSES OF PLACEMENT. Students are encouraged to contact their cooperating
teachers once all placements have been confirmed. Confirmed placements are posted during the first
week of December for spring placements and the first week of May for fall placements on the bulletin
board across from Brewer 151. Any questions or concerns should be directed to the Field Experience,
Certification and Licensure Office.
    Cooperating teachers, principals, and district administrators are encouraged to refer questions and
comments to the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Office. One of our major objectives is to
establish positive and continuing communication with area districts with respect to field experiences. We
want to ensure that our students are making positive contributions wherever they are placed.


         Tardiness & Absences
     Regular attendance is required. Excessive tardiness or absences for any reason may result in an
extension of the professional semester experience. Student teachers and interns must inform their
cooperating teacher and university supervisor as early as possible regarding an absence for illness or
appointments. Appointments should be made at a time when the least amount of student teaching is
missed and should be approved by the cooperating teacher PRIOR to the absence. The student teacher
should remember that consistent attendance is expected and is a criteria used in the evaluation of the field
experience. Cooperating teachers are asked to notify the assigned supervisor when students have missed
days. If a student misses five or more days in succession, the student must present a doctor’s excuse to the
cooperating teacher upon his/her return. The cooperating teacher and university supervisor will determine
if additional time at the placement is required. Attendance at on-campus student teaching/interning
seminars is mandatory!

         Calendar
    Student teachers/interns are required to follow the calendar, vacation dates, and building policies of
the school in which they are placed. However, UW-Eau Claire personnel will identify dates for the
completion of Quarter 1 and Quarter 3 placements.
    Student teachers/interns are required to function as regular staff members of the school/agency in
terms of arrival and departure times. This includes attending school functions such as team meetings,
faculty meetings, in-service sessions, and parent/teacher conferences.
    Students enrolling at UW-Eau Claire for the spring semester or participating in overseas student
teaching may encounter conflicts due to an overlap of the end of the fall semester calendar in the school
and the beginning of the spring semester at UW-Eau Claire.

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 20
    Student teachers/interns are required to honor any extended school year calendars due to school
cancellation because of weather or other extenuating circumstances.

         Injury
    All expenses associated with health surveillance and cares are borne by the student unless the Student
Health Service specifically indicates otherwise. Students are not covered by health or accident insurance
by UW-Eau Claire, the practicum facility, or the practicum institution. Workers’ compensation insurance
does not cover students. Joining SWEA may be something a student may want to consider.

         Resolution of Problems
    All issues or problems that arise with a student teacher/intern should be directed by the cooperating
teacher(s) to the university supervisor; likewise, issues or problems encountered by the student
teacher/intern should be brought to the attention of the university supervisor. It is the responsibility of the
university supervisor to mediate any conflicts. Issues may be brought to the attention of the Department
Chair and/or Associate Dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences by the supervisor for
adjudication if necessary.

         Workload
     The student teaching experience is a full-time commitment for the entire school district semester. A
satisfactory workload for the student teacher should be cooperatively arranged and agreed upon by the
cooperating teacher, the student teacher, and the university supervisor. In addition, the workload should
consist of the full range of activities to include but not limited to:
                                    classroom instruction
                                    assessment
                                    parent-teacher conferences
                                    faculty meetings
                                    supervisory duties
                                    co-curricular activities
    Because student teachers are considered learners at this stage of their teacher education, they
normally do not start out by carrying as heavy a teaching lead as a regular teacher but gradually assume
more responsibility throughout the experience. The student teacher should have experience teaching a full
load for at least one week during each nine-week placement. The actual numbers of classes which are
assigned to student teachers/interns vary across programs and are dependent on several factors such as the
student’s readiness to assume increased responsibility, the number of preparations involved, the needs of
the pupils, and the workload of the cooperating teacher. Student teachers are encouraged to become
involved in co-curricular activities, but they should limit their participation to assisting rather than
assuming leadership of the activity.
Student Teaching/Intern Transportation of Students for School Event Purposes
    All student teachers/intern drivers must follow the school district approval processes and policies for
driving students to/from academic and/or co-curricular activities/events. If a student teacher/intern would
be involved in an accident with their personal vehicle, while transporting students, the student
teacher/intern’s insurance will be the primary insurance. Therefore, a student teacher/intern shall NOT
use their personal vehicle for student transportation.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 21
         Absence of the Cooperating Teacher
    If a cooperating teacher must be absent on a short term basis (1-5 days) a substitute teacher must be
present in the classroom. The student teacher’s responsibilities should include only those which have
been previously defined. The student teacher may observe or assist the substitute in ongoing classroom
activities.

         Long Term Absence of the Cooperating Teacher
     If the cooperating teacher is expected to be absent for an extended period of time (in excess of a
week) the university supervisor and the Field Experience Office must be contacted to determine whether
alternative arrangements must be made for completion of student teaching requirements.

         The Cooperating Teacher Leaving the Room
    The student teacher may be in the classroom by himself/herself for short periods of time when there is
a necessity. This should only occur when the cooperating teacher decides that the student teacher can
handle the classroom. If an emergency arises and the cooperating teacher must leave the room for more
than a few minutes he/she should tell another teacher that the student teacher is in the room alone. During
the student teacher’s full time teaching part of the experience, the cooperating teacher may leave the room
for extended periods of time. The cooperating teacher should always inform the student teacher of where
he/she is going in the building.
    * This policy regulating the cooperating teacher leaving the student teacher in the room alone will be
different if the student teacher is completing an internship.


         Professional Liability
    Professional liability coverage is provided by the State of Wisconsin under provisions of S.S. 165.25(6)
and 895.46(1) of Chapter 81, Laws of 1975 for all University of Wisconsin System student teachers, intern
teachers, or for any others assigned to field experiences. This coverage protects the university student
against claims from third parties for personal injury or property damage caused while performing within the
scope of duties as a student teacher/intern. Questions about liability insurance should be directed to the
Associate Dean’s Office in the College of Education and Human Sciences, Brewer Hall 153.


         Student Teachers/Interns as Substitute Teachers
    Student teachers are not licensed and therefore cannot be utilized as substitutes. This is a University
of Wisconsin policy and is intended to protect the cooperating school system and its students as well as
the student teacher. While interns do have a license, they are not to be utilized as substitute teachers.


         Extra-Curricular Assignments

    Student teachers/interns are encouraged to participate in school functions. In some cases, assistant
coaching or other paid opportunities may be offered. Before accepting any offers, it must be discussed
with your cooperating teaching to ensure they will not place considerable demands on time and effort or
detract from the major purpose of student teaching. Student teaching is the top priority everything else
comes after that.


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 22
Labor Disputes
    When a work stoppage occurs in a cooperating school system/agency where student teachers/interns
are placed, it is the policy of UW-Eau Claire that the student teachers/interns be non-participants to either
party involved. STUDENT TEACHERS/INTERNS ARE NOT TO CROSS PICKET LINES OR PARTICIPATE IN
ANY SCHOOL-RELATED ACTIVITIES UNTIL THE ISSUES HAVE BEEN RESOLVED BETWEEN THE BOARD
OF EDUCATION AND THE LOCAL TEACHER EDUCATION ASSOCIATION.

     When a work stoppage occurs in a cooperating school system where interns are placed, it is the policy
of the Wisconsin Improvement Program (WIP) that interns be declared non-participants to either party
involved. INTERNS WILL REMAIN ON A STANDBY BASIS, WITHOUT PAY, during the period of time when
schools are closed or during the period of time when schools are declared open without resolution of
conflicting issues between the board of education and the local teacher association.
     Being a “non-participant” means student teachers will not be on picket lines, or make public
statements about the situation during school hours or at school sanctioned activities. In the event of a
strike or work slowdown, UWEC students shall immediately notify their University Supervisor and the
Field Experience Office who will determine the appropriate action for all student teachers/interns.


         Removal of Student Teachers/Interns
    The College of Education and Human Sciences recognizes the right of the cooperating institution and
the university to terminate a student's professional semester placement. A Student teacher/intern may be
removed under the following conditions:
    1. Continued participation in the experience is determined by the school district or university
       supervisor(s) to adversely affect the pupils or clientele served, the university student, the
       participating school or agency, or the university.
    2. The student teacher/intern is not meeting the minimum requirements of the experience as
       determined by the cooperating teacher(s) and the university supervisor(s). In this case, the
       evidence to support the decision should be provided by the university supervisor(s) with the
       advice of the cooperating teacher(s).
The procedures for the removal of a student teacher/intern are as follows:
         1. Consultation concerning the removal of a student teacher/intern takes place between the
            cooperating teacher and university supervisor.
         OR

         2. Consultation concerning the removal of a student teacher/intern takes place between the
            School Principal and the cooperating teacher. The university supervisor is notified of their
            decision.
         3. The university supervisor notifies the student teacher/intern of the impending removal from
            student teaching/interning. Written appeal procedures for the student removed from the
            professional semester experience will be made available to the student by the supervisor(s) at
            the time of removal.
         4. The university supervisor notifies the appropriate Department Chair at the University. The
            Department Chair provides written notification to the student.
     A student who has been removed from a professional semester placement(s) may appeal that decision
to the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences using identified University appeal
procedures.
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 23
         Statement of Non-discrimination
     No student of the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire may be denied admission to, participation in
or the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any service, program, course or facility of the system or
its institutions or centers because of the student’s race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin,
disability, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, pregnancy, marital status or
parental status in accordance with Wisconsin Statute Chapter 36.12 and Board of Regents policy. This
statement is published, in part, to fulfill requirements of Section 86.9 of the title 45, Code of Federal
Regulations, which implements Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972.


         Access and Accommodation
     The American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires state and local governments and places of public
accommodation to furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to ensure effective
access and communication for individuals with disabilities, unless doing so would result in a fundamental
alteration to the program or service or an undue burden. Therefore, the University of Wisconsin – Eau
Claire, in conjunction with its cooperating schools and agencies, is accessible to student teachers/interns
with disabilities and will make every effort to provide reasonable accommodations for qualified
individuals with disabilities. If the student teacher/intern is so qualified, they will arrange to meet with the
Field Experience Coordinator to secure suitable student teaching placements.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 24
                 Certification & Licensure


         Certifying Officer
    The Field Experience Coordinator of the College of Education and Human Sciences is the
University’s Certifying Officer. The Certification and Licensing Program Associate along with the
Certifying Officer’s signatures are recognized by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and
other states’ teacher licensing agencies for the official verification of completion of a teacher education
program at UW-Eau Claire. No teacher licensing forms can be signed by the Certification Officer or
Program Associate until the student teaching experience is completed, the grades submitted, the
final graduation review completed by the Registrar’s Office, and the degree awarded.


         Proof of Licensure
    As you are applying for teaching positions prior to graduation, districts will request proof of licensure
or proof that you will be eligible for a license. The Field Experience Office has a standard letter that
verifies a student is a candidate for graduation and indicates the grades and subjects for which he/she will
be endorsed. This letter is available after you have completed one quarter of student
teaching/interning. Letters will be distributed at the second seminar occurring after the first quarter
of student teaching/interning.
    You should keep the original and make copies for school districts as needed.


         Initial Wisconsin Licensure
    The easiest way to fill out the license application is to go to the Wisconsin DPI website at
http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/tepdl/index.html
                   Click “Licensing” on the right sidebar
                   Click on “Application Forms and Instructions”
                   Click on PI-1602-IS. This form can be completed on-line and then printed out or
                    printed out and manually completed in black ink.

The form PI-1602-IS should be completed and mailed to: College of Education and Human Sciences
                                                       Field Experience Office-UW-Eau Claire
                                                       Brewer Hall 151
                                                       PO Box 4004
                                                       Eau Claire, WI 54702-4004



    Please do not send the application directly to DPI; it should be completed and ready for the
University to endorse and forward to the Wisconsin DPI. Payment for the processing fee (check (made
out to DPI) or credit card info) should be included when mailing or bringing the form to the
University! Please contact the Certification & Licensure Program Associate for additional
assistance at (715) 836-2281.



Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 25
         Points to Remember About Your Initial License
 Your application will be processed after your degree is set by the registrar. This means that the
  Certification Officer cannot work on your License application until everyone has finished student
  teaching and/or all grades are assigned.
 License applications are processed in the order they are received.
 Incomplete applications will be sent back to the applicant for completion.
 After your License application has been sent to DPI, you may need to wait approximately 8-12 weeks
  for your License. You can check the DPI website under “License Look Up” to monitor the progress
  of your application.


         Licensing in Other States (www.uky.edu/Education/TEP/usacert.html)
     Students seeking licensure in other states should do so by contacting the Education or Public
Instruction Department of the state in which they expect to work. The University Of Kentucky College
Of Education (www.uky.edu/Education/TEP/usacert.html) maintains a website that attempts to collect
the teacher certification requirements for all 50 states. Find contact information for each state via this
site. Note that your license may have to be signed by a representative of the endorsing institution, which
will be UW-Eau Claire.
  It is the responsibility of the student to seek out Licensure requirements of other states if so desired.
UW-Eau Claire is only responsible for certifying teachers in Wisconsin.
   Licensing requirements differ from state to state and students may need to take additional
course work and additional exams in order to be certified outside Wisconsin.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 26
                                Phases of the Professional Semester

         Three Phases Comprise the Professional Semester:
                        Phase 1: Orientation
                        Phase 2: Beginning teaching/team teaching
                        Phase 3: Advanced teaching


         Phase 1:          Orientation
    During Phase 1, the Cooperating Teacher:
          Orients the student teacher/intern to the school/agency and community.
          Provides the student teacher/intern with opportunities to observe teacher and student
           behaviors and classroom management techniques.
          Communicates to the student teacher/intern school/agency, department, and program policies
           and practices.
          Identifies performance expectations of the student teacher/intern.
    It is important that the university supervisor contact the cooperating teacher early in the semester to
discuss the expectations for the student teacher/intern. In addition, this early contact can serve to clarify
procedures for communication should any problems occur during the professional semester.


         Phase 2:          Beginning Teaching/Team Teaching
    The focus during Phase 2 shifts from the assistant activities of Phase 1 to assuming some actual
teaching duties on a limited basis or working as part of a team with the cooperating teacher.
    The student teacher/intern enters a classroom situation where many important decisions regarding
curriculum and classroom procedures have been made prior to their arrival. It is important for the
cooperating teacher to provide the student teacher/intern with a background to the curriculum and
classroom practices.
    In these initial lessons taught by the student teacher/intern, it is very important for the cooperating
teacher to discuss the lesson plans before the lesson is taught and then provide immediate feedback on all
facets of the performance of the student teacher/intern.
    Phase 2 may begin as early as the first week of student teaching depending on the skills and
confidence of the student teacher/intern(s).




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 27
         Phase 3:          Independent Teaching
    In Phase 3, the cooperating teacher assigns the student teacher/intern responsibility for regular
teaching duties. The student teacher/intern should assume teaching responsibility for entire lessons and
unit(s) working as the lead or primary teacher. The goal of this phase is for the student teacher/intern to
exhibit skills expected of a beginning teacher. The student teacher/intern should work with the
cooperating teacher to plan lessons that meet curriculum goals and the needs of the pupils.
    Near the end of the quarter or semester each student teacher/intern is expected to assume the
teaching responsibilities which are typical of the cooperating teacher for a minimum of one week.
     Providing feedback to the student teacher/intern continues to be an important and necessary function
of the cooperating teacher. Furthermore, the cooperating teacher should encourage the student
teacher/intern to reflect and evaluate his/her own performance.


         Summary
    The degree of teaching responsibility assigned to the student teacher/intern is based on the principle
of gradual induction. The student's work should progress from observing and assisting to teaching short
lessons or teaming with the cooperating teachers to assuming responsibility for developing and teaching
lessons with less direct supervision.
    All student teachers/interns complete one or more pre-professional semester field experiences and,
therefore, should be ready to assume responsibilities in the classroom. However, the cooperating teacher,
university supervisor, and student teacher/intern should cooperatively develop a teaching schedule that
suits the student teacher/intern's abilities and the needs of the pupils.
    The pace at which teaching responsibilities are assumed is continually reexamined in relation to the
student teacher/intern's demonstrated abilities. The assumption of classroom responsibilities should be
gradual enough so that the student teacher/intern has time to adjust to added responsibilities, yet rapid
enough so that the student faces continuing challenges.
     While gaining experience in preparation for a career in teaching, the student teacher/intern’s presence
in the classroom should add value to the instruction process in the school to which the student
teacher/intern(s) are assigned.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 28
                             Evaluation of the Professional Semester

         Philosophy
Evaluation of student teachers/interns is the joint responsibility of the university supervisor(s) and the
cooperating teacher(s). Evaluation is an ongoing process throughout the professional semester and is a
combination of informal and formal assessments. Evaluation data are gathered from a variety of sources
including:
                              observation of the student teacher/intern
                              lesson plans
                              conference sessions
                              review of portfolio
The university supervisor has responsibility for assigning the final grade of the student teacher/intern.
This grade should be determined after consultation with the cooperating teacher and any other involved
supervisor.


         Monitoring Progress
1. The cooperating teacher should provide daily feedback/documentation to the student teacher/intern
   about lessons taught during the day and discuss the student teacher/intern’s plans for the following
   day. This feedback can be:
                            oral and written
                            formal and informal.
2. The cooperating teacher shall conduct formal observations of the student teacher/intern's teaching
   several times during the semester. Formal observations are defined as those times when the
   cooperating teacher functions solely as an observer. These observations should supplement
   "informal" observations that are made on a continuing basis.
    It is also recommended that the cooperating teacher hold at least two formal conferences per quarter
    with the student teacher/intern at which time the primary focus will include but not be limited to the
    student teacher/intern's:
                              strengths and areas needing improvement
                              meeting the needs of students
                              development of lesson plans, etc.
                              various assessment procedures
                              growth in the teaching standards
    These reflection conferences are excellent opportunities to complete the Mid-Quarter and End of
    Quarter Curriculum & Instruction Evaluation Form.
3. When the cooperating teacher is not able to participate in a conference following the university
   supervisor’s observation, the supervisor is encouraged to arrange another time to talk with the
   cooperating teacher and student teacher about the student teachers’ progress.
4. When circumstances warrant, a recommendation for the extension of the professional semester
   experience may occur. The cooperating teacher, university supervisor(s), and department chair
   should make this documented decision and negotiate with student teacher/intern.

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 29
5. At the conclusion of the student teaching/intern experience, the student may request the cooperating
   teacher(s) and/or university supervisor(s) to write a letter of recommendation. Student
   teachers/interns involved in co-curricular activities may seek a letter of recommendation from those
   individuals.


         Grading System
  The grading system for student teachers/interns in Education Studies Department programs (MCEA,
EAA, and ECA) is:
                            Satisfactory
                            Unsatisfactory
    Student teachers/interns in Special Education, Library Media programs receive grades of
A, B, C, D, F.


Special Education
Completion of student teaching courses requires undergraduates to earn at least a grade of B- (minus).
Graduate students must earn a grade of B in student teaching courses.
If the grade requirement is not met, the undergraduate student may repeat the student teaching course and
earn the appropriate minimum grade of B- or may graduate without the recommendation for teaching
licensure.


Library Media
Completion of student teaching courses requires undergraduates to earn at least a grade of B- .
Graduate students must earn a grade of B in student teaching courses.
If the grade requirement is not met, the undergraduate student may repeat the student teaching course and
earn the appropriate minimum grade of B- or may graduate without the recommendation for teaching
licensure.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 30
        Academic Grievances and Appeals for Student Denied or
    Removed from Field Experience Courses, Student Teaching, or
                    Intern/Practical Programs
          Academic Grievances

An academic grievance is an allegation by a student of substantial and unjustified deviation, to the
student’s detriment, from any of the following:

     1.    Officially announced or published policies, procedures, and/or requirements regarding
           admission into programs, schools, or individual courses;

     2.    Officially established grading policies of the University

     3     The instructor’s requirements for a course as announced to the class at the beginning of the
           semester.

     4.    The instructor’s own grading policies as announced to the class or as demonstrably applied to
           other students in that same class.

(2002-003 Student Services and Standards, page 31)

Grievance Procedure for Academic Decisions Based on Grades

The General Policies and Initial Procedures of the University Academic Grievance Procedure (see above)
are to be followed in cases where a student wishes to challenge an academic decision based on a grade
that results in the student being denied admission to a field experience course or denied a
recommendation for licensure after completing all required field experiences. The policies and
procedures are published in the Student Services and Standards document available in the office of the
Dean of Students located in Schofield Hall 240. If a grievance proceeds beyond the department level, the
College of Education and Human Sciences Academic Appeals Process shall be used. The process is
described below.


          Academic Appeals

An academic appeal is a request by a student to reconsider a decision based on factors other than grades
that results in the student being removed from or denied admission to a field experience course or denied
a recommendation for licensure after completing all required field experiences.

Academic Decisions about Admission to Program

A student who is denied admission to a program should first follow established departmental policies to
file a petition for reconsideration. The procedures are available in the program department office
[Education Studies (Brewer), Special Education (HSS 249)]. Department decisions regarding petitions
for reconsideration may be appealed only under criteria 1-4 above. If an appeal proceeds beyond the
department level, the College of Education and Human Sciences Academic Appeals Process shall be
used. The process is described below.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 31
Academic Decisions related to Field Experiences

A student who has been denied access to or removed from a field experience, student teaching, or
intern/practica experience based on factors other than grades, such as one or more factors identified in the
questionnaire that he/she filled out at the time of application, unsatisfactory performance during the
experience, or failure to pass the content examination may appeal that decision following the procedures
in place in the department where his/her program resides. If an appeal proceeds beyond the department
level, the College of Education and Human Sciences Academic Appeals Process shall be used. The
process is described below.


                 College of Education and Human Sciences Academic Appeals Process

A student who wishes to appeal an academic decision beyond the department level may submit an appeals
request to the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences. The request shall be in
writing and must be submitted to the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences
within fifteen (15) calendar days of the receipt of the decision to deny the student’s appeal at the
department level or of the decision to deny access to or remove the student from the field experience.

Within fifteen (15) calendar days of the receipt of the appeals request, the Associate Dean shall convene a
three-person panel appointed for that purpose, whose members shall be an education department chair
within the student’s program or his/her designee, a licensed practicing PK-12 educator, and a
representative of the Office of the Dean of Students. The department chair of the student’s program or
his/her designee shall serve as chairperson of the panel. No person who was involved in the decision
resulting in the appeal shall serve on the panel.

The student may be advised by a person of his/her choice, at his/her expense.

The panel shall proceed informally, and shall provide the student and his/her assistant or representative an
opportunity to present his/her position in person or in writing. Among the factors, enumerated without
limitation, that the panel may consider are the specific statement(s), misstatement(s) or omission(s) that
are at issue and the likelihood that the student’s purported condition or prior experience might adversely
affect the pupils or clientele served, the student himself/herself, the participating school or agency, or the
University. The panel may meet separately with the student and with others with whom it is consulting,
and not necessarily on the same day. Unless otherwise requested by the student, panel meetings involving
the student, his/her representative, and others shall take place in closed session. The panel may separately
convene in closed session to deliberate and make recommendations in a case.

The panel shall submit its findings and recommendations in writing to the Associate Dean of the College
of Education and Human Sciences, with a copy to the student. The Associate Dean’s decision to grant or
deny the appeal shall be final and shall be communicated to the student in writing.


                                                                                         Approved SEAPC, 9/26/03




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 32
                     Sample Timeline for Student Teaching Activities
                                     8-9 Week Assignment

    During this experience the cooperating teacher should provide both informal and formal
feedback on a continuous basis.


Week 1       Observe all classes/activities, learn student names, become familiar with classroom and
             school policies and procedures, assist teacher with as many areas as possible, become familiar
             with school and community. Prepare to assume responsibility for a subject/class.
             In the second (2nd) and fourth (4th) quarter student teachers should show more initiative and
             resourcefulness in preparing to assume teaching responsibilities than in first (1st) and third
             (3rd) quarter placements.


Week 2       Write and teach a few lessons in one subject/class area.


Week 3       Write and teach a week’s lesson plans in one or two areas.


Week 4       Write and teach a week’s lesson plans in two subject/class areas. Prepare to teach or assist in
             a new subject/class area. Discuss portfolio requirements and reflect on progress.


Week 5       Write and teach a week’s lesson plans in three or more subject/class areas. Prepare to teach
             or assist in a new subject/class area. Complete university mid-quarter evaluation.


Week 6       Write and teach a week’s lesson plans in four or more subject/class areas. Prepare lesson
             plans to assume full load of teacher (all subjects or classes)


Week 7-8 Write and teach all lesson plans for all subjects or classes.


Week 9       Begin handing responsibilities back to cooperating teacher. Observe other teachers in
             different grade levels. Assist with evaluation of students. Complete university end-of-
             quarter evaluation.

NOTE: The above example is provided as a suggested guideline and not an explicit plan. Each
experience is unique to the school and the student. Cooperating teachers are encouraged to talk
with the student to design a timeline that is mutually acceptable. The student and cooperating
teacher are encouraged to be flexible and to clearly communicate expectations.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 33
                         Responsibilities of Student Teachers/Interns


   For each student teacher/intern placement, a number of individuals and offices commit themselves to
making the experience a success. Their responsibilities are enumerated below.


         Student Teachers/Interns
    1. Dress, act, talk, and conduct oneself as a professional both in school and in the community.
    2. Familiarize oneself with the school district to include but not be limited to its philosophy,
       structure, materials, and neighborhood.
    3. Read the school district/school handbook, student handbook, and parent handbook.
    4. Understand and follow the school’s policies as applied to regularly employed staff to include but
       not limited to:
                              Arrival and departure times
                              Dress code
                              Reporting absences
                              Parking
                              Use of the teacher’s lounge and/or work room
                              School wide discipline plan
                              Computer usage (both student and staff)
                              Cell phone usage (both students and staff)
                              Lesson plan deadlines
                              Rapport with students
                              In-service sessions
                              Faculty meetings
                              Parent/teacher conferences
    5. Maintain ethical conduct in all relations with the staff, student body, school patrons, the
       administration, and other student teachers/interns.
    6. Maintain confidentiality with respect to information given by students, parents and families,
       faculty, administrators, or supervisors. This includes information derived from student
       performance, pupil data records, personnel records, or faculty meetings.
    7. Teach the curricula approved by the school and the district where placed. The cooperating
       teacher(s), in conjunction with the student teacher/intern will determine the programs or units to
       be taught.
    8. Assess pupil growth resulting from the student teacher/intern’s efforts. This may or may not
       include the determination of final grades for a reporting period in the school. Cooperating teacher
       is responsible for making a final judgment.
    9. Plan all lessons and assignments thoroughly. Submit individual lesson plans to the cooperating
       teacher prior to class presentation.
    10. Apply the principles of effective teaching of lessons by practicing and observing effective
        classroom management.
    11. Assist with co-curricular activities.
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 34
    12. Become familiar with the following:
                              School media center
                              Health services
                              Guidance services
                              Co-curricular activities
                              Technology resources
                              Use of duplicating materials
                              Grading procedures
                              Emergency procedures
                              Fire and tornado drill regulations
                              Student referral procedures
                              Rules of conduct in assemblies, on playgrounds, etc.
    13. Attend school functions that occur in the building. It is most desirable to attend faculty or
        departmental meetings and to participate in Parent Teacher Organization meetings.
    14. be receptive to suggestions and criticism. Constructive feedback from the cooperating teacher
        and university supervisor is essential for growth as a professional educator.
    15. Ask for advice or suggestions from cooperating teachers and supervisors.
    16. Keep the communication channels open by setting up regular meetings with the cooperating
        teacher to discuss concerns, plans, and lessons in progress.
    17. Complete all written assignments related to student teaching course requirements.
    18. Submit portfolio to university supervisor for final assessment.


    In addition to the above items, the student teacher/intern must attend all student teaching
seminars conducted by the university. These are usually scheduled on Fridays from 8:00-3:00.
Every effort should be made to avoid scheduling field trips, workshops, or job interviews during
these required seminar dates.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 35
                            Responsibilities of Cooperating Teachers

     The cooperating teacher is an important part of the student teaching/interning experience and plays a
vital role in the experience. It is important to accept the student teacher/intern as a co-worker and convey
that acceptance to both their students and colleagues. The following suggestions, which are not all
inclusive, are offered to aid the cooperating teacher in helping the student teacher/intern become a
positive and enthusiastic educator.
    1. Develop a plan for integrating the student teacher/intern into the teacher role.
    2. Provide a desk or work space for the student teacher/intern whenever possible.
    3. Prepare the students for the arrival of the student teacher/intern and establish the idea of two
       teachers in the classroom.
    4. Introduce the student teacher/intern to building staff and administration.
    5. Describe the community that the school serves and the role of parents in school affairs.
    6. Explain the organizational structure of the school and/or department.
    7. Share school duties and routine matters.
    8. Orient the student teacher/intern with:
                              School policies, procedures, and philosophies
                              Staff
                              School facilities
                              Equipment
                              Materials
    8. Describe individual students, particularly those with special needs.
    9. Demonstrate effective teaching methods and discuss these methods with the student
       teacher/intern.
    10. Establish daily times to discuss lessons, acquired skills, or progress, and weekly times for
        extended conferences.
    11. Engage in ongoing dialogue through the use of the following:
         A. Initial conferencing including student’s background, philosophy, previous field experiences,
            lesson planning and expectations of cooperating teacher.
         B. Developmental conferencing including student’s reflection on personal growth, analysis of
            teaching skills, evaluation of performance, long range planning, classroom management,
            rapport with students, specific lessons taught, and goals for future.
         C. Summary conferencing including review of established goals, growth that has occurred, areas
            that need improvement, attitudes toward teaching, comfort with grade/age level of students,
            reflection on teaching as a profession.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 36
    12. Provide written evaluations which include the following:
                              Positive aspects of lessons taught
                              Identification of specific areas that need improvement
                              Anecdotal notes of successes or reoccurring problems
                              Final evaluation of the performance of the student teacher/intern
    13. Provide at least one written evaluation to be included in the students’ portfolio. (PI 34.13)
    14. Provide opportunities for the student teacher/intern to gain experience in a variety of teaching
        formats that may include the following:
                              Small groups
                              Large groups
                              Individual
                              Team teaching
    15. Provide the student teacher/intern with experiences in such areas as the following:
                              Student conferences
                              Parent conferences
                              Co-curricular activities
                              School reports and records
                              Departmental and faculty meetings
    16. Work with the university supervisor(s) to assist the student teacher/intern.
        (Arrange time to converse with the student teacher and university supervisor)
    17. Exhibit a positive attitude toward the education of teachers and maintain respect f or the integrity
        of the teacher education program.
    18. Complete the Mid-Quarter and End of Quarter Education Studies Evaluation Form. This would
        be an excellent opportunity for you, the student teacher, and the university supervisor to evaluate
        the progress of the student teacher.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 37
                                  Cooperating Teacher’s Checklist
                                       Suggested Time Line of Activities
   This is a reminder list of things you need to do or          Discuss student arrival/leaving times, routines
   your student teacher needs to know – not all on the          Discuss attendance policies, reports, handling
   first day – check it over to jog your memory about            excuses for absence, tardiness, and make-ups
   your school.                                                 Discuss reporting count for lunch (elementary)
                                                                Discuss classroom behavior rules in place
   Before student teacher arrives                               Discuss routine expectations for student behavior
      Prepare your students for student teacher’s arrival       in building, discipline policies, including
      Review student’s resume and philosophy                    procedures for sending student to office
      Review requirements and expectations for                 Discuss maintenance duties assigned to students
       cooperating teachers                                     Discuss homework policy of classroom
      Prepare work area for the student teacher                Discuss supervision of halls, restrooms, or bus
      Develop a plan for student’s entry into teaching          loading
                                                                Discuss playground access and rules (elementary)
   The First Day                                                Discuss access to building after regular hours
      Show space for personal belongings, i.e. coat,
       purse, papers, food, car                              Before the Student Teacher Takes Over the
      Show faculty room and/or lunch arrangements           Class
      Discuss school calendar, with vacations, events          Discuss responsibility for reporting incidents of
      Give a copy of teacher handbook                           abuse, suicide, etc.
      Introduce student teacher to class                       Talk about Media Center services and policies
      Introduce student teacher to principal and other         Demonstrate use of audio/visual equipment
       staff                                                    Discuss handling grading and return of student
      Discuss expected teacher arrival/departure and            papers and projects
       phoning in notice of personal illness                    Discuss record-keeping and parent report system
      Discuss school norms for teacher dress                   Discuss handling bus violations (elementary)
      Exchange home phone numbers or E-mail                    Discuss handling student illness, medications
       addresses                                                Discuss students receiving special services
      Give seating chart/class list/daily/schedule(s)          Discuss availability of planning time/location
      Set up available times for conferences/chats             Model contacts with parents about behavior
      Give textbooks, manuals and curriculum guides
       for assigned classes                                  End of Quarter
      Discuss how the student teacher can begin to work        Complete and share final evaluation
       in your classroom immediately
      Discuss how to get help quickly in absence of a       Whenever it occurs . . .
       cooperating teacher                                      Participation in seminars, in-service
      Show floor plan/tour of school                           Schedule for school-wide tests
                                                                Access to student records
   Soon…During the First Week or Two                            Assemblies and another all-school activities
        Discuss expected relationship/communications           Extracurricular activities involving students in the
         with cooperating teacher                                class
     Discuss expectations of accomplishment over               Community agencies linking to school service
         entire range of student teaching
     Determine areas and topics for teaching
     Set up calendar of teaching schedule
     Plan for observations and feedback
     Discuss expectations for lesson plan submission
     Discuss how to work with paraprofessionals
     Introduce custodians
     Introduce services of office, i.e. mail box,
         bulletins, telephones, FAX, intercom system
     Review schedule of grading periods, staff
         meetings, and in-service meetings
     Review procedures for reporting accidents
     Demonstrate operation of fire extinguishers
     Discuss evacuation/protection procedures
     Discuss location of text, materials, supplies
     Show supplies available from school
     Demonstrate access to computer(s)/network
     Show work room equipment
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 38
                        Responsibilities of University Supervisors


    Requirements for Supervisors of Student Teachers/Interns

1. Conduct a minimum of 4 classroom supervisory visits of at least one hour in length for each student
   teacher/intern (PI 34.15). Collaboration between the supervisors of a student teacher/intern is
   encouraged. (A minimum of four one-hour supervisory visits is required by state statute, but the
   programs in the College of Education and Human Sciences strive towards achieving excellence.)
   Therefore, although a minimum of four supervisory visits is required, more visits may be necessary to
   adequately support the student teachers.
2. Provide at least two (2) – per quarter – written evaluations of each student based on classroom
   observations by the cooperating teacher and the supervisor (PI 34.15). These written evaluations will be
   done by the general supervisor and an additional evaluation will be completed by the content area
   supervisor. Collaboration between the supervisors is required.
3. Provide at least two (2) – 1 per quarter – evaluation conferences involving the student teacher/intern, the
   cooperating teacher, and the supervisor (PI 34.15). These evaluation conferences can be done by either
   the general supervisor or the content area supervisor and/or by both supervisors in collaboration with the
   cooperating teacher and the student teacher or intern.
4. Review the Student Teacher’s Portfolio if assigned students during Quarter 2 & 4, per PI 34.13 (3) (b)




    Requirements for General Supervisors of Student Teachers/Interns

1. Communicate with the cooperating teacher and student teacher/intern within the first two weeks of the
   quarter/semester to discuss expectations and procedures for evaluation of the student teacher/intern.
2. Consult with the cooperating teacher regularly regarding the student teacher/intern's performance.
3. Serve to eliminate misunderstandings and resolve conflicts between the cooperating teacher and the
   student teacher/intern.
4. Assign the final grade AFTER consultation with the cooperating teacher and other involved
   supervisor(s).
5. Monitor and evaluate any special circumstances that may occur during the placement. (E.g. extended
   absence.




                                                   39
    Requirements for Content Supervisors of Student Teachers/Interns

Content supervisors are assigned to Early Adolescence-Adolescence and Early Childhood-Adolescence
majors.
1. Provide a minimum of one supervisory visit to each student teacher/intern in a semester. This visit
   should be made as early in the semester as possible.
2. Assist the student teacher/intern with concerns about the content being taught. These concerns may
   focus on content, instruction, assessment, and resources.
3. In cases where a student teacher/intern may be experiencing difficulties, work with the general
   supervisor and cooperating teacher to rectify the situation.
4. Provide input into final grade for the student teacher/intern(s).




                                                    40
                Field Experience, Certification & Licensure Coordinator
The responsibilities of the Field Experience, Certification & Licensure Coordinator are enumerated below.
    1. Coordinate the assignment of field experiences for all teacher education programs.
    2. Administer the field experience, certification and licensure office, including supervision of support staff
       managing the budget and maintaining a database for all information pertaining to field experience,
       certification and licensure programs.
    3. Work with faculty to develop coordinated field experience, certification and licensure curriculum,
       including the coordination of field experience seminars for all teacher education programs.
    4. Work with a Field Experience Council to develop policies and procedures for developing and
       maintaining quality field experiences.
    5. Conduct in-service programs that contribute to the development and maintenance of high quality field
       experience placements; provide orientation and professional development programming for faculty and
       staff involved in field experience supervision.
    6. Develop and implement an assessment plan for monitoring the quality of field experience placements.
    7. Serve as the liaison between the:
                          Associate Dean of Teacher Education of the College of Education and Human
                           Sciences
                          various departments of UW-Eau Claire
                          Cooperating school/agencies.
    8. Communicate placement policies and procedures to:
                          students in professional education programs
                          faculty involved in teacher education
                          participating school/agency personnel
    9. Identify school districts/agencies for field experience placements.
    10. Meet with prospective College of Education and Human Sciences field experience student
        teachers/interns prior to the field experience to emphasize their responsibilities and to clarify the role of
        the student teacher/intern in the program of the cooperating school.
    11. Manage incentives/rewards for cooperating teachers.
    12. Report to the College of Education and Human Sciences, Associate Dean of Teacher Education.




                                                         41
                        Wisconsin Improvement Program: Internships

        What is the Wisconsin Improvement Program?
    Originally funded by the Ford Foundation in the latter 1950s, the Wisconsin Improvement Program (WIP)
was founded and directed by John Guy Folks, then Dean of the School of Education at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison. By action of the Wisconsin 1987-89 budget bill, WIP is now an integral component of the
Department of Public Instruction (DPI). WIP is a consortium of 32 teacher education institutions, and the DPI.
The purpose of WIP is to promote and encourage the professional development and education of teachers
throughout their careers.
    Two major initiatives of WIP are the teacher intern program and the funding of professional development
programs for interns and cooperating teachers throughout the state. The internship program offers pre-service
teachers throughout Wisconsin a chance to enter the profession as licensed teachers with a specialized contract.
    WIP gives final approval to internship designs as they are submitted and amended, and coordinates
placement between districts that need interns and campuses that have qualified students. The intern experience is
an important component of the teacher education program, and all parties must strive to ensure that a supportive
learning environment exists.

        What is a WIP Teacher Internship?
    Each WIP internship is designed by the cooperating school and the participating college or university. An
internship is organized around an intern team. The team guides and advises the teacher intern. The intern team
consists of the teacher intern, the cooperating teacher, select school staff, and the college or university
supervisor who provide input, direction and support for the teacher intern.

        Who is the Teacher Intern?
    The teacher intern is a college or university student in the process of completing a teacher education
program leading to professional licensure. Teacher interns are selected based on criteria established by
individual campuses.
    Interns are licensed by the Department of Public Instruction. Intern applicants are interviewed and selected
based on high admission standards. Interns are paid a minimum stipend of $4,500 per semester by the district
while working under the guidance of an experienced cooperating teacher, and the district pays a $500
professional development fee per intern per semester to the DPI.
    Students attending Wisconsin colleges and universities and some out-of-state member schools are eligible to
participate in the WIP teacher intern program.




                                                        42
What is the Intern’s Role in the School District?
    The teacher intern assumes a partial teaching assignment. The assignment can be no more than 50 percent of
the workload of a full-time teacher in the district. The rule applies to time, not number of assigned students. A
more detailed explanation of the 50 percent workload is as follows:
        Example 1 - A full-time teacher in a district teaches students six periods a day. The intern
        may teach three periods per day on his/her own. The remainder of the day the intern may
        observe the cooperating teacher or other teachers in the building/district.
        Example 2 - A full time teacher in a district teaches four periods a day. The intern may
        teach one period per day on his/her own for the first six weeks. For the second six weeks,
        the intern may teach two periods per day on his/her own. For the final six weeks, the intern
        may teach three periods per day on his/her own. Throughout the semester, the intern may
        observe the cooperating teacher and other veteran teachers during the periods he/she is not
        teaching.
    The intern is assigned a variety of instructional duties; planning, teaching, observing, and conferring with
colleagues. The intern is not a substitute teacher. An intern usually is not enrolled in formal coursework
during the internship. The actual workload of an intern will vary depending on the program worked out by team
members. The normal work week for a teacher intern is to be on site at the district school five days per week
during the semester (as defined in the district’s policy manual, association contract, and so forth.)

What is the Role of the Cooperating Teacher?
    The cooperating teacher provides day-to-day guidance to the intern and is available to observe the intern and
provide feedback on a daily basis. The cooperating teacher introduces the intern to other team members, other
faculty, administrators and resource persons in the school district, and orients the intern to team operations. The
cooperating teacher will also advise the intern on the expectations of the school building, district, and
community; and how to maintain student-teacher-parent rapport and professional ethics. The cooperating
teacher will report to the intern’s college or university and complete an evaluation of the intern necessary for the
intern’s certification.

What Legal Requirements must Cooperating Teachers Meet?
   PI 34.15(6) Wis. Admin. Code, Cooperating Teachers, requires that local school districts shall ensure
cooperating teachers utilized in their clinical programs meet all of the following requirements:
    a. Hold a regular Wisconsin License and have volunteered for assignment as a cooperating
       teacher.
    b. Have at least three years of teaching experience with at least one year of teaching experience
       in the school system of current employment.
    c. Have completed training in both the supervision of clinical students and in the applicable
       standards.

        School personnel should contact local campuses for information about supervisory courses or
        workshops that may be offered.




                                                        43
What Role does the School Principal Play?
    The school principal shares some of the duties of the cooperating teacher in helping to orient the intern to
the school system, the staff, and the community. The principal also ensures that the intern has adequate time to
confer with the cooperating teacher. When the intern request/design has been assigned an intern by a
college/university, it is the responsibility of the building principal to notify the local teacher association
representative with the name of the intern and daily schedule.

What is the Role of the Union?
     The intern request form requires a signature of the union for the process to begin. When the intern
request/design has been assigned an intern by a college/university, the association representative will be notified
of the name of the intern and his/her daily schedule.

What are the Responsibilities of the Intern’s College or University Supervisor?
    The supervisor will visit the school and will consult with all team members at least four times during the
intern’s assignment. Based upon classroom observation of the intern, the supervisor will document four written
observations of the intern. The supervisor will also conduct at least two three-way conferences involving the
intern, the cooperating teacher, and the supervisor.

What is the DPI’s role in the Intern Process?
    The DPI is the legal agency through which interns are issued licenses in Wisconsin; the license is issued to
the district. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction operates the program under State Statute 115.41. The
DPI advises the WIP teacher intern program by providing information on current license requirements and by
offering assistance to colleges, universities, and local school personnel in the development, implementation, and
evaluation of instructional programs related to teacher education.
    The WIP director reviews intern requests/designs, advises school districts on modifications of their designs,
approves those designs meeting WIP criteria, and investigates complaints or concerns about placements.

The following is a list of criteria used for the approval of internship designs:
    a. The intern schedule is to be no more than 50 percent work-load of a full time teacher.
    b. The overriding consideration in making decisions about intern design approval is the welfare of
       the intern.
    c. For a successful intern design, adequate day-to-day time must be provided for the cooperating
       teacher and intern for planning, observing, and evaluating.
    d. The cooperating teacher must be a voluntary participant in the intern team and must meet legal
       requirements as specified in Wisconsin Administrative Code PI 34.15(6).
    e. Intern designs should be supported by the entire educational community and should be viewed by
       members of the educational community as an enhancement to the district program.
    f. Each design must ensure that the intern will receive an experience that will include the teaching
       activities needed to meet the requirements of the individual’s certification area.
    g. Intern designs are approved for one-semester placements.




                                                        44
    Problems or concerns expressed by parents, interns, the cooperating teacher, other teaching staff members,
school district administrators, or teachers’ association representatives about the use of teacher interns in the
school will be considered in determining whether to place an intern in a particular school district. Evidence that
a particular placement may not be supportive of the teacher internship program in general or may not be a
positive environment for a teacher intern may result in a decision not to approve a particular request for an
intern

        Making the Program Work
     The individual school system and the college/university should cooperatively plan the internship design. It
is coordinated by Wisconsin Improvement Program.
    Release time must be provided for the intern to observe other teachers and for the cooperating teacher to
observe, confer, and plan with the intern. The intern becomes an extra human resource for curricular planning.
         A key component of any internship design is the opportunity for common planning time.




                                                        45
                                              Selection of Interns

The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire College of Education and Human Sciences views student teaching as
the capstone experience for our education students. The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Office in
partnership with all departments associated with the teacher education program follow a procedure for the
selection of intern candidates. The steps are outlined below:

1.      The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator will receive internship requests from
        various school districts desiring to have UW-Eau Claire students apply.
2.      The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator will carefully read the designs and
        determines if the internship is a valuable educational experience for students. The coordinator wants to
        ensure that there is enough time available for students to observe other teachers and plan their lessons.
3.      If further details are required regarding the internship design, the Field Experience, Certification and
        Licensure Coordinator contacts the school district and inquires.
4.      Once the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator determines the internship is a good
        educational experience for students, he/she makes a list for advertisement to all eligible students.
5.      The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Program Associate will then circulate a list of
        students admitted to their student teaching semester to all departments associated with teacher
        education. Department members recommend students for student teaching based upon established
        department criteria. Furthermore, department members recommend or comment on those students
        whom they believe are exceptional as well as those they believe would not be successful in an
        internship. ** Exception to the above practice in Education Studies is stated on the next page.
6.      The recommended students are sent a copy of all internship openings and given directions to apply to
        individual school districts.
7.      The Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Office sends all applications for internships at one
        time to the school districts so that they can determine whom they would like to interview for positions.
8.      The school districts contact students for interviews, interview the candidates, and contact all those
        interviewed to inform them of their decision.
9.      The district administrator of each school district contacts the UW-Eau Claire Field Experience,
        Certification and Licensure Office and informs them of what students were hired for internships.


NOTE: The College of Education and Human Sciences has an established a Field Experience Council whose
purpose is to advise the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinators in all field experience matters.
One of the objectives of the council is to establish guidelines for determining how internships are accepted and
advertised to our students. As the number of internships increase or decrease, it will become even more important
to carefully select internships as well as the interns themselves.




                                                        46
                             Department of Education Studies
                              Policy: Recommendation of Internship




  A. EAA/ECA:        All candidates admitted to EAA and ECA programs are eligible for internship IF
                     THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDS THE CANDIDATE FOR
                     ELIGIBILITY. At the end of “Block,” portfolios for candidates who have
                     applied to student teacher for the next semester, (Gate 2) are reviewed by the
                    education/program faculty. Candidates may be pulled from eligibility for either
                    an internship or student teaching at the time of the Gate review given the
                    following circumstances:

                               Not passing the Praxis II content test,
                         Portfolio score below the passing cut score, and/or
                         Unsuccessful block (teacher assisting) experience.


  B. MCEA:       All candidates admitted to MCEA are eligible for internship given a satisfactory
                 review of the Gate 2 portfolio which occurs at the conclusion of the Block Semester
                 (ES 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309). Candidates may be pulled from eligibility for
                 either an internship or student teaching at the time of the Gate 2 review or
                 subsequently given any of the following circumstances:

                  No passing score for Praxis II, the Middle Level Content Test,
                       Unsuccessful review of the Gate 2 portfolio, and /or
            Unsuccessful Block experience (**see criteria in catalogue as stated below).




** Applicants in program options A and B must earn a minimum grade of B in the Block practicum
field experience for three of the five areas: language arts, mathematics, reading, science, and social
studies and earn a minimum GPA of 2.75 across the block courses with no less than a grade C in the
   following courses: ES 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309. Applicants in other program options must
achieve a GPA of 2.75 or higher across professional education courses (ES 210, 211, 312, 317, 318,
    328, special methods) to gain departmental approval for admission to student teacher or intern.




                                                 47
        Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault                                 Information Sheet Series

              Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse & Neglect
The State of Wisconsin requires individuals who work in certain professions to report child abuse and neglect.
With some exceptions, any of the following individuals who “has reasonable cause to suspect that a child seen
by the person in the course of professional duties has been abused or neglected or who has reason to believe that
a child seen by the person in the course of professional duties has been threatened with abuse or neglect and that
abuse or neglect of the child will occur” must report as described below [See Wis. Stat. sec. 48.981(2)(a)].
Every new instance of child abuse or neglect must be reported. Reporters are protected from discharge for
reporting child abuse. Reports must be made to law enforcement, the child welfare agency (CWA), or child
protective services (CPS) agency. Law enforcement must refer all reports to CWA or CPS agencies within 12
hours. CWA or CPS agencies must refer reports of sexual abuse to law enforcement within 12 hours and must
also develop a policy regarding referrals for other types of abuse. These agencies are required to collaborate
with each other when investigating sexual abuse.

Who Must Report? Wis. Stat. 48.981(2)(a)1
The following individuals are mandated reporters:
 • Physician                               • Public assistance worker, including a financial and
 • Coroner                                    employment planner, as defined in s. 49.141(1)(d)
 • Medical examiner                        • Member of the treatment staff employed by or working under
 • Nurse                                      contract with a county department under s. 46.26, 51.42, or
 • Dentist                                    51.437
 • Chiropractor                            • Marriage and family therapist
 • Optometrist                             • Professional counselor
 • Occupational therapist                  • Day care provider
 • Dietician                               • Speech-language pathologist
 • Audiologist                             • Emergency medical technician
 • Acupuncturist                           • Count appointed special advocate
 • Physical therapist & PT assistant       • Police or law enforcement officer
 • Alcohol or other drug abuse counselor • Child care worker in a day care center, group home as
 • Medical or mental health professional      described in s. 48.625(1m), or residential care center for
 • Social worker                              children and youth
 • Mediator under s. 767.11                 • School teacher, school administrator, school counselor
 • First responder                         • Clergy (See section below.)

What is Reportable Child Abuse? Wis. Stat. sec. 48.02(1)
  • Physical abuse inflicted on a child by non-accidental means, serious physical harm inflicted on an unborn
  child, and the risk of serious physical harm to a child when born, caused by the habitual lack of self-control of
  the expectant mother in the use of alcoholic beverages, controlled substances, or controlled substance analogs,
  exhibited to a severe degree.




                                                        48
  • Sexual abuse, defined as:
        ° Sexual intercourse or sexual contact under s. 940.225, 948.02, or 948.025 (sexual assault, sexual
          assault of a child, and repeated acts of sexual assault of the same child)
        ° Sexual exploitation of a child
        ° Causing a child to view or listen to sexual activity
       ° Permitting, allowing, or encouraging a child to engage in prostitution
       Exposing genitals or pubic area
  • Emotional damage for which the child’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian has neglected, refused, or
   been unable for reasons other than poverty to obtain the necessary treatment or to take steps to relieve the
   symptoms.
  • Neglect is the “failure, refusal or inability on the part of a parent, guardian, legal custodian, or other person
   exercising temporary or permanent control over a child, for reasons other than poverty, to provide necessary
   care, food, clothing, medical or dental care or shelter so as to seriously endanger the physical health of the
   child” [Wis. Stat. sec. 48.981(1)(d)].
Notably, acts that would constitute the crime of sexual intercourse with a child age 16 or over are not reportable
abuse, but acts that would constitute sexual assault under Wis. Stat. sec. 940.225 are reportable child abuse.
Wis. Stat. sec. 940.225 describes the acts of sexual contact or intercourse with another person without consent,
with a person incapable of giving consent, or between people in certain relationships, such as inmate-guard.

Exceptions to Reporting Requirements: Wis. Stat. sec. 48.981(2m)
The State of Wisconsin carved out an exception to reporting requirements to allow children to obtain
confidential health care services. Health care services means family planning services as defined by law,
pregnancy testing, obstetrical health care or screening, and diagnosis or treatment for a sexually transmitted
infection. For purposes of this exception, health care providers include physicians, physician assistants, and
registered or licensed nurses.
The exception applies when one of these persons provides a health care service to a child or when a mandatory
reporter obtains information about a child who is receiving or has received health care services from one of
these persons. However, this exception is not absolute. A report is required in spite of the exception whenever
the health care provider suspects any of the following:
   The sexual intercourse or sexual contact occurred or is likely to occur with a caregiver.
   The child suffered or suffers from a mental illness or mental deficiency that rendered or renders the child
    temporarily or permanently incapable of understanding or evaluating the consequences of his or her actions.
  
    sexual intercourse or sexual contact.
   The child was unconscious at the time of the act or for any other reason was physically unable to
    communicate unwillingness to engage in sexual intercourse or sexual contact.
   Another participant in the sexual contact or sexual intercourse was or is exploiting the child.
                                                                                                     e was
    voluntary.




                                                         49
Clergy Mandatory Reporting Provisions
As of May 1, 2004, clergy are mandatory reporters of child sexual abuse. Under these provisions, a report is
required if a clergyperson has reasonable cause to suspect that a child seen in the course of the clergyperson’s
professional duties was sexually abused or was threatened with sexual abuse and sexual abuse is likely to occur.
Further, a report is also required if a clergyperson has reasonable cause to believe, “based on observations made
or information that he or she receives,” that a child has been sexually abused or has been threatened with sexual
abuse and sexual abuse is likely to occur. However, “[a] member of the clergy is not required to report child
abuse information . . . that he or she receives solely through confidential communications made to him or her
privately or in a confessional setting if he or she is authorized to hear or is accustomed to hearing such
communications and, under the disciplines, tenets, or traditions of his or her religion, has a duty or is expected to
keep those communications secret. Those disciplines, tenets, or traditions need not be in writing.” Wis. Stat. sec.
49.981(2)(bm)(3).

Are Staff at Sexual Assault Service Provider Agencies Mandated Reporters?
Under Wisconsin law staff of sexual assault service provider (SASP) agencies are not mandated reporters.
However, individuals who work at these agencies may be mandated reporters due to their profession, such as
licensed social workers, etc. Many agencies, through agency policy or due to grant requirements, have adopted
these reporting guidelines for all staff. A minor concerned about mandatory reporting and seeking services at a
SASP should ask for a copy of the agency’s reporting policy.

For further information, see WCASA’s information sheets on sexual assault laws, child sexual assault laws,
child pornography laws, and the WCASA information sheet on teens.




This information sheet was compiled in 2004 by the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault (WCASA). WCASA is a membership
organization of sexual assault service providers, other organizations, and individuals throughout Wisconsin working to end sexual violence.
For information sheets on other topics or to become a member contact WCASA, 600 Williamson St., Suite N-2, Madison, WI 53703,
(608)257-1516, www.wcasa.org. For more information about sexual assault or to receive support with a sexual assault experience, contact
your local sexual assault program. This sheet may be reproduced in its original format only. This information does not constitute legal
advice.




                                                                           50
                                             Sexual Harassment Policy Statement
                                             And Mechanism for Implementation

        Policy
         It is the policy of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin system, consistent with its efforts
to foster an environment of respect for the dignity and worth of all members of the University community, that
sexual harassment of students and employees in the University of Wisconsin System is unacceptable and
impermissible conduct which will not be tolerated.


        Definition
A. Sexual harassment of employees is defined as any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors,
   and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
    1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s
       employment, or
    2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment
       decisions affecting such individual, or
    3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work
       performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment.
B. Sexual harassment of students is defined as any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and
   other verbal or physical conduct as a sexual nature when:
    1. Submission to such conduct is made wither explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a student’s
       grade, recommendations, or other factors related to the student’s academic career, or
    2. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with a student’s work performance
       or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive classroom environment.


        Informal Procedures for Addressing Allegations of Sexual Harassment
    An allegation of sexual harassment should be brought to the Affirmative Action Office. Procedures
followed by the Affirmative Action office in its investigation and review are available in the
Affirmative Action office or on its campus website. http://www.uwec.edu/affirm/Policies/index.htm




                                                         51
                AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMPLAINT PROCEDURES
                              http://www.uwec.edu/sdd/documents/Handbook06.pdf


I.   EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY

The University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire is committed to a policy of providing equal educational and employment
opportunity for all persons regardless of race, religion, creed, color, sex, gender identity or expression, ancestry,
national origin, age, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, veteran's status, membership in the military forces,
arrest or conviction record, political affiliation or other protected status. Discrimination or harassment based on any
protected category that has the purpose and effect of adversely affecting any aspect or condition of a person’s
education, employment, housing, or participation in a university activity or program is prohibited.

As a part of its continuing commitment to eliminate discrimination and harassment, the university has established
procedures for providing prompt and fair resolution of complaints. All complaints, questions, or requests for
information should be referred to the Affirmative Action Office, 217 Schofield, (715) 836-2387,
affirm01@uwec.edu, http://www.uwec.edu/affirm/index.htm.

II. INFORMAL RESOLUTION OF COMPLAINTS

To the extent practical, all complaints should be settled through informal discussions among the parties involved. If
discussions among the parties involved are ineffective, employees may seek assistance from their union officials,
supervisors, directors, chairs, or deans; and students may contact an Associate Dean of Student Development, 240
Schofield Hall, 836-2325.

Employees and students may also at any time seek advice and assistance on informal resolution from the
Affirmative Action Officer, 217 Schofield Hall, 836-2387, affirm01@uwec.edu

III. COMPLAINT PROCEDURES IN THE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICE

Should informal discussions fail, initiation of a complaint may take the form of an inquiry in person, in writing, or
by telephone to the Affirmative Action Officer, at 217 Schofield Hall, 836-2387, affirm01@uwec.edu. A complaint
form is available on the Affirmative Action website.
        A. Time for Filing
        B. Investigation and Review
        C. Hearing Committee
        D. Committee Recommendation.

     IV.     DISCIPLINARY ACTION

     Any individual who is disciplined as a result of this procedure retains applicable rights and procedures with
     regard to the disciplinary action.




                                                              52
                                    Suggestions for Mental Health Issues

         Mental health trauma, difficulties, illnesses, and disorders can have a disabling impact on those who
struggle to cope with them. They can cause an individual irrational fear, overwhelming stress, and changes in
behavior. While undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at UW—Eau Claire encounter situations and
expectations that can tax mental health conditions, off-campus practicum experiences can be particularly
challenging.
         The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA; http://www.ada.gov/cguide.htm) prohibits discrimination
on the basis of disability in employment and education settings. To be protected by the ADA, one must be “a
person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a
person who has a history or record of such impairment, or a person who is perceived by others as having such
impairment.” The ADA does not specifically name all of the impairments that are covered, but mental health
conditions are explicitly protected. In order to receive services and accommodations for the disability, a student
must provide current documentation from an appropriate licensed professional that identifies a disability and
demonstrates that it substantially limits a major life activity, including learning. The documentation must show
how the disability impacts the student and support specific accommodation requests.
         Teacher Education in the College of Education and Human Sciences (COEHS), as part of UW—Eau
Claire, is committed to providing equal educational opportunity for all students, including undergraduate and
graduate students enrolled in part- and full-time off-campus practicum experiences (e.g., student teaching,
internships, etc.). Students with disabilities protected by ADA can seek services and accommodations to
facilitate successful practicum experiences. Furthermore, the mental health and well-being of our COEHS
students who do not have a documented disability is held in high regard. The following suggestions,
responsibilities, and guidelines are designed to facilitate success for all COEHS practicum students.

        Student Responsibilities
    Just as we are all responsible for our physical health, we are equally as responsible for our emotional health.
Some students enrolled in off-campus practicum experiences may find themselves encountering sudden, acute,
transient, or situational mental health challenges that do not constitute a disability. In those situations, the
following suggestions are offered:
       Contact your immediate supervisor, University Liaison Supervisor, Field Placement, Certification and
        Licensure Coordinator, or another faculty member from your department. These individuals can assist
        practicum students during moments of crisis and concern. Temporary accommodations may be offered
        to allow the practicum student necessary time and/or services. This may include making a contact with
        the Dean of Students Office, especially when a period of time off from the practicum experience is
        deemed necessary.

       Contact the UW—Eau Claire Counseling Services. This office offers free, confidential, short-term
        individual, group, and couples counseling to assist students with personal, developmental, or
        psychological concerns related to their educational progress and personal growth. This office also offers
        counseling support to students experiencing crisis involving traumatic events and emotional trauma.
        Referrals to outside services are provided when necessary.

       Stay connected with wellness activities throughout the practicum experience. Maintain healthy routines
        and relationships.



                                                        53
     When mental health challenges are more than moderate, transient, or situational, it is up to the student to
request access to needed services and accommodations. UW—Eau Claire provides academic services and
accommodations for all students who provide appropriate documentation of the existence of a disability, as this
is in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and
UW System policy. It is important to remember that it is the student's responsibility to initiate the provision of
any accommodations. Practicum students who have a confirmed psychological disability should refer to the
following process:

      1.    Contact the Services for Students with Disabilities Office (715-836-4542; Old Library 2136).

      2.    Provide current documentation that demonstrates that a disability exists resulting in a substantial
            limitation to a major life activity, and supports the requested services.

      3.    Be prepared to discuss the accommodations you feel are necessary and appropriate. Follow all
            appropriate policies and procedures when requesting services and/or accommodations.

      4.    Make necessary contacts with the University Liaison Supervisor, departmental field placement
            coordinators, and/or the Field Experience Coordinator for COEHS Teacher Education to discuss
            how approved accommodations will be provided.

      5.    Be aware of and follow the established Grievance Policy for Students with Disabilities when
            necessary.


        Off-Campus and University Liaison Supervisor Responsibilities
The off-campus and University Liaison supervisor play a vital role in the education and nurturing of practicum
students. The off-campus supervisor is likely going to be the first person to notice challenges to a practicum
student’s mental health and well-being. However, the University Liaison supervisor often has a level of
familiarity with the practicum student. The practicum student may often feel most comfortable seeking guidance
from the University Liaison Supervisor, or another “home” department faculty member, due to past relationships
and familiarity. Note the following suggestions for handling mental health issues when working with practicum
students.


      1.    Model and promote mental wellness through effective interpersonal communications, respect for a
            balance of work and home, and passion for the profession.

      2.    Maintain appropriate boundaries while keeping the lines of communication open and positive.

      3.    When a serious mental health condition is suspected, consult with the University Liaison supervisor
            and make a recommendation to the practicum student to seek assistance from the UW—Eau Claire
            Counseling Services (715.836.5521), the Dean of Students Office (715.836.5626), or the Services
            for Students with Disabilities Office (715.836.4542).

      4.    Remember to maintain a student’s right to confidentiality when addressing a mental health issue
            associated with a practicum student.




                                                        54
                          College of Education and Human Sciences Guidelines
                                   For Students Regarding H1N1
UW-Eau Claire faculty and staff are actively planning, preparing, and being proactive for this flu season and
want to provide some guidelines for you to follow regarding H1N1:

    1. Determine what the policy is for the school, agency, or child care center for employees who show
       symptoms of or who have H1N1. As a practicum student placed in this facility, you are asked to follow
       the policy as if you were an employee.

    2. As is the case for absence from field experience, student teaching, internships, etc., for any reason,
       consult with your university supervisor about how to make up missed days or hours due to H1N1. Your
       supervisor and cooperating teacher will work with you to determine if you have had sufficient
       experience to complete the required placement. The decision will be based on your progress and
       performance. If your supervisor and cooperating teacher determine that you need additional time, they
       will create a plan in consultation with you so that you can successfully complete the experience.

    3. Please be diligent about monitoring yourselves for signs and symptoms of H1N1. This includes the
       following:
            Fever
            Persistent cough
            Sore throat
            Body aches and chills

    4. Everyone must use universal precautions at all times. Remember to wash your hands continually,
       use antibacterial lotions, avoid sharing food and drinks, avoid setting snacks out to share, etc. Be
       extremely vigilant about this process.

    5. We encourage you to stay informed, stay healthy, and be prepared.

        Stay Informed
            Be prepared for cancellation notices for your placement.
            View the CDC H1N1 website at http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/qa.htm

        Stay Healthy
            Get adequate sleep, exercise, and nutrition.
            Cover nose and mouth with a fresh tissue or your sleeve when you cough or sneeze.

        Stay Prepared
            Self-isolate when/if you become ill.
            Have over-the-counter cold/cough and flu symptom relief medicines at home.




                                                       55
                    Appendix A - Answers to Some of Your Field Experience
                                 Questions

        When Do I apply for Student Teaching?
    You usually apply the year before you will be student teaching. If you are student teaching in fall, you
apply the previous fall. If you are student teaching in spring, you apply the previous spring. With your
application, you need to submit a resume and a philosophy of education. These are given to your cooperating
teachers so that they know a little more about you before you arrive.


        What Are the Typical Placements for Various Majors?
    If you are an Middle Childhood-Early Adolescence major with a minor such as language arts, math, social
studies, Spanish, English, etc., you will be placed for a quarter in an elementary school and a quarter at the
middle school in your minor.
    If you are an early Adolescence-Adolescence or Early Childhood-Early Adolescence major, you will be
placed for a quarter at the middle level and a quarter at the high school level.
    If you are a comprehensive Special Education major, you will be placed for a quarter at the elementary level
and a quarter at a middle or high school level.
    If you are a Special Education major with dual certification in MCEA you will be placed a quarter in an
elementary school and a quarter in a middle or secondary school in special education.


        How Do I Apply for Internships?
     First of all, you must be eligible, as determined by your department, for an internship. Then, you will
receive a list of all internship openings by email. You usually have a week and a half to apply. You will need a
copy of your resume, a cover letter and a copy of your transcript to apply. You will apply for the position on-
line for the Eau Claire School district, and furnish the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure office with
a copy of your cover letter. The principal and coordination teacher will screen all electronic applications and
contact you if they wish to interview you. If the school district hires you, you will need to report back to the
Field Experience, Certification and Licensure office for information on obtaining your Internship License.


        Are There Any Special Projects to Participate in for Student Teaching?
    Yes, there are some projects that you can participate in for student teaching. Once each semester, we have a
teaming project, (usually Delong Middle School) where you are assigned to a team of teachers and work on a
special project. We also have opportunities to teach in an urban setting in Milwaukee Public Schools or in Aldine
School District in Houston, Texas.
Finally, we have an opportunity to complete part of your student teaching overseas through Global Student
Teaching. Please contact the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator for further details.


                                                        56
        What is the Length of my Student Teaching Placement?
     DPI requires that you student teach for an entire semester following the school district calendar, not the
UW-Eau Claire calendar. If you student teach in fall, you should expect to be ready to begin your placement in
mid-August and finish about mid-January. In this situation, you will be graduating in December and continuing
to student teach about three weeks after you graduate. If you student teach in spring, you should expect to be
ready to begin your placement in mid-January and finish the first week in June. In this situation, you will be
graduating in May and continuing to student teach about three weeks after you graduate.


        Can I Take a Winterim Course Before I Student Teach in Spring?
    The answer to this question is usually "no" unless the course meets after 4:00 p.m.
    Most schools begin their second semester before the UW-Eau Claire Winterim session ends. You must be
ready to report to your placement when the second semester begins.


     Can I Make Special Requests Regarding My Placement for Student
Teaching?
    The personnel in the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Office ask that unless you have an
extreme request that meets one of the criteria listed on page 13, you do not make a special request for your
student teaching placement. If you feel you must make a special request, we try our best to meet all special
requests, but cannot guarantee it. If we cannot meet your request, the Field Experience, Certification and
Licensure Coordinator will telephone you to see what can be worked out. We place in Wisconsin in a service
area of approximately 80-90 miles.


        What Can the Field Experience, Certification & Licensure Office Do For
Me?
    The personnel in the office are here to serve students. We believe in placing students first; therefore, we
will make every effort possible to work with you with any concerns you have. Please feel free to stop in at any
time and check on how your placement is coming, recommend a good teacher whom you have worked with so
other students may benefit, or inform us of a placement that we should not use again. We place about 1000-
1200 students each academic year in field experience placements. We are thorough and constantly
communicate with teachers, principals, students, and UW-Eau Claire faculty. We promise to do our best in
helping you have a successful student teaching/interning experience.




                                                       57
                             Appendix B - Field Experience Office


Goal:
   To arrange quality field experiences for all students enrolled in teacher education
   programs at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

Objectives:
 To place all students in appropriate field experiences in a timely
  manner.
 To meet the needs of students for field experience placements with
  respect to location, grade level, subject matter, and other quality
  considerations.
 To establish positive, continuing communication with area districts with
  respect to field experiences.
 To attend local and state meetings involving field experience matters.
 To advertise opportunities for students to participate in a variety of
  field experiences.
    To provide continuing support for faculty and staff relating to field
     experiences.


Debra Harding, Field Experience, Certification & Licensure Coordinator

715-836-5544                                hardindr@uwec.edu




                                                 58
                 Appendix C - University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
                                    Background Check Procedures
                                College of Education and Human Sciences
                                          As adopted October 9, 2008



Stage 1—Check for Initial Field Experience
All students complete the “Criminal Background Disclosure” form during the ES 203, ES 210 / 211, 212 and
SPED 205 pre-program courses. A background check is then run on all students by a staff member in the office
of the College of Education and Human Sciences.

Students whose background checks reveal a significant history will be asked to meet with the Associate Dean
of the College of Education and Human Sciences to discuss the results. The Associate Dean, in consultation
with the Department and the Field Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator will determine whether
the student may continue with the field experience.

A course fee of $20.00 is added to the above-mentioned courses to cover the cost of the background check.


Stage 2—Check for Professional Semester
Students applying for the professional semester (i.e., student teaching) complete the ”Criminal Background
Disclosure” form and submit it as part of their application for the professional semester. A background check
is run on all students by a staff member in the office of the College of Education and Human Sciences during
the semester prior to student teaching.

Students whose background checks reveal a significant history will be asked to meet with the Associate Dean
of the College of Education and Human Sciences to discuss the results (unless a meeting subsequent to the
Stage 1 check already occurred). The Associate Dean, in consultation with the Department and the Field
Experience, Certification and Licensure Coordinator, will determine whether the student may go forward with
the professional semester.

All information is confidential and held within the College of Education and Human Sciences, unless it is
requested by an administrator at a potential placement site. The release of information will only be made if
the student has signed an authorization to release the information, has been informed by the Associate Dean
that a request has been made, and has met with the Associate Dean to discuss the release of the information.

A course fee of $55.00 is added to the ES 497 student teaching seminar course to cover the cost of the second,
more comprehensive background check and a T.B. test.

No background check is conducted for an on-the-job placement.




                                                      59
                     Appendix D - Human Relations Cultural Diversity
                                   Requirement
    The teacher education programs in the College of Education and Human Sciences at UWEC approved a
change to the service learning and human relations clock hour requirement to comply with new Wisconsin
Department of Public Instruction rules. Under the new procedures, all students who enroll in ES 385-Social
Foundations of Human Relations after August 30, 2004 will need to fulfill the new requirements. Students will
be required to complete thirty hours of service learning which will be credited upon completion of ES 385 using
the following procedures.

FIRST 15 HOURS:

Fifteen of the thirty hours should be completed BEFORE beginning the class but AFTER the student has been
enrolled in or formally transferred to UWEC. The hours must follow the service learning guidelines requiring
direct, interactive, voluntary service with populations who have backgrounds different from the students. You
may already have some volunteer experience that would count for part or all of these hours. During the first
week of enrollment in ES 385 Students will be asked to submit a written reflection on the first 15 hours which
must receive a passing grade. If a student does not complete 15 hours nor has less than 15 hours, the additional
hours will need to be completed during enrollment in the class to fulfill the thirty hour requirement. Given the
other demands of the ES 385 course, we encourage you to complete some or all of the 15 hours prior to the
course.

SECOND 15 HOURS:

The remaining 15 hours will be completed as part of assigned activities during the ES 385 class. Specific
instructions for these hours will be given to you in each section. Students will write a second reflection on these
hours and must receive a passing grade on it. This will constitute completion of all 30 hours by the end of the
class.

NOTE: The attachment provides further direction regarding service learning and human relations requirements.

If you need assistance in finding appropriate service learning activities, see the

1. Service Learning office resource website
<http://www.uwec.edu/sl/project.htm>http://www.uwec.edu/sl/project.htm ...or go to

2. The CALL website
<http://www.uwec.edu/asp/dc/call/call.htmCALL>http://www.uwec.edu/asp/dc/call/call.htmCALL.




                                                         60
                       ES 385 Service Learning Requirement: Criteria for Completion.

In the College of Education and Human Sciences, all students who will be licensed to work in schools need to
meet the UWEC Service Learning hour’s requirement using the following criteria:
    1. Service activity is conducted in and meets the needs of the community.
    2. Service activity must occur after entrance or transfer to UWEC.
    3. Acceptable experiences may include on- and off-campus activities, or volunteer, internship, or
       employment opportunities. The service must constitute significant, direct interaction with other
       cultures—observations are not accepted. What constitutes experience with people who have a “different
       background” than you? Usually this will be very obvious to the student because it would have
       constituted a uniquely different experience. Looking back on it you should feel that you learned
       something about a person or group of people that you didn’t ever know before. Some examples of high
       value experiences are the Reading Partners program, Special Olympics, Art for Disadvantaged, camps
       for children with disabilities, programs for urban children, etc.
    4. The activity must enhance the student’s academic major/minor in the following areas of knowledge
       (taken from the eleven goals of the baccalaureate):
             intercultural experiences (including people with backgrounds different than that of the students
                (e.g. ethnic, socio-economic, gender, sexual orientation, disability, age)
             an understanding of inquiry methods
             an understanding of values
             an understanding of human behavior and institutions
             ability to inquire, think, and analyze
             ability to write, read, speak, listen
    5. Written reflection and discussion: ES 385 class activities include structured time for the students to
       reflect on all 30 hrs of service learning experience. The written reflections will be done during ES 385
       and will include one for the pre-ES 385 hrs. and one for the hours collected during the time period of the
       class. Each reflection will be evaluated by the instructor. Students who receive passing grades on the
       reflections and complete ES 385 will have satisfied the Service Learning Requirement.

Outline for Reflections:
   1. What was the experience?
            a. Total Number of hours of direct interaction
            b. Where was it (Name of agency, institution, and program)?
            c. Name of Supervisor, address, phone number and e-mail
            d. What were your responsibilities?
   2. Describe the specific services you contributed and the kind of interaction you had with the group and/or
       person.
   3. What did you learn about the person’s history background and culture that you didn’t know before?
   4. How will these experiences affect your practice with regard to:
            a. Curriculum and lesson planning
            b. Teaching or therapy methods
            c. Interpersonal relationships/understanding of your students, colleagues and parents

References:
    UWEC Center for Service Learning Website http://www.uwec.edu/sl/index.html
    Guidelines for Arranging and Completing Human Relations Clock Hours, FED in-house publication
    Revised October 30, 2000




                                                           61
                           Appendix E - Credentials For Teacher Candidates




What are Credentials, Anyway?

    Often teacher candidates are asked to submit their “credentials” when applying for teaching positions. This
can be confusing because technically “credentials” is an outdated term; and although the term is still used
credentials as such are not.

    The term comes from a time when all education majors were required to maintain credential files in the
Career Services Office. A few years ago, however, the Federal Government made closed files illegal. After
extensive consultation with System lawyers, school personnel and other career services offices, UW-Eau Claire
has established a different policy. In keeping with other professionals, education employers should now accept
credentials directly from the candidate. Thus Career Services staff encourages teacher candidates to “self-
credential” or send their credential file directly to employers.

    To replace their service of sending credential files, Career Services offers a new service. 1 st Place! is an
electronic registration process used to refer available candidates to employers. To learn about 1stPlace! Visit
their Web Registration/Web Walkup website (http://first.uwec.edu/)




                                                         62
What should be sent when credentials are requested?

     It is very important to recognize that all school district’s application procedures are different. Follow the
instructions precisely. Failure to follow directions may cause your application to be eliminated. Typically, a
position vacancy specifies inclusion of some or all of the following:

     A letter of application often called a “cover letter”
     A resume
     A list of professional references with addresses and phone numbers
     Copies of letters of recommendation from principals and/or other school administrators. Newly
      certified candidates are most frequently asked for evaluations from their student teaching cooperating
      teacher(s) and university supervisor(s)
     A copy of official transcripts
     A separate application form (if required by school district)


What are the Advantages of Self-Credentialing?

     Self-credentialing allows candidates to take full responsibility for job search and career
      planning correspondence.
     Self-credentialing promotes efficient and timely delivery of application materials directly
      from the candidate to the employer. Candidates may deliver materials in a more timely
      procedure without Career Services involvement.
     Self-credentialing allows for flexibility and the ability to select which materials are most
      appropriate to a certain vacancy.

    Occasionally, a candidate may come in contact with an employer not familiar with the practice of self-
credentialing and may not want to accept materials directly from the candidate. If this occurs, please contact
Career Services, and we will send your materials with a cover page.




                                                         63
                Appendix F - Tips for Teachers: Writing Letters of
                             Recommendation

1. Tell the student about the letter you feel you can honestly write for them; and give them a chance to ask
   someone else if you cannot write a strong letter.
         If a positive recommendation cannot be written, the individual should be so
          informed. One should never agree to write a letter of recommendation and then
          write a letter of condemnation.
         If a letter of recommendation, but with some reservations, can be written, the
          person requesting the letter should be informed and his/her agreement to proceed
          should be obtained.
         It is possible and sometimes preferable to distinguish between a letter of evaluation
          and a letter of recommendation.
2. Ask for as much information from the student as possible (due date, resume)
3. Use a letterhead that matches your relationship with the student. In other words, use your school
   letterhead when writing a letter.
4. Explain how long, how well, and under what circumstances you have come to know this student.
5. Address aspects of the student’s performance you know first-hand. Eyewitness accounts are more
   convincing than hearsay.
6. Support your generalizations with specific details or anecdotes; help the reader to imagine the student
   by illustrating with examples the student’s performance.
7. End the letter with a summary paragraph recapping your main points and your final recommendation of
   the student as a teacher.
8. Ask the student to let you know what happens to his/her application.




                                                   64
                  Appendix G - Questions to Ask at the Beginning of
                               Your Placement


1.   What is the district/school calendar (workdays, holidays, special events)?
2.   What are the district/school procedures and policies about discipline?
3.   What are the building philosophy and goals?
4.   What procedures do I follow when absent or tardy?
5.   Where can I get curriculum guides?
6.   How do I order films?
7.   How do I request audio-visual equipment?
8.   When are class list(s) and bell schedules available?
9.   What are the procedures for making discipline/guidance referrals? Are certain
     administrators/counselors responsible for certain groups of students?
10. What are the fire/tornado/emergency procedures for the building?
11. What are the procedures for events such as field trips, school pictures, etc.?
12. What are my school hours?
13. Where should I park my car? Is a permit required?
14. What telephone is available for my use? Can I make long distance calls?
15. What are the birthday celebration procedures for students? Staff? Can students bring treats to share?
16. Where can I safely store my purse, coat, and other valuables?
17. Where are computers located for faculty use?
18. What is the district/school policy regarding appropriate bulletin board displays (especially for religious
    holidays)?
19. Where is the faculty workroom? Restroom? Lounge? Lunchroom?
20. How are Public Address announcements handled?
21. Under what circumstances and for what activities can I appoint a student monitor?
22. What is the district/school grading policy?
23. What is the district/school homework policy?
24. How will I know if a student has an excused absence?
25. How do I obtain copies of worksheets, quizzes, and tests?
26. What is the procedure for taking a class to the library?




                                                     65
27. What is the district/school policy regarding writing passes for students (hall, library, locker, water
    fountain, restroom)?
28. What are the procedures for using the in-school telephone?
29. How do I find out if school is canceled?
30. What do I do with a sick student?
31. Can I leave the school during the day to run errands?
32. Am I required to turn in lesson plans in advance? When?
33. To whom do I refer students who I suspect may be abused? Chemically dependent? Suicidal?
34. What is the district/school crisis plan? May I have a copy?
35. What are the procedures for removal of a student from the classroom?
36. May I take a couple of days off to interview for jobs?
37. How will you be evaluating me?
38. May I observe other classes during the final week of my placement?
39. Are there any extra-curricular activities you would recommend for me?
40. When can we meet to plan for each week?




                                                     66
                   What advice would you give to someone
                   who is about to begin student teaching?
         Taken from http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/student-teaching.html


                           5 Keys to Success
                            Submitted by Amy from Wisconsin
                            Grade 1-5; Math Support Teacher

As a second year teacher, I am not much of a stranger to the student teaching
experience. In my opinion, if you keep the following five points in mind, you will
be sure to experience success.

#1 Be Original! Teachers, staff members, and administration will appreciate
someone who brings a unique personality to the student teaching experience.
Teachers aren’t looking for a carbon copy of themselves, so be yourself.

#2 Be Innovative! This is your time to take all that you have learned and apply
it to your teaching. Let the knowledge, ideas, and experiences you acquired along
the way fuel your teaching. Don’t be afraid to experiment. Ask your cooperating
teacher to allow you to try that lesson or activity you worked so hard to create.

#3 Collaborate! It is very important to network with all teachers, staff
members, and administrators within the school community. The young teachers
who go the extra mile to collaborate are the ones remembered down the road for
prospective positions.

#4 Be Dedicated! Always show a passion for what you do. Take advantage of
opportunities to become involved with activities outside of school if possible.
Schools will applaud the efforts of someone who always is willing to give 110%

#5 Have fun! You can do all of the things above, but will be missing out on one
of the greatest aspects of the education profession if you forget to have fun.
Enjoy the students; they will make you smile every day. Enjoy your colleagues;
they are wonderful role models. Enjoy the experience; it is something that you
will carry along into your teaching career!

Good luck!




                                           67
                                                                              MCEA Assessment
                                                                            Mid and End of Quarter
                                                                                 Gold in Color
                                               Appendix H


                                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDIES


                                             University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
                                    Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence Program (MCEA)
                         MCEA Assessment Profile (Student Teaching)

                                  Mid-Quarter and End-of-Quarter

Conceptual Framework
The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Teacher Education Program commits itself to Preparing
Collaborative Leaders who can develop, apply, and integrate knowledge within and across subjects,
as well as reflect on their practice to improve performance. The Block practicum contributes to the
development of knowledge in Planning and Evaluation, Learning Environment, Instruction, and
Professionalism.

The MCEA faculty views collaborative leadership as the involvement of two or more people in a
group working toward a common vision or goal in a manner that reflects shared ownership,
authorship, use, or responsibility. A successful collaboration takes place when participants with
diverse experiences and expertise work together to solve a common problem or produce a common
product. Successful collaborations are non-jurisdictional, relationship driven and sensitive to issues of
inclusion and exclusion.

The information contained in this profile serves two purposes in relation to a student teacher's
performance in the professional semester. The information recorded at an approximate mid-quarter
date provides information to the student teacher as a means of improving performance for the
remainder of the experience. The information provided at the completion of the experience serves as a
record of the cooperating teacher's assessment of the student teacher's level of professional
competence.

The form should be completed, discussed with the student teacher, and shared with the university
supervisor at a designated mid-quarter date. The same form should be completed and serve as the
cooperating teacher's final evaluation of the student teacher's performance. At the last supervisor's
visit, the information should be discussed and the form given to the university supervisor to be
included among the official records according to University and the Department of Public Instruction
requirements.

                      Student: _______________________________________________

                      Cooperating Teacher: _____________________________________

                      School: ________________________________________________

                      Grade Level/Subject ______________________________________
                                                                                                     4/07
                                                   68
Directions: Indicate competence level with an "X". If not observed or not applicable specify that with an "N". Comments
may be included to clarify or elaborate on particular characteristics.

                                                           COMPETENCE LEVEL                    COMMENTS
                 PLANNING                               Mid-Quarter End-of-Quarter
        WT Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10)          Low    High  Low      High
Incorporates knowledge of students’ background and
capabilities in lessons.                                |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Creates detailed and articulate learning goals.         |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Prepares material and resources.                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Reflects curricular demands in lessons.                 |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Shows command of subject matter.                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Presents curriculum integration in lessons.             |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Integrates appropriate technology in lessons.           |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Creates appropriate assessment tools.                   |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Makes provisions for advanced preparation.              |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|



                                                           COMPETENCE LEVEL                    COMMENTS
          LEARNING ENVIRONMENT                          Mid-Quarter End-of-Quarter
                (WTS 3, 5, 6)                          Low     High Low      High
Provides clear expectations to students.                |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Establishes and maintains rapport with students.        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Maintains consistent standards of behavior.             |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Promotes fairness.                                      |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Arranges and maintains a physical environment
                                                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|
conducive to learning.



                                                           COMPETENCE LEVEL                    COMMENTS
                 INSTRUCTION                            Mid-Quarter End-of-Quarter
               (WTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8)               Low     High Low      High
Articulates clear learning goals to students.           |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Structures content and conveys it in an articulate
                                                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|
manner.

Encourages higher levels of thinking.                   |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Paces lessons consistent with time allocations.         |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|

Shows awareness of lesson variables and changes when
                                                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|
and where it is needed.
Maintains effective verbal and non-verbal
                                                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|
communication.
Provides for different learning styles, talents, and
                                                        |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|
capabilities.

Communicates assessment criteria and processes.         |_|_|_|_|       |_|_|_|_|



                                                                69
                                                             COMPETENCE LEVEL           COMMENTS
               PROFESSIONALISM                            Mid-Quarter End-of-Quarter
                  (WTS 8, 9, 10)                         Low     High Low      High
Displays self-confidence and assertiveness.             |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Maintains bearing and demeanor appropriate for the
                                                        |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|
environment.

Responds to suggestions, criticisms, and directions.    |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Evaluates self-performance.                             |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Interrelates with staff and colleagues.                 |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Communicates with parents or community members.         |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Seeks assistance when needed.                           |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Adapts to diverseness within the environment.           |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|

Conveys a professional attitude.                        |_|_|_|_|        |_|_|_|_|


                                                       Collaborative Leadership

All UWEC Teacher Education programs emphasize the development of educators who are collaborative
leaders. The four core principles of collaborative leadership include the following:

    Collaborative leadership is the intentional and skillful management of relationships that enables others
     to succeed individually while accomplishing a collective outcome.

    Collaborative leaders ably facilitate the involvement of two or more people in a group working toward
     a shared outcome in a manner that reflects collective ownership, authorship, use, or responsibility.

    Collaboration is NOT the outcome or goal. Collaborations are processes that, when successful, align
     people’s actions to accomplish a goal or solve a problem.

    Collaborative leaders possess knowledge, skills, and dispositions that enable them to carry out leaderful
     actions.

Collaborative leaders make particular kinds of choices about how to work with others, commit to outcomes
that are less individual than collective, and invest time and energy to sustain shared goals. However,
committing to collaborative approaches does not diminish the importance of individual perspectives or
individual expertise. Assessing dispositions engages educators in thinking about how such choices can
empower them to better help students succeed in becoming self-directed learners committed to sustaining
and improving a socially just, democratic society.

Directions: For each of the five collaborative leadership dispositions A – E listed in the left column on the
following page, please circle items in one or both columns that you think best represent trends in the pre-
service teacher’s performance. Please list some examples as evidence for your assessment of each
disposition. This form should be completed and discussed with the pre-service teacher as part of the mid-
quarter evaluation and updated at the end of the placement.




                                                                    70
     DISPOSITION     WORKS INDEPENDENTLY           EVIDENCE           WORKS COLLABORATIVELY                      EVIDENCE

                    Asks clarifying questions                  Asks clarifying questions for self and/or
                     for self                                    group needs
A. STRIVES FOR      Paraphrases for personal                   Solicits responses from all parties
 SHARED              clarification                              Paraphrases for better self and group
UNDERSTANDING       Cooperates when working                     understanding
                     with others                                Redirects counter-productive participation
                                                                Demonstrates active listening during
                                                                 collaborations
                    Describes current condition
                    Tells why change might be                  Seeks input from and works with others
                     necessary                                    to describe current condition
B. SEEKS            Independently finds                        Works with others to determine need for
BENEFICIAL           resources to support                        change
SOLUTIONS             change
                                                                Considers other’s ideas and perspectives to
                    Defers judgment in order
                                                                 generate possible solutions and meet
                       to come up with unique
                                                                 multiple needs
                       and workable solutions
                    Accepts responsibility for                  Accepts and seeks out responsibility for
                     tasks when asked to do so                    tasks that support others as well as self
 C. ACCEPTS         Assists with meeting the                    Advocates for other’s needs, regardless of
RESPONSIBILITY       needs of others when                         personal beliefs/needs
FOR SELF AND         within own control                         Actively seeks out assistance from
TAKES ON                                                           others to meet identified needs
RESPONSIBILITY
FOR OTHERS
                    Asks questions to find out                  Actively seeks out others for contributions
D. DISPLAYS          more in order to make                        in order to make change and persist with
PERSEVERANCE         more productive future                       tasks
FOR PROJECTS AND     attempts at a task                          Acknowledges all participants contributions,
INTERPERSONAL       Describes options for                        concerns, and ideas
RELATIONSHIP          approaching others for                    Depersonalizes negativity from others
MANAGEMENT            assistance                                  and contributes positive responses

E.                  StatesDexpectations that go                Active and positive member of groups
DEMONSTRATES A       beyond the status quo                      Uses excellence in a context of learning to
PASSION FOR         Independently uses the                      collaborate with and influence others
EXCELLENCE           meaning of excellence in a                 Celebrates group successes
                     context of learning for                    Exhibits an appropriate sense of humor, a
                     individual growth                           positive manner, and enthusiasm during
                                                                 interactions



                                                              71
                                           Mid-Quarter Assessment Signatures

Cooperating Teacher: ___________________________________________
                                  (Signature)               (Date)


Student Teacher: ________________________________________________
                                 (Signature)                (Date)


University Supervisor: ___________________________________________
                                 (Signature)          (Date)



                                                  End-of-Semester Assessment
Cooperating Teacher: ____________________________________________
                                  (Signature)                (Date)


Student Teacher: _________________________________________________
                                 (Signature)                  (Date)


University Supervisor: ____________________________________________
                                 (Signature)           (Date)


                                                Recommendation for Certification

  Please circle one recommendation below. If your answer was NO, please provide or
  attach reasons. Include a brief summary statement in the space below.

  The student should be certified to teach.                                          Yes        No


 Cooperating Teacher Signature:


 __________________________________________________________________________________________________
 (Full Name)                               (Signature)                      (Date)



Reasons for not recommending certification:




University Supervisor’s Recommendation:                                Successful    Unsuccessful
University Supervisor Signature:


__________________________________________________________________________________________
(Full Name)                                (Signature)                               (Date)




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 72
                                       Education Studies Department
                                              UW-Eau Claire




         Classroom Profile

Name: __________________________________________Phone:_________________________________

E-mail: __________________________________

Cooperating Teacher ____________________________Phone: ___________________________________

E-mail__________________________________

Grades:                                           Subjects:
(Please attach a daily schedule)



General Characteristics of Students:




Students with exceptionalities:




Diversity Factors to consider:




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 73
Learning Environment Characteristics:




Most important classroom routines, procedures, rules, and expectations for students:




Special circumstances to be considered (scheduled field trips, planning days, programs, etc.)




Activities which must be coordinated with other colleagues:




Other:




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 74
                                                                                                  Formative
                                                                                                  Assessment
                                             Department of Education Studies                      EAA/ECA
                                                                                                 End of Qtr. 1
                                             University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire                    or 3
                                                                                                Green in Color

              Formative Assessment for EAA/ECA Student Teachers and Interns (End-of-Quarter 1 or 3)
                                      Wisconsin Teaching Standards
                                 and Collaborative Leadership Dispositions


       The information collected here serves two purposes in relation to a student teacher’s or intern’s
performance during the professional semester (student teaching/internship). Information recorded and
provided at the close of Quarter 1 or Quarter 3 provides information to the student teacher/intern as a
means of improving performance for the remainder of the experience.

        This form should be completed, discussed with the student teacher or intern, and shared with the
university supervisor at the end of the Quarter 1 or Quarter 3. The candidate puts the completed form into
his/her portfolio and it is to be shared with the Quarter 2 or Quarter 4 University supervisor.

       Within this evaluation form, the terms “intermediate” and “apprentice” are used and the student
teacher is expected to achieve the “management” level by the close of student teaching. [For performance
benchmarks and descriptions of these performances, please see: http://www.uwec.edu/ci/EAA-
ECAMainPage.htm.]




End of Placement                Signatures                                     Date
Assessment

Cooperating Teacher:
                                ________________________________               __________
Student Teacher:
                                ________________________________               __________

School:
                       ________________________________
Grade Level and
Discipline:            ________________________________
Cooperating Teacher Endorsement based on performance in Quarter 1 (or 3):

Circle one:       yes      no




NOTE: This form is given to the student teacher for the portfolio.


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 75
                                           Wisconsin Teaching Standards:
Standard #1: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the
disciplines he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of
subject matter meaningful for pupils.

Criteria:                                Performance:                Comments:
                                         Intermediate > Apprentice
                                         (2) -------------- (3)
Extensive content knowledge              ---------------------
connects central concepts to student
learning data
Students used tools of inquiry and are   ---------------------
beginning to think like content
experts
Subject matter is being used to          ---------------------
enhance the quality of student’s lives
Standard #2: The teacher understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn and
provides instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development.

Delivers daily lessons that meet         ---------------------
students’ specific developmental
needs
Standard #3: The teacher understands how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the
barriers that impede learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of pupils,
including those with disabilities and exceptionalities.

Activities are culturally relevant and   ---------------------
meet needs of all students:
MI/LS/Race/Class/Gender
Standard #4: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including the
use of technology to encourage children’s development of critical thinking, problem solving, and
performance skills.

Demonstrate critical thinking,           ---------------------
problem solving, performance skills
and creativity in lessons
Standard #5: The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior
to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
learning, and self-motivation.

Demonstrate motivation through           ---------------------
engagement in planned activities
Community encourages positive            ---------------------
social interaction and active learning
engagement
Standard #6: The teacher uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques as well
as instructional media and technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive
interaction in the classroom.

Uses lesson-enriching vocabulary,        ---------------------
spoken and written language and
picks up non-verbal cues from
students
Uses instructional technology to         ---------------------
foster active inquiry
Uses technology to foster interaction    ---------------------
and collaboration


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 76
Standard #7: The teacher organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of
subject matter, pupils, the community, and curriculum goals.

Modifies 5 E’s lesson plan to             ---------------------
differentiate based on student’s
developmental needs
Units designed including central          ---------------------
concept and mirror discipline inquiry.
Deemed effective by student learning
data
Standard #8: The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to
evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the pupil.

Implements a variety of assessment        ---------------------
strategies ensuring continuous
development of students in all areas
(intellectual, social, and/or physical)
Standard #9: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effect of his or
her choices and actions on pupils, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and
who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

Offers specific suggestions to            ---------------------
improve instruction as well as
chances for success
Standard #10: The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in
the larger community to support pupil learning and wellbeing and who acts with integrity, fairness
and in an ethical manner.

Cooperates and collaborates with          ---------------------
colleagues, beginning to assume
leadership roles
Uses out of class activities to enhance   ---------------------
student learning
Standard #11: Collaborative Leadership:
Is the intentional and skillful management of relationships that enables others to succeed
individually while accomplishing a collective outcome. Collaborative leaders ably facilitate the
involvement of two or more people in a group working toward a shared outcome in a manner that
reflects collective ownership, authorship, use, or responsibility. Collaboration is NOT the outcome
or goal. Collaborations are processes that, when successful, align people’s actions to accomplish a
goal or solve a problem. Collaborative leaders possess knowledge, skills, and dispositions that
enable them to carry out leaderful actions.
*The only required artifact for Chapter 11 is the CT Dispositions Evaluation Form.

                                                                         RATING
                                      COLLABORATIVE                  (Intermediate >
      DISPOSITIONS                                                                                COMMENTS
                                          LEVEL                        Apprentice)


1                                  Asks clarifying questions     (2) --------------------- (3)
    STRIVES FOR SHARED              for self and/or group needs
                                   Solicits responses from all
    UNDERSTANDING
                                    parties                       (2) --------------------- (3)
                                   Paraphrases for better self
                                    and group understanding
                                                                  (2) --------------------- (3)
                                   Redirects counter-
                                    productive participation
                                   Demonstrates active
                                    listening during              (2) --------------------- (3)

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 77
                               collaborations
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
2                             Seeks input from and works      (2) --------------------- (3)
    SEEKS BENEFICIAL
                               with others to describe
                               current condition
    SOLUTIONS
                              Works with others to
                               determine need for change       (2) --------------------- (3)
                              Considers other’s ideas and
                               perspectives to generate
                               possible solutions and meet
                               multiple needs                  (2) --------------------- (3)
3                             Accepts and seeks out           (2) --------------------- (3)
    ACCEPTS                    responsibility for tasks
                              Advocates for other’s           (2) --------------------- (3)
    RESPONSIBILITY FOR
                               needs, regardless of
    SELF AND TAKES ON
                               personal beliefs/needs
    RESPONSIBILITY FOR
                              Actively seeks out
    OTHERS                                                     (2) --------------------- (3)
                               assistance from others to
                               meet identified needs
4                             Actively seeks out others       (2) --------------------- (3)
    DISPLAYS                   for contributions in order to
                               make change and persist
    PERSEVERANCE FOR
                               with tasks
    PROJECTS AND
                              Acknowledges all
    INTERPERSONAL              participants contributions,
    RELATIONSHIP               concerns, and ideas
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
    MANAGEMENT                Depersonalizes negativity
                               from others and contributes
                               positive responses
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
5                             Active and positive             (2) --------------------- (3)
                               member of groups
    DEMONSTRATES A
                              Uses excellence in a            (2) --------------------- (3)
    PASSION FOR                context of learning to
    EXCELLENCE                 collaborate with and
                               influence others
                              Celebrates group successes
                              Exhibits an appropriate
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
                               sense of humor, a positive
                               manner, and enthusiasm          (2) --------------------- (3)
                               during interactions




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 78
                                                                                                  Summative
                                                                                                  Assessment
                                     Department of Education Studies                              EAA/ECA
                                                                                               End of Qtr. 2 or 4
                                        University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire                     Blue in Color

             Summative Assessment for EAA/ECA Student Teachers and Interns (End-of-Quarter 2 or 4)
                                     Wisconsin Teaching Standards
                                and Collaborative Leadership Dispositions

       This form should be completed, discussed with the student teacher or intern, and shared with the
university supervisor at the end of Quarter 2 or Quarter 4. It serves as the cooperating teacher’s final
evaluation of the student teacher’s or intern’s performance. At the end of the student teaching or intern
experience, this form should be signed by all (see below) and given to the candidate for his/her portfolio,
per DPI mandate. The duplicate page (see last page) should be signed and given to the University
supervisor, who returns it to the Department to be included among the official records according to
Department and Public Instruction requirements.
       Within this evaluation form, the terms “intermediate” and “apprentice” are used and the student
teacher is expected to achieve the “management” level by the close of student teaching. [For performance
benchmarks and descriptions of these performances, please see: http://www.uwec.edu/ci/EAA-
ECAMainPage.htm.]

End of Student Teaching Assessment
The student taught effectively in a range of circumstances.                         Yes   No
The student has consistently demonstrated personal responsibility.                  Yes   No
The student has consistently shown professional behavior.                           Yes   No
The student has developed effective self-assessment strategies.                     Yes   No
The student has been involved in school life.                                       Yes   No
The student has consistently demonstrated human relation’s competencies             Yes   No
The student demonstrates performances assessment capabilities.                      Yes   No

Cooperating Teacher:          ________________________________            __________

Student Teacher:
                              _______________________________             __________
University General
Supervisor:                   ________________________________            __________

Recommendation for Certification
The student should be certified to teach.                           Yes        No

Cooperating Teacher Signature:
__________________________________                Date:________

The student teacher/intern completed experience successfully. Yes              No

University General Supervisor’s Signature:
__________________________________           Date:_______
University Content Supervisor’s Signature (where appropriate- EAA/ECA):
__________________________________           Date: _______


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 79
                                           Wisconsin Teaching Standards:
Standard #1: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the
disciplines he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of
subject matter meaningful for pupils.

Criteria:                                Performance:                Comments:
                                         Intermediate > Apprentice
                                         (2) -------------- (3)
Extensive content knowledge              ---------------------
connects central concepts to student
learning data
Students used tools of inquiry and are   ---------------------
beginning to think like content
experts
Subject matter is being used to          ---------------------
enhance the quality of student’s lives
Standard #2: The teacher understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn and
provides instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development.

Delivers daily lessons that meet         ---------------------
students’ specific developmental
needs
Standard #3: The teacher understands how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the
barriers that impede learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of pupils,
including those with disabilities and exceptionalities.

Activities are culturally relevant and   ---------------------
meet needs of all students:
MI/LS/Race/Class/Gender
Standard #4: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including the
use of technology to encourage children’s development of critical thinking, problem solving, and
performance skills.

Demonstrate critical thinking,           ---------------------
problem solving, performance skills
and creativity in lessons
Standard #5: The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior
to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
learning, and self-motivation.

Demonstrate motivation through           ---------------------
engagement in planned activities
Community encourages positive            ---------------------
social interaction and active learning
engagement
Standard #6: The teacher uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques as well
as instructional media and technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive
interaction in the classroom.

Uses lesson-enriching vocabulary,        ---------------------
spoken and written language and
picks up non-verbal cues from
students
Uses instructional technology to         ---------------------
foster active inquiry
Uses technology to foster interaction    ---------------------
and collaboration


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 80
Standard #7: The teacher organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of
subject matter, pupils, the community, and curriculum goals.

Modifies 5 E’s lesson plan to             ---------------------
differentiate based on student’s
developmental needs
Units designed including central          ---------------------
concept and mirror discipline inquiry.
Deemed effective by student learning
data
Standard #8: The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to
evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the pupil.

Implements a variety of assessment        ---------------------
strategies ensuring continuous
development of students in all areas
(intellectual, social, and/or physical)
Standard #9: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effect of his or
her choices and actions on pupils, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and
who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

Offers specific suggestions to            ---------------------
improve instruction as well as
chances for success
Standard #10: The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in
the larger community to support pupil learning and wellbeing and who acts with integrity, fairness
and in an ethical manner.

Cooperates and collaborates with          ---------------------
colleagues, beginning to assume
leadership roles
Uses out of class activities to enhance   ---------------------
student learning
Standard #11: Collaborative Leadership:
Is the intentional and skillful management of relationships that enables others to succeed
individually while accomplishing a collective outcome. Collaborative leaders ably facilitate the
involvement of two or more people in a group working toward a shared outcome in a manner that
reflects collective ownership, authorship, use, or responsibility. Collaboration is NOT the outcome
or goal. Collaborations are processes that, when successful, align people’s actions to accomplish a
goal or solve a problem. Collaborative leaders possess knowledge, skills, and dispositions that
enable them to carry out leaderful actions.
*The only required artifact for Chapter 11 is the CT Dispositions Evaluation Form.

                                                                         RATING
                                      COLLABORATIVE                  (Intermediate >
      DISPOSITIONS                                                                                COMMENTS
                                          LEVEL                        Apprentice)


6                                  Asks clarifying questions     (2) --------------------- (3)
    STRIVES FOR SHARED              for self and/or group needs
                                   Solicits responses from all
    UNDERSTANDING
                                    parties                       (2) --------------------- (3)
                                   Paraphrases for better self
                                    and group understanding
                                                                  (2) --------------------- (3)
                                   Redirects counter-
                                    productive participation
                                   Demonstrates active
                                    listening during              (2) --------------------- (3)

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 81
                               collaborations
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
 7                            Seeks input from and works      (2) --------------------- (3)
     SEEKS BENEFICIAL
                               with others to describe
                               current condition
     SOLUTIONS
                              Works with others to
                               determine need for change       (2) --------------------- (3)
                              Considers other’s ideas and
                               perspectives to generate
                               possible solutions and meet
                               multiple needs                  (2) --------------------- (3)
8                             Accepts and seeks out           (2) --------------------- (3)
     ACCEPTS                   responsibility for tasks
                              Advocates for other’s           (2) --------------------- (3)
     RESPONSIBILITY FOR
                               needs, regardless of
     SELF AND TAKES ON
                               personal beliefs/needs
     RESPONSIBILITY FOR
                              Actively seeks out
     OTHERS                                                    (2) --------------------- (3)
                               assistance from others to
                               meet identified needs
 9                            Actively seeks out others       (2) --------------------- (3)
     DISPLAYS                  for contributions in order to
                               make change and persist
     PERSEVERANCE FOR
                               with tasks
     PROJECTS AND
                              Acknowledges all
     INTERPERSONAL             participants contributions,
     RELATIONSHIP              concerns, and ideas
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
     MANAGEMENT               Depersonalizes negativity
                               from others and contributes
                               positive responses
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
10                            Active and positive             (2) --------------------- (3)
                               member of groups
     DEMONSTRATES A
                              Uses excellence in a            (2) --------------------- (3)
     PASSION FOR               context of learning to
     EXCELLENCE                collaborate with and
                               influence others
                              Celebrates group successes
                              Exhibits an appropriate
                                                               (2) --------------------- (3)
                               sense of humor, a positive
                               manner, and enthusiasm          (2) --------------------- (3)
                               during interactions

Additional Comments:




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 82
                                     Department of Education Studies
                                        University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
             Summative Assessment for EAA/ECA Student Teachers and Interns (End-of-Quarter 2 or 4)
                                     Wisconsin Teaching Standards
                                and Collaborative Leadership Dispositions

       This form should be completed, discussed with the student teacher or intern, and shared with the
university supervisor at the end of Quarter 2 or Quarter 4. It serves as the cooperating teacher’s final
evaluation of the student teacher’s or intern’s performance. At the end of the student teaching or intern
experience, this form should be signed by all (see below) and given to the candidate for his/her portfolio,
per DPI mandate. The duplicate page (see last page) should be signed and given to the University
supervisor, who returns it to the Department to be included among the official records according to
Department and Public Instruction requirements.
       Within this evaluation form, the terms “intermediate” and “apprentice” are used and the student
teacher is expected to achieve the “management” level by the close of student teaching. [For performance
benchmarks and descriptions of these performances, please see: http://www.uwec.edu/ci/EAA-
ECAMainPage.htm.]

End of Student Teaching Assessment
The student taught effectively in a range of circumstances.                         Yes   No
The student has consistently demonstrated personal responsibility.                  Yes   No
The student has consistently shown professional behavior.                           Yes   No
The student has developed effective self-assessment strategies.                     Yes   No
The student has been involved in school life.                                       Yes   No
The student has consistently demonstrated human relation’s competencies             Yes   No
The student demonstrates performances assessment capabilities.                      Yes   No

Cooperating Teacher:          ________________________________            __________

Student Teacher:
                              _______________________________             __________
University General
Supervisor:                   ________________________________            __________

Recommendation for Certification
The student should be certified to teach.                           Yes        No

Cooperating Teacher Signature:
__________________________________                Date:________

The student teacher/intern completed experience successfully. Yes              No

University General Supervisor’s Signature:
__________________________________           Date:_______
University Content Supervisor’s Signature (where appropriate- EAA/ECA):
__________________________________           Date: _______

NOTE: A copy of this page is to be returned by the University Supervisor to the ES Department for filing
      in keeping with DPI mandate.
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 83
               University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
            Observation Appraisal Form                                          Education Studies Department
                                                                         ___ES 203 ___ Block ___Student Teaching

Student Teacher: ______________________ Date _________              Comments:
Coop. Teacher ________________________________________
Subject: _____________________________________________
School: ______________________________________________
           Planning                           Competence Level
 (WTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10)
General Preparation
(weekly plans, background work)          High _______________ Low
Lesson Outcomes
(clear, concise, focused)                High ________________Low
Appropriate Methods,
materials/activities                      High _______________Low

Evaluation and Assessment                 High _______________Low

   Learning Environment                       Competence Level
         (WTS 3, 5, 6)
Physical Space Management
(seating, displays)                      High ________________Low
Interpersonal Environment
(fairness, respect)                      High ________________Low
Rapport with students
                                         High ________________Low
Sustains Behavior Standards
(expectations, consistency)              High ________________Low
Content Organization (focus,
coherence)                               High ________________Low
Communication
(verbal/non-verbal)                      High ________________Low

         Instruction                          Competence Level
   (WTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8)
Learning Focus
(instructions, purpose)                  High ________________Low
Content
(structure, coherence)                   High ________________Low
Thinking Skills,
(engagement, questioning,                High ________________Low
materials)
Lesson Process
(modifications/adjustments)              High ________________Low
Instructional time Mgt.
(pacing, routines)                       High ________________Low

        Professionalism                       Competence Level
        (WTS 8, 9, 10)
Reflectivity
                                         High ________________Low
Efficacy
(resourcefulness, responsibility)        High ________________Low
Demeanor
(attitude, promptness, dress,            High ________________Low
bearing)

Signature ________________________________________________________________________________________
                          University Supervisor                     Cooperating Teacher                Student



Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 84
                                                                               LD / Mild CD /
                                      Department of Special Education          ECSE 6-8 / EBD
                                     University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire        Evaluation Form



                                UNDERGRADUATE PRACTICUM EVALUATION FORM
                                      LD / MILD CD / ECSE 6-8 / EBD

(Directions: Complete the attached evaluation checklist using the column for midterm and discuss with
your student teacher. Then, complete this summary page, tear off, and mail to the University Supervisor.
Do not return the checklist to the University supervisor until after you have completed the final
evaluation.)

Evaluation of _____________________________________                 Date __________________

by Cooperating teacher _____________________________

1. Indicate the student teacher’s current level of functioning by checking off in the following table.

                       Lesson
                     Planning & Classroom       IEP       Formal          Progress
                     Instruction Management Development Assessment       Monitoring   Dispositions
Exceeds
expectations in
this area.
Good, but could
improve in this
area.
Not yet
performing
acceptably in
this area.

2. Please include a narrative that reports on strengths and weaknesses of the student teacher. If you are
   specific enough the supervisor can work on weaknesses during supervised visits. Continue your
   narrative on the back side of this page.




                                                                                        Revised November 2005




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 85
                                           Department of Special Education
                                          University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
                                     UNDERGRADUATE PRACTICUM EVALUATION FORM
                                            LD / MILD CD / ECSE 6-8 / EBD

Evaluation of ________________________________________________                   Date ________________

                                                                                                   Check One 
Cooperating Teacher ________________________________________________                              Per Set of Three
                                                                                             Midterm Final Supervisor
   WTS 1
   uses his/her knowledge about special education to solve difficult educational
   problems creatively
 1 contributes information from coursework or other sources at appropriate times
   no application of special education content is apparent

   WTS 2
   articulates why he/she is teaching a lesson and how the skills relate to the scope
   and sequence and future learning
 2 articulates why he/she is teaching a lesson, but does not see the "big picture"
   cannot articulate why he/she is teaching a lesson

   WTS 3
   independently writes an individualized, educationally useful IEP that contains
   measurable goals and benchmarks
 3 writes an individualized, educationally useful IEP that contains measurable goals
   and benchmarks with assistance
   writes an IEP that contains errors in where information is placed or how it is
   stated

   adapts and modifies (general education) curricula in creative ways that meet
   unique individual needs
 4 adapts and modifies (general education) curricula
   does not adapt or modify curricula

   WTS 4
   a variety of settings have been utilized to instruct students in their transition goals
 5 the school/classroom setting is the primary place for instruction to occur
   setting has not been considered in the delivery of transition goals and objectives

   systematically promotes generalization of social and academic skills
 6 activities to promote generalization are "hit and miss" or superficial
   no activities to promote generalization are observed
   pacing is brisk during teacher-directed activities and students are actively
   engaged and frequently interact with the teacher
 7 pacing is uneven during teacher-directed activities; sometimes there is too much
   “teacher talk”
   pacing is slow during teacher-directed activities and lessons sometimes boring


   lesson is highly organized and efficient; no wasted time
 8 lesson has no glaring problems with organization, but includes wasted time

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 86
    lesson is disorganized; confusion and/or problems with materials take up a
    significant amount of class time and create conditions for behavior problems

   successfully manages more than one activity at a time; is “with it”
 9 has difficulty attending to several activities at once, but can manage small group
   that he or she is working with or no opportunity to observe
   cannot manage even one activity successfully

   transitions are smooth and quick
10 transitions are relatively quiet, but longer than necessary
   transitions are often noisy, confusing and longer than necessary

   promotes academic engaged time; students are consistently on-task more than
   80% of the time
11 keeps individuals on-task more than 80%, but often groups are on-task less than
   80% of the time
   both individuals and groups are on-task less than 80% of the time

   WTS 5
   has a good rapport with and the respect of all students
12 has a good rapport with and the respect of most students
   has a good rapport with and the respect of some students
   routinely sets up high expectations and provides feedback to students on how
   well they met expectations (positive, contingent, specific reinforcement)
13 sets up expectations or provides feedback to students; but expectations and
   feedback do not go together and expectations are minimal
   occasionally sets up expectations or provides feedback to students; feedback,
   when provided, is very general (e.g., “good job”) and expectations are minimal

   enforces rules without help from cooperating teacher
14 enforces rules with help from cooperating teacher
   cooperating teacher must enforce the rules
   knows what behaviors to ignore and how to ignore successfully
15 tries to ignore, but ignoring is ineffective
   attends to minor misbehavior

   avoids the “criticism trap” or can make appropriate changes to get out of it
   independently
16 recognizes when he or she is in the “criticism trap,” but cannot get out of it
   is in the “criticism trap” and does not recognize the need for changes
   provides consequences that are consistent, appropriate and delivered without
   emotion
17 provides consequences, but consequences may be inappropriate or delivered
   inconsistently; responds emotionally to disruptive students
   consequences are ineffective

   implements behavior modification system by the 3rd week or system is well-
   conceived and easy to manage
18 implements behavior modification system by midterm or system is cumbersome
   or was not thought through well enough
   implements behavior modification sys. but results are inconclusive or incomplete
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 87
   makes changes if the system doesn’t work; increases the sophistication of
   systems as students achieve goals
19 makes changes if the system doesn’t work, but doesn’t increase the sophistication
   if it does
   keeps system in place without changing it
   interacts positively with students; ratio is about 3:1; positive reinforcement/praise
   is contingent, specific and varied
20 interacts positively with students; but ratio is less than 3:1 or positive
   reinforcement/praise tends to be praise is general (good job) or repetitive
   interactions are more negative than positive; positive reinforcement/praise does
   not motivate students
   uses problem prevention strategies routinely; prevents problems by referring to
   rules, adjusting the physical setting, proximity, etc.; consistently proactive
21 uses problem prevention strategies, but still reacts to problems that could have
   been avoided
   uses problem prevention strategies on a one-time basis; usually reactive

   WTS 6
   directions are clear and explicit; checks for student understanding before
   beginning activity
22 directions are sufficient; but does not check for student understanding
   directions are given; but students are confused when beginning an assignment
   students are highly successful (generally 90+% accuracy)
23 students are somewhat successful (about 70-90% accuracy)
   students are unsuccessful (many students make frequent errors)
   provides modeling and guided practice consistently for each new skill and
   actively leading to high success rates for students
24 provides some modeling and guided practice, but not enough to ensure students
   master new information
   insufficient modeling and/or guided practice lead to numerous student errors on
   independent work
   very articulate; verbal communication is clear and English is correct
25 expresses self clearly, but occasionally uses incorrect grammar or slang
   verbal communication is frequently unclear, incorrect, or inappropriate

   WTS 7
   keeps "week-at-a-glance" plans up-to-date; writes lesson plans as needed; plans
   contain measurable objectives and detailed procedures
26 keeps "week-at-a-glance" plans up-to-date; rarely writes lesson plans or lesson
   plans are vague
   week-at-a-glance is not up-to-date; likes to "wing it"

   transition plan is based on preferences, interests, and needs with IEP goals and
   objectives directly related; potential outside agencies identified
27 transition plan identifies preferences, interests, and needs with some suggestions
   for goals and objectives
   transition plan is limited to form in IEP packet


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 88
   WTS 8
   inquires about student’s unique characteristics, selects tests and seeks additional
   information about the student on that basis
28 gives a standard battery of tests with only minor variations
   gives a standard battery of tests

   seeks opportunities to practice assessment skills
29 assesses students as required
   appears to be nervous about assessing students
   administers and scores standardized tests independently; obtains valid results
30 administers and scores standardized tests with help; makes minor errors
   administers and scores standardized tests incorrectly; results are invalid
   finds opportunities to conduct direct systematic observation and is able to report
   data objectively
31 needs guidance to conduct direct systematic observation and report results
   results of direct systematic observations are invalid

   anecdotal observations contain well-defined behaviors, specific examples and
   insightful comments
32 anecdotal observations are correct and adequate
   anecdotal observations are not specific; do not differentiate significant from non-
   significant events

   assessment report is well-written and insightful
33 assessment report contains appropriate content and needs only minor revisions or
   assessment report not completed
   assessment report has errors in English and spelling, but communicates the
   information

   makes insightful comments about referral and assessment practices
34 asks questions about referral and assessment practices in the district
   follows referral and assessment practices as directed
   designs appropriate curriculum-based assessment measures as needed
35 gives appropriate curriculum-based assessment measures that have already been
   developed, but does not design new ones
   gives curriculum-based assessment measures as directed
   corrects student errors appropriately; firms and checks for understanding later in
   the lesson
36 corrects student errors appropriately; but doesn’t go back to check for
   understanding; correction may or may not be effective
   some errors are not corrected; attempts to correct are confusing

   diagnosis and remediation of student errors is ongoing and insightful
37 diagnosis and remediation of student errors is ongoing, but patterns of errors may
   not be detected
   very little diagnosis and remediation of student errors occurs
    creates charts and graphs to monitor progress of all groups or individuals; charts
    are neat, informative and easy-to-understand; uses charts to make instructional
    decisions
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 89
38 keeps charts and graphs for some groups or individuals
   does not keep charts and graphs for most groups or individuals or they are
   difficult to read and interpret

   distributes independent work that is relevant, at student’s level and monitored
   consistently (collected, evaluated, and returned)
39 distributes independent work that is appropriate; but independent work is not
   consistently monitored
   independent work is busywork and inconsistently monitored

   WTS 9
   audio/video tapes interactions without being reminded (2-3 completed by
   midterm), sets goals and accomplishes them, then sets new goals
40 audio/video tapes lessons and sets goals to improve interactions
   resists audio/video taping (has not completed this assignment by the 7th week)

   seeks criticism; and uses feedback to improve teaching skills immediately
41 accepts criticism; but doesn’t make significant changes in teaching behavior
   does not accept criticism; is defensive and makes excuses when given feedback
   accurately identifies their own strengths and weaknesses on midterm evaluation
   and lesson plan evaluations; can diagnose errors in teaching behavior
42 has some sense of whether a lesson has gone well or not, but cannot diagnose
   make appropriate changes on their own
   consistently over or underestimates their abilities

   reflects on lessons daily and can use student feedback and behavior
43 writes reflections as required
   does not write required reflections

   routinely arrives early and/or stays late
44 occasionally arrives early or stays late
   usually arrives on time and seldom leaves early
   demonstrates initiative; participates as needed without being told
45 demonstrates some initiative; but often needs direction
   follows directions well

   teacher views herself/himself as an effective change agent and has high
   expectations for self and for students
46 teacher views herself/himself as having some responsibility for student learning,
   but doesn’t know how to respond when a lesson fails
   teacher views children's success or failure as the result of factors outside the
   teacher's control


   WTS 10
   conducts appropriate IEP meetings; appears confident
47 conducts IEP meetings; but is hesitant
   attends, but does not participate in IEP meetings
   seeks opportunities to participate in school and faculty activities
48 willingly participates in school and faculty activities
   participates in school and faculty activities when required

Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 90
   is enthusiastic and energetic
49 is pleasant and does what needs to be done
   appears to be unenthusiastic and lacks vitality

   interpersonal relationships with staff are excellent; seeks opportunities to work
   with general education staff; doesn’t let differences create conflict
50 interpersonal relationships with most staff are good; works with general
   education staff as necessary
   interpersonal relationships with most staff are cordial; but occasionally tense
   always uses good judgment in confidential matters without being told
51 usually uses good judgment in confidential matters
   needs to be reminded about protocol regarding confidentiality

   relates well to parents from different socioeconomic backgrounds; takes the
   initiative to communicate positive behavior
52 has a cordial relationship with parents, but makes judgmental comments
   appears to be intimidated by parents; makes few contacts
   can identify which agency would be appropriate team member Job Center, DVR,
   Social Services, SSI, Independent Living, IHE Disability Services, Community
   College Staff, or mental health
53 can identify several potential agencies that may be appropriate team member
   cannot identify potential outside agency team member
   assumes leadership in collaborations with general educators to provide
   modifications and accommodations
54 collaborates with general educators to provide modifications and
   accommodations
   provides modifications and accommodations; seldom interacts with general
   educators for the benefit of students




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 91
                                                                                   Early Childhood
                                                                                   Special Education
                                                                                   Evaluation Form
                                      Department of Special Education
                                     University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
                                UNDERGRADUATE PRACTICUM EVALUATION FORM
                                   EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION

(Directions: Complete the attached evaluation checklist using the column for midterm and discuss with
your student teacher. Then, complete this summary page, tear off, and mail to the University Supervisor.
Do not return the checklist to the University supervisor until after you have completed the final
evaluation.)

Evaluation of _____________________________________                   Date __________________

by Cooperating teacher _____________________________

1. +Indicate the student teacher’s current level of functioning by checking off in the following table.

                        A.          B.              C.            D.            E.          F.
                   Planning [and Learning      Instruction   Profession-      Parent    Intra- and
                   Assessment] Environment                      alism      Support and Interagency
                                                                              Family   Cooperation
                                                                           Involvement
Exceeds
expectations in
this area.
Good, but
could improve
in this area.
Not yet
performing
acceptably in
this area.

2. + Please include a narrative that reports on strengths and weaknesses of the student teacher. If you are
   specific enough the supervisor can work on weaknesses during supervised visits. Continue your
   narrative on the back side of this page.




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 92
                                            Department of Special Education
                                           University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

                                     UNDERGRADUATE PRACTICUM EVALUATION FORM
                                        EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION

Evaluation of _____________________________________                           Date __________________

Cooperating Teacher _____________________________

                                                                                                      Check One 
                                                                                                     Per Set of Three
                                                                                                     Midterm Final
                                 A. PLANNING [AND ASSESSMENT]
     seeks opportunities to practice assessment skills
 A-1 assesses students as required
     appears to be nervous about assessing students

     administers and scores standardized tests independently; obtains valid results
 A-2 administers and scores standardized tests with help; makes minor errors
     administers and scores standardized tests incorrectly; results are invalid

     inquires about student’s unique characteristics, selects tests and seeks additional
     information about the student on that basis
 A-3 gives a standard battery of tests with only minor variations
     gives a standard battery of tests

     identifies appropriate techniques to gather assessment information (e.g., interviews,
     observation, play) and reports valid results
 A-4 needs help identifying appropriate techniques to gather assessment information; reported
     results are not entirely valid or accurate
     does not do a good job of gathering assessment information or reported results are not valid

     anecdotal observations contain well-defined behaviors, specific examples and insightful
     comments
 A-5 anecdotal observations are correct and adequate
     anecdotal observations are not specific; do not differentiate significant from nonsignificant
     events

     assessment report is well-written and insightful; uses language that families can accept and
     understand
 A-6 assessment report contains appropriate content and needs only minor revisions
     assessment report has errors in English and spelling, but communicates the information;
     does not use language that families can understand

     participates appropriately in IEP/IFSP meetings; appears confident
 A-7 participates in IEP/IFSP meetings; but is hesitant
     attends, but does not participate in IEP/IFSP meetings

     makes insightful comments about referral and assessment practices
 A-8 asks questions about referral and assessment practices in the district
Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 93
                                                                                                          Check One 
                                                                                                         Per Set of Three
                                                                                                         Midterm Final
       follows referral and assessment practices as directed

     designs appropriate curriculum-based assessment measures as needed
 A-9 gives appropriate curriculum-based assessment measures that have already been
     developed, but does not design new ones
     gives curriculum-based assessment measures as directed

     identifies students’ unique characteristics and writes a correct and educationally useful IEP
     or developmentally appropriate IFSP
A-10 writes a correct IEP, but it is relatively indistinguishable from other IEPs/IFSPs
     writes an IEP/IFSP that contains errors in where information is placed or how it is stated;
     IFSP is not developmentally appropriate

     develops detailed matrices that embed instruction in daily activities
A-11 matrices are not well developed
     does not develop matrices

     does lesson plans as routinely; plans contain measurable objectives and detailed
     procedures
A-12 does lesson plans routinely; plans are vague
     does lesson plans sometimes; likes to "wing it"

     uses problem prevention strategies routinely; prevents problems by referring to rules,
     adjusting the physical setting, proximity, etc.; consistently proactive
A-13 uses problem prevention strategies, but still reacts to problems that could have been
     avoided
     uses problem prevention strategies on a one-time basis; usually reactive

     lesson plan(s) identifies objectives that address the range of abilities of children in the class
A-14 some of the objectives in lesson plan(s) address the range of abilities of children in the class
     few of the objectives in lesson plan(s) address the range of abilities of children in the class

     supplements curriculum materials with appropriate, well-designed activities
A-15 needs encouragement and help developing curriculum materials
     does not develop curriculum materials or materials developed are not appropriate

                                    B. LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
     usually interacts with students in positive and nurturing ways
 B-1 sometimes interacts with students in positive and nurturing ways
     seldom interacts with students in positive and nurturing ways




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 94
     directions are usually understandable and at a level consistent with the child's understanding
 B-2 directions are sometimes understandable and at a level consistent with the child's
     understanding
     directions are seldom understandable and at a level consistent with the child's
     understanding

     usually sets up appropriate expectations for children
 B-3 sometimes sets up appropriate expectations for children
     seldom sets up appropriate expectations for children

     enforces rules without help from cooperating teacher
 B-4 enforces rules with help from cooperating teacher
     cooperating teacher must enforce the rules

     knows what behaviors to ignore and how to ignore successfully
 B-5 tries to ignore, but ignoring is ineffective
     attends to minor misbehavior

     avoids the “criticism trap” or can make appropriate changes to get out of it independently
 B-6 recognizes when he or she is in the “criticism trap,” but cannot get out of it
     is in the “criticism trap” and does not recognize the need for changes

     provides consequences that are consistent, appropriate and delivered without emotion
 B-7 provides consequences, but consequences may be inappropriate or delivered inconsistently;
     responds emotionally to disruptive students
     consequences are ineffective

     plans, develops, and implements appropriate behavior management programs
 B-8 needs help to plan, develop, and implement appropriate behavior management programs
     has difficulty planning, developing, and implementing appropriate behavior management
     programs

     makes changes if the system doesn’t work; increases the sophistication of systems as
     students achieve goals
 B-9 makes changes if the system doesn’t work, but doesn’t increase the sophistication
     keeps system in place without changing it

     usually provides appropriate feedback to children
B-10 sometimes provides appropriate feedback to children
     seldom provides appropriate feedback to children




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 95
     usually sets up environment to promote appropriate behavior and discourages inappropriate
     behavior
B-11 sometimes sets up environment to promote appropriate behavior and discourages
     inappropriate behavior
     seldom sets up environment to promote appropriate behavior and discourages inappropriate
     behavior

                                         C. INSTRUCTION
     children are often engaged in appropriate activities
 C-1 children are sometimes engaged in appropriate activities
     children are rarely engaged in appropriate activities

     pacing of lessons/activities is usually appropriate
 C-2 pacing of lessons/activities is sometimes appropriate
     pacing of lessons/activities is seldom appropriate

     teacher is usually responsive to needs/abilities of children during instructional activities and
     provides appropriate level of assistance
 C-3 teacher is sometimes responsive to needs/abilities of children during instructional activities
     and provides appropriate level of assistance
     teacher is seldom responsive to needs/abilities of children during instructional activities and
     provides appropriate level of assistance

     lesson is highly organized and efficient; no wasted time
 C-4 lesson has no glaring problems with organization, but includes wasted time
     lesson is disorganized; confusion and/or problems with materials take up a significant
     amount of class time and create conditions for behavior problems

     successfully manages more than one activity at a time; is “with it”
 C-5 has difficulty attending to several activities at once, but can manage small group that he or
     she is working with
     cannot manage even one activity successfully

     is usually organized and prepared for instruction (e.g., materials are ready, children do not
     have to wait)
 C-6 is sometimes organized and prepared for instruction (e.g., materials are ready, children do
     not have to wait)
     is seldom organized and prepared for instruction (e.g., materials are ready, children do not
     have to wait)

     usually develops instruction based on the needs/interests of the children
 C-7 sometimes develops instruction based on the needs/interests of the children
     seldom develops instruction based on the needs/interests of the children



Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 96
     transitions are often well-planned and implemented
 C-8 transitions are sometimes well-planned and implemented
     transitions are seldom well-planned and implemented

     often uses incidental learning strategies to capture the teachable moment
 C-9 sometimes uses incidental learning strategies to capture the teachable moment
     seldom uses incidental learning strategies to capture the teachable moment

     appropriately and consistently uses augmentative communication and assistive technology
C-10 inconsistently uses augmentative communication and assistive technology
     fails to use augmentative communication and assistive technology in an appropriate manner

     appropriately and consistently demonstrates appropriate positioning and handling
     techniques
C-11 inconsistently demonstrates appropriate positioning and handling techniques
     fails to use appropriate positioning and handling techniques

     usually provides appropriate support and feedback to facilitate student learning
C-12 sometimes provides appropriate support and feedback to facilitate student learning
     rarely provides appropriate support and feedback to facilitate student learning

     usually measures child's performance and documents progress (charts or graphs) on an on-
     going basis
C-13 sometimes measures child's performance and documents progress (charts or graphs) on an
     on-going basis
     seldom measures child's performance and documents progress (charts or graphs) on an on-
     going basis

                                        D. PROFESSIONALISM
     routinely arrives early and/or stays late
 D-1 occasionally arrives early or stays late
     usually arrives on time and seldom leaves early

     seeks opportunities to participate in school and faculty activities
 D-2 willingly participates in school and faculty activities
     participates in school and faculty activities when required

     always uses good judgment in confidential matters without being told
 D-3 usually uses good judgment in confidential matters
     needs to be reminded about protocol regarding confidentiality

     demonstrates initiative; participates as needed without being told
 D-4 demonstrates some initiative; but often needs direction
     follows directions well




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 97
     seeks criticism; and uses feedback to improve teaching skills immediately
 D-5 accepts criticism; but doesn’t make significant changes in teaching behavior
     does not accept criticism; is defensive and makes excuses when given feedback

     often demonstrates self-evaluation skills; modifies teaching behaviors and lessons based on
     feedback
 D-6 sometimes demonstrates self-evaluation skills and modifies teaching behaviors and lessons
     based on feedback
     seldom demonstrates self-evaluation skills or modifies teaching behaviors and lessons
     based on feedback

     is enthusiastic and energetic
 D-7 is pleasant and does what needs to be done
     appears to be unenthusiastic and lacks vitality

     always uses professional language that is free of jargon; uses correct grammar
 D-8 sometimes uses professional language that is free of jargon; does not always use correct
     grammar
     often fails to use professional language that is free of jargon; often uses incorrect grammar

     interpersonal relationships with staff are excellent; seeks opportunities to work with parents
     and other staff; doesn’t let differences create conflict
 D-9 interpersonal relationships with most staff are good; works with parents and other staff as
     necessary
     interpersonal relationships with most staff and parents are cordial; but occasionally tense

     relates well to parents regardless of different backgrounds; takes the initiative to
     communicate positive behavior
D-10 has a cordial relationship with parents, but makes judgmental comments
     appears to be intimidated by parents; makes few contacts

     often demonstrates initiative in improving performance
D-11 sometimes demonstrates initiative in improving performance
     rarely demonstrates initiative in improving performance

                          E. PARENT SUPPORT AND FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
     is usually skilled at establishing rapport with parents and in building supportive and effective
     relationships with them
 E-1 is sometimes skilled at establishing rapport with parents and in building supportive and
     effective relationships with them
     is seldom skilled at establishing rapport with parents and in building supportive and effective
     relationships with them




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 98
     usually demonstrates interaction skills with parents, such as attending behavior,
     paraphrasing content, and reflecting feelings
 E-2 sometimes demonstrates interaction skills with parents, such as attending behavior,
     paraphrasing content, and reflecting feelings
     seldom demonstrates interaction skills with parents, such as attending behavior,
     paraphrasing content, and reflecting feelings

     usually demonstrates suspending value judgments, conveying acceptance and
     unconditional, positive regard; giving and receiving information, and facilitating
     communication
 E-3 sometimes demonstrates suspending value judgments, conveying acceptance and
     unconditional, positive regard; giving and receiving information, and facilitating
     communication
     seldom demonstrates suspending value judgments, conveying acceptance and
     unconditional, positive regard; giving and receiving information, and facilitating
     communication

     usually communicates effectively with parents through a variety of oral strategies, e.g., initial
     contacts, phone calls, informal contacts, parent interviews, parent conferences, parent
     information meetings, and home visits
 E-4 sometimes communicates effectively with parents through a variety of oral strategies, e.g.,
     initial contacts, phone calls, informal contacts, parent interviews, parent conferences, parent
     information meetings, and home visits
     seldom communicates effectively with parents through a variety of oral strategies, e.g., initial
     contacts, phone calls, informal contacts, parent interviews, parent conferences, parent
     information meetings, and home visits

     usually communicates effectively with parents through a variety of written formats, e.g.,
     traveling notebooks, newsletters, handouts and notices, handbooks, and reports
 E-5 sometimes communicates effectively with parents through a variety of written formats, e.g.,
     traveling notebooks, newsletters, handouts and notices, handbooks, and reports
     seldom communicates effectively with parents through a variety of written formats, e.g.,
     traveling notebooks, newsletters, handouts and notices, handbooks, and reports

                          F. INTRA- AND INTERAGENCY COOPERATION
     contributes as a team member in assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of
     intervention
 F-1 needs encouragement to contribute to team process
     implements team decisions, but does not contribute to team process




Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 99
                                     Appendix J Quick Reference License Guide



                                College of Education and Human Sciences


                 Teacher Education Program
 Collaborative Leaders for Today & Tomorrow




Initial Educator License
& PI34 Quick Reference                                                Initial Educator PDP Writing Guidelines
Guide                                                                 1. Reflect on your professional practice and student learning.
                                                                         (Year 1)
                                                                      2. Write your professional goal. (Sections A-E on PDP
                                                                         document) Information, timelines and Initial Educator Tool
Initial Wisconsin Certification for UW-EC Graduates                      Kit can be found at http://dpi.state.wi.us/tepdl/initialed.html
 Obtain license application form from the Wisconsin Dept of             (Year 1)
  Public Instruction website                                          3. Convene a PDP review team to approve your goal between
  http://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/licguide.html                                  June 1 of first year and January 1 of your second year of
 Click on License Applications                                          employment. Send ONLY the goal approval signature
  The form (PI-1602-IS) can be printed and filled out by hand or         form to DPI by January 1 of the second year.
  the information can be filled in on the computer and then           4. Work toward completing your PDP. (Year 2-4)
  printed. Please print the application on plain white paper – not    5. By January 15 of year 4 or 5 of your employment/licensure
  a colored paper or heavy resume paper.                                 cycle, convene a PDP review team to verify completion of
 Return completed license application, $100 processing fee              your PDP.
  payment, and any other required materials such as fingerprint
  cards (if applicable) to the Field Experience/Certification
  Office (Brewer Hall 151).                                           Initial Educator License Cycle
  Fingerprint cards for WI licensure are available in the rack        Year 1 Reflection
  outside Brewer Hall 153.                                            Year 2 Convene PDP review team to approve goal by January 1
 Payment can be in the form of a personal check, money order,               and write an annual review.
  or credit card. Cash is not acceptable. If you wish to pay with     Year 3 Make progress toward goal and write an annual review
  a credit card (MasterCard or Visa only), fill in the account        Year 4 Make progress toward goal and write an annual review
  number and expiration date and sign the cover sheet.                Year 5 Submit completed plan to PDP Review Team (January
                                                                             15-April)
Advancement of Initial Educator License to                            NOTE: The Initial Educator may complete a 3, 4, or 5 year plan.
Professional Educator License
 Three years of regular (not substitute) employment in your          Initial Educator PDP Review Team
  specific license category (teacher, pupil services or               A PDP Review Team consists of 3 people who have completed
  administration), and                                                the DPI state approved training:
 A Professional Development Plan (PDP) based on the                   A peer (teacher, or administrator, or pupil service)
  appropriate Wisconsin Educator Standards as verified by your         An administrator designated by the district
  Wisconsin Initial Educator PDP Team (See
                                                                       An institution of higher education representative (IHE)
  http://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/standards.html for teacher, pupil
  services, and administrator standards), and                         If you need help with finding an IHE representative a list of
                                                                      eligible people can be found at
 A PI-1602-ADV License Application form and fee (Download at         http://dpi.state.wi.us/tepdl/pdpteammembers.html
  http://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/applications.html ), and
                                                                      If you want an IHE representative from UW-EC, please call Deb
 A PI 1613 Employment Verification form to be filled out by
                                                                      Harding, FE Coordinator at (715) 836-5544 or email her at
  employer (Download at http://dpi.wi.gov/tepdl/applications.html )
                                                                      hardindr@uwec.edu.


 Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 100
  Professional Educator License & PI 34 Quick Reference Guide

Professional Educator License Renewal                               2. Can an educator who completed an approved program
Requirements Using PDP                                              prior to August 31, 2004 choose to renew with a PDP and
1. Reflect on your professional practice. Prepare to or begin to    then switch back to the six credits system for later renewals?
   write a PDP. (Year 1)                                            Yes, educators who completed an approved program prior to
2. Write the PDP including goal, objectives, and activities         August 31, 2004 can switch back and forth between the PDP
   during fall semester. (Year 2)                                   renewal option and the six semester credit renewal option for
3. Complete an annual review each year; work on activities;         renewal of that particular professional educator (40) license. If
   collect evidence that demonstrates professional growth &         an educator selects the PDP renewal option it is important to
   student learning. (Year 2, 3, 4)                                 remember the PDP is a five-year plan that includes annual
                                                                    reviews and activities completed over that five-year period.
4. Finalize PDP and submit to PDP Review Team for
   verification during spring semester. At least two of the three   3. If an educator is adding a new license after 8/31/2004, is a
   team members must verify successful completion of the PDP        Professional Development Plan (PDP) required for renewal
   on PI-PDP-2 Verification Form. (Year 5)                          in the future?
5. Download application form that may be found at                   Professional educators (40) who complete an additional license
   http://dpi.state.wi.us/tepdl/applications.html; send your        program(s) after August 31, 2004 in the same licensure category
   licensing fee and paperwork to DPI along with the signature      for which they already hold a license (e.g. have a regular
   page from your PDP Review Team.                                  education teaching license and add a special education teacher
                                                                    license) can renew both licenses by completing either a PDP OR
                                                                    six semester credits of course work related to his/her area of
 License Cycle for a Professional Educator                          licensure.
Year 1 Reflection
                                                                    Anyone who completes a program for the first time in a
Year 2 Write PDP, begin activities, write first annual review
                                                                    particular licensure category (teacher, pupil services, or
Year 3 Make progress toward goal and write second annual            administrator) after 8/31/2004 is considered an initial educator
       review                                                       (20) in that licensure category and must complete a PDP to
Year 4 Make progress toward goal and write third annual             advance to the professional educator (30) license stage. For
       review                                                       example, a professional educator (40) who has a license in
Year 5 Submit completed plan to PDP Review Team                     teaching and completes a program for administrative licensure
                                                                    after August 31, 2004 (and has never before completed an
NOTE: The Professional Educator must complete a 5 year PDP          approved license program in administration) will be issued an
      with 3 annual reviews.                                        Initial Educator (20) license and will be required to complete a
                                                                    PDP to advance to the professional educator (30) stage in that
 Professional Educator PDP Review Team                              category. However, if the educator has not attained employment
 A PDP Review Team consists of 3 peers who have completed           in that new category, s/he may renew his/her Professional
 the DPI state approved training:                                   Educator (40) license in teaching by completing six semester
 If you are a teacher your team should be 3 teachers               credits of course work related to the area of licensure or could
                                                                    also complete a PDP that focuses on the teaching standards.
 If you are an administrator your team should be three
                                                                    4. When I get a new license added, how do I proceed to get
   administrators
                                                                    the new license and my current license on the same 5-year
 If you are in pupil services (i.e. guidance counselor, social     track?
   worker, school psychologist or school nurse) your team
                                                                    You may put both of the licenses on the same 5-year track and it
   should be any 3 people within the pupil services group.
                                                                    is often advantageous to do so, but it may result in losing some
                                                                    years off of your current license. The process will require two
 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)                                  applications, two fees, and original transcripts verifying six
1. When is a PDP Required?                                          semester credits of course work for the current license. When
                                                                    you apply for your new license, DPI will contact you regarding
Anyone who completes a program for the first time in a              options for renewing your current licenses.
particular licensure category (teacher, pupil services, or
administrator) after 8/31/2004 is considered an initial educator    5. Can a teacher who holds an Initial Educator License and
(20) in that licensure category and must complete a PDP to          who completes an approved principal program apply for
advance to the professional educator (30) license stage. These      and be issued an Initial Educator License as a principal?
educators will continue to use the PDP process for future           No. The educator would first have to complete all requirements
renewals of the professional educator (30) license.                 to advance his/her non-renewable Initial Educator License for
                                                                    teaching to the professional educator license stage. If an Initial
A professional educator (40) who completed a program prior to       Educator License was issued in an administrative category to an
8/31/2004 has the option of completing either a PDP or six          educator who still was licensed at the initial educator stage as a
semester credits of course work related to his/her area of          teacher, there is no assurance that the educator would complete
licensure to renew the license. A professional educator (40) who    requirements for advancement to the professional educator stage
completes an additional license program(s) after August 31,         as a teacher. The educator would therefore no longer be eligible
2004 in the same licensure category for which s/he already holds    for the administrator license since eligibility for a teaching
a license (e.g. has a regular education teaching license and adds   license is a prerequisite.
a special education teacher license) can renew both licenses by
completing either a PDP OR six semester credits of course work
related to his/her area of licensure.


Student Teacher/Intern Handbook 101

				
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