Personal Care And Grooming: Relationship To Self-Esteem by 3Go71Fl

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									            Unit 9
Personal Care And Grooming:
 Relationship To Self-Esteem
      Nurse Aide I Course




         DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   1
     Personal Care And Grooming:
      Relationship To Self-Esteem
              Introduction
      Nurse aides are the members of
the health care team responsible for
providing personal care and grooming
for the resident.
      They encourage the resident to do
as much as possible for themselves,
but assist as needed with personal
cleanliness, oral hygiene, nail care,
shaving, dressing, care of hair and skin
care.
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   2
   Personal Care And Grooming:
    Relationship To Self-Esteem
            Introduction
                (continued)
    Personal grooming is important for
a positive self-image and every effort
should be made to encourage and
assist the resident to maintain a
pleasing and attractive appearance.


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   3
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   4
9.0 Provide for the resident’s personal
    care and grooming needs and
    identify the role of the nurse aide in
    meeting these needs.
9.1 List the daily hygienic needs of an
    individual.
              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   5
       Daily Hygiene Needs

• Bathing                         • Shampooing
• Skin care                         hair
• Back care                       • Hair care
• Oral                            • Nail care
  hygiene                         • Perineal care
• Shaving                         • Dressing and
                                    undressing
              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9        6
9.1.1 Describe factors that affect a
      resident’s personal hygiene
      practices.



             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   7
       Factors That Affect Hygiene
                Practices
•   Culture
•   Family Practices
•   Illness
•   Individual preferences
     –Bath in morning or before going to
       bed
     –Frequency of bathing, shaving
     –Shampooing hair daily or weekly
               DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   8
    Factors That Affect Hygiene
             Practices
             (continued)
• Economics
  –Unable to afford
   deodorant, shampoo,
   etc.
  –Unable to afford
   utilities

           DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   9
9.1.2 Discuss the role of the nurse
      aide and how personal care can
      be used to promote self-esteem
      and well-being.


            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   10
   Personal Care and Grooming:
      Role of the Nurse Aide
• Assist to follow their
  personal hygiene practices
• Encourage to do as much of
  their daily care as possible
• Assist residents to select
  their own clothing

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   11
   Personal Care and Grooming:
      Role of the Nurse Aide
                (continued)
• Promote independence and self
  esteem
• Encourage use of deodorant,
  perfume, aftershave lotion, and
  cosmetics
• Be patient and encouraging

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   12
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   13
9.2 Define and discuss oral hygiene.




            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   14
            Oral Hygiene


• Definition: measures used to
  keep mouth and teeth clean
  and free of microorganisms




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   15
           Oral Hygiene
               (continued)
• Purpose
  –Prevent odors
  –Prevent infections
  –Prevent tooth decay and
   loss of teeth
  –Prevent gum disease
  –Increase comfort
  –Enhance taste of food
            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   16
            Oral Hygiene
                (continued)
• Oral hygiene is provided:
  –Before breakfast
  –After meals
  –At bedtime
  –Other times as
   requested or necessary

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   17
           Oral Hygiene
               (continued)
• Observations to report:
  –Foul mouth odors
  –Bleeding
  –Loose or broken teeth or
   dentures
  –Sores in or around mouth
  –Coated tongue
  –Complaints of pain
            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   18
9.2.1 List seven principles to practice
      when brushing teeth.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   19
   Principles For Brushing Teeth

• Hold brush at 45 degree angle
• Use circular motion to brush teeth
• Brush well where teeth and gums
  meet
• Brush all surfaces
• Brush upper teeth first
• Brush gently
• Offer diluted mouth wash
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   20
    Special Mouth Care Products

• Swabs
• Toothettes:
  –usually soaked in
   mouthwash or plain water
  –hydrogen peroxide, salt
   water solution if specified
   on care plan
• Petroleum jelly for dry lips
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   21
9.2.2 Discuss the care of a resident’s
      dentures.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   22
            Denture Care
• Handle carefully – expensive to
  replace
• Clean as often as natural teeth
• Protect from loss or breakage
• Store safely, when out of
  mouth, in labeled container
• Never use hot water, which can
  warp dentures

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   23
             Denture Care
                 (continued)
• Store dry, in water or in special
  solution
• For long term storage, put
  container holding dentures in
  bedside stand




              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   24
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   25
9.3 Demonstrate the procedure for
    assisting the resident with oral
    hygiene.



             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   26
9.4 Demonstrate the procedure for
    providing mouth care.




            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   27
9.5 Demonstrate the procedure for
    providing mouth care for the
    unconscious resident.



            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   28
9.6 Demonstrate assisting with
    denture care.




            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   29
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   30
9.7 Discuss the care of the resident’s
    nails and feet.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   31
                Nail Care

• Requires daily cleaning and
  trimming of fingernails and
  toenails as needed
• Maintain nails by keeping
  nails:
   –short
   –clean
   –free of rough edges
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   32
9.7.1 List three purposes of nail and
      foot care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   33
                Nail Care
                (continued)

• Purpose
  –Prevent infection
  –Prevent injury
  –Prevent odors




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   34
9.7.2 Identify factors to be considered
      when giving a resident nail care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   35
   Nail Care: Factors To Consider

• Easier to trim and clean after
  soaking
• Nail clipper used to cut and
  trim nails
• Clip nails straight across
• Softened cuticle can be
  pushed back with orange stick

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   36
   Nail Care: Factors To Consider
                (continued)

• Use file or emery board to smooth
  rough edges
• Use care not to injure skin when
  clipping




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   37
   Nail Care: Factors To Consider
                 (continued)

• Diabetics and residents with
  circulatory problems will have their
  nails trimmed only by a licensed
  nurse or podiatrist
• Review resident care plan and check
  with supervisor prior to trimming
  nails

              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   38
9.7.3 Identify factors to be considered
      when giving a resident foot care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   39
  Factors To Consider In Foot Care

• Wash feet using warm water
  and mild soap
• Dry feet carefully, especially
  between the toes
• Apply lotion to tops and
  bottoms of feet only, not
  between the toes
              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   40
 Factors To Consider In Foot Care
                (continued)
• Check feet daily for:
  –redness, warmth or constant pain
  –numbness or tingling
  –dry, cracked skin
  –swelling
  –blisters, cuts, scratches or other
   sores
  –ingrown toenails, corns, calluses
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   41
  Factors To Consider In Foot Care
                (continued)

• Do not use a heating
  pad on resident’s feet
• Keep footwear on;
  residents never go
  barefoot
• Change socks and
  shoes daily

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   42
  Factors To Consider In Foot Care
                (continued)
• Foot injuries and
  infections can lead to
  gangrene and
  amputation, especially in
  diabetics
• Notify supervisor
  immediately of any
  unusual observations of
  the feet
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   43
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   44
9.8 Demonstrate cleaning and
    trimming a resident’s nails.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   45
9.9 Demonstrate foot care.




            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   46
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   47
9.10 Discuss the nurse aide’s
     responsibility in assisting the
     resident with shaving.



              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   48
  Assisting Resident With Shaving

• Daily activity for men
• Promotes:
  –Physical comfort
  –Psychological
    well-being


              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   49
9.10.1 Review the factors to consider
       when shaving a resident.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   50
  Assisting Resident With Shaving

• Factors to consider:
  –Electric razor provides greatest
   safety
  –Use own equipment or a disposable
   safety razor
  –Soften beard and skin prior to
   shaving
            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   51
  Assisting Resident With Shaving
                 (continued)

• Factors to consider (continued):
  –Use care not to cut or irritate skin
   while shaving
  –Shave in direction hair grows
  –Do not use electric razors when
   oxygen in use

              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   52
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   53
9.11 Demonstrate assisting the
     resident with shaving.




            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   54
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   55
9.12   Describe ways to assist the
       resident with hair care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   56
                Hair Care

• Hair care includes
  –Daily brushing
   and combing
  –Styling
  –Shampooing



             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   57
9.12.1 Review factors to consider for
       daily hair care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   58
      Factors To Consider For
          Daily Hair Care
• Because hair style is
  personal preference, ask
  about style
• Make brushing and
  combing part of morning
  care


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   59
      Factors To Consider For
          Daily Hair Care
                (continued)
• Protect resident’s
  clothing by placing
  towel around shoulders
• Cover pillow with towel
  for residents confined
  to bed

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   60
      Factors To Consider For
          Daily Hair Care
                (continued)
• Brushing hair:
  –refreshes resident
  –improves morale
  –stimulates circulation
  –distributes natural oils evenly
  –removes lint and dust
• Handle hair gently when brushing or
  combing
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   61
      Factors To Consider For
          Daily Hair Care
                (continued)
• Section hair and work on one
  area at a time
• Note appearance of scalp
  and hair
• Hair style should be age
  appropriate

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   62
      Factors To Consider For
          Daily Hair Care
               (continued)
• Residents are encouraged to do as
  much as possible for themselves
• Comb and brush are cleaned after
  use
• Combs and brushes are never
  shared

            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   63
9.12.2 Discuss considerations used
       when shampooing a resident’s
       hair.



            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   64
    Shampooing Considerations

• Frequency individualized
• Resident’s shampoo,
  conditioner and other
  hair care products are
  used
• Resident assisted to
  beauty shop if available

             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   65
9.12.3 List the various methods for
       shampooing hair.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   66
    Shampooing Considerations
               (continued)

• Methods of shampooing:
  –during shower
  –at sink
  –using stretcher
  –in bed


            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   67
    Shampooing Considerations
                 (continued)
• Eyes and ears protected
• Hair dried as fast as
  possible
• Cold or drafty areas
  eliminated
• Female residents
  assisted to curl or set hair

              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   68
     Shampooing Considerations
                  (continued)
• Barbers or beauticians
  may be contacted by
  facility to care for hair of
  residents
• Care plan to be checked
  for any special
  instructions prior to
  shampooing
               DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   69
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   70
9.13   Demonstrate caring for the
       residents’ hair.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   71
9.14   Demonstrate shampooing hair
       of resident who is in bed.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   72
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   73
9.15   Identify the general principles of
       dressing and undressing a
       resident.



              DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   74
      Dressing And Undressing

• Encourage resident to
  choose own clothing
• Dress daily own clothing
  and underwear
• Make sure clothes are in
  good repair


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   75
     Dressing And Undressing
               (continued)

• Dress weak or affected
  side first
• Undress weak or affected
  side last
• Ensure clothing is
  appropriate for weather
  and environment

            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   76
     Dressing And Undressing
                (continued)

• Encourage resident to
  wear clothing that matches
  and is clean and neat
• Dress should be age
  appropriate
• Do not put clothing on
  backwards
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   77
     Dressing And Undressing
                (continued)

• Be gentle
• Always be patient
  and provide time for
  residents to do as
  much as possible for
  themselves


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   78
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   79
9.16   Demonstrate the procedure for
       dressing and undressing the
       resident.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   80
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   81
9.17 Identify the purposes of bathing a
     resident.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   82
          Bathing Resident
• Purpose of Bathing
  –Removes
   perspiration, dirt and
   microorganisms
  –Stimulates circulation
  –Exercises body parts


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   83
          Bathing Resident
                  (continued)
• Purpose of Bathing
 (continued)
  –Refreshes, relaxes and
   promotes physical
   comfort
  –Removes odors
  –Allows for evaluation of
   skin condition
               DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   84
9.17.1 Discuss the various methods of
       bathing a resident.




            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   85
          Bathing Resident

• Methods of Bathing
  –Partial bath
  –Complete bed
   bath
  –Tub bath
  –Shower

            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   86
9.17.2 Identify guidelines for bathing a
       resident.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   87
       Guidelines for Bathing
• Receive instructions
  from supervisor
  regarding method of
  bathing and skin care
  products to use
• Provide privacy
• Reduce drafts by closing
  windows, drapes and
  doors
             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   88
       Guidelines for Bathing
               (continued)
• Use good body mechanics
• Keep covered for warmth and privacy
• Protect safety of resident:
  –never leave unattended in bathtub
    or shower
  –take precautions to prevent slips
    and falls
  –have temperature no higher than
    105°F for tub or shower
            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   89
       Guidelines for Bathing
                (continued)
• Rinse skin completely if not using
  no-rinse product
• Encourage to do as much as
  possible for self
• Pat skin dry
• Observe condition of skin


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   90
9.17.3 Observe the condition of the
       skin and report any unusual
       observations.



             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   91
 Skin Observations While Bathing

• Color of skin, lips, nail
  beds and sclera of eyes
• Location and description
  of rashes
• Dry skin
• Bruises or open areas on
  skin

            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   92
 Skin Observations While Bathing
               (continued)
• Pale or reddened
  areas, especially over
  bony parts
• Drainage or bleeding
  from wounds or orifices
• Skin temperature
• Complaints of pain or
  discomfort
            DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   93
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   94
9.18   Demonstrate the procedure for
       giving a complete bed bath and
       partial bath.



             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   95
9.19   Demonstrate the procedure for
       giving a tub bath or shower.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   96
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   97
9.20   Discuss giving perineal care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   98
            Perineal Care

• Used to clean genital and anal areas
  –Prevents infection
  –Prevents odors
  –Promotes comfort




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   99
            Perineal Care
• Rules of medical asepsis and
  Standard Precautions followed
  –Work from cleanest to dirtiest area
    (front to back)
     • urethral area – cleanest
     • anal area – dirtiest


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   100
            Perineal Care
                (continued)

• Delicate area that needs special care
  –Use warm water
  –Wash gently
  –Rinse well
  –Pat dry


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   101
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   102
9.21   Demonstrate giving perineal
       care.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   103
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   104
9.22   Discuss giving a back rub.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   105
         Giving A Back Rub

• Purpose
  –Stimulate circulation
  –Prevent skin
   breakdown
  –Soothing
  –Refreshing


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   106
          Giving A Back Rub
                (continued)
• Use a combination of strokes
  –Long, smooth strokes – relaxing
  –Short, circular strokes – stimulating
• Use warmed lotion applied with
  palms of hands
• Rub 3 - 5 minutes


             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   107
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   108
9.23   Demonstrate giving a back rub.




             DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   109
DFS Approved Curriculum-Unit 9   110

								
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