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									   DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION




2007-2008


   FOR
   Student Teachers
   Interns
   Cooperating Teachers
   Site Supervisors
   School Administrators
   College Supervisors
Welcome student teachers, interns, cooperating teachers, site supervisors,
and college supervisors. This handbook provides an overview of the important
guidelines, policies and information for the student teaching/internship experience.
We hope it will be a helpful source of answers to questions about Centenary’s
student teaching/internship program. Please read the handbook before the student
teaching/internship experience begins and keep it handy as a reference if questions
should arise.


To our student teachers/interns: Unlike any other time during the teacher
preparation process, you now have this unique time to apply fully your acquired
knowledge, including theory and content, to the classroom. Your cooperating teacher
or site supervisor, and college supervisor make up a team of professionals who will
assist you in developing your teaching skills. We would like to take this opportunity
to wish you the very best during your student teaching/internship experience.


To the cooperating teachers and site supervisors: We would like to take this
opportunity to thank you for continuing to assist us in preparing new teachers. We
know our student teachers and interns join us in expressing our sincere appreciation
for your support and assistance.


We extend an invitation to all of you to feel free to contact those listed below if you
have any questions or concerns.


Sue Hernandez,     shernand@centenary.edu           859-5066      Education
Ph.D.                                                             Department Chair

Sharon Little,     slittle@centenary.edu            869-5069      Supervisor of
Ph.D.                                                             Secondary Student
                                                                  Teachers/ Interns
Robert Prickett,   rpricket@centenary.edu           869-5225      Secondary Methods
Ph.D.
Karen Soul,        ksoul@centenary.edu              869-5065      Supervisor of
Ph.D.                                                             Elementary Student
                                                                  Teachers/ Interns
Ilka Vaitkus       ivaitkus@centenary.edu           869-5223      Education
                                                                  Department
                                                                  Administrative
                                                                  Assistant
                                                 Table of Contents

Calendar ....................................................................................................................... 3


Introduction and General Information ........................................................................ 4


Conceptual Framework – The Dedicated Educator ...................................................... 6


Section 1: Responsibilities of the Student Teacher/Intern ......................................... 7


Section 2: Expectations of the Cooperating Teacher/Site supervisor ......................... 17


Section 3: Expectations of the College Supervisor....................................................... 25


Section 4: Phase-In Schedule...................................................................................... 28


Section 5: Evaluation ................................................................................................... 35
                                                                                                           3



                                                 Calendar
Note: Student teachers and interns follow the school’s district’s vacation schedule, not Centenary’s.

          Week                           Dates            Special Events , Holidays, and Forms Due

                                                         Wednesday, January 16: Special Meeting for
                                                          Cooperating Teachers/ Site Supervisors/
                                                          Student Teachers/ Interns
Week 1                     January 14-18                 Friday, January 18 – Caddo Parish Professional
                                                          Development Day (Student Teachers attend)
                                                         Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor
                                                          Questionnaire due

                                                        Monday, January 21 - Caddo, DeSoto, and Bossier
Week 2                     January 21-25
                                                        Parish MLK Holiday

Week 3                     January 28-February 1        First Quarter Evaluations due

                           February 4-8                 Centenary Mardi Gras Break – Centenary closed
Week 4
                           No seminar                   (Student teachers attend placements)

Week 5                     February 11-15

                                                        Monday, February 18 – Presidents’ Day Holiday for
Week 6                     February 18-22
                                                        all public schools


Week 7                     February 25-29
                                                        Mid-Term Evaluations due and 3-way
                                                        conferences
                                                        Time Logs due
Week 8
                           March 3-7

Week 9
Second Placement begins
                           March 10-14                  State Testing GEE/LEAP 21/iLEAP (Grades 3-12)
for Elementary and K-12
Student Teachers

                           March 17-21                  Centenary Spring Break – Centenary closed
Week 10
                           No seminar                   (Student teachers attend placements)

                           March 24-28                  Spring Break for all public schools

Week 11                    March 31-April 4             Third Quarter Evaluation due

Week 12                    April 7-11

Week 13                    April 14-18

Week 14                    April 21-25                  Thursday, April 24, 5:00 – Centenary Honors
                                                        Convocation
                                                        Final Evaluation and Dispositions Forms due
Week 15                    April 28-May 2               and 3-way conferences
                                                        Time Logs due

                           Saturday, May 10, 10:30 am   Centenary Commencement!
                                                                                                     4


                                          Introduction

    We perceive the student teaching/internship experience not as a culminating activity, but rather
as a first step in inducting candidate’s into the teaching profession. The success of the student
teaching/internship experience depends on the close cooperation and collaboration of all the people
involved: the cooperating teacher, the site supervisor teacher, the candidate, and the college
supervisor. Each has a distinct role to play, and each is responsible for helping to make this unique
opportunity a rich and rewarding one. Following are some guidelines related to the student
teaching/internship experience. It is hoped that the guidelines will prove to be a useful resource as
the experience unfolds.
    We believe that the student teaching/internship experience we offer today will greatly impact the
classrooms of tomorrow. Together, we can provide a program that ultimately will contribute to a
stronger profession. Thus, we look forward to working with you in achieving this goal. Welcome to
the student teaching/internship experience!


General Information

Time Requirements
    By Louisiana Law, student teachers are required to log 270 hours, with 180 of those hours being
actual teaching time. A substantial portion of student teaching must be on an all-day basis (see
section titled “Phase-In Schedule”). It is expected that the candidate will plan on the implementation
of these hours using the Phase-In Schedule provided by the college over one full semester. The
student teacher/intern is required to keep an accurate time log of all activities during the semester.
This log will be turned into the Education Department at the end of the semester.

Schedule
    Candidates are required to follow the school district calendar during their student
teaching/internship semester; this includes holidays, breaks, etc.
    Candidates are expected to report to school each morning at least fifteen minutes before the
students arrive (preferably earlier), and are expected to remain at least fifteen minutes or more
after the school day has ended to review the day, plan for the next day’s lessons, etc. Candidates
should follow the example of the cooperating teacher/site supervisor with regard to arrival and
departure requirements for teachers in respective districts.


Absences
     Candidates are expected to assume the same responsibility for the performance of their duties at
school as the cooperating teacher does; therefore, absences should be rare and only for instances of
illness or unexpected emergencies.
     In the event of an unexpected absence, the student teacher should immediately notify his or her
cooperating teacher and the college supervisor; the intern should follow his/her school district
guidelines for absences and notify the college supervisor. This courtesy is essential in order for
arrangements to be made to cover those classes and activities for which the candidate is responsible.
Further, notification of the college supervisor will allow for an adjustment in scheduling if there are
any planned supervisory visits and to avoid unnecessary trips. Student teachers/interns should not
make appointments during school hours unless it is an emergency.

Supervision of Student Teachers/Interns
   Regular, planned supervision of candidates will be the joint responsibility of the cooperating
teacher/site supervisor and the college supervisor. Candidates will meet with the college supervisor
once a week. This weekly meeting constitutes EDUC 471, Senior Seminar for undergraduate
                                                                                                       5


candidates; it is required for graduate candidates. The supervisor will also make frequent scheduled
and unscheduled visits when the candidates take on instructional responsibilities.

Evaluation of Student Teachers/Interns
  Cooperating teachers, site supervisors, and college supervisors will submit written evaluations of
the candidate’s performance to the Education Department at first quarter, mid-term, third quarter,
and at the end of the semester.

Unsatisfactory/Unacceptable Performance

   Unsatisfactory performance may be determined at any portal or between portals by
documentation including but not limited to the following: 1) Disposition evaluations by any and all
parties involved, 2) Student Teaching/Internship evaluations by any and all parties involved, 3)
Interviews, 4) Lesson Plans, 5) Observations, 6) Classroom management, 7) Attitude, 8) Commitment
to the profession, 9) Cooperation. If unsatisfactory performance is determined, the Department of
Education may take any one of the following actions, dependent upon the point in the program at
which the determination is made, and upon our level of confidence that the candidate will benefit
from the action:

                        1) Postponed participation in student teaching or internship
                        2) A requirement to participate in student teaching with no option to
                           participate in internship
                        3) An individual Plan of Action designed to address the candidate’s specific
                           areas for improvement before or during student teaching or internship
                        4) Removal from student teaching or internship
                        5) Dismissal from the program
                                                                                                      6




                                               Conceptual Framework:
                                               The Dedicated Educator


                                               The unifying concept on which Centenary College of
                                               Louisiana bases teacher preparation is the Dedicated
                                               Educator. The four essential elements of content
                                               knowledge, pedagogy, inquiry, and community
                                               support this framework.

                                               The main objective of the Department of Education is
                                               to prepare dedicated educators. A dedicated educator
                                               is one who commits to the personal and professional
                                               development and success of all learners, colleagues,
                                               and self. Dedicated educators exhibit the knowledge,
                                               skills, and dispositions embedded within the essential
                                                elements to effectively promote this development and
                                                success.

Content Knowledge ___________________________________________________________________
Dedicated Educators realize that their mastery of content must be so well-refined that they can turn
their attention and energy to the appropriate pedagogical approach to present the material to
students. Developing a high level of competence in content knowledge is crucial to making important
content decisions appropriate for the classroom: deciding what material is important and what is
inconsequential, deciding how broad and how deep the study of the content should be, and equally
important, deciding which pedagogical strategy is the most effective to ensure that their students
process it (Armstrong and Savage, 1998).

Pedagogy ____________________________________________________________________________
The Dedicated Educator must also have highly refined pedagogical skills including effective
communication; understanding that how students learn informs how they should be taught;
appreciation of diverse learning styles exhibited by diverse populations of students; the use of
innovative methods, such as technology; and being able to select the appropriate strategies to use
for different students from different cultures with different learning styles. To become proficient with
these skills, the Dedicated Educator realizes the value of grounding practice in theory and utilizes the
most valid and reliable research available.

Inquiry ______________________________________________________________________________
The Dedicated Educator is analytical and examines components through the asking of questions.
Thompson and Zeuli (1999) define inquiry and its accompanying reflection, as “thinking to learn.”
The ideal to which the unit aspires is the development of learners and teachers who value systematic
and rigorous reflection, who interact with colleagues and others in the community as they reflect, and
who make meaning of their teaching and learning experiences through reflection.

Community __________________________________________________________________________
The Dedicated Educator creates a school climate that empowers students by developing a community
of learners. In a community of learners, adults and children alike assume responsibility for their own
learning and the group’s functioning “with all serving as resources to the others, with varying roles
according to their understanding of the activity at hand and differing (and shifting) responsibilities in
the system” (Rogoff, Matusov, and White, 1996). Moreover, a realized community of learners
includes threads of diversity, communication, collaboration, service, and leadership.
                  7




    Section 1:

Responsibilities of
Student Teachers
   and Interns
                                                                                                    8



Section 1
Responsibilities of the Student Teacher/Intern


Prepare
• Review the district and school procedures regarding discipline, dismissal and safety procedures
• Review the curriculum to be covered with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor
• Student teachers: Agree with cooperating teacher on a plan for becoming involved in the
   teaching responsibilities in the class (See section titled “Phase-In Schedule”)
• Know the roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher/site supervisor and the college
   supervisor
• Be familiar with physical layout of school
• Observe cooperating teacher/site supervisor

Plan
• Student teachers: Plan cooperatively with the cooperating teacher for the students’ instruction
   (See example lesson plans)
• Be familiar with benchmarks and standards
• Be prepared by having lesson plans and materials (Student teachers: Plans are to be turned in at
   least one week in advance)
• Construct materials for lessons, bulletin boards, etc.
• Student teachers: Provide the cooperating teacher with copies of any materials intended to be
   sent home with students so the cooperating teacher may review the material before distribution

Teach
• Learn the students’ developmental levels and provide lessons appropriate for them
• Be successful in classroom procedures for managing the class effectively during instruction,
   incorporating various groupings and presentation techniques
• Assume extra duties willingly
• Become involved in the school program
• Observe the teaching of other teachers in the building after making arrangements with the
   assistance of the cooperating teacher/site supervisor
• Maintain an attitude of professionalism at all times in appearance, speech, and mannerisms with
   students, parents, faculty, and staff

Assess
• Meet regularly with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor and college supervisor to review
   progress and/or needs
• Maintain an accurate record of the required teaching hours for certification
• Prepare a professional portfolio
• Be involved in continual self-evaluation and reflection for professional growth through journal/log
   writing and reading
• Attend College Senior Seminar
• Coordinate proposed dates for college supervisor visits with the cooperating teacher/site
   supervisor
• Contact in writing the college supervisor of the agreed upon dates for the announced visits
                                                                                     9


               Student Teacher/Intern Professional Checklist

 Be appropriately groomed at all times. Follow school and district dress code.

 Be prompt at all times.

 Use proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

 Obtain and know the policies of the school.

 Show initiative.

        1. Participate as a full faculty member

        2. Attend faculty meetings

        3. Participate in parent-teacher conferences

        4. Volunteer

 Use your time efficiently.

 Be prepared with daily lesson plans and materials.

 Maintain a written reflective journal.

 Display enthusiasm and interest.

 Keep student information confidential.

 Use teachers’ and other staff members’ last names in front of the students.

 Be the teacher, not one of the students.

 Show respect for your students through your words and actions.

 Complete and submit a self-evaluation at mid-term and the end of the experience.

 Follow the school district calendar during student teaching/internship.

 Contact your college supervisor if you have any concerns.
                                                                                                      10


                                       Relating to Pupils

The questions on this form should be used by the student teacher/intern to analyze personal
relationships with pupils. Record answers in your reflective journal. These will be used for review
and discussion with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor and college supervisor.

1.    Do I show sufficient enthusiasm so that my students are aware of the interest that I have in
      the subject?
      Supporting Information:
      Enthusiasm could be improved by:
2.    Am I always courteous to my students?
      Supporting Information:
      Respect could be improved by:
3.    Do I insist that my students are courteous to one another and to me?
      Supporting information:
      I could appear more courteous by:
4.    Do I recognize good work as much as or more than I criticize poor student accomplishment?
      Supporting information:
      I could better recognize student work by:
5.    Do I make assignments that are clear and specific, and do I justify those assignments in terms
      of their value to students?
      Supporting information:
      Assignments would be acceptable if:
6.    Do I make an effort to provide for individual differences?
      Supporting information:
      I could further individualize my teaching by:
7.    Do I employ a variety of teaching procedures in order to avoid monotony and to appeal to
      student interests?
      Supporting information:
      I could improve variety by:
8.    Do I attempt to make every student in my classes feel some personal responsibility for the
      effectiveness of my class?
      Supporting information:
      I could increase students’ feelings of responsibility by:
9.    Do my students really believe that my main purpose is to help them to learn?
      Supporting information:
      I could better convince my students by:
10.   Do I believe that my main purpose in teaching is to help students?
      Supporting information:
      I can further refine my beliefs through:
                                                                                         11


                            Classroom Demographic Data Collection


Student Teacher/Intern: _______________________________________ Date: ____________________
Classroom Teacher/Site Supervisor: ______________________________ Grade: ___________________
School: _______________________________________________________________________________


Please indicate a numeric value for each:
_______ Total number of students
_______ Males
_______ Females
_______ Total number of students with identified exceptionalities



Please indicate a numeric value for each ethnicity:
_______ Non-Resident Alien
_______ African American/Non-Hispanic
_______ Asian/Pacific Islander
_______ Hispanic
_______ White/Non-Hispanic
_______ Other



Indicate the number of students identified with:
_______ Autism. Notes: ________________________________________________________________
_______ Gifted. Notes: _________________________________________________________________
_______ Specific Learning Disabilities. Notes: _______________________________________________
_______ Speech/Language Impairment. Notes: _____________________________________________
_______ Traumatic Brain Injury. Notes: ____________________________________________________
_______ Developmental Delay. Notes: _____________________________________________________
_______ Hearing Impairment. Notes: ______________________________________________________
_______ Emotional Disturbance. Notes: ____________________________________________________
_______ Visual Impairment. Notes: _______________________________________________________
_______ Mental Disability. Notes: _________________________________________________________
_______ Orthopedic Impairment. Notes: ___________________________________________________
_______ Multiple Disabilities. Notes: ______________________________________________________
_______ Gifted and Talented. Notes: ______________________________________________________
_______ ADD/ADHD. Notes: _____________________________________________________________
_______ Other health impairment. Notes: __________________________________________________
                                                                                                      12



_______ I have read the IEP’s for these students.
_______ I understand/have a list of modifications these children need.


Are there any unidentified students that the teacher feels may be in one of the categories above? If
so, identify the appropriate categories and number of students for each.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________


With the teacher, identify students who are:

        Visual Learners                    Auditory Learners                 Kinesthetic Learners




With the teacher, identify students who are not identified through special education or gifted and
talented, but who also need modifications, such as repeated directions, extra time, enriched
assignments, etc.

_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________


Other information about the students that will assist you in preparing lesson plans and activities:

_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                                     13


Lesson Plans

Success in teaching depends upon preparation. A well-developed lesson plan meets the needs of the
students, has a specific purpose, promotes good use of class time, and assists with general classroom
management and discipline.
Much of good teaching happens before the school day even begins. Though we cannot always know
all of what students will learn in their classes, teachers need to know what they want their students
to learn. Planning gives teachers a sense of where they are going, so that even as they adjust and
respond to students’ interests and needs, they are able to move students forward. Planning takes
many shapes in the work of different teachers, but one thing is consistent: planning provides a sense
of direction.
Candidates from the teacher education program at Centenary College have learned about the need
for and importance of daily lesson planning. They have been exposed to several different models of
lesson plan preparation. Now, it is expected that the candidates will refine their skills in lesson
planning. The lesson planning process also encourages candidates to think carefully through each
lesson in advance. The lesson plan provides a guide to be used during the actual teaching process.
Given the importance of lesson planning, all candidates must complete daily lesson plans for each
lesson to be taught. These lesson plans will be shared with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor
and college supervisor and used as evidence of candidates’ thorough planning. These lesson plans
should be kept in a folder such as a three-ring binder. Only those lesson plans that will be included in
the portfolio must be word-processed and printed. Other lesson plans may be handwritten.


Lesson Plan Format
Student teachers have learned a variety of lesson plan formats in their coursework at Centenary. The
Dedicated Educator Planning Form should be utilized for some lesson planning. However, no matter
which format is used, a lesson plan should address at least the following key points:
           Lesson Title
           Subject/Content area
           Date
           Length of Time
           Purpose of Lesson
           Objectives/Outcomes
           Materials/Resources/Equipment Required
           Procedure/Activity Sequence/Outline
           Student Modifications/Adaptation
           Student Assessment/Assignments/Tasks
           Reflection/Self-Assessment/Evaluation
                                                                                                               14


                                        Centenary College of Louisiana
                                            Department of Education


                                DEDICATED EDUCATOR PLANNING FORM



                                                                              Think About!
Personal Info
                                                               Content Knowledge: In order to ensure
Candidate Name:                                                student success, what do I need to know?
Date lesson submitted to professor:                            What do the students need to know?

Date lesson submitted to cooperating teacher:                  Pedagogy: Have I utilized various teaching
                                                               methods that are appropriate to the content
Date lesson is to be taught:                                   area and the specific student population?

                                                               Inquiry: Have I thought critically about
                                                               this lesson? Have I utilized reflections from
Initial Planning
                                                               prior lessons to create these learning
Grade Level:                                                   experiences?

Subject/Content Area(s):                                       Community: What have I planned to
                                                               foster a community of learners?
Learning Objective(s) (Outcomes) and Standards:
Setting:
Diverse Learner Needs/Accommodations/Modifications/Individual Differences:
Student Prior Knowledge (Prerequisites):
Resources (including Technology):
Student Assessment/Evaluation (aligned with Learning Objectives and Standards):



Lesson Introduction
Focus/Review/Anticipatory/Engagement/Motivation:
Statement of Objective(s) in Student Terms:



Lesson Development (Input, Modeling, Checking for Understanding)
Procedures/Activities/Experiences/Content Development (with time allotment)
           Integrate diverse learner needs/accommodations/modifications/individual differences and
           technology, if applicable, throughout
Closure/Review/Conclusion/Attention to Upcoming Lesson



After the Lesson is Taught
Reflection/Meta-analysis/Effects on Student Learning




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                                        Centenary College of Louisiana
                                          Department of Education

                                   Student Teaching/Internship Time Log

Candidate’s Name                  _________________________________________________
Semester/Year                     _________________________________________________
Certification Area(s)             _________________________________________________


Placement One

Grade Level                                 _______________
School                                      ___________________________________________
Cooperating Teacher(s)/Site Supervisor ___________________________________________
College Supervisor(s)                       ___________________________________________



                    Approximate Hours                 Conferences
                                                                                               Cooperating
    Week                                      Cooperating
                                                                College     Other Activities    Teacher’s
    Dates      Observe   Assist     Teach     Teacher/ Site
                                                               Supervisor                        Initials
                                               Supervisor

   Week 1



   Week 2



   Week 3



   Week 4



   Week 5



   Week 6



   Week 7



    Week 8
 (if needed)




Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor Signature _______________________________________

Candidate’s Signature                               _______________________________________

College Supervisor’s Signature                      _______________________________________


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Placement Two (if applicable)

Grade Level                                 _______________
School                                      ______________________________________________
Cooperating Teacher(s)/Site Supervisor ______________________________________________
College Supervisor(s)                       ______________________________________________


                    Approximate Hours                 Conferences
                                                                                               Cooperating
    Week                                      Cooperating
                                                                College     Other Activities    Teacher’s
    Dates      Observe   Assist     Teach     Teacher/ Site
                                                               Supervisor                        Initials
                                               Supervisor

   Week 1



   Week 2



   Week 3



   Week 4



   Week 5



   Week 6



   Week 7



    Week 8
 (if needed)




Time Log Totals:

Total Observation Hours = __________
Total Assisting Hours = __________
Total Teaching Hours = __________


Grand Total = ________


Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor Signature _______________________________________

Candidate’s Signature                               _______________________________________

College Supervisor’s Signature                      _______________________________________



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                             17




              Section 2:
          Expectations of
             Cooperating
               Teachers
                 and
          Site Supervisors



Version 2.1
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Section 2

Expectations of Cooperating Teachers/Site Supervisors
Perhaps one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences in the teaching profession is that of site
supervising a student teacher/intern. It is a humbling experience to realize that the candidate develops
many life-long teaching patterns as a result of the interaction with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor.
He or she should treat the student teacher/intern as a co-worker as well as a learner.

Prepare
 Cooperating teachers: See Checklist for the Student Teacher’s Arrival
 Accept candidate as a professional equal
 Know and understand the roles and responsibilities of the candidate and the college supervisor
 Plan a place for the student teacher’s desk, materials that will be needed, class list, school policies
   and procedures.

Plan
 Cooperating teachers: See Preparing for the First Few Days of Student Teaching
 Cooperating teachers: Agree upon a plan for the student teacher to assume teaching responsibility in
    the classroom (See Section titled “Phase-In Schedule.”)
 Share long range plans
 Share school and policies regarding teaching, dismissal, copy machines, and safety procedures
 Determine with the candidate the most convenient time (preferably every day after school) to meet for
    mini-conferences about lesson plans, daily events, etc.
 Cooperating teachers: Review and approve lesson plans and materials to be sent home
 Keep candidates informed of all procedures and expectations
 Share with the candidate any relevant information about individual students that may impact the
    effectiveness of the candidate’s lesson delivery or the candidate’s relationship with the class

Teach
 Model lessons for the candidate
 Cooperating teachers: Maintain responsibility for the quality of the educational experience of the
   students in the class
 Cooperating teachers: Customize the phase-in plan with the student teacher for teaching lessons and
   determine when the student teacher should assume the major responsibility for teaching
 Encourage the candidate to use a variety of teaching materials, including resources, technology, and
   techniques
 Coach the candidate
 Arrange for the candidate to observe other teachers
 Share with the candidate the reasons why things are done in the classroom, keeping in mind that this
   experience is an apprenticeship for the candidate. It is important that the candidate “hear” the
   cooperating teacher’s/site supervisor’s thinking

Assess
 Cooperating teachers: Maintain responsibility for the evaluation of the students in the classroom
 Provide feedback for both informal and formal observations
 Communicate professionally
 Be tactful but honest
 Address problems with candidate before they are addressed with the college supervisor
 Write a first quarter, mid-term, third quarter, and final evaluation of the candidate’s performance
 Determine a time when you can meet with the college supervisor to discuss the strengths and
   weaknesses of the student teacher
 Encourage the candidate to engage in self-evaluation activities



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                            Checklist for Student Teacher’s Arrival

The list below may serve as a guide for insuring that a cooperating teacher has completed the activities
necessary to assure a smooth beginning for a student teacher.

1.      Prepare the pupils for a student teacher’s arrival.
        ____ Inform pupils of the impending arrival
        ____ Tell pupils something about the student teacher
        ____ Create a feeling of anticipation for a student teacher’s arrival

2.      Learn about the student teacher’s background.
        ____ Subject knowledge
        ____ Pre-student teaching field experiences
        ____ Special interests or skills

3.      Read the College student teaching handbook.
        ____ Understand basic responsibilities
        ____ Review requirements and expectations for cooperating teachers

4.      Become aware of the legal status of student teachers.
        ____ Responsibility of cooperating teacher when student teacher teaches class
        ____ Rights and responsibilities of the student teacher

5.      Become familiar with school policy concerning student teacher responsibilities.
        ____ Reporting to school and absences
        ____ Attendance at faculty meetings
        ____ Supervisory activities

6.      Secure copies of materials to be used in orienting the student teacher.
        ____ School handbook
        ____ Daily schedule
        ____ Seating charts

7.      Make necessary arrangements for the student teacher to be comfortable in the classroom.
        ____ Arrange a desk or table for the student teacher
        ____ Have necessary supplies
        ____ Prepare a file of necessary and informative materials

8.      Secure copies of teaching resources for the student teacher.
        ____ Textbooks
        ____ Curriculum guides
        ____ Resource books
        ____ School/district policies and procedures

10.     Develop a plan for the student teacher’s:
        ____ Introduction to the class
        ____ Introduction to the faculty
        ____ Initial teaching activities




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                  Preparing for the First Few Days of Student Teaching

The following responsibilities usually must be assumed by a cooperating teacher during the first few days
of student teaching. This form may be used either as a planning guide or as a review of preparation
activities in meeting these responsibilities.


1.    Prepare for the special needs of the student teacher in adjusting to a different environment.

2.    Introduce the student teacher to the class and provide name cards for the students.

3.    Establish a partnership arrangement.

4.    Introduce the student teacher to other faculty members and the administrative staff.

5.    Acquaint the student teacher with the classroom routine and management techniques.

6.    Apprise the student teacher of the class work that is currently under way.

7.    Involve the student teacher in the activities of the classroom.

8.    Provide the student teacher with textbooks and a place to work.

9.    Orient the student teacher to the school building and its facilities.

10.   Discuss school policies and regulations with the student teacher.

11.   Assist the student teacher in learning pupil names.

12.   Delegate responsibility and authority to the student teacher.

13.   Plan for the student teacher’s gradual assumption of teaching responsibilities.
      Planned procedures:

14.   Orient the student teacher to the community.

15.   Help the student teacher acquire background information on the students.




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                                 Checklist for Guided Planning

The following procedures are recommended as ways of guiding planning more effectively.

1.    Planning should be done cooperatively. Both the cooperating teacher/site supervisor and the
      candidate should suggest activities and ways of teaching the lesson.

2.    The cooperating teacher should acquaint the student teacher with his or her yearly plans and review
      what occurred before the student teacher’s arrival and project what will likely occur after he or she
      leaves.

3.    The cooperating teacher/site supervisor should explain his or her procedures for pupil/teacher
      planning.

4.    The cooperating teacher/site supervisor should review the teaching plans made by the candidate,
      raise questions, and offer suggestions.

5.    The cooperating teacher/site supervisor should provide evaluative sessions in which the candidate
      gains skill in judging the effectiveness of his or her plans.

6.    The cooperating teacher/site supervisor should make certain that the candidate’s plans are
      submitted or reviewed in advance so that they may be changed, if necessary.

7.    The cooperating teacher/site supervisor should encourage creativity and allow freedom in planning.


Analysis of candidate/teacher planning procedures:




Ideas for improvement:




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         Personal Competencies of Cooperating Teachers/Site Supervisors

Cooperating teachers and site supervisors serve as role models, facilitators, and sometimes counselors for
candidates. The criteria below provide indicators for determining the extent to which one serves as a
supportive guide for a candidate.

1.    Accepts the candidate as a professional colleague as evidenced by:
      ____ showing respect for the candidate’s decisions
      ____ allowing the candidate to assume responsibility
      ____ permitting the candidate to assume the same privileges as a cooperating teacher/site
            supervisor

2.    Accepts the usual mistakes of the candidate as evidenced by:
      ____ refraining from overreacting to mistakes
      ____ allowing the candidate to continue with responsibilities
      ____ stating that mistakes are normal and not irrevocable

3.    Restrains from prescriptive directions as evidenced by:
      ____ discussing options with the candidate before a decision is made
      ____ allowing freedom of choice on the part of the candidate

4.    Conducts professional discussions with the candidate, as evidenced by discussions about:
      ____ learning problems of students
      ____ teaching methodologies and their applications
      ____ student behavior

5.    Allows a candidate to observe and discuss the cooperating teacher’s/site supervisor’s activities and
      teacher effectiveness as evidenced by:
      ____ candidate analysis of a supervisor’s lesson
      ____ candidate suggesting alternative procedures to the cooperating teacher/site supervisor

6.    Diagnoses learner’s interests and needs, develops learning strategies and shares these procedures
      with the candidate, as evidenced by:
      ____ discussing diagnostic procedures
      ____ explaining why conclusions were reached
      ____ explaining why certain teaching techniques will be employed as a result of the diagnosis and
             analysis




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                                Ten Ways to Increase Dialogue

     Try to “debrief” your student teacher at the end of each day. Ask him/her to say what went well.
      Why? What caused it to go well? What did not work? Why? How would it be done differently the
      next time?

     Get student teachers teaching as soon as possible—even if it is just a small group and a five- to ten-
      minute lesson.

     Start student teacher off with small management tasks such as taking the class to enrichment or
      lunch. Observe them and talk about what worked, did not work, and why.

     Let them observe you teach. Talk to them about what you thought went well and why. Tell them
      what you would do differently and why. Give them a copy of your lesson plan to follow along.
      Explain why you deviated from it or stuck to it and why.

     Get a school video camera. Tape each other teaching, then play it back, and watch it together.
      Discuss strengths and weaknesses.

     Even though it is imperative you model effective instruction for them, it is also okay to let them
      know you are human. You do not have to appear to be the world’s greatest teacher. Talk to them
      about some of your failures and how you handled them so they will know we all have them.

     Allow them to attend parent-teacher conferences. Tell them about your worst conference. Tell
      them about your best.

     If you see them doing something wrong, stop them. Do it kindly and gently and in private, but stop
      them. (Praise in public, criticize in private.) Don’t let them develop any bad habits that they will
      have to correct later.

     Get them started quickly. Give them feedback, always emphasizing the positive as well as the
      negative.

     When they are ready to go into a classroom where your child or grandchild is a student, they are
      ready to receive an “A” and your job is done.




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                                    Cooperating Teacher “Shoulds”

        •     Establish rules
        •     Be punctual
        •     Make introductions (staff and class)
        •     Plan effectively
        •     Be supportive
        •     Cooperate
        •     Conference daily for feedback
        •     Be responsible for final decisions on discipline
        •     Be responsible for final decisions on grades
        •     Always be a positive role model
        •     Always exercise good judgment
        •     Assume liability
        •     Be tactful yet honest
        •     Be enthusiastic
        •     Accept student teacher as a professional equal
        •     Help student teacher maintain a wholesome self-image
        •     Share teaching experiences and ideas
        •     Give immediate feedback
        •     Model and explain everything
        •     Praise specifically
        •     Prepare a place for student teacher
        •     Explain policies
        •     Involve student teacher as soon as possible
        •     Set clear expectations
        •     Encourage
        •     Give suggestions for improvement as needed
        •     Provide supplies
        •     Send letter to parents of students welcoming the new student teacher




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               Section 3:
              Expectations
                 of the
                College
              Supervisor




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Section 3

Expectations of the College Supervisor

The college supervisor is the link between the candidate and the cooperating teacher/site supervisor.
The supervisor acts as a placement consultant, candidate advisor, seminar director, mediator, confidant,
and evaluator. In light of these various roles, it is the responsibility of the college supervisor to:

•     Determine and secure appropriate placements for candidates
•     Orient candidate to the rules, regulations, responsibilities, deadlines, and professional expectations
      associated with the experience
•     Conduct weekly seminars discussing general and professional issues related to teaching
•     Assist in the improvement of the teaching/learning process for the candidate by serving as an
      observer and providing feedback that stimulates professional growth in the candidate
•     Serve as a resource for the cooperating teacher/site supervisor as well as the candidate
•     Meet with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the
      candidate
•     Address any curriculum issues with regard to content or teaching practices that may prove
      problematic with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor
•     Maintain open lines of communication among the cooperating teacher/site supervisor, candidate,
      and yourself
•     Work with the public school personnel to develop competency in guiding candidates
•     Conduct formal and informal classroom visits to observe the candidate in the educational setting
•     Encourage the candidate to engage in self-evaluation activities such as journaling, video taping,
      peer review, etc.
•     Submit a final grade for the student teaching/internship experience to the college




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                                    Supervisory Evaluations

The college supervisor will conduct at least two informal observations and two formal evaluations during
the placement; informal observations and evaluations will also be conducted. Once the candidate and
college supervisor have selected a time convenient for both, it is then the candidate’s responsibility to
check this date with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor to make sure the time and date are
agreeable.


Candidates: At all times:
1.  Plan thoroughly and have a copy of your lesson plan
2.  Have a place for the supervisor to sit
3.  If you are using texts, handouts, or workbooks, have copies available for college supervisor
4.  Make sure you know the objectives for your lesson
5.  Edit all written material
6.  Make sure room is arranged for this particular lesson


Observations:
Observations are informal in nature, but are documented. College supervisors, cooperating teachers, and
Site supervisors may choose to schedule observations, or observations may be unannounced. Sample
observation guidelines and formats are provided in the Evaluation section of this Handbook.


Formal Evaluations:
At least two formal evaluations will be conducted during the student teaching/internship semester. Each
formal evaluation must be successfully completed before the candidate can progress to the next visit. If
an evaluation is not 100% successful, the supervisor will return at an agreed time to observe the
candidate.




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              Section 4:
              Phase-In
              Schedule




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Section 4

Phase-In Schedule
The Phase-In Schedule is a suggested sequence for the student teacher’s assumption of responsibility. It
is a norm from which the cooperating teacher, student teacher, and college supervisor will work when
structuring a specific student teacher’s semester involvement. The goal of the Phase-In Schedule is to
gradually provide the student teacher with an increasing amount of responsibility in the classroom,
leading eventually to the required weeks of full teaching responsibility.

The college supervisor provides a planning calendar to be used for the designing of the student teacher’s
individual Phase-In Schedule. The student teaching experience is divided into four phases:

Phase I         Orientation
Phase II        Assuming Partial Responsibility
Phase III       Full Responsibility
Phase IV        Transfer of Responsibility

On the following pages, the roles and responsibilities of the student teacher and cooperating teacher for
each phase are detailed.




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     Sample Pacing Guide and Master Plan for Elementary and K-12 Student
                                 Teachers


                                                          Student Teaching Placement 1
                          Phase I                        Phase II                             Phase III                Phase IV
              Week 1         Week 2             Week 3          Week 4             Week 5              Week 6          Week 7-8
                                                                                                                     
Subject 1                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                      
Subject 2                                                                                                             
                                                                                                      
Subject 3
               observe                                                                                             cooperating
              and tutor                                                                                               teacher
Subject 4                                                                                             
                                                                                                                       gradually
                                                                                                       
Subject 5                                                                                                             resumes
                                                                                                                     teaching
Subject 6                                                                                              
                                              Observations                                                             Formal Mid-
                Informal drop-ins and         and Informal                                                                Term
                                                                               Observations
                    Observations               1st Quarter                                                           Evaluations and
                                               Evaluations                                                           3 way meeting




                                                         Student Teaching Placement II
                          Phase I                     Phase II                     Phase III                 Phase IV
                 Week 9             Week 10          Week 11             Week 12         Week 13        Week 14      Week 15
  Subject                                                                                            
    1                                                                                                
  Subject                                                                                             
    2                                                                                                 
  Subject                                                                                  
                                                                                                                         student
    3                                                                                      
                                                                                                       cooperating       teacher
  Subject                                                                                  
                                                                                                          teacher      observes in
    4                                                                                      
                                                                                                        gradually         other
  Subject                                                                                   
                                                                                                         resumes       classrooms
    5                                                                                       
                                                                                                        teaching
  Subject                                                                                   
    6                                                                                       
                                                    Observations
                   Informal drop-ins and          and Informal 3rd                                     Formal Final Evaluations
                                                                             Observations
                       Observations                    Quarter                                           and 3 way meeting
                                                     Evaluations


 teach using cooperating teacher’s plans
 plan for following week
 teach using your own plans




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      Sample Pacing Guide and Master Plan for Secondary Student Teachers

                          Phase I                      Phase II                                 Phase III
              Week 1            Week 2        Week 3              Week 4            Week 5       Week 6           Weeks 7-8
                                                                                                                
Subject 1                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                 
Subject 2                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                  
Subject 3
               observe                                                                                            
              and tutor                                                                                           
Subject 4                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                   
Subject 5                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                   
Subject 6                                                                                                          
                                            Observations                                                         Formal Mid-
                Informal drop-ins and       and Informal                                                            Term
                                                                                 Observations
                    Observations             1st Quarter                                                       Evaluations and
                                             Evaluations                                                       3 way meeting




                                                            Phase IV
               Week 9          Week 10        Week 11           Week 12               Week 13      Week 14        Week 15
  Subject                                                                                       
    1                                                                                           
  Subject                                                                           
    2                                                                               
  Subject                                                        
                                                                                                 cooperating       student
    3                                                            
                                                                                                    teacher        teacher
  Subject                                     
                                                                                                  gradually      observes in
    4                                         
                                                                                                   resumes          other
  Subject       
                                                                                                  teaching       classrooms
    5           
  Subject
    6
                                             Informal 3rd
                                                                                                  Formal Final Evaluations
                     Observations               Quarter                    Observations
                                                                                                    and 3 way meeting
                                              Evaluations


 teach using cooperating teacher’s plans
 plan for following week
 teach using your own plans




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                       Sample Pacing Guide and Master Plan for Interns


                                                                   Internship
              Week 1         Week 2           Week 3             Week 4              Week 5         Week 6         Week 7-8
                                                                                                                  Formal Mid-
                                            Informal 1st
                   Observations                                                                                 Term Evaluation
                                              Quarter                             Observations
                                                                                                                   and 3 way
                                             Evaluation
                                                                                                                    meeting




                                                                  Internship
                Week 9            Week 10           Week 11               Week 12         Week 13    Week 14        Week 15
                                                  Informal 3rd
                                                                                                     Formal Final Evaluations
                       Observations                  Quarter                    Observations
                                                                                                       and 3 way meeting
                                                   Evaluations




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                                   Suggested Activities Chart
                                      Phase-In Schedule

                                   PHASE I – ORIENTATION

Roles of Student Teacher: Observer and tutor

Student Teacher
1.  Becomes familiar with rules, regulations, and procedures of classrooms; develops skill in
    communicating rules to pupils.
2.  Becomes familiar with physical features of buildings.
3.  Becomes acquainted with and learns names of pupils; becomes aware of friendships and sub-
    groups; becomes acquainted with unique needs of individuals.
4.  Observes instruction, follows lesson plan prepared by teacher.
5.  Participates in classroom routine, (recording grades, handing out/collecting material, supervising
    outside classroom) and learns daily schedule.
6.  Instructs in a limited sense (administering tests, tutoring, conducting short informal segments of the
    lesson).
7.  Participates to some extent in related activities (faculty meetings, athletic events, and student
    clubs).
8.  Tutors individual students as assigned by cooperating teacher.
9.  Constructs teaching aids and contributes materials to a motivating, attractive learning environment.
10. Begins research on topics to be taught later.

Cooperating Teacher
1.  Assumes responsibility for planning and conducting class but involves student teacher in planning;
    shares long range plans for semester.
2.  Involves student teacher in observation, routine, procedures, preparation of materials, and
    interaction with students.
3.  Sets aside special time to discuss the rationale of what the student teacher is seeing.
4.  Sets standards for initial lesson planning format.
5.  Assists student teacher in becoming familiar with benchmarks and standards.

                  PHASE II – ASSUMING PARTIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Roles of Student Teacher: Intern (materials development, audiovisual aids), Teaching assistant (small
group instruction, team-teaching), and Instructor (limited large group instruction)

Student Teacher
1.  Increases efforts to identify special class characteristics and to relate instructions to individual
    students (meet with individual students having problems, develop remedial materials, and
    determine utilization of special student talents).
2.  Works with small groups
3.  Teaches as specified by the cooperating teacher, following school policies regarding lesson plans
    being available for administrators or available for substitutes.
4.  Assumes gradually a larger responsibility for instruction by increasing teaching responsibilities,
    adding one subject, period, or preparation as suggested by the cooperating teacher.
5.  Constructs teaching aids and contributes materials to a motivating, attractive learning environment.
6.  Begins research on topics to be taught later.

Cooperating Teacher
1.  Plans cooperatively with the student teacher to execute instruction, starting with small tasks, such
    as: doing a portion of a presentation; directing cooperative learning groups; jointly developing
    evaluation instrument; re-teaching concepts to small groups; providing enrichment activities.

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2.    Continuously assesses the student teacher’s level of competency in instruction and classroom
      management so that the student teacher can gain confidence before assuming additional
      responsibilities.
3.    Models a variety of instructional techniques so that the student teacher develops a comfort level for
      a broad spectrum of teaching activities.

                             PHASE III – FULL RESPONSIBILITY

Roles of Student Teacher: Teacher (Major responsibility for teaching and planning)

Student Teacher
1.  Assumes primary responsibility for planning, preparing materials, and instructing assigned classes.
2.  Implements a discipline plan effectively.
3.  Assumes primary responsibility for developing the instruments of evaluation.
4.  Recommends student grades to cooperating teacher.
5.  Works on refinement of specific instructional techniques.
6.  Shows evidence of the ability to provide instruction that recognizes and provides for the ability and
    interests of individual students.

Cooperating Teacher
1.  Examines, critiques, and provides necessary approval of student teacher plans for instruction and
    evaluation.
2.  Assumes primary responsibility for the assignment of any final grade.
3.  Observes and assesses student teacher pre-lessons and provides appropriate evaluation.
4.  Contributes to the class instruction in ways that are complementary to the general class
    presentation under the direction of the student teacher

              PHASE IV – TRANSFER OF RESPONSIBILITY (OPTIONAL)

Roles of Student Teacher: Transfer of responsibility is the decision of the cooperating teacher.

Student Teacher
1.  Phases out of total responsibility by gradually turning portions of the instruction back to the
    cooperating teacher.
2.  Completes record-keeping evaluation for portion of curriculum taught previously.
3.  Visits other classrooms to see other grade levels, teaching styles, etc.
4.  Collects ideas to use at future time.

Cooperating Teacher
1.  Assumes major instructional function.
2.  Models teaching strategies that teacher has not seen or tried previously.
3.  Shares files and teaching ideas for curriculum not taught this semester.




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              Section 5:
              Evaluation




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Section 5

Evaluation

Evaluation as a continuous process
A continuous evaluation of the progress of all candidates is essential. This means that evaluation should
help candidates grow now as well as provide them with ideas, attitudes, and techniques that will help
them continue to grow when they become certified teachers. Evaluation should be as routine as
teaching, cover every part of the experience, and be performed by both the cooperating teacher/site
supervisor and the candidate. Evaluation should stress analysis and reflection rather than criticism and
faultfinding. Plans, procedures, alternatives, and implications should all be analyzed. Self-assessment
should be a major component.

Observations
         A.      Observing other teachers (see pages 39-40 for observation forms and
                 questions)
         Observation is an acceptable, efficient, and beneficial way of professional learning. It is a way of
         broadening awareness of styles and techniques and expands understanding of the purposes and
         procedures that are being followed. Observations conducted by the candidate should be
         encouraged early in the experience. This may be the last time the candidate will have the
         opportunity to observe a variety of professionals at work in one place. The cooperating
         teacher/site supervisor can assist the candidate in this process by helping the candidate focus on
         particular areas of concern or interest. A follow-up conference between the candidate and the
         cooperating teacher/site supervisor is essential in helping the candidate analyze the data
         obtained. These findings can be utilized in developing the candidate’s own teaching methods.

         B.      Self-observations (see pages 41-43 for video analysis form)
         Video recordings provide an opportunity for self-evaluation. Please consult the school’s policy for
         photographing and videotaping of students. Videotaping a candidate’s lesson after some
         experience is required. The candidate will use the video tape in a variety of ways. The
         candidate will view the tape alone and evaluate his or her performance and determine what
         improvements need to be made. The candidate will also view the tape and discuss the
         performance with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor, receiving suggestions and
         recommendations for improvement. The college supervisor will also view tapes and provide
         helpful feedback to the candidate. It is helpful to tape a series of lessons during the experience
         to allow the candidate to compare lesson presentations and note growth in a variety of areas.
         During the phase-in schedule be sure to provide opportunities for video-taping.

Conferencing

Conferencing is an important component of the evaluation process during the student teaching/internship
experience. The conference should contain a specific agenda and help the candidate to become more
aware of his or her strengths and weaknesses and what can be accomplished to improve teaching skills.
The conference should contribute to the candidate becoming increasingly self-directive and self-
evaluative. Criticism should be constructive. Possible evaluation opportunities are listed below.

         1.      Daily conferences with the cooperating teacher/site supervisor
         Daily conferences of comparatively short duration will give attention to matters of immediate
         consequence – adjusting plans, coordinating work schedules, identifying and solving daily
         problems, providing that needed “boost in morale,” and in general keeping things functioning
         smoothly. The timing of such conferences may vary from day to day, but this should not be left
         to chance. It is important to keep a log of these conferences in your notebook.

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         2.      Weekly conferences

         It is probably best to reserve about one hour for this purpose. These conferences may be used
         for long-term planning, cooperative evaluation of the candidate’s performance analysis of the
         cooperating teacher’s/site supervisor’s teaching procedures, and to develop in-depth
         understanding of pupil behavior and community relations. A log should be kept for these
         conferences in your notebook.

         3.      Written evaluation of lesson plans
         The candidate has the opportunity to evaluate student perception of a presentation. A written
         evaluation after teaching from a lesson plan will provide answers to such questions as: “Were my
         pupils interested?” “What will I do differently next time?” and “Did I accomplish my goals?”

         4.      Three-way conferences
         Three-way conferences among the candidate, cooperating teacher/site supervisor, and college
         supervisor are planned for cooperative evaluation during mid-semester and final evaluation.
         Additional conferences may be planned if necessary.

         5.      Seminars
         Weekly seminars provide opportunities for candidate to clarify their understanding of
         responsibilities, to seek help on personal and professional problems, to plan and evaluate their
         experiences, and to share ideas and materials with other candidate.

Reflective Journal (See page 44 for sample forms and questions)

Candidates are required to keep a daily journal during the 15-week student teaching/internship
experience. The purpose of the journal is to deepen their thinking about teaching and learning. The daily
reflection journal should include experiences, observations, and reactions. Entries should focus on
students’ reactions to as well as the candidate’s self-evaluation of what happened—what worked or didn’t
work and why. Material in your lesson plans should not be repeated in this journal.

Candidates should write for approximately ten minutes a day. The journal should be available for the
supervisor to read each time the candidate is visited. At the end of the semester, candidates are to
review the journal and complete a self-evaluation of strengths and weaknesses. This will be the final
entry in the journal.

Notebook Documentation

Candidates must maintain a notebook (binder) of all lesson plans, unit plans, handouts, assignments,
tests, and reflections throughout the student teaching experience. This documentation provides the
cooperating teacher/site supervisor and college supervisor with an accurate record of the work the
candidate has done during the semester. It also provides the candidate a sequential record of the
teaching experience and materials to include in the final portfolio. Candidates should keep a list of ideas
and practices that they want to remember for future implementation.

Formal Evaluations (see pages 45-51 for Evaluation Forms)

During the student teaching/internship experience, two informal (first and third quarter) and two formal
(mid-term and final) evaluations will be completed by the cooperating teacher/site supervisor, candidate,
and college supervisor. Student Teaching/Internship Evaluations are filed in the Office of the Education
Department at the end of the semester. The information on these forms will be the basis for the
candidate’s grades. These grades for student teaching/internship are usually assigned after all parties
involved review and discuss the formal evaluations and any other pertinent data gathered during the
semester.
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Guide to Classroom Observation

1.    The     beginning of class
      a)       How does the teacher get the attention of the class?
      b)       How are initial activities related to previous activities?
      c)       How does the teacher maintain the attention of the class?

2.    Activities and teaching procedures
      a) What kinds of activities are provided and what is the purpose of each activity?
      b) How does the teacher transition from one activity to the other?
      c)    How does the teacher select/direct activities to meet attention span of the group?
      d) How does the teacher adapt materials/procedures to the abilities of the group?
      e) To what part of the lesson do the activities mainly contribute? Introduction and overview?
            Development? Culmination? Evaluation?
      f)    How much student participation is there? How much teacher participation?
      g) What evidences of group processes do you see?
      h) When and how does the teacher give the assignment?
      i)    When are the students expected to do the assignment—in class or at home?
      j)    What use does the teacher make of the technology?

3.    The subject matter
      a) What indication is there that the teacher has tried to select subject matter suited to the ability
           of the class?
      b) How has the teacher organized the subject matter that she or he selected?
      c)   How does the teacher relate the subject matter being taught to the unit of which it is a part?

4.    The handling of materials
      a) What procedures are used in handling supplies and papers written by students?
      b) What supplies are students expected to bring to the classroom?

5.    The students and teacher
      a) What is the ability level of the students?
      b) If there are any students with physical disabilities (e.g., vision-impaired, hearing-impaired),
           how does the teacher provide for their needs?
      c)   Are the students self-directed?
      d) What appears to be the relationship between teacher and students, students and teacher?

6.    The     room
      a)       What is the general appearance of the room?
      b)       How does the teacher make use of bulletin boards?
      c)       How does the teacher provide for adequate lighting and ventilation?

7.    The     end of the class
      a)       How are the activities for the class concluded?
      b)       How is the room made ready for the next class?
      c)       How are the students dismissed?




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                               Instructional Observation Checklist

1.     Was the objective appropriate?

2.     Were previously learned skills reviewed?

3.     Were students motivated before and/or during the lesson?

4.     Was reinforcement appropriately used?

5.     Was the lesson sequenced (easy to difficult, narrow to broad, general to specific, etc?)

6.     Were the students attending to the learning?

7.     Were directions clearly given?

8.     Was there active participation of the learners?

9.     Was there evidence of teacher monitoring of comprehension and application of skills taught?

10.    Were students given an opportunity to practice or apply skills taught?

11.    Were techniques for retention used?

12.    Was transfer of learning built into the lesson?

13.    Did use of materials and activities facilitate the lesson?

14.    Did the teaching style fit the lesson?

15.    Were provisions made for evaluating the students prior to the end of the lesson?

16.    Were students given knowledge of results?

17.    If needed, were provisions made for re-teaching or extension?

18.    Were the lessons objectives achieved?




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                      Form for Self-Assessment of Video of Teaching

1.     Are there any verbal tics or repetitive, unnecessary hand gestures I wish to eliminate? (“OK,” “Uh,”
       playing with glasses, constantly pushing back hair, etc.)

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


2.     Were my directions clear at all times? Give examples.

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


3.     Were students successful and able to do what was asked?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


4.     Was I able to maintain student attention all or most of the time?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


5.     Was I able to maintain the noise level I wanted all or most of the time?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


6.     Were all students interested in the lesson?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________



Version 2.1
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7.     List three strengths in this lesson.

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


8.     List two things I would change or do differently next time.

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


9.     Is there any student behavior in the video that surprises me? If so, describe it.

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


10.    Did I have all materials ready?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


11.    How did I address higher order thinking skills?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________




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                                                                                                         42


12.    How did this lesson address and meet the needs of different students?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


13.    Did I follow my lesson plan closely or make modifications? If I made modifications, tell what they
       were and why.

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________


14.    Was this lesson educationally relevant? Will success in this lesson make a difference to the student
       in five or ten years?

        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________




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                                   Reflective Journal Formats


Format A*

1. Topic – Major focus of this journal entry
2. Sequence of events - Includes a short list of what happened.
3. Highlights of one or two notable events - Select one or two situations that occurred that were
significant, and describe in detail what happened. Focus especially on your impact on student learning.
Four items to include in your description are: your role as the teacher, the student(s) involved, the
subject matter being taught at the time, and the context, such as surroundings.
4. Analysis of the event - This is a time for you to interpret what happened, including an assessment of
what students learned, your own thoughts and feelings, questions that were raised, and what you
learned that will help you be a more effective teacher. This section can be a particularly useful starting
point for discussion when meeting with your supervisor.

*Posner, George J., Field Experience, A Guide to Reflective Teaching, Fifth Ed. New York: Addison Wesley
Longman, 2000.


Format B

Responses are recorded for the following six statements:
1.     Things I have done well that helped students learn:
2.     Thoughts I have had today:
3.     Feelings I have had today:
4.     One important thing I have learned today:
5.     Things I want to remember to do in the future to help students learn:
6.     Things my college supervisor should know:

It is important to remember that the journal is a great tool through which you can reflect upon your
student teaching experience and grow as a beginning teacher. The effort and time you put into it now
has the potential to improve your effectiveness as a teacher and to substantially decrease problems,
concerns, or issues in your first teaching position.




Version 2.1
                                                                                       44


                         Centenary College of Louisiana
                           Department of Education

                             Observation Form

Observee/Position: __________________________________ Date: ____________ Time: ________
Observer/Position: _____________________________________________________   Grade: ______
School: _____________________________________________ School District: _________________
City: _____________________________________________________ State____________________
Observation Topic: ___________________________________________________________________
Observation Data/Summary:




Analysis of Data and Future Directions:




Signature of Observer: _____________________


Version 2.1
                                                                                                                            45



                             Centenary College of Louisiana
                               Department of Education

              STUDENT TEACHER AND INTERN EVALUATION


Evaluatee/Position: __________________________________________                              Date: _________________

Evaluator/Position: ____________________________________________________                                   Grade: ______

School: _____________________________________________ School District: _________________

City: _____________________________________________________ State____________________

Please use the following scale and descriptors to reflect your assessment of the level that the student
teacher/intern has met each assessment component:
         3 – Distinguished: Consistently observed; consistently exceeds expectations for a beginning teacher.
         2 – Proficient: Frequently observed; meets, sometimes exceeds, expectations for a beginning teacher.
         1 – Basic: Occasionally observed; minimally meets expectations for a beginning teacher.
         0 – Unsatisfactory: Not observed; does not meet expectations for a beginning teacher.
         N – Not applicable
It should be assumed that only about 15% of the candidates reach level 3 – Distinguished.

Subject Matter (LCET Domain III, B; CCP 4)*                                                                3    2   1   0   N
Understands content; presents accurate subject matter
Links content to students’ prior knowledge and everyday life
Chooses accurate, comprehensive, and useful resources (e.g. visuals, alternate texts)
Presents content at a developmentally appropriate level
Child Development and Learning Theory (LCET Domain III; CCP 5)                                             3    2   1   0   N
Provides instruction to support all learning styles and learners’ needs in intellectual,
social, and personal development
Provides opportunities for active engagement
Provides opportunities for students to assume responsibility for their own learning
Pre-assesses student thinking and experience as a basis for instruction
Diversity (LCET Domains I, III; CCPs 2, 7)                                                                 3    2   1   0   N
Acknowledges and appreciates multiple learning styles and is able to effectively plan
for the success of all students
Makes provisions for, and uses appropriate services and resources for exceptional
learning differences and needs
Uses multiple perspectives in teaching, connecting students’ diverse backgrounds
and cultures to content
Instructional Strategies (LCET Domain III; CCP 6)                                                          3    2   1   0   N
Uses the right combination of teaching strategies to ensure student learning of the
lesson objective(s)
Engages students in learning opportunities that promote critical thinking, problem
solving and performance capabilities
Sequences lesson to promote learning
Adjusts lesson when appropriate
Integrates technology into instruction, as appropriate


Version 2.1
                                                                                                            46


Management (LCET Domain II)                                                                 3   2   1   0   N
Uses effective management strategies and sets appropriate behavior
expectations/standards so that students can engage in purposeful learning activities
Establishes a positive learning climate where individual differences are respected
Provides opportunities for successful collaborative and independent learning
Motivates students to learn
Organizes available space, materials, and/or equipment to facilitate learning
Manages routines and transitions in a timely manner; manages and/or adjusts allotted
time for activities planned
Communication (LCET Domain III)                                                             3   2   1   0   N
Uses effective communication strategies (e.g., shows enthusiasm, uses engaging
manner and voice, is articulate and clear in communicating concepts and information
to students)
Supports students’ communication skills
Uses effective and varied questioning strategies to stimulate higher order thinking
Uses a variety of technology communication tools (e.g., audio-visual aids, computers)
to facilitate learning
Planning (LCET Domains I, III)                                                              3   2   1   0   N
Plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community,
and curricular goals.
Specifies learner outcomes in clear, concise objectives, and includes activities that
develop objectives
Identifies and plans for individual differences
Identifies materials, other than standard classroom materials, as needed for lesson
Assessment (LCET Domain III)                                                                3   2   1   0   N
Uses appropriate and effective formal and informal assessments to evaluate students’
performance and modify teaching and learning strategies, including self-assessment
opportunities for students
Consistently monitors ongoing performance of students
Keeps detailed, appropriate records
Produces evidence of student academic growth of students under his/her instruction
Reflection and Professional Growth (LCET Domain IV; CCPs 1, 8)                              3   2   1   0   N
Self-assesses accurately through reflective strategies
Accepts, uses, and responds well to feedback from colleagues and supervisors
Identifies areas of instruction that need strengthening, develops with cooperating
teacher and college supervisor a plan for improvement, and works to complete the
plan
Seeks ideas and strategies from resources (e.g., books, professional journals,
websites, etc.) and colleagues that will improve teaching and learning and employs
them
Interpersonal Relationships (LCET Domain V; CCPs 1, 3)                                      3   2   1   0   N
Creates partnerships with parents/caregivers and colleagues
Utilizes school and community resources to foster student learning
Participates in grade level and subject area curriculum planning and evaluation
Demonstrates professional characteristics of integrity, intellectual and moral courage,
responsibility, fairness, compassion, and leadership
*LCET: Louisiana Components of Effective Teaching, CCP: Centenary Candidate Proficiencies
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                                                                                                       47

                            Distinguished    Proficient      Basic      Unsatisfactory    Unsatisfactory
                                  A              B            C               D                 F
Recommended Grade



Areas of Strength …




Areas to be Developed …




Summary Statement




Completed by: (please check one)

 Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor  College Supervisor  Student Teacher/Intern       Principal


Printed Name: ____________________________       Signature: _______________________________
                                                                                                                                     48


                 Centenary College of Louisiana
     Association of Childhood Education International (ACEI)
      Elementary Student Teacher/ Intern CONTENT AREA
                          EVALUATION
Evaluatee/Position________________________________ Date: __________
Evaluator/Position: _________________________________________________ Grade: ___________
School: _________________________ District ________________________
Please use the following scale and descriptors to reflect your assessment of the level that the student
teacher/intern has met each assessment component:
         3 – Distinguished: Consistently observed; consistently exceeds expectations for a beginning teacher.
         2 – Proficient: Frequently observed; meets, sometimes exceeds, expectations for a beginning teacher.
         1 – Basic: Occasionally observed; minimally meets expectations for a beginning teacher.
         0 – Unsatisfactory: Not observed; does not meet expectations for a beginning teacher.
         N – Not applicable
It should be assumed that only about 15% of the candidates reach level 3 – Distinguished.
Standard 2.1 Reading, Writing and Oral Language                                                3 2 1 0 N
Demonstrates a high level of competence in use of English language arts.
Teaches the conventions of language needed to compose oral and written texts for a range of purposes and
audiences.
Creates a high quality literate environment for the classroom that includes attention to books, electronic-based
information sources, and locally created materials.
Creates a classroom culture that motivates students to engage in reading, writing, and oral language for
personal growth, knowledge development, enjoyment and insight into the human experience.
Standard 2.2 Science                                                                                               3   2   1   0     N
Knows, understands, and uses fundamental concepts in the subject matter of science—including physical, life,
and earth and space sciences—as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal and social
perspectives, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry processes
scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific and technological literacy.
Standard 2.3 Mathematics                                                                                           3   2   1   0     N
Knows, understands, and uses the major concepts and procedures that define number and operations, algebra,
geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability. In so doing, consistently engages problem solving,
reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representation.
Standard 2.4 Social Studies                                                                                        3   2   1   0     N
Knows, understands, and uses the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies—the integrated
study of history, geography, the social sciences, and other related areas—to promote elementary students’
abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent
world.
Standard 2.5 The Arts                                                                                              3   2   1   0     N
Knows, understands, and uses—as appropriate to their own knowledge and skills—the content, functions, and
achievements of the performing arts (dance, music, theater) and visual arts as primary media for
communication, inquiry, and engagement among elementary students.
Standard 2.6 Health Education                                                                                      3   2   1   0     N
Knows, understands, and uses the major concepts in the subject matter of health education to create
opportunities for student development and practice of skills that contribute to good health.
Standard 2.7 Physical Education                                                                                    3   2   1   0     N
Knows, understands, and uses—as appropriate to their own understanding and skills—human movement and
physical activity as central elements to foster active, healthy life styles and enhanced quality of life for
elementary students.


Completed by: (please check one)
 Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor  College Supervisor  Student Teacher/Intern                                     Principal

Printed Name: ____________________________                          Signature: _______________________________
                                                                                                            49
                        Student Teacher Assessment of the Cooperating Teacher

Cooperating Teacher: _________________________Date: ________________
Student Teacher Filling in this Assessment ______________________________
School: ______________________________________

Please rate your level of agreement with           Strongly   Agree    Moderately     Disagree     Strongly
the following statements.                           Agree      (4)       Agree           (2)       Disagree
                                                      (5)                 (3)                         (1)
1. The cooperating teacher remained
accessible and approachable.
2. The cooperating teacher read and critiqued
weekly lesson plans.
3. The cooperating teacher reviewed daily
instructional progress and provided
developmental feedback.
4. The cooperating teacher exercised respect
and patience toward the student teacher as a
developing professional.
6. The cooperating teacher modeled the roles
of an effective classroom educator and life-long
learner.
7. The cooperating teacher actively
collaborated during the student teaching
experience as outlined in the student teaching
handbook.
8. The cooperating teacher supported the
student teacher with appropriate guidance and
evaluation as outlined in the student teaching
handbook.
9. The cooperating teacher successfully guided
the student teacher through the transition in
and out of the classroom.
10. The cooperating teacher modeled a
thorough understanding of the Centenary
College teacher preparation program
expectations.
11. The cooperating teacher encouraged the
student teacher to implement various research-
based pedagogical and classroom management
strategies.

12. I would recommend that Centenary use this cooperating teacher to supervise another teacher candidate.
Yes _____ No _____

Student Teacher’s Signature: _________________________________

Additional Comments: (continue on reverse, if needed)
                                                                                                   50
               Louisiana Components of Effective Teaching
Domain I Planning
Component A: The teacher plans effectively for instruction.
   IA1. Specifies learner outcomes in clear, concise objectives
   IA2. Includes activity/activities that develop objectives
   IA3. Identifies and plans for individual differences
   IA4. Identifies materials, other than standard classroom materials, as needed for the lesson
   IA5. States method(s) of evaluation to measure leaner outcomes
   IA6. Develops an Individual Education Program and/or an Individualized Family Service Plan

Domain II Management
Component A: The teacher maintains an environment conducive to learning.
   IIA1. Organizes available space, materials, and/or equipment to facilitate learning
   IIA2. Promotes a positive learning environment
Component B: The teacher maximizes the amount of time available for instruction.
   IIB1. Manages routines and transitions in a timely manner
   IIB2. Manages and/or adjusts allotted time for activities planned
Component C: The teacher manages learner behavior to provide productive learning opportunities.
   IIC1. Establishes expectations for learner behavior
   IIC2. Uses monitoring techniques to facilitate learning

Domain III Instruction
Component A: The teacher delivers instruction effectively.
    IIIA1. Uses technique(s) which develop(s) lesson objective(s)
    IIIA2. Sequences lesson to promote learning
    IIIA3. Uses available teaching material(s) to achieve lesson objective(s)
    IIIA4. Adjusts lesson when appropriate
    IIIA5. Integrates technology into instruction
Component B: The teacher presents appropriate content.
    IIIB1. Presents content at a developmentally appropriate level
    IIIB2. Presents accurate subject matter
IIIB3. Relates relative examples, unexpected situations, or current events to the content
Component C: The teacher provides opportunities for student involvement in the learning process.
    IIIC1. Accommodates individual differences
    IIIC2. Demonstrates ability to communicate effectively with students
IIIC3. Stimulates and encourages high-order thinking at the appropriate developmental levels
    IIIC4. Encourages student participation
Component D: The teacher demonstrates ability to assess and facilitate student academic growth.
    IIID1. Consistently monitors ongoing performance of students
    IIID2. Uses appropriate and effective assessment techniques
    IIID3. Provides timely feedback to students
    IIID4. Produces evidence of student academic growth under his/her instruction

*Domain V School Improvement
Component A: The teacher takes an active role in building-level decision making
Component B: The teacher creates partnerships with parents/caregivers and colleagues

* Student teachers will not be assessed on this domain.


http://www.doe.state.la.us/DOE/OQE/Contents.asp
                                                                                                       51

   Centenary College
Department of Education

                                     Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor Questionnaire




Cooperating Teacher/Site Supervisor: __________________________________________

School: ___________________________________________________________________

Current Teaching Assignment: ________________________________________________

Preferred e-mail address: ____________________________________________________

Cell phone: ___________________________ Home phone: ________________________

Gender:        Female       Male

Race:       American Indian or Alaskan Native              Hispanic
            Asian or Pacific Islander                      Not Reported
            Black, Non-Hispanic                            White, Non-Hispanic
            Foreign/Non-Resident Alien

Highest Degree Earned:

            Bachelor’s                 Master’s           Specialist               Doctorate


Additional Qualifications:

            National Board Certification                   LaTAAP assessor training

            Other, please specify: __________________________________________________________

Years Teaching at Current School: ____________ Total Years Teaching: ________________


Supervisors of Student Teachers: Certification Type and Supervision Eligibility. Louisiana
Bulletin 746 requires that cooperating teachers (those teachers who supervise student teachers) meet
one of the following eligibility criteria:
          Valid Type A or Level 3 Louisiana certificate in the field of the supervisory assignment
            Valid Type B or Level 2 Louisiana certificate in the field of the supervisory assignment and
             successfully complete the three semester-hour course in the supervision of student teaching
            Valid Type B or Level 2 Louisiana certificate in the field of the supervisory assignment and
             successfully complete assessor training through the Louisiana Teacher Assistance and
             Assessment Program
            Valid Type B or Level 2 Louisiana certificate in the field of the supervisory assignment and
             National Board Certification in the field of the supervisory assignment

								
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