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Department of English Language and Literature - DOC by c5XQICr

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									                       Department of English Language and Literature
                              National University Singapore

                                MASTER OF ARTS BY RESEARCH
                                   in the area of Literary Studies
                    For those admitted in Academic Year 2005/06 and after

The information here applies only to graduate students matriculated in AY2005/06 and
after.

Every effort is made to ensure that the information, applicable policies, and all other materials
contained in this webpage are accurate and current. However, NUS reserves the right to make
changes any time without prior notice.

Admission Requirements
1 (a) A B.A. Honours degree (2nd class and above) or equivalent (for instance, a four-year
      Bachelors degree with at least an average grade of B or equivalent) in a relevant
      discipline;

OR

1 (b)   In exceptional cases, a B.A. degree in a relevant discipline with at least two years of
        relevant work experience, subject to approval by the Faculty and the Board of Graduate
        Studies on a case-by-case basis;

2.      TOEFL (minimum score of 580 for the paper-based test or 237 for the computer-based
        test) OR IELTS (minimum 6.0 score) for applicants whose native tongue or medium of
        undergraduate instruction is not in English. Some successful candidates may be required
        to take the Diagnostic English Test at NUS and, where necessary, attend the Graduate
        English Course.

Duration
Students may be admitted as full-time or part-time students. However, foreign students on a
student pass must pursue their studies on a full-time basis. The maximum period of candidature
for both full-time and part-time candidates is 36 months from the date of registration for the M.A.
degree and includes the time allowed for writing and submitting the thesis, medical leave, and
approved study leave but may exclude periods of approved leave of absence subject to Faculty
approval. It is exclusive of any period of preparatory study that may be required by the
Department.

Degree Requirements
Students are advised to read carefully and observe the degree requirements in the Guide for
Graduate Research Students pertaining to the MA by research.

The MA with research in the area of Literary Studies is divided equally between taught classes
and independent research.

The student will be required to:
1.     pass a minimum of 16 modular credits (MC) or four modules (each module is worth 4 MC).
       The four modules should include:

                                         -1-
             EN6770 Graduate Research Seminar (this is a compulsory module for students
              enrolled in the M.A. Literary Studies programme)
             three other modules from the EN4xxx, EN5xxx and/or EN6xxx series. No more
              than one of these three modules may be taken from the EN4xxx series.

       A student enrolled in the M.A. with research in Literary Studies may also take modules
       offered by another graduate programme in the university, subject to the approval of the
       student's supervisor, the lecturer of the module, the Head of the Department of English
       Language and Literature, and the host department, and relevance to the student's studies
       and availability.

2.     write and pass a thesis of not more than 30,000 words (including footnotes, but excluding
       appendices, bibliography, maps, charts, statistical tables, graphs, illustrations, etc).
       Supervision for the thesis is by an individual member of faculty. Thesis guidelines are
       posted at http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/ell/docs/Thesis_guidelines.doc. A contract will be
       drawn between supervisor and supervisee to indicate broadly the frequency, length and
       nature of meetings. The supervisor(s) must submit to the Registrar's Office through the
       Faculty, bi-annually, a confidential report on the work of each candidate under his/her
       supervision.

       The thesis will be examined by two examiners, one of whom may be an external
       examiner. The examiners may set such further tests as they think fit to enable them to
       assess the thesis. The Board of Examiners may pass or fail a candidate or refer him/her
       for further work.

       Work which has been submitted for a degree of, or for which a degree has already been
       conferred by the University or any other university, may not be submitted again as a
       thesis; but a student is not precluded from incorporating part of such work provided that,
       in the thesis, the student clearly indicates the part of the work which has been so
       incorporated. A student may, in addition, submit such other published work as he/she
       desires provided it has not already been submitted for a degree in the University or any
       other university.

3.     obtain a minimum Cumulative Average Point (CAP) of 3.00 for all examinable modules.
       The candidature of a student will be terminated if he/she:
             obtains a CAP of less than 2.50 for two consecutive semesters or 3.00 for three
              consecutive semesters
             fails more than two modules

A student may be required by the Department to undertake such other work as may be deemed
relevant to his/her candidature for the M.A.

Assessment
Assessment of a module shall comprise continuous assessment and an examination at the end of
the semester. There may be instances when assessment of a module may comprise 100%
continuous assessment.

If a student should fail a module, he/she can either retake the module and resit the examination,
or take some other module in its place. However, if a module is deemed essential, then this
module must be passed.



                                        -2-
Thesis
Work on the thesis shall commence after the completion of all coursework and shall be
supervised by a university staff member or any other person jointly, appointed by the Executive
Committee for Graduate Studies, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences on the recommendation of
the Head of Department. The thesis shall be examined by two examiners, one of whom may be
an external examiner. Thesis guidelines are posted at
http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/ell/docs/Thesis_guidelines.doc.

A candidate whose thesis is found by examiners to be unsatisfactory will be given one
opportunity to revise and resubmit the work within a time-limit specified by the examiners. If,
after such revision and resubmission, the thesis is found by the examiners to be unacceptable,
the candidate will be deemed to have failed to fulfil the requirements of the degree, and will be
required to leave the programme.

Residency Requirements
Students must spend a period of residence in Singapore for a minimum of six months during their
candidature. Periods of study leave and overseas fieldwork do not count towards residency. A
student who is awarded a Research Scholarship must reside in Singapore for the duration of the
scholarship award. A student must also be resident during the semester in which he/she submits
the thesis for examination.

Converting From M.A. to Ph.D.
A student currently registered in the M.A. by research programme may apply to convert his/her
candidature to the PhD programme instead, with effect from the date that the student was
admitted as a candidate on the MA programme or such later date as may be specified by the
Faculty. To be eligible for converting from the M.A. to the PhD programme, a student must satisfy
all of the following conditions:

1)     passed at least 5 modules, of which at least two must be at level 6000
2)     obtained a minimum CAP of 3.5
3)     where applicable, obtained satisfactory grades in the CELC graduate English modules at
       intermediate level
4)     met the following Departmental requirements:
       a)   all applications for conversion must be formally made to the Department (either by
            email or letter), which will then convene an ad-hoc committee for the purpose of
            assessing the applicant’s eligibility
       b)   the intention to convert should be made known to the supervisor in the second
            semester of the MA programme
       c)   the student should submit a portfolio (which may include essays of modules taken,
            any work done to date on the MA thesis, sample ISM, description of proposed
            research topic, etc) that will help the committee in its assessment
       d)   the student must obtain a letter of reference from the supervisor in support of the
            proposed conversion
5)     taken and passed the PhD Qualifying Examination (QE) after having met conditions (1) to
       (4).

Once the PhD QE has been successfully cleared, formal conversion is deemed to have taken
place. In the case where a student is unsuccessful in clearing the QE, he or she then carries on
with the formal requirements for completing the MA (by research) degree.




                                         -3-
Students should note that EN6770 Graduate Research Seminar and EN6102 Advanced
Critical Reading are compulsory modules in the PhD in Literary Studies programme.

Course Structure

The modules at level 5000 belong to three groups:

 Concentration:    EN5231           EN5232               EN5233           EN5234          EN5235         EN5236
 Literatures and   Asian and        Ideological          Postcolonial     The             Politics and   The
 cultures in the   Other            Approaches to        Poetry in        Postcolonial    Literature     Literature of
 Asia-Pacific      Modernities      Literature           English          Novel in                       the Asian
 context                                                                  English                        Diaspora
                   EN5237
                   Chinese
                   American
                   Literature
 Foundations       EN5241           EN5242               EN5243           EN5244          EN5245         EN5246
                                                                                                         The 19th
                   Literature and   Women                The Birth of     Shakespeare     Gothic
                                                                                                         Century
                   New Worlds:      Novelists            the Critic       and Literary    Properties
                                                                                                         Domestic
                   1590-1750                                              Theory
                                                                                                         Novel
 Interfaces        EN5251           EN5252               EN5253           EN5660          EN5881         EN5882
                   Orientalism:     Movies,              Writing in the   Independent     The Rise of    Topics in
                   British and      Spectatorship        Aftermath        Study           the Lyric      Cultural
                   French Texts     and                                                                  Studies
                                    Subjectivity


                   EN5883
                   Screen Culture
                   in Southeast
                   Asia


                   TS5101           TS5211               TS5212           TS5232          TS5660
                   Text and         Classical            Asian            Performance,    Independent
                   Performance      Theories of          International    History and     Study
                                    Asian Theatre        Cinema           Cultural
                                                                          Memory
 Level 6000        EN6770           EN6102               EN6660           EN6880          EN6881         EN6882
                   Graduate         Advanced             Independent      Topics in the   Topics in      Advanced
                   Research         Critical             Study            New             Literary       Topics in
                   Seminar          Reading                               Literatures     History        Cultural
                   (Compulsory      (Compulsory                                                          Studies
                   module)          module for
                                    PhD
                                    candidates)
                   TS6660           TS6880
                   Independent      Advanced
                   Study            Topics in
                                    Theatre




                                                   -4-
The concentration modules allow students to pursue focused and extended study in topics
pertaining to English literary and cultural production in the Asia-Pacific region. They cover topics
such as English in this region, postcolonial texts in different genres, and ideology and literature.

The foundation modules further the student's knowledge in English literary and cultural history.
They concentrate on advanced discussion of areas of literary history, and on traditions of literary
theory and scholarship.

The interface modules offer breadth and the opportunity to pursue interdisciplinary study and
approaches. Topics covered include film narratives, spectatorship, and comparative literary and
cultural studies.




                                BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF MODULES

Different modules will be taught in different semesters within an academic year. Not all modules listed
will necessarily be offered in any given academic year. The Department reserves the right to re-
schedule or not to offer certain modules.

The general pre-requisite for all level 5000 modules is admission to a graduate degree programme or
the permission of the Department upon recommendation of the instructor.

Level 6000 modules are pitched at a higher level than level 5000. They are intended for students on the MA
with research and PhD programmes.

The general pre-requisite for all other modules at level 6000 is admission to the PhD programme, or doctoral
competence in the discipline, to be determined by the Department upon recommendation of the supervisor or
instructor.

EN5231             Asian and Other Modernities
Over the last two hundred years, writers in Asia have often struggled with the question of
modernity. Initially, indigenous or indigenised modernity offered a means of resisting colonialism
and of asserting cultural autonomy; latterly, pan-Asian art forms have been proposed as a means
of marketing a distinctively Asian space within globalisation. The module examines a number of
comparative case studies of "modern" transcultural literary, historical, and theoretical issues. We
will consider how notions of modernity might be applied to our primary texts, and how in turn the
texts may interrogate or challenge theoretical models and constructs. This module is targeted at
M.A students.

EN5232            Ideological Approaches to Literature
An ideological approach to literature is one that reads not only the primary literature--it also
reads the way we read literature. An incisive statement about the necessity of such critical self-
consciousness is Fredric Jameson's "Metacommentary", and this essay will guide our reflections
on the study of the interrelations between primary literature, criticism and reviews, and tertiary
critical engagements with the issues that arise when readers become increasingly self-conscious
about the values in play during any act of reading. This matter can be approached from a number
of angles, and on its first run the course will concern American literary orientalism in the postwar
period

EN5233              Postcolonial Poetry in English

                                              -5-
The twentieth century witnessed the growth to maturity of a number of new literary traditions
from the nations that arose all over the world after the demise of European colonialism. This
module offers an extensive and intensive introduction to these traditions through the genre of
poetry in English. The themes, issues, challenges and opportunities that link and differentiate
these diverse traditions will be examined through a close study of seven key texts drawn from
the new poetic traditions in English from the Caribbean, Africa, and Australasia. Target students:
5000 level; 6000 level.

EN5234            The Postcolonial Novel in English
This module centres on the critical reading of selected anglophone postcolonial novels along with
the questions they raise. Issues to be addressed include the articulation of postcolonial identity,
postcolonial resistance and revisionism, the representation of history, the relation between
postcolonialism and postmodernism. Postcolonial novelists to be studied may include Chinua
Achebe, J. M. Coetzee, Wilson Harris, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, V. S. Naipaul and
Salman Rushdie. Some theoretical readings will be assigned though the emphasis will be on the
close reading of primary texts. The module is designed especially for graduate students who want
to read selected postcolonial novels in depth.

EN5235              Politics and Literature
EN5235 is a focused examination of the various senses of "political literature". One may say "all
literature is ideological", but this course raises doubts that "everything is political" in a significant
way. This course examines the differences between "ideology" and "politics" in relation to
literature. The course considers works that challenge conventional distinctions such as that
between "propaganda" and "literature". Students will test definitions of "the political" on a variety
of texts.

EN5236            The Literature of the Asian Diaspora
This module invites students to think across cultures about the literature of Asian peoples in the
English-speaking world. Examining literature produced by and about Asians living in Britain,
Australia, North America, Africa, and the Caribbean, it probes the similarities and differences in
the experience of migration as understood by different Asian groups, as well as by members of
the same ethnicity inhabiting different regions. The course traces changes in mainstream
attitudes towards Asian immigrants from racist demonisations to model minorities and their effect
on literary production. Texts will be complemented by readings in Asian and Asian American
Studies and postcolonial theory.

EN5237           Chinese American Literature
This module invites students to consider the literary, cultural, and political significance of
“Chinese American Literature” in the canon we refer to as “Asian American Literature”. Starting
with an analysis of the literary genres favoured by Chinese American authors, this module next
proceeds to explore such controlling thematic concerns as the politics of canon formation; the
migrant and minority experience, and race and national belonging. This module finally considers
how the theoretical discourses of gender, postcolonialism, and diaspora can help propel readings
of the Chinese American literary corpus in new and exciting directions.

EN5241             Literature and New Worlds: 1590-1750
From early modern England up into the eighteenth century, English literature registers
distinctively a deep fascination with worlds both old and new: Egypt, Africa, China, and India are
some examples. In reading critically how different authors in this historical timeline represent old
and new worlds in their literary production, this module seeks to analyse the formation of cultural
perceptions relating to such topics as (a) the emergence of a colonial and imperial consciousness;

                                           -6-
(b) the apprehension of cultural difference; (c) the crystallisation of national identity. It offers
opportunity for considering the engagements of literature with certain momentous social,
historical, and political realities, such as the slave trade and the activities of the British East India
Company.

EN5242           Women Novelists
The objectives of this course are to invite students to reflect on and analyse texts by great
women novelists. Topics covered include the choice of genre, the relation between narrative
structure and psychological experience and their political implications, the nature of the
dilemmas at the heart of each text, and the problems of defining and responding to what is
specific to women’s writing. For M.A.- level students with an interest in women’s writing.

EN5243              The Birth of the Critic
The module examines the role of criticism in the crucial period that had seen it evolve into a
social institution: the long eighteenth century. It goes beyond tracing the early history of a critic-
function to explore its relation to the emerging public sphere of civil society in which the so-called
'reading revolution' had taken place. Selected writings on two key literary figures, Shakespeare
and Milton, are examined for the underlying discursive framework granting a critic powers to
examine taste and virtue, forge a literary canon, and locate state-culture connections.

EN5244            Shakespeare and Literary Theory
This module approaches Shakespeare’s plays by considering not only genre and theme, but also
their relationship to the development of literary history, including critical theory. The
Shakespearean corpus has led to a multitude of critical possibilities, such that the text has lent
support for materialism or deconstruction, for patriarchy or feminism, for the secure clichés of
the so-called Elizabethan world picture or for their subversion and dissolution. Given the open-
endedness of these critical possibilities, what does engaging with Shakespeare reveal about the
relationship between text and context, between literary production and particular historical
conditions, and the very making of meaning itself?

EN5245             Gothic Properties
This module will train students to read nineteenth and twentieth-century British Literature texts,
focusing on gothic novels and their treatment of authority, place and identity. Existing
scholarship focuses on the fragmentary and proto-postmodern qualities of gothic narrative and
the issue of sites, especially cities and manor houses. This module builds on such scholarship,
connecting these perspectives to related themes of property, commodity culture,
authority/policing, transnational flows, the body as a nexus of many of these flows, and the
implications of these for identity in a modern age. The module will also make connections
between these concerns and the larger issues of fissures and dislocations in identity and society
in a transnational age.

EN5246             The Nineteenth Century Domestic Novel
This module will examine the genre of the Victorian domestic novel. It will consider both ‘main
stream’ works as well as those by writers who are less read today but who attracted wide
readership in their time. As ‘bestsellers’, these works are arguably more representative of the
common ethos and concerns and yield important insights into the cultural and literary aspects of
the period. They also help put in clearer perspective the works of the major writers. Some
familiarity with Victorian literature/fiction would be desirable.

EN5251             Orientalism: British and French Texts



                                           -7-
The module will examine the representations of Asia in British and French texts of the nineteenth
and twentieth centuries. It will investigate the relation between writing, representation, identity
and power. The module will elaborate upon Said’s (1979) theoretical framework and also
incorporate more recent developments in the study of colonial and post-colonial writings.

EN5252            Movies, Spectatorship and Subjectivity
This course involves a critical interrogation of key theoretical approaches addressing the study of
film spectatorship and the ways in which subjectivity is constructed. This module adopts a
specialised emphasis on that tradition of film theory associated with a psychoanalytical-textual-
apparatus model and offers graduate students an opportunity to engage in in-depth explorations
of the key problems and issues associated with this branch of film theory. In examining the
highly complex interaction between spectator and text, students will also gain a greater
understanding of the ways in which issues such as gender, identity, and ideology intersect with
the cinematic/visual text.

EN5253             Writing in the Aftermath
The module addresses issues of historical trauma and cultural memory; through a focus on how
such memory is manifested in aesthetic (primarily literary) representation. The module assumes
a dual approach to the study of selected texts, requiring attention to the topic of violence and
memory on the one hand; and the ethics and politics of representation on the other. Literary
texts will illuminate problems of narrative agency, responsibility and testimony in the aftermath
of a violent past. The conceptual framework of discussions derives from Maurice Blanchot and his
influence on post-structuralism, and from contemporary uses of psychoanalysis by literary
theorists.

EN5660            Independent Study
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study
Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in English Literature in
depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and
assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear
account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details.
The Head's and/or Graduate Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular
meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and
must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental
approval.
Remark: (1) Word limit: 5000 - 6000 words. (2) Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The
precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and preparation is to be worked out between the
lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental approval.

EN5881             The Rise of the Lyric
The module will provide students with an understanding of theoretical discourses and the
historical development of the lyric since the nineteenth century. Students will be exposed to the
development of lyric forms such as the dramatic monologue. The dramatic monologue emerged
in the nineteenth century and its social and psychological implications became the focus of critical
debate. It is an important example of the way in which the module will get students to engage
with the question of the changing role of poetry since the age of mechanical reproduction. Poets
in the course include Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Tennyson, Emily Dickinson, T. S. Eliot,
Elizabeth Bowen, Jorie Graham. The module aims to sharpen the students' awareness of the
theoretical underpinning of form and in order to do this, students will be required to engage with
critical discourses about poetry found in the writings of Hegel, J. S. Mill and Adorno, among
others.

                                         -8-
EN5882            Topics in Cultural Studies
Students will learn about the range of inquiry within the domain of Cultural Studies, gain an
understanding of its history, promise, and drawbacks, and undertake a sustained interaction with
a specific dimension of the field in an applied manner. Students will get an overview of Cultural
Studies, major theorists, major antecedents, applications, limits, debates and potential areas of
application, and develop a specific engagement with some aspect of the larger domain.

EN5883             Screen Culture in Southeast Asia
This interdisciplinary will acquaint students with various theoretical approaches to the moving
image, and equip them to write critically about contemporary screen cultures of Southeast Asia.
Readings will be from media theory, art history and critical theory, as much as film studies. The
module encourages students to think beyond the conventions of cinema studies (national cinema,
genre, etc), the rationale being that as screen culture spreads beyond industrial cinema, so too
should theory and criticism. Films studied will privilege independent and experimental work,
video/media art, animation and web based video, emphasising the diversification of moving
image practices with video and digital media.

EN6102          Advanced Critical Reading
This module is an advanced graduate class in critical reading. In it students develop three main
areas of competence: 1) knowledge of different critical traditions; 2) awareness of the various
problems of reading and interpretation; and 3) close reading of texts informed by the knowledge
of (1) and the awareness of (2). In keeping with the advanced nature of the module, much of the
responsibility for the direction of the work falls upon the students. Students will explore the texts
of a few key thinkers and learn to understand some of the basic principles of critical theory. They
will learn to apply specific reading strategies to selected texts and to raise questions about the
reading process and its contexts. The emphasis throughout is on the development of students'
critical awareness of positions, strategies and possibilities of interpretation. The module is a core
course for research students.

EN6660         Independent Study
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study
Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in English Literature in
depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and
assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear
account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details.
The Head's and/or Graduate Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular
meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and
must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental
approval.
Remarks: (1) Word limit: 7000 - 8000 words. (2) Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The
precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and preparation is to be worked out between the
lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental approval.

EN6770         Graduate Research Seminar
This is a required module for all research Masters and Ph.D. students admitted from AY2004/ 05.
The module provides a forum for students and faculty to share their research and to engage one
another critically in discussion of their current research projects. The module will include
presentations by faculty on research ethics and dissertation writing. Each student is required to
present a formal research paper. Active participation in all research presentations is expected.
The module may be spread over two semesters and will be graded “Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory”
on the basis of student presentation and participation.

EN6880        Topics in the New Literatures

                                          -9-
This module trains students in select key texts in the new literatures and their social contexts. It
locates those literatures in the cultural histories of nationalism, postcolonialism, modernisation,
intertextuality and related topics. The module is intended for graduate students.

EN6881          Topics in Literary History
This advanced seminar is especially useful for students who are considering pursuing research in
literature written before the twentieth century. Students are expected to identify for themselves
key issues pertaining to the relationship between historical and literary studies, including the
identification of appropriate evidence and constraints on the interpretation of texts. Topics and
texts will depend upon the research interests of individual students, and may include
consideration of different literary historical periods. Every student is expected to complete the full
range of the reading for the module.

EN6882         Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies
This advanced seminar allows graduate students the opportunity to address the interface
between the wide range of disciplines found under the rubric of Cultural Studies, including
literature, anthropology, art history, and media studies. Students will be exposed to areas such
as critical theory, visual culture, popular culture, postcolonial studies, gender studies, race
studies and history of technology while also pursuing readings intended to help them refine their
objects of inquiry, methodologies and theoretical perspectives.

Students on the M.A. with research in the area of English Literature may take these
modules from the Theatre Studies curriculum to fulfil the non-compulsory coursework
requirements of the programme:



TS5101             Text and Performance
This module provides a broad-based critical and methodological foundation for advanced research
in theatre and performance. Taking one example from each of three aspects of performance - a
script, a live performance, and a media/cultural performance - the module trains students to
examine and compare the critical positions and questions posed by a range of theoretical texts
with different approaches, priorities and methodologies. Core topics are the mutually
transformational modalities of textuality and performativity, live and mediated performance, and
non-traditional critical and performance practices. Students are guided in formulating a research
proposal and project, which forms the main coursework component.

TS5211             Classical Theories of Asian Theatre
This module examines the foundations, attitudes, and aesthetic beliefs expressed in the
theoretical writings that underpin the three major theatrical traditions of India, China, and
Japan. The Natyasastra, the theory of Theatre Unintentional, and the writings of Zeami are
studied in relation to their actualisation in the conventions and vocabulary of Sanskrit theatre,
Chinese opera, and Noh drama respectively, and their comparison draws points of relation
between them that enable a more flexible and comprehensive understanding of shared
principles and practices.

TS5212             Asian International Cinema
In recent years, the vitality and currency of Asian cinema has resulted in texts that can no longer
be viewed as merely artefacts of a particular culture or nation. This module looks at how film
industries in Asia have engaged with global cinema through various forms of negotiations that
assert, compromise or consume national, cultural or conventional distinctions. We assess the
implications of a conglomerate Asian cinema by examining the current trend of transnational
Asian films, the translatability of conventions and adaptability of ideas within Asia itself as well as
between Asia and dominant cinemas like Hollywood.

                                          - 10 -
TS5232            Performance, History and Cultural Memory
How do societies use performance to mediate between the past and the present? This module
addresses the question by considering the place of performance in the forging of history, the use
of performance analysis as a means of gaining insights into historical events, and the function of
performance as a process of remembering. Combining historical case studies and contemporary
performances from local, regional and international contexts from colonial encounters and
memorial rituals to trauma plays historiography is studied alongside the ways in which theatrical
and other performances play a role in both reinforcing and challenging prevailing cultural
memories.

TS5660             Independent Study
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study
Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in Theatre Studies in
depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and
assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear
account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details.
The Head's and/or Graduate Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular
meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and the
balance of written and other components must be worked out between the student and the
lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.
Remark: (1) Word limit: 4000 - 6000 words, the lower limit being permissible only where the
project involves a substantial amount of practical work, and is agreed with the supervisor. (2)
Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and
preparation is to be worked out between the lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental
approval.

TS6660          Independent Study
Pre-requisite: Admission to the PhD programme or doctoral competence in the discipline to be
determined by the Department upon recommendation by the instructor.
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study
Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in Theatre Studies in
depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and
assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear
account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details.
The Head's and/or Graduate Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular
meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and the
balance of written and other components must be worked out between the student and the
lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.
Remark: (1) Word limit: 6000 - 8000 words, the lower limit being permissible only where the
project involves a substantial amount of practical work, and is agreed with the supervisor. (2)
Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and
preparation is to be worked out between the lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental
approval.

TS6880          Advanced Topics in Theatre
Pre-requisite: Admission to the PhD programme or doctoral competence in the discipline to be
determined by the Department upon recommendation by the instructor.
This module is designed to cover selected topics in Theatre and Performance Studies at advanced
graduate level. The topic to be covered will depend on the interest and expertise of regular or
visiting staff members in the department.




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