Marketing Plan - Careers in Trades

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					Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report




        Promoting Skilled Trades
        & Apprenticeship Project
                    PHASE I REPORT SUMMARY


                                            January 2004
                                      ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Our thanks to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum - Forum canadien sur
l’apprentissage (CAF-FCA) and to the Board of Directors of Skills/Compétences Canada (SCC) for
their efforts in spearheading this initiative.

The completion of this report would not have been possible without the cooperation of countless
individuals who contributed their time to provide information and participate in the research for this
study. The Steering Committee expresses its appreciation to all these individuals and
organizations for their input and support.

Finally, thanks to APCO Worldwide and their associated consultants for the comprehensive
research and analysis they conducted.


                   This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.


The opinions and interpretations in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily
reflect those of the Government of Canada.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

BACKGROUND............................................................................................................ 1
CAMPAIGN GOALS..................................................................................................... 3
SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS........................................................................................... 4
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ........................................................................................ 7
POSITIONING STRATEGY........................................................................................ 10
TARGET AUDIENCES ............................................................................................... 12
   Primary Youth Audience (13 to 18 year olds) .............................................................................12
   Parents (of 13 to 18 year olds, age 35 to 55)..............................................................................13
   Secondary School Educators and Guidance Counsellors...........................................................14
   Employers...................................................................................................................................14
   Equity Seeking Groups ...............................................................................................................15
MARKETING STRATEGY.......................................................................................... 18
   Outline of Marketing Tactics by Audience...................................................................................18
   Youth Marketing Strategy ...........................................................................................................21
   Parents Marketing Strategy ........................................................................................................33
   Educators and Guidance Counsellors Marketing Strategy..........................................................41
   Employer Marketing Strategy......................................................................................................48
   Equity Seeking Groups Marketing Strategy ................................................................................56
PARTNERSHIPS STRATEGY ................................................................................... 71
   Year One ....................................................................................................................................73
   Year Two ....................................................................................................................................74
   Year Three..................................................................................................................................74
BENCHMARKING, MONITORING AND EVALUATION ........................................... 75
   Monitoring Tools .........................................................................................................................75
IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK .......................................................................... 77
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BACKGROUND
Canadian industry is facing widely acknowledged skills shortages in many sectors, especially
within the skilled trades professions. There are a variety of contributing factors to the skills
shortage, including: a high number of expected retirements; a high proportion of individuals
entering the workforce who lack sufficient essential skills and other “job ready” attributes; and, over
the past 20 years, a steady decline in the number of people completing apprenticeship programs.
A number of national research studies, including several commissioned by Human Resources
Development Canada (HRDC), indicate that the low interest in skilled trades careers can be
attributed to the negative image and low awareness of these careers.

The January 2001 Speech from the Throne recognized and acknowledged existing and pending
skills shortages and emphasized the need for a collaborative national effort to address this issue.
The Government of Canada developed a policy paper entitled “Knowledge Matters – Canada’s
Innovation Strategy” which proposed a strategic national action plan and platform that will enable
Canadians to develop the necessary skills to fully participate in a knowledge-based economy.

In support of this strategy, HRDC announced that two organizations would share the responsibility
to develop and implement a comprehensive multi-year marketing campaign to change the existing
perceptions of skilled trades careers in Canada. The two organizations selected, the Canadian
Apprenticeship Forum – Forum canadien sur l’apprentissage (CAF-FCA) and Skills/Compétences
Canada (SCC), were chosen for their national scope, their ability to work in multi jurisdictional
environments and their proven capability to bring all key stakeholders, such as educators,
business, unions, government agencies at all levels and community groups, together on this issue.
While HRDC is providing $12 million towards this project, it is also expected that there will be an
opportunity to forge additional partnerships and leverage resources through the CAF-FCA and
SCC network of stakeholders.

The Canadian Apprenticeship Forum/Forum canadien sur l’apprentissage (CAF-FCA) is a federally
chartered, non-profit organization working to promote apprenticeship as a viable career option and
to support the apprenticeship training systems across Canada. CAF-FCA brings together
representatives of business, labour, the Inter-Provincial Alliance of Apprenticeship Board Chairs
(IPA), education, equity groups, the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA) and
Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC).

Skills/Compétences Canada (SCC) is also a national non-profit organization whose mission is to
promote skilled trades and technology as a first choice career option for young Canadians. It
engages volunteers from across the country, representing education, trades, labour, business and
government sectors. Through very close working relationships between SCC and its Provincial and
Territorial affiliated Skills organizations, it develops programs that showcase the skilled trades to
create awareness and interest among young Canadians.

A Steering Committee was assembled to oversee the development of this comprehensive multi-
year marketing campaign. Members of the Steering Committee were selected from within the
Boards of the CAF-FCA and SCC, and also include representatives from HRDC.
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In June 2003, APCO Worldwide was retained by the Steering Committee to develop the creative
strategy and pan-Canadian marketing plan to promote skilled trades and apprenticeships. Working
in collaboration with Ipsos-Reid and Grey Worldwide, APCO was assigned with undertaking the
following:

1. Conducting a literature review of research reports and studies on skills shortages and skilled
   trades issues.
2. Collecting and undertaking an audit of existing skilled trades marketing campaigns and
   programs.
3. Identifying “exemplary practices” from these campaigns and focus group testing key messages
   and creative concepts.
4. Developing a campaign creative platform and approach for all target audiences based on the
   research findings.
5. Focus group testing preliminary creative concepts and key messages with multiple target
   audiences in various jurisdictions.
6. Developing final creative concepts and all necessary creative elements for the campaign.
7. Delivering a pan-Canadian marketing and implementation plan to promote skilled trades and
   apprenticeships.
8. Establishing a systematic benchmarking and evaluation criteria to measure the results and
   achievements of the project.

In addition, APCO was tasked with developing a strategy to engage employers to provide
sustainable apprenticeship opportunities. This included undertaking the following:

1. Reviewing available research relating to apprenticeship programs and barriers to
   apprenticeship.
2. Interviewing a cross-section of employers to determine marketing approaches and messages
   to effectively communicate the benefits of training apprentices.
3. Developing a creative strategy and concepts specific to this audience.
4. Focus group testing the creative concepts.
5. Developing a specific marketing strategy to reach and engage employers.
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CAMPAIGN GOALS
While HRDC, CAF-FCA and SCC ultimately want to ensure a sustainable labour force in the skilled
trades and apprenticeships sector, this project is not specifically designed to “recruit” employees or
immediately drive more youth towards careers in the skilled trades and apprenticeship programs.
While this would be a positive outcome, it is recognized that this project is designed to develop and
implement a comprehensive pan-Canadian marketing campaign that would ultimately begin to
accomplish the following:

1.      “Reposition” skilled trades from its current negative perception toward a more positive
       position, and eventually, as a first choice career option in the minds of Canadian youth and
       those who influence their career decisions.

2. Further encourage employers to create, expand and sustain career opportunities in the skilled
   trades for young Canadians.

In order to develop an effective plan based on meeting these goals, it is essential to fully
understand the current situation, the root causes for negative perceptions towards careers in the
skilled trades, and what is currently being done across Canada to address these issues. The
following sections highlight the salient factors that contribute to the current status quo in the skilled
trades.
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SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS
Based on numerous research studies, it is clear that the skilled labour shortage has become a very
critical issue within the Canadian economy. To ensure a thorough understanding of the current
situation with skilled trades and identify potential opportunities and barriers to the campaign, it was
necessary to conduct a thorough review of existing reports, studies and marketing programs.
APCO Worldwide collected and reviewed over 100 studies and reports and more than 200
marketing campaigns and programs from national, provincial/regional organizations, provincial
government apprenticeship programs, Sector Councils, industry, and career development
organizations. The objective of this research was to identify the severity of the skills shortage, its
root causes, and the current activities that exist to address these issues. After this research was
reviewed and analyzed, it became abundantly evident that a national public awareness campaign
was needed to bring youth back into the skilled labour force.

The Skill Shortage is Real

It is clear from the research that the skilled trades profession in Canada is facing a very serious
problem. Between 1991 and 2001, there was a 3.8% decline in the number of people working in
skilled trade occupations and a similar decline is predicted over the next decade. Recent studies
from HRDC, the Conference Board of Canada and the Canadian Federation of Independent
Business confirmed that skills shortages are expected in various sectors over the next 4 to 10
years since the attrition rate of the current skilled workforce is currently greater than the recruitment
rate of youth into skilled trade careers. While not universal, analysis of many demographic factors
indicates the potential for skills shortages in a wide range of sectors.

Factors Contributing to the Shortage

There are five main issues that have been identified by various researchers to explain why there is
a declining ability to recruit youth into skilled trade careers. These issues include:

▪     The negative perception of youth and their key influencers about skilled trade careers;
▪     The belief that university education will provide a more promising and secure future;
▪     The lack of awareness of the various opportunities and careers that are considered skilled
      trades;
▪     A decline in the number of apprenticeship completions; and,
▪     The need for greater employer involvement in apprenticeship programs to support students
      who have entered skilled trade programs.

The first issue is one of the most challenging issues to overcome. Unfortunately, youth, their key
influencers and the general public have deeply rooted, negative perceptions about skilled trade
careers. This perception has resulted in youth choosing university-educated careers instead of
careers in the skilled trades. Based on several research reports, the perceptions of skilled trade
careers are that they are:

▪     Low paying
▪     Dirty and dangerous
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▪     For less intelligent and uneducated people
▪     Physically demanding

These perceptions have created many myths about skilled trades that need to be addressed. For
example, HRDC data clearly shows that salaries for trades people exceed the national average.
This fact contradicts the perception within the marketplace that skilled trades do not pay well and
cannot provide a good lifestyle. This perception is very damaging, as one of the primary
motivations for making career decisions is income.

The second issue is that the university panacea myth still exists. The public, and key influences
such as parents and teachers, view university education as the most effective, if not the only
means of securing gainful employment and a promising future. Since pursuing skilled trades
typically means completing post-secondary education with training through an apprenticeship
program, the perception is that these careers are for people who could not make it into university.
This myth has caused many parents and educators to strongly encourage and direct youth into
university programs instead of college. Little do they know that training for skilled careers can, in
fact, be highly specialized and most often challenge intellectual, creative and problem solving skills.
Training is typically more practical, provides the opportunity to “earn while you learn” and carries a
lesser debt load than university education. It therefore provides a greater and more immediate
return on investment, which ironically, speaks to the financial reward issue that the public primarily
seeks from their career choices.

The third issue is that there is a major lack of awareness relating to skilled trades. There is a low
awareness of the variety of skilled trade careers, especially those relating directly to the new
economy such as computer technicians, animators, graphic designers, etc. People are unfamiliar
with the fact that technology and computers are used in most trades, and the level of technical and
on-the-job training that trades people receive is quite advanced.

The fourth issue is that almost all jurisdictions are experiencing a decline in the number of people
completing apprenticeship programs. According to the Registered Apprentices Information System,
most jurisdictions show an increase in the number of people registering as apprentices, but are
showing a decline in the rate of apprenticeship completions. In 2001, there were a record 217,560
apprenticeship registrations; however, over the past 20 years, the number of new tradespersons
entering the labour market has remained static, despite a 50% increase in the number of
registrants over the same period. Although a number of factors, ranging from the economy in some
sectors to personal reasons, can be attributed to low completion rates, other factors such as
perceptions about skilled trades careers and employer retention/training practices also play a
significant role in the steady decline of apprenticeship completions.

The final issue is that many employers across the country are not embracing an apprenticeship
program within their own organizations. This reality is quite ironic, given that approximately 84% of
business leaders are “significantly concerned” about the skilled labour shortage. According to the
preliminary results of the Accessibility and Barriers Report, a major study conducted on behalf of
CAF-FCA, there are nine key factors impacting employers with respect to an apprenticeship
program. They are as follows:
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1.     Employers view training apprentices as costly and time consuming;
2.     It is difficult to attract and retain high quality apprentices;
3.     Employers do not see or appreciate the benefits of “investing” in training apprentices;
4.     There is a lack of information about apprenticeship programs for employers;
5.     Schools do not provide adequate trades training and support to prepare youth to enter
       apprenticeships;
6.     Employers prefer to hire skilled journeypersons instead of apprentices;
7.     The apprenticeship system is too restrictive;
8.     There is not enough work to employ apprentices; and,
9.     Employers do not have the appropriate training and workforce planning system in place.

Current Campaigns to Combat the Skill Shortage

Over 200 campaigns exist within the Canadian marketplace to create interest, provide information,
and improve enrollment into various skilled trades’ sectors. These campaigns range from
extensive public awareness campaigns that include mass media, to local and regional campaigns
that are more grass roots and program-specific. After a comprehensive review of these campaigns
as well as discussion with the campaign managers, some key observations can be made about the
current strategies that have been implemented to combat the skill shortage issues.

       There is currently no national umbrella campaign that addresses the need to change current
       negative attitudes and promote skilled trades as a first career choice among young Canadians.
       While certain programs, notably Emploi Quebec, RAP in Alberta and Skills Work in Ontario,
       among others, have had success in their local and regional markets, none contain all the
       unique and special ingredients and criteria that is essential to begin the social marketing
       process to ‘change attitudes’.
       Although there are many initiatives being undertaken by various industry groups and provincial
       governments across the country, there were few that actually addressed the issue of the
       negative perception of skilled trade careers. Many communication tactics were used and
       designed to provide information about specific sector opportunities, but did not address the
       need to change the perception of their target audience to careers within that sector.
       There are few communication tactics that are focused on specific target audiences, such as
       parents, educators, and equity seeking groups or employers.
       There are an extensive number of career websites and regional and sectoral skilled trades
       websites that are good resources on skilled trades careers.
       There are numerous grass roots programs that exist across the country, many of which include
       in-school presentations as well as a variety of informational and promotional items such as CD
       ROMs, videos, pamphlets, posters, etc.
       There are limited programs in Canada that involve tactics that effectively reach teenagers,
       such as television, computers or movie screens.
       In general, there is no cohesive integrated strategy that pulls all the current efforts and
       resources together to address the enormous challenge of changing the negative attitudes that
       currently exist towards skilled trades careers to a point where youth and their key influencers
       will consider skilled trades as a first career choice.

Clearly, there is an urgent need to change the perceptions and attitudes of Canadians towards
skilled trades. To achieve this, a comprehensive and strategic public education campaign is
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required to change perceptions and increase the awareness of skilled trades and career
opportunities.

STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK
As the situational analysis has indicated, Canada is facing a pending skills shortage in most trade
sectors, especially since attrition continues to be a major issue. As indicated, the primary factors
for the skills shortage are the lack of youth choosing skilled trades as a first choice, and the lack of
employers committing to apprenticeship programs. The most notable reasons for youth not
choosing careers in the skilled trades are the poor image and lack of desirability of these
professions, and the fact that their influencers are not encouraging, and are, in fact, often
discouraging, such career options. In addition, one of the most notable reasons employers are not
committing to apprenticeships is the lack of perceived “return-on-investment” apprenticeship
programs provide them.

Ultimately, the following strategy needs to be undertaken to address these issues:

1. Develop a generically branded, national, bilingual, umbrella campaign within a social marketing
   framework to shift perceptions about careers in the skilled trades and inspire audiences to
   seek more information.
2. Develop sub-strategies to address the multiple target audiences and jurisdictions in Canada.
3. Develop a parallel but separate strategy and campaign targeting employers to promote the
   need and the benefits of undertaking apprenticeship programs.
4. Develop a common creative look and feel, overarching value proposition, campaign logo and
   tagline, and umbrella key messages designed to reposition skilled trades with all audiences.
5. Focus the campaign on audiences with greatest opportunity to impact.
6. Enhance the campaign’s reach and resources through strategic partnerships.
7. Leverage and compliment existing resources, campaigns and programs.
8. Ensure that the campaign is flexible to reflect jurisdictional regional and sectoral needs.

The chart on the following page highlights the strategic framework for the campaign.
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                                        NATIONAL UMBRELLA CAMPAIGN




     Parents                 Youth               Educators &             Employers   Equity Seeking
                                                  Guidance                              Groups
                                                 Counsellors




                                       GRASS-ROOTS STRATEGY
                                       PARTNERSHIP STRATEGY


Based on the strategic framework, which outlines the guidelines for a national umbrella campaign,
two sub-campaigns are also required that focus on each of the project’s goals. Each of these sub-
campaigns will have unique audiences, unique messages and unique communication tactics as
outlined below.

Goal #1 - “Reposition” skilled trades as a first choice career option in the minds of
Canadian youth and those who influence their career decisions.

The deep-rooted negative perceptions and attitudes towards skilled trades and the clear lack of
information available to pan-Canadian audiences suggest that the implementation of social
marketing principles is required for this campaign. In order to change behaviors and attitudes,
successful social marketing programs must reach audiences on both emotional and rational levels.
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Programs must be comprised of a combination of elements including targeted advertising, media
relations, communications and community grassroots to reach audiences on a number of levels.
Social marketing programs also need to include a call-to-action message and must provide
necessary information to allow audiences to make informed choices.

Social marketing, however, is a long-term process and it will take some time to significantly shift
the current deeply embedded negative attitudes towards skilled trades. The focus for the three-
year campaign has to be on beginning to “reposition” skilled trades and apprenticeships as a first
choice career option in the minds of Canadian youth and those who influence their career
decisions. This will be accomplished by undertaking the following social marketing strategic
approach:

1. Capture the audience’s attention through thought provoking targeted advertising.
2. Trigger emotional reactions that pique their interest and make them view skilled trades in a
   “new” and positive way through key messages and a new value proposition for skilled
   trades.
3. Motivate them to seek more information to better understand and rationalize this “new”
   perception through a clear call-to-action message.
4. Provide them with factual, rational and compelling information, primarily through a user-
   friendly website.
5. Engage the media and the grassroots movement to provide further credible information and
   messages to support this “new” perception.

Goal #2 - Encourage the creation of meaningful and sustainable career opportunities for
young people with an interest in the trades.

As part of an integrated marketing strategy, employers must be targeted to communicate the
benefits of hiring and training apprentices to ensure a supply of skilled trades people for the future
workforce. The marketing approach for accomplishing this is to:

1. Use high-profile industry spokespeople and key champions to capture the attention of
   employers.
2. Focus on the “return-on-investment” benefits of apprenticeship programs to motivate them to
   seek more information.
3. Provide them with compelling information that highlights the benefits of apprenticeship
   programs through the website and other communication tools.
4. Engage industry/employer associations, labour unions and other grassroots
   organizations to support the campaign’s messages to employers.

In order to effectively attain these two goals, it is evident that a positioning strategy needs to be
developed that clearly improves the image of skilled trades and defines a new value proposition for
the sector.
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POSITIONING STRATEGY
The success of this project rests in the ability to reposition skilled trades as viable career options.
In order to accomplish this, a positioning strategy must be developed that will govern the creative
“theme” for the campaign, provide a value proposition for skilled trades, and present an umbrella
message that is consistent in defining such careers.

To develop the positioning strategy, the attributes that people associate with “positive” careers
must be identified. Based on the review of the numerous research studies and on the focus group
testing undertaken for this project, the following key benefits are deemed to be the most important
influences on one’s career choice:

▪     Personal satisfaction - Youth are seeking fulfilling careers that provide job satisfaction and
      quality of life, and parents want their children to be “happy” and to enjoy what they are doing.
▪     Job security – This attribute is especially pertinent with parents and with females who
      associate job security with sustainable quality of life.
▪     Status/prestige/cool/respect – For the most part, people are seeking respect from their
      careers and youth in particular want to be associated with “cool” jobs. While parents typically
      want their children to be doctors or lawyers, many youth want to be involved in careers that
      reflect their lifestyle.
▪     Good salary –Whether it is parents or youth, salary is a key consideration in making a career
      choice. The more money a career has to offer, the more likely people will consider that career
      as an option.
▪     Intellectual and creative challenge – Youth do not want to be bored and would like their
      career to be intellectually challenging, creative and motivating.
▪     Advancement – The ability to get promoted, move through the ranks, and increasingly make
      more money is a very important attribute associated to desired careers. In addition, people
      want to continuously learn to advance themselves and want to work in settings that provide
      ongoing learning/training.
▪     Interesting work environment – Again, youth do not want to be bored with their careers and
      want to have flexible and interesting work environments. In particular, youth do not want to be
      “stuck behind a desk” and want the ability to travel and work in different settings.

Based on these desired attributes, to effectively position skilled trades and apprenticeships as
positive career choices, we need to define them as:

▪     Careers that provide a satisfying, well paying, secure and rewarding lifestyle
▪     Careers that consist of thriving professional choices that are in demand and therefore, provide
      security
▪     Careers that are highly skilled and creative professions

To communicate these desired career attributes to target audiences, the suggested approach
focuses on the value proposition that careers in the skilled trades matter and are valued. This
value proposition personifies skilled trades on an emotional level and automatically elevates the
status and image of these careers. We propose that this value proposition sets the tone for the
creative theme of the campaign, supported by the following specific umbrella key messages:
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▪     Job satisfaction and quality of life – Skilled trades allow you to do what you like and makes you
      happy
▪     Ability to earn a good salary – Earn a good living and quality of life
▪     Professional careers that “matter” – Do something you’ll be proud of
▪     Careers that are in demand and provide “job security” – You’re needed
▪     Diverse learning and growth opportunities – It’s a lifelong learning experience
▪     Challenging and highly skilled careers – These careers are for smart people
▪     Ability to “Earn while you Learn” – There is an immediate payback when entering skilled trade
      careers

In addition to the above messages, focus group testing identified that the target audiences also
require the following information to catch their attention:

▪     Inform youth of possible options in skilled trades
▪     Show youth actually doing the trade at their workplace
▪     Convey a passion for what they are doing
▪     Use humour to deliver the message
▪     Identify the earning potential of skilled trade careers
▪     Be realistic – don’t exaggerate
▪     Communicate that skilled trades involves “thinking” and not just “dirty” work
▪     Provide contact information (website address for more information)

These elements and the proposed value proposition and key messages would form the basis of the
creative strategy for the campaign. The creative strategy would then ultimately provide direction
for the development of a campaign logo and tagline, advertising concepts, web pages and
collateral material that reach audiences on both emotional and rational levels while piquing their
interest by repositioning skilled trades in a “new” and “surprising” way.
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TARGET AUDIENCES
From the research, it is evident that the negative bias towards skilled trades is a societal issue and
that such careers need to ultimately be repositioned with the general population. However, as
outlined in the Strategic Framework, the campaign must be focused on target audiences where
there is the greatest opportunity for impact over the duration of the three-year campaign. This
approach is driven by the reality of the initial budget for the campaign, which dictates that the
campaign cannot be all things to all people. Therefore, the target audiences will be segmented to
be more effective with current resources. A targeted campaign provides the opportunity to marshal
somewhat limited resources and tactics on specific audiences, thereby increasing the ability to
reach, motivate and influence audiences.

The audiences that we recommend targeting for this campaign are:

▪     Youth (13-18)
▪     Parents of Youth
▪     Secondary School Educators and Guidance Counsellors
▪     Industry/Employers
▪     Equity Seeking Groups (Aboriginals, women, persons with disabilities and visible minorities)

While these audiences will be the “primary targets”, it should be noted that because the campaign’s
strategy is to employ targeted advertising, media relations and grassroots activities, most
segments of the Canadian population will, in effect, be reached and exposed to the campaign’s
messages.

Brief profiles of these audiences are discussed below, as well as the rationale for targeting these
specific audiences.

Primary Youth Audience (13 to 18 year olds)

Youth between 13 and 18 years old are the critical market segment that this campaign must
effectively reach. It is therefore important to have a thorough understanding of this market to know
what key messages will resonate with them, and how they perceive skilled trade careers.

Based on quantitative and qualitative research included in the GPC International Marketing Skilled
Careers Report, 2001, youth can be profiled with the following characteristics:

▪     Spend their leisure time on the web, viewing television and attending movies
▪     Significantly affected by media and role models within the pop-culture
▪     Look to parents and teachers for guidance
▪     Have a good lifestyle and have an expectation that this will be maintained in the future
▪     Conscious of brand-name consumer goods
▪     Seek belonging by peer groups
▪     Money-conscious
▪     Self-conscious, discriminating, opinionated
▪     Mobile and independent (urban public transportation)
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▪     Conscious of the need to choose a career
▪     Strive to be “cool”
▪     Have a low awareness of trade opportunities and lack the knowledge of the breadth and depth
      of job opportunities in the trades areas
▪     Have a low knowledge of apprenticeship and other skilled trade training programs that are
      available
▪     Perceive the university track to be the most desirable route to professional and personal
      success
▪     Stereotype skilled trades to be plumbers, carpenters and electricians, and have a 1950’s
      image of a male, aged 40-50 who is in these occupations
▪     Perceive skilled labour to be manual, boring and for underachievers
▪     Unaware of the technical skills required by skilled trade careers
▪     Influenced by that parents and teachers, who may be discouraging them from skilled trade
      careers and directing them into university careers

The main rationale for focusing on this target audience is as follows:

▪     Career decisions have not yet been made in this age group, therefore there is still an
      opportunity to position skilled trades as a viable career option.
▪     The lack of awareness of the skill trades presents an opportunity to “surprise” them and raise
      their curiosity of what these careers may have to offer.
▪     This target audience presents a perfect opportunity to begin shifting the workforce into skilled
      trade careers. This age group is representative of youth that will be making career choice
      decisions over the next four years.
▪     With skills shortages expected to occur within the next 4 to 10 years, the campaign will have
      the most impact by targeting youth between 13 and 18 who will be entering the workforce
      during this timeframe.
▪     Youth favour the idea of “earn while you learn”.
▪     Youth are primarily motivated in their career decisions by the overall satisfaction that their job
      can provide them.

Parents (of 13 to 18 year olds, age 35 to 55)

Parents, between the ages of 35 and 55, are primary influencers in the education and career
decisions of their children. With this target audience, it is also critical to shift their perception and
attitudes of skilled trades to allow them to direct and support their children to choose a career in the
skilled trades. Based on quantitative and qualitative research included in the GPC International
Marketing Skilled Careers Report, 2001, parents of our targeted segment have the following profile:

▪     Major influencers in the career decisions and in general are very involved in the day-to-day
      educational activities of their children
▪     Believe that their youth’s success hinges on a university education
▪     Perceive skilled trade careers to be manual, boring and involve jobs for underachievers
▪     Unaware of the technical skills required by skilled trade careers and the various careers
      available within the skilled trades sector
▪     Unaware of the salaries involved in skilled labour careers compared to university careers
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▪     Desire a “respectability” quotient for the jobs their children choose
▪     Are involved in providing resources for their children’s post-secondary education
▪     Want their children to be in a career that they enjoy and find satisfying
▪     Favour the idea of “earn while you learn” and the potential for a shorter educational timeframe
      that will lead to their children’s independence and career success

The main reasons for targeting this audience are that parents have a very high level of influence on
their children’s career decisions and there is a need to change their negative perceptions of the
skilled trades, and to educate them of the value and diversity of skilled trade careers.

Secondary School Educators and Guidance Counsellors

Another critical influencer on a youth’s career choice is educators and guidance counsellors.
Educators and guidance counsellors play a critical role in shaping the career decisions of young
people by delivering all curriculum and career information programs. Based on quantitative and
qualitative research included in the GPC International Marketing Skilled Careers Report, 2001, a
profile of this target audience is as follows:

▪     Average age of educators is higher than the regular work force, at 43 years old
▪     Are university educated, and tend to steer students toward a university or college pathway
▪     Tend to have limited exposure and experience with careers in the skilled trades, and are
      naturally less inclined to encourage or offer apprenticeship as an equally viable post-secondary
      education path to university or college
▪     Play an important role in streaming students into recommended education paths
▪     Generally unable to spend quality one-on-one time with students

The main reasons for targeting this audience is that educators have a key opportunity to present all
the career options to students during their high school education. By educating them on the
positive attributes and the diversity of skilled careers, there is a higher likelihood that they will
further encourage their students to consider career options in the skilled trades.

Employers

Developing a targeted approach towards employers and understanding the dynamics of large
corporations and small and medium sized businesses is important since this audience is
responsible for creating and sustaining apprenticeship positions and job opportunities for youth.
This target audience can be divided into two segments, large corporations and small and medium
sized enterprises (SMEs). Based on information and reports obtained from the Canadian
Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) from 2002-3, the profile of each is as follows:

Large corporations:

▪     Large corporations represent 3% of Canadian businesses.
▪     Key decision makers within large corporations are generally the President, the Vice Presidents
      of Human Resources (HR) or Human Resource Managers. These decision makers are
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 15


      important target audiences, as they develop HR programs that incorporate apprenticeship
      training programs.
▪     Large corporations have structured HR programs and plans, and have a higher likelihood of
      having an infrastructure in place that will allow them to train apprentices.
▪     Large corporations generally have more financial and human resources available to train and
      develop their own programs for apprenticeship.
▪     Large corporations are capable and supportive of partnering with CAF-FCA and SCC on this
      campaign initiative.

Small and medium sized businesses:

▪     SMEs represent 97% of Canadian businesses and have fewer than 50 employees.
▪     42% of SMEs expect to increase employment over the next 3 years and 61% view
      apprenticeship as the primary solution to skills shortage.
▪     In many small businesses, the owner is often the person responsible for managing the human
      resources of the business, which should be reflected in the marketing messages and vehicles.
▪     The training structure in small companies tends to be more informal and there are often few
      systems in place compared to those in large corporations.
▪     It should be noted that understandably, smaller companies have a more limited ability to take
      on apprentices at any one time, in comparison to larger companies.

Employers are a critical and integral component of the campaign as research has demonstrated
that they must be educated as to the needs, benefits and ROI of apprenticeship programs, as they
will create future jobs for our youth. In addition, given their vested interest in the skilled trades
sector, employers should become natural advocates, ambassadors and spokespeople for the
campaign. Unfortunately, current research suggests that many, in fact, are not advocates for their
skilled trade.

Equity Seeking Groups

In addition to the main target audiences, there are a number of important sub-groups that will be
targeted during this campaign, including Aboriginal persons, women, visible minorities and persons
with disabilities. These sub groups are important to segment since they require unique strategies
to reach them effectively. The profile of these various audiences, obtained from Statistics Canada
Census 2001, is as follows:

1. Aboriginals

▪     In 1996, there were approximately 811,400 Aboriginals in Canada.
▪     A greater proportion of Aboriginal youth are about to enter the workforce: 53% of the Aboriginal
      workforce are under the age of 25, compared with 34% of all Canadians and 45% are under
      the age of 20 years, compared with 27% of all Canadians.
▪     Approximately 95% of Aboriginal youth will not attend university and will either attend college
      or go directly to work.
▪     In general, Aboriginals have a low awareness of apprenticeships and consequently few enter
      apprenticeship programs/training.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                16


▪     Aboriginals respond more effectively if programs are developed and delivered by Aboriginal
      people.

2. Women

▪     Approximately 51% of the Canadian population is women.
▪     31% of the total population is working women between the ages of 19-65 years old.
▪     In the coming years, a higher proportion of women will be in the labour force. Women
      participate more in training than men – but are less likely to receive employer sponsored
      training.
▪     Women still tend to work more predominantly in “traditional” job sectors such as retail sales,
      secretarial, teachers, etc.
▪     Women’s participation in trades occupations is low and fewer than 10% of workers in their
      trade and technology occupations are women.
▪     Gender bias and social ideals of what roles are appropriate for women and men still persist
▪     Women, more than men, have a low awareness of the diversity of options available to them in
      the skilled trades.
▪     From 1995 to 2001, the number of registered women apprentices increased by 76%.
▪     More women are registering in apprenticeships usually dominated by men.
▪     In 2001, women accounted for 9% of total apprentice registrations, an increase from 7% in
      1995.
▪     The number of women completing apprenticeships has not increased since 1999, and is only
      seven per cent higher than in 1995.

3. Persons with disabilities

▪     Persons with disabilities that are over 15 years old represent approximately 14.5% of the
      population.
▪     There are varying degrees of disabilities that are categorized into pain, learning, memory,
      development, and physical disabilities.
▪     In general, people with disabilities receive lower wage jobs than those without disabilities.
▪     Women with disabilities generally receive lower wages than men with disabilities.

4. Visible Minorities

▪     Approximately 13.4% of the Canadian public are visible minorities.
▪     96% of immigrants live in metropolitan areas.
▪     Although visible minorities have greater education levels, their income and employment levels
      are lower.
▪     Only half of foreign-born visible minorities find high skill jobs.
▪     Many visible minorities are highly skilled and highly educated.
▪     Many visible minorities live below the poverty line.
▪     The rate of growth among youth within immigrant populations is higher than in the Caucasian
      population – the number of children aged 15 or younger within immigrant families is rising at a
      faster rate than Canadian-born families.
▪     In some ethnic communities, the influence of parents on the career decisions of youth is
      monumental.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   17



5. Rural Communities

▪     Approximately 22% of the Canadian population lives in rural communities.
▪     There is a population decline in rural and small town of 12% between 1976 to 1996.
▪     Apprenticeship opportunities may be scarce in smaller towns with fewer employers.
▪     Many apprentices and workers are forced to leave their hometowns to work and train, which
      impacts retention.
▪     Generally, there is difficult access to academic training, which has created a need for
      alternative training delivery such as mobile classrooms and e-learning.
▪     Community is more likely to be exposed to traditional skilled trades.

Overall, the main reasons for segmenting and identifying these sub-groups is to recognize the
unique features of each and the opportunity to target them more effectively with key messages that
will resonate, images that will be relevant, and grass-root strategies that will engage them in the
skilled shortage issue. It will also raise the level of awareness of the opportunities that exist within
each sector.

The following section outlines the marketing strategy that will provide details on how to reach each
of the target audiences that have been identified.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    18


MARKETING STRATEGY
Based on the strategic framework, the national umbrella campaign will provide a common look and
feel, key messages and a value proposition for repositioning skilled trade careers with all target
audiences. In addition, the execution of the campaign is based on the following marketing
guidelines:

▪     Dedicate a significant amount of the annual budget to targeted advertising. The primary need
      is to generate awareness of the positive attributes and diversity of options in skilled trades, and
      to pique the target audiences’ interest to seek further information on the campaign website.
▪     Select media (television) with a pan-Canadian reach to key target audiences in all markets,
      including rural, urban, and northern regions.
▪     Use complementary media to help increase frequency of the messages (radio and cinema).
▪     Generate extensive media coverage through pro-active media relations and media
      partnerships.
▪     Develop effective regional grass roots campaigns in conjunction with existing regional and
      jurisdictional programs and support tools (such as brochures, posters) to reinforce the creative
      campaign and its key messages for each audience.
▪     Use additional campaign resources to reach out to existing organizations that can assist with
      the dissemination of these materials or possible even adopt them as their own (i.e. media
      relations and strategic partnerships).
▪     Develop partnerships with all key stakeholders, such as, media, corporations, industry
      associations, educational organizations, unions, labor groups, etc. This component of the
      strategy will be a key cornerstone of the campaign.
▪     Launch the campaign in early 2004 and implement it over three government fiscal years (April
      2004 to December 2006).
▪     Focus on two campaign periods of 4 to 6 weeks each year to allow for the opportunity to
      saturate the market in two distinct time periods instead of spreading small amounts of media
      advertising throughout an entire year.
▪     Review the marketing strategy and monitoring research each year to modify the campaign for
      years 2 and 3, if required.

Based on the umbrella campaign and the above guidelines, APCO is proposing specific marketing
approaches and tactics to provide customized and effective means of reaching and communicating
with each audience.

Outline of Marketing Tactics by Audience

AUDIENCE                                   TARGETED ADVERTISING             SUPPORT PROGRAMS & TOOLS
Youth                                        Television                       Website
                                             Radio                            Brochure
                                             Cinema                           Poster
                                             Online/Interactive               Information booklet
                                                                              Grass roots
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               19



Parents                                      Print Advertising             Website
                                             Television                    Brochure
                                             Radio                         Grass roots
                                             Cinema
                                             Media Relations
Educators/Guidance                           Educator Publications         Website
Counsellors                                  Media Relations               Brochure
                                                                           Skilled Trades Resource list
                                                                           Grass roots
Employers                                    Trade Publications            Council of Champions
                                             Direct Mail                   Website
                                             Media Relations               Brochure
                                                                           Apprenticeship Tool Kit
                                                                           Direct Mail/Email
                                                                           Employer Recognition Program
Aboriginal Groups                             Television                   Website
                                              Print                        Grass roots
                                              Radio                        Brochure
                                              Cinema
                                              Media Relations
Women                                         Television                   Website
                                              Print                        Grass roots
                                              Radio                        Brochure
                                              Cinema
                                              On-line
                                              Media Relations
Persons with disabilities                     Television                   Website
                                              Print                        Brochure
                                              Radio                        Grass roots
                                              Cinema
                                              Media Relations
Visible Minorities                            Television                   Website
                                              Print                        Brochure
                                              Radio                        Grass roots
                                              Cinema
                                              Media Relations
Rural Audiences                               Television                   Website
                                              Print                        Brochure
                                              Radio                        Poster
                                              Media Relations              Grass roots


As indicated earlier, there is also a spillover effect from selected tactics as advertising, media
relations and grassroots activities reach many segments of the population. As an example, while
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    20


television, radio and cinema advertising in this plan are targeted at youth, they are not restricted to
this audience. Based on the media selection, the youth targeted ads will also be seen by teachers,
parents, employers, equity seeking groups and youths from other age groups who are watching the
same television program or viewing the same movie. The same theory applies for ads targeting
parents, for coverage in mainstream media, and for community grassroots initiatives.

The following chart highlights the reach and spillover reach of each advertising tactic to the target
audiences in the advertising campaign:

                                                     Youth         Parents     Educators     Employers
Television                                                X                X        X                   X
Radio                                                     X
Cinema                                                    X                X        X                   X
Parent Magazines                                                           X        X                   X
Educator Magazines                                                                  X
Employer Trade Magazines                                                                                X



The individual marketing strategies for each target audience are presented in the following pages
and are organized to provide an overview of the following:

▪     Key objectives – what are we are trying to accomplish with the targeted audience?
▪     Marketing considerations – what issues or special considerations impact our approach with
      the targeted audience?
▪     Key messages – based from the umbrella messages, what specific messages must we tailor
      for the targeted audience?
▪     Marketing approach – what is our umbrella approach for reaching the target audience?
▪     Tactical approach – stemming from the marketing approach, what are the specific tactics
      recommended for reaching and influencing the targeted audience?
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   21


Youth Marketing Strategy

Objectives
By the end of the three-year campaign, the desired outcome is for the campaign to have
accomplished the following:

1. Create a level of awareness of the campaign and its messages among youth with a targeted
   20-25% recall of exposure to the campaign.

2. Begin shifting their current negative attitudes of careers in the skilled trades toward a more
   positive attitude. Based on a benchmark study to be completed prior to the campaign launch,
   the objective will be to increase by 2-3% the number of youth who view skilled trades in a more
   positive light each year over the three-year campaign to achieve a total shift in attitudes of 6-
   9% at the end of the campaign.

Rationale for Objectives
1. The targeted recall objective is based on campaign evaluation standards used by Ipsos-Reid to
   evaluate targeted advertising campaigns, including social marketing campaigns. These targets
   are based on combination of advertising tactics (television, radio and print) and the anticipated
   reach or Gross Rating Points (GRPs) for each audience.

2. The objective to shift attitudes by 6-9% at the end of the campaign is considered reasonable
   based on past evaluations conducted by Ipsos-Reid.

Marketing Considerations
Today’s youth are media savvy and spend a significant amount of time watching television, going
to movies, listening to radio and using the web. Using these mediums to reach and influence youth
is central to any marketing campaign. Persuasive and thought provoking advertising must be
developed to first get their attention and pique their curiosity enough to compel them to want to
learn more about the options in skilled trades. Reflective of today’s fast paced society and a mass
media culture competing for audience attention, the creative approach for the campaign must
specifically reflect the characteristics and priorities of today’s youth. Youth want to feel independent
and that they have the freedom to make their own career choices. They are major consumers and
expect to have a prosperous lifestyle in the future. To reach youth, the creative tone must be
modern, stylish, fast-paced and inspirational to make them think differently and want to learn more
about skilled trades careers.

Key Messages
Based on the umbrella messages and repositioning strategy, the following key messages will be
incorporated into campaign elements targeting youth:

▪     Careers in the skilled trades allow you to do what you like and makes you happy
▪     Careers in skilled trades allow you to earn a good living and quality of life
▪     Do something you’ll be proud of
▪     Skilled trade careers are in demand – You’re needed and have great opportunities to grow
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   22


▪     These careers are for smart people and provide a lifelong learning experience
▪     “Earn while you Learn”

Marketing Approach
To reach youth, there must be a heavy emphasis on targeted media tactics to deliver a high impact
message about skilled trades careers and create a ‘call to action’. Once youth have been
motivated to visit the campaign website, they must be met with supporting, more detailed
information about skilled trades: diversity of opportunities, key attributes, and why skilled trades are
so valuable and worth investigating as a career choice. In addition, the influencer channel (parents
and educators) must be engaged to support and encourage their children and students
respectively, assisting them to choose a career in the skilled trades and apprenticeships.

Based on this approach, the following tactics will be used to reach youth and provide them with
information:

▪     Television
▪     Radio
▪     Cinema
▪     On-line
▪     Website
▪     Brochure
▪     Poster
▪     Information booklet
▪     Grass roots

Projected Impact of Targeted Advertising for Youth

The following chart represents the percentage of youth who will be reached through the targeted
advertising per medium, the frequency at which they will be reached and the number of
impressions (how many times they will see the advertising) that will be created through the
advertising buys.

Youth                                  Reach         Frequency             Impressions (000)
Television                                80%                  12                    n/a
Radio                                     59%                  22                    n/a
Cinema                                     n/a                 n/a                  5,756
OnLine                                     n/a                 n/a                  7,370
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   23


TELEVISION

Rationale:
▪ Television is the highest rated vehicle to reach youth in all regions (urban, rural, north) as it is
    their most popular medium, with 85-87% of the youth target audience viewing television at
    least three times per week.

Strategy:
▪ Three television commercials will be produced, in both English and French, for the campaign.
    These commercials can be altered through editing and voice over, as required, in years 2 and
    3 of the campaign.
▪ The key to successfully reaching youth is specialty programming. Specialty programming is the
    precise selection of advertising on specialty networks and the placement of advertisements on
    particular programs with high youth viewership.
▪ Specialty programming will provide the most highly targeted, cost-effective, national reach:
    Canadian English Specialty programming has the largest share (23%) of the youth audience
▪ According to Neilson Media Research, the top 10 programs for youth are also consistent with
    the habits of the adult demographic.
▪ Programs selected through specialty networks and ad buys will include
       - MuchMusic and MusiquePlus (youth audience views over 3 hours per week)
       - The Comedy Network
       - Teletoon
       - YTV
       - The Simpsons on CBC
       - Reality Programming (Fear Factor, Survivor, American Idol)
▪ Establish media partnerships with MuchMusic, MusiquePlus and YTV to leverage ad buys and
    generate on-air VJ promotion and sustain editorial and promotional coverage.

Frequency, Reach and Annual Ad Buy:
▪ 2 campaigns of 4 weeks each
▪ The ad buy will be based on attaining 85 Gross Rating Points (GRPs) per week - This is a
    calculation of Reach X Frequency. i.e. the percentage of people reached multiplied by the
    number of times they see the ad.


Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (4 weeks)
▪ Mid-September to mid-October (4 weeks)

RADIO

Rationale:
▪ Radio is the second most popular youth medium with 82-85% of youth listening to radio.
▪ Radio will provide the frequency to reach the northern, urban and rural markets.
▪ Radio is the complementary medium to television to reach all demographic groups including:
    Aboriginal groups, women, persons with disabilities and visible minorities.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                     24


▪     Youth listen to radio primarily in the evenings; this will allow for very strategic placement of ads
      at specific times and will reduce overall costs.

Strategy:
▪ One English and One French 30 second radio ad will be developed. New ads for radio will be
    developed annually to ensure that the trades referenced are current to market demands.
    These ads will still reflect the creative theme of the campaign.
▪ We recommend using the top 1 or 2 stations in each major market including: Vancouver;
    Calgary; Regina; Winnipeg; Toronto; Ottawa; Montreal; Halifax; St. John’s; Moncton;
    Charlottetown; Yellowknife and Whitehorse.
▪ Formats recommended include: Dance, Modern/Alt Urban, and Top 40.
▪ Consider sponsorships and promotions at key connection points, as well as taking the role of a
    content provider.
▪ Key to connecting to this target is relevancy. The creative message has to fit the station sound
    and speak to the listener.
▪ Radio ad buys require a minimum of 8 weeks advance booking to ensure optimum placement
    and cost.

Frequency, Reach and Annual Ad Buy:
▪ 2 flights; 6 weeks each
▪ 100 Gross Rating Points (GRPs) per week

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (6 weeks)
▪ Mid-September to end of October (6 weeks)

CINEMA ADVERTISING

Rationale:
▪ Youth are heavy movie goers – over 50% of youth have gone to movies more than two times
    over the past month.
▪ Over 60% of youth go to movies more than twice per month during summer months.
▪ Fits with the strategy to market to youth in spring and late summer – provides opportunity to
    reach youth during heavier movie-going times.
▪ Cinema advertising is also an opportunity to present a message to a ‘captive audience’; in a
    theatre setting, the audience cannot change the channel or leave the room easily during the
    ad.

Strategy:
▪ Digital Full Motion spots are recommended: use 30 second TV creative for cinema ads.
▪ National selection of 466 major Famous Players Theatres, such as; Silvercity, Coliseum, and
    Colossus.
▪ Establish media partnerships to increase exposure of the campaign through value added
    advertising in lobbies of cinemas and Tribute magazine.
▪ Cinema ads are rarely sold out but conservative closing date is 8 weeks in advance. Material
    closing can be 4 weeks prior if modifications are required.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   25


Frequency, Reach and Annual Ad Buy:
▪ 2 flights, four weeks each
▪ Advertising in 466 Famous Players theatres across Canada

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (4 weeks)
▪ Mid-September to mid-October (4 weeks)

ONLINE

Rationale:
▪ On-line use is the third most popular among youth after television and radio use.
▪ The campaign website is the primary information point for youth and use of on-line advertising
    is key to driving traffic to the campaign site.
▪ Online is the sustaining medium to television to reach all demographic groups including:
    Aboriginal groups, women, persons with disabilities and visible minorities.

Strategy:
▪ Banner ads will be produced that incorporate creative and link to campaign website.
▪ A two pronged approach will be used to drive traffic to the campaign website using top rated
    websites in the following categories:
       - Banner ads on Portals, Entertainment and Game sites as well as web mail account
           sites and search engines such as:
                         MSN, Sympatico, Rydium Network, MuchMusic/MusiquePlus and Google
       - Direct emails to third party lists targeting youth
▪ Major portals have no lead-time problems. Specialized/vertical sites may, in extreme cases,
    need 4 weeks lead time to insure availability.

Impressions and Annual Ad Buy:
▪ Total of 7,370,000 impressions

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (6 weeks)
▪ September to October (6 weeks)

WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ It is essential that a core destination point be established for our audiences to seek more
    information and explore careers in the skilled trades. This website must reflect and reinforce
    the messages and creative imagery of the media tactics to ensure consistency and credibility.
    It is also critical however that we don’t “re-invent the wheel” and invest resources in developing
    new databases of information when it already exists.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                     26


Strategy:
▪ Recently, the CAF-FCA and SCC have established in-depth websites, which provide
    substantial information for each of the audience segments we are targeting. Therefore, the
    proposed campaign website strategy involves utilizing the CAF-FCA inventory portal and the
    SCC websites as the main sites for the campaign. We recommend supplementing these sites
    with the audience specific home pages (landing pages), which will have a common look and
    feel of the campaign materials and provide compelling information on the diversity, benefits
    and relevant facts on skilled trade careers. These landing pages will also encourage the
    individual to seek further information by probing further into the CAF-FCA and SCC websites.
▪ Based on this strategic framework, the campaign website strategy is as follows:
        - The campaign website URLs will be www.careersintrades.ca and
             www.metiersspecialises.ca.
        - The website main page will be segmented for each target audience (Youth, Parents,
             Educators, Employers, Equity Seeking Groups and Media). Upon landing on the site,
             youth will immediately link to their own section. All information will be presented in the
             choice of either English or French.
        - A unique landing page will be developed for youth and content will be customized
             specifically for youth that will pull them deeper into the website.
        - The campaign home pages will provide top level content on why skilled trades are a
             first choice career option and provide preliminary information on the trades. Ultimately it
             will serve as a main landing page to drive traffic to the CAF-FCA and SCC sites, as well
             as other, more robust websites that have comprehensive information on skilled trades,
             by region, sector, etc.
        - Website functionality should have the ability to capture information on visitors by having
             them subscribe to an email newsletter or submit requests for information and support
             tools, such as brochures and posters.
        - During media campaign periods, create a contest on the website that visitors (youth)
             can enter by completing an “educational” quiz or game on skilled trades. This will allow
             the audience to interact with the website and allow contact and profile information to be
             captured.
        - Install web tracking software onto website that will track web visits, repeat visits, pages
             viewed, linkages selected, etc. to monitor use regularly.

Reach:
   The website URL will appear or be referenced in all marketing efforts.
   Reciprocal links will be established with existing youth career websites in order to drive traffic
   to the campaign website
   The website will have the appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by the search engines
   (e.g. Google and Yahoo).

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   27



BROCHURE

Rationale:
▪ Brochure for youth is required to provide top-level information on the benefits of careers in the
    skilled trades.

Strategy:
▪ English and French versions of the brochure will be developed
▪ Design will reflect the images, and creative look and feel of the targeted media ads and other
    support tools
▪ Content will reinforce the key messages for youth and include the following support
    information:
        - Facts that will expand upon and support the key messaging points: How many different
           types of career opportunities are available? Why should I feel proud to work in the
           skilled trades?
        - Are skilled trades right for me? Am I right for the skilled trades? What kinds of qualities,
           interests and skills do I need to work in the skilled trades?
        - General information on “how apprenticeship works” – the training process, timeframe,
           the role of the employer - that will in turn direct them to the campaign website to find
           apprenticeship information relevant to their jurisdiction
        - Case studies or testimonials from people who work in the skilled trades
▪ All will be 4” x 9” vertical size, 4 colour and will open to approximately 16” x 9”
▪ Quantities: 200,000 English; 40,000 French

Distribution:
▪ This brochure will be distributed through the following organizations:
        - Provincial apprenticeship branches;
        - Skills Canada offices and events (including the National Skills Competition in May
            2004);
        - School boards; and,
        - Other partners and events to be leveraged will be identified within the grass roots
            strategy.
▪ For schools, the brochure would be packaged with posters, information booklets and educator
    and parent brochures for distribution to schools on an annual basis.
▪ Brochures would also be available upon request through an order form accessible on the
    campaign website.

Timing:
▪ March 2004 – in advance of the campaign launch
▪ August 2004 – for school distribution. Additional brochures would be printed bi-annually before
    each wave of media advertising begins (February and July of each year) and for distribution to
    schools every fall.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                28


POSTER

Rationale:
▪ At the grass roots level, a campaign poster will reinforce the campaign and provide youth with
    additional exposure through schools, community centres and events.

Strategy:
▪ The poster for youth will be distributed to schools across Canada, youth career centers, and
    other relevant partners and stakeholders. The brochure and additional campaign materials will
    accompany the poster in a kit distributed to educators and other key contacts as required.
▪ Follow up will be conducted with organizations to ensure they have received materials and that
    posters are indeed displayed.
▪ The design of the posters will be in keeping with the creative theme to capture the attention of
    the youth audience. Copy will be direct, bold and contain a simple message that reinforces the
    campaign theme. It will also direct the viewer to the website for further information.
▪ Posters will be 16 x 20 vertical size; 4 colour
▪ Quantities: 10,000 English and 2,000 French

Distribution:
▪ The poster will be distributed through the following organizations:
        - Provincial apprenticeship branches;
        - Skills Canada offices and events (including the National Skills Competition in May
            2004);
        - School boards; and,
        - Other partners and events identified within the grass roots strategy.
▪ For schools, the poster will be packaged with brochures and information booklets for
    distribution to schools on an annual basis.
▪ Posters will also be available upon request through an order form accessible on the campaign
    website.

Timing:
▪ As with all the materials distributed to schools, the poster will be completed by August 2004 for
    distribution as part of an educational resource kit.

INFORMATION BOOKLET

Rationale:
▪ During the creative audit and the first focus group phase of the project, it was noted that a
    comprehensive guide on skilled trades careers would be valuable as a resource that educators
    could distribute to students.
▪ One exemplary practice of an information booklet on skilled trades careers has been
    developed annually by Skills Canada, Ontario. This brochure consists of the following
    components:
       - Information about the value and benefits of careers in the skilled trades including
           content to dispel misperceptions about these careers, steps to an apprenticeship, how
           to talk to one’s parents about skilled trades careers and additional skilled trades
           resources.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 29


        -   Detailed profiles on 30 Skilled trades careers in high demand, from each trade sector
            (Construction, Manufacturing, Service, Transportation and Communication)
        -   Each profile outlines the job description; education prerequisites, training required,
            projected earnings and employment prospects.

Strategy:
▪ If permitted, a skilled trades career information booklet will be developed which uses the
    template and content style of the Skills Ontario booklet that will be customized to the look and
    feel of this campaign.
▪ The effectiveness of the booklet should be assessed on an annual basis, updated and re-
    printed according to feedback, skills shortages/high demand occupations and adjustments to
    apprenticeship guidelines.

Distribution:
▪ This booklet will be distributed along with the campaign poster and brochures to schools
    across Canada and through other grass roots programs during the first year of the project.
▪ The opportunity to print copies of this booklet can be made available to other programs and
    schools.
▪ The demand for this booklet during the first year will determine quantities for future print runs
    and how the booklet would be made available and utilized on a regional basis.

Timing:
▪ August 2004 - Limited copies of the booklet would be printed for the August 2004 campaign
    launch to schools and would be included in other campaign materials. Each school would be
    sent a booklet for their resource centre with an opportunity to order additional copies.

GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ As identified in the strategic framework of the marketing plan, each jurisdiction has unique
    characteristics and needs that must be considered in the campaign strategy.
▪ The national umbrella campaign must facilitate the regional and local delivery of the
    campaign’s messages, which will further enhance the reach of the campaign with all target
    audiences and key stakeholders.
▪ During the research phase, existing programs for youth (and the other target audiences) were
    identified. Each program was developed in a regional context and is relevant to the needs of
    specific audiences and sectors in those regions. It is evident from the research that there are
    many successful existing initiatives and in many cases these could be shared across the
    country. By developing and enhancing existing programs, a “menu” of activities and tools
    would be available to be shared across jurisdictions throughout and beyond the campaign.
    These programs include:
       - In-school presentations and activities
       - Career fairs
       - Youth camps
       - Networking events
       - Training programs
       - Seminars and Workshops
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               30


         - Mentoring programs
         - Skills competitions
▪     The existence of many excellent programs for all target audiences and the identified need for
      the campaign to have a regional reach illustrate that the campaign plan must have an effective
      regional/jurisdictional or “grass roots” delivery strategy.

Guiding Principles:
▪ Based on the main guiding principles for the campaign, the following guidelines govern the
   development of the grassroots approach:
       - Ensure no duplication of existing programming;
       - Utilize existing resources in a cost-effective manner;
       - Ensure the inclusion of all national and jurisdictional stakeholders;
       - Work to enhance dialogue, cooperation and collaboration with these stakeholders;
       - Expand on programs that have been identified as truly relevant and required within
           each jurisdiction; and
       - Utilize exemplary practice principles of existing programs and where possible, replicate
           and share these programs.

Strategy:
▪ Based on the parameters outlined above, the following approach is recommended:

      Stakeholder Consultations
      From January to June 2004, extensive consultations would be held with stakeholders in each
      jurisdiction. The objectives of these consultations will be to:
          - Share the goals and strategy for the national campaign;
          - Share information already gathered on exemplary practice programs from across the
               country;
          - Discuss programming needs and gaps with key stakeholders;
          - Explore opportunities for partnerships with these stakeholders and obtain referrals to
               other key organizations that should be consulted;
          - Identify how existing programs can be adapted nationally and/or in other jurisdictions;
          - Identify costs associated with rights fees, royalties, printing; and
          - Identify a distribution strategy for potential programs.

      The following have been identified as potential organizations for consultations:
         - Directors of Apprenticeship (Ministries of Training/Apprenticeship)
         - Skills Canada regional offices
         - Ministries of Education (if not part of the Ministries of Training/Apprenticeship)
         - Regional offices of Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)
         - Provincial Directorates (representing equity seeking groups)
         - National organizations representing Equity Seeking Groups (e.g. Aboriginal Human
              Resource Council, Canadian Council for Persons with Disabilities, Canadian Rural
              Partnership, National Women’s Reference Group (NWRG) )
         - Business Associations (e.g. Canadian Construction Association, Automotive Industries
              Association, Canadian Association of Manufacturers and Exporters)
         - Canadian School Board Association
         - Association of Canadian Community Colleges
Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   31


      -   Sector Councils
      -   Chambers of Commerce

  Consultation and collaboration with each jurisdiction will begin the process of identifying
  required grass roots programs. Funding for programs in each jurisdiction will be allocated
  based on population ratio from the national budget for grassroots.

  Needs and Gaps Analysis
  Information and input obtained from the consultation process (in addition to information already
  gathered on organizations, existing programs and exemplary practices) will facilitate the
  completion of a needs and gaps analysis on programming for each jurisdiction. This unbiased
  analysis would ensure that required programs are identified in an equitable manner for each
  jurisdiction and would also identify potential delivery organizations and/or mechanisms.

  Required programming
  Based on the needs and gaps analysis, a specific program or programs will be identified for
  possible development and implementation within each jurisdiction. Exemplary programs and
  tools from across Canada will also be identified which may fit the need for that jurisdiction. For
  example, the consultations may conclude that one province would greatly benefit from the
  delivery of in-school presentations on skilled trades to grade 10 students. Based on this
  recommendation, an existing, exemplary in-school presentation for youth being delivered
  elsewhere in the country could be adopted to meet the needs of this jurisdiction. In this case,
  rights for that in-school presentation would have to be retained and the program may also need
  to be customized and modified to reflect the jurisdiction as well as the umbrella campaign’s key
  messages.

  Project Planning
  Based on the needs analysis, gaps analysis and exemplary programs/tools available, the
  consultations will also address the following:
          - Is the originating program developer willing to share the program and have it
              adapted to reflect the national campaign’s messages?
          - Will there be a licensing fee or royalties to be paid for the use of this program?
          - How will the originating program developer be recognized for sharing the program?
          - What resources are needed to implement the program?
          - Once developed, how will the program be distributed and in-serviced throughout
              the jurisdiction?
          - What organization will be responsible for implementing the program?
          - Can the grass roots program be successfully implemented within the budget
              allocation?
          - What is the distribution mechanism or process?

  Based on all of the information generated through the consultations, the national campaign, in
  collaboration with each jurisdiction, will develop a project plan and budget. If desired, the
  jurisdiction or a project sponsor could add additional funding to the project to enhance its
  reach. For example, if the budget allocation for a province permitted the delivery of 25 in-
  school presentations, the jurisdictional body could contribute additional funding to deliver the
  presentation to 50 schools if feasible and desirable.
Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 32



  Promotion of these Programs
  As programs are identified and developed, a toolkit (“menu”) of grass roots initiatives will be
  made available. This toolkit will be promoted on the campaign website and on reciprocal
  websites such as school boards, educator organizations, industry associations, stakeholders,
  etc. Organizations that are interested in developing these programs will be able to download
  an outline of the program from the website. This approach will allow for further promotion of
  existing programs and allow many different groups to utilize the formats or templates of these
  successful programs.

  Annually, during the first week of November, The Canadian Career Consortium promotes
  “Canada Career Week” to encourage independent organizations (schools, sector councils,
  non-profits) across Canada to plan career events, such as symposiums, job fairs, career fairs
  and networking events. Programs like “Take Your Kids to Work Day” and “National Technology
  Week” are organized to coincide with Canada Career Week to capitalize on its established
  momentum, networks, promotional tools and resources. By creating “Skilled Trades Career
  Week” under the umbrella of “Canada Career Week”, existing exemplary programs can be
  promoted and made available to other jurisdictions and partners.

  The following list outlines how “Skilled Trades Career Week” will allow the campaign to
  establish links between grass roots activities and the national skilled trades promotion project
  that will add momentum and substance to the project.
            - Establish “Skilled Trades Career Week” the first week of November 2004.
            - The Alliance of Sector Councils, already a supporter of Canada Career Week,
                could call on its skilled trades members (Construction Sector Council, Canadian
                Automotive Repair and Service Council, etc.) to organize events under the “Skilled
                Trades Career Week” umbrella.
            - Grass roots programs that were developed in partnership with the jurisdictions
                could potentially be implemented during the career week for optimum impact.
            - The new campaign brochures will be ready and delivered to schools and specific
                events for distribution during “Skilled Trades Career Week.”
            - The establishment of the career week will provide an ideal “hook” to create media
                attention around the skilled trades campaign and promote event coverage. In
                addition, selected cities will be asked to have “National Skilled Trades Career
                Week” officially designated by the city mayor for regional emphasis.
            - Pro-active media relation’s activities will also be undertaken such as pitching of
                story ideas on Skilled Trades Career Week events and activities and the use of
                Council of Champions members as spokespersons.

  Evaluation
  Goals and objectives will be established from the outset in order to measure and evaluate the
  effectiveness of the programs. Specific goals and expectations will be established in
  partnership with the jurisdictions. The project will then be reviewed and evaluated upon
  completion and decisions made on the future of the project will be undertaken.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                       33


Reach:
▪ The reach of these programs will be determined by the type of program, target audience and
   budget that will be a result of the implementation of these programs within each jurisdiction.

Timing:
▪ Consultations would be initiated in January 2004 and project development would begin in July
    2004. Projects would be completed within one year of the start of implementation.

The following table illustrates the process and timeline of the grass roots strategy.

                         Stakeholder Consultations                         January to June 30, 2004
                         Needs/Gaps Analysis                               January to June 30, 2004
                          Program Selection                                   By June 30, 2004
                   Program Planning & Implementation                         July to October 2004
                             Program Promotion                                  November 2004
                                  Evaluation                             One year after project completion

Parents Marketing Strategy

Objectives
By the end of the three–year campaign, the desired outcome is for the campaign to have
accomplished the following:

1. Reach parents with high impact, informative messages to broaden their perspective and create
   a level of awareness of the campaign with a 15-20% recall of exposure to the campaign.

2. Begin shifting the current negative attitude that parents have of skilled trades towards an
   improved awareness of the positive aspects of skilled trades and to begin to seek further
   information on skilled trade careers in preparation for discussion with their children. Based on
   a benchmark study to be completed prior to the campaign launch, the objective will be to
   increase by 2-3% the number of parents who view skilled trades in a more positive light each
   year over the three-year campaign to achieve a total shift in attitudes of 6-9% at the end of the
   campaign.

Rationale for Objectives
1. The objectives are based on campaign evaluation standards used by Ipsos-Reid to evaluate
   social marketing campaigns. These targets are based on the use of a combination of
   advertising tactics (television, radio and print) and the anticipated reach/Gross Rating Points
   (GRPs) for each audience.

2. The objective to shift attitudes by 6-9% at the end of the campaign is considered reasonable
   based on past evaluations conducted by Ipsos-Reid.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                     34


Marketing Considerations
Print advertising will be a focal point in the campaign to reach parents as it provides an opportunity
to deliver more detailed and supporting facts to the campaign’s key messages. Parents must be
approached on both emotional and rational levels about careers in the skilled trades. Parents want
what is best for their children and at this point in time, parents don’t think skilled trades careers will
offer the kind of future they want for their child. The rational messages will provide the supporting
information about why skilled trades are a great idea and show job potential and how
apprenticeship training works.

Key Messages for Parents:
The following key messages will be incorporated into the creative elements of the campaign for
parents:

▪     Skilled trades careers are professional careers that are worthwhile and valued in society
▪     Skilled trades careers offer the opportunity for their children to earn above average salary and
      may be a platform for starting their own business (entrepreneurship)
▪     Skilled trades careers are in demand - employment prospects are good and secure
▪     Skilled trades careers can provide their children with a very satisfying career and a great
      quality of life
▪     Education for a skilled trade career is cost-effective. Apprenticeship training costs less than
      university and provides an opportunity to learn and earn at the same time.
▪     Apprenticeship training programs are a viable post-secondary education pathway

Marketing Approach
Targeted media advertising is also required to reach parents effectively. However, since there will
be a spillover effect from the targeted media advertising for youth, additional targeted media
advertising that is more informational and detailed in nature, will be developed for parents. In
addition, the extensive media relations campaign developed for the project will include key
messages exclusively for parents.

Based on this approach, the following targeted media tactics will be used to reach parents:

▪     Print advertising
▪     Television (spillover)
▪     Radio (spillover)
▪     Cinema (spillover)
▪     Media Relations
▪     Website
▪     Brochures
▪     Grass Roots

Projected Impact of Targeted Advertising for Parents
The following chart represents the percentage of parents who will be reached through the targeted
advertising per medium, the frequency at which they will be reached and the number of
impressions that will be created through the advertising buys.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                              35




Adults                                Reach          Frequency           Impressions (000)

Television                               60%                    7                  n/a
Radio (spill)                            28%                   15                  n/a
Cinema                                    n/a                  n/a                5,756
Magazines                                45%                    4                 9,597



PRINT ADVERTISING

Rationale:
▪ Print advertising provides an opportunity to deliver more detailed information to parents about
    the positive attributes of the skilled trades and to provide them with references for further
    information.
▪ Magazine advertising is a complimentary medium to television and will deliver the support
    messages from the television ads.
▪ Magazines reach the low quintile television viewer (those who watch little television).
▪ PMB research indicates that 75% of adults over 35 looked at a magazine the previous day.

Strategy:
▪ Select National monthly magazines, to reach parents such as:
       - Chatelaine
       - Canadian Living
       - MacLeans (Spring and Fall and special University Guide issue)
       - L’Actualité (Spring and Fall)
▪ These magazines are the top magazines (based on PMB data) for parents

Reach, Frequency and Annual Ad Buy
▪ 42% reach, Frequency of 6 with 8,181 impressions
▪ Full page, 4 colour ads


Timing:
▪ Spring 2004
▪ November 2004

TELEVISION

Rationale:
▪ The television and media advertising implemented for youth will also reach parents. As noted
    in the youth section, the selected programs on specialty networks are among the most highly
    viewed programs for youth and for parents.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   36


Strategy:
▪ The creative direction of the campaign, in particular the television advertising, includes and
    speaks to the key messages required to reach parents on perceptions of skilled trades.
▪ The television advertising that includes parents will also be reflected in the print advertising for
    parents.

Frequency, Reach and Ad Buy:
▪ 2 campaigns per year of 4 weeks each (rolled into the campaign for youth)
▪ 60% Reach with a Frequency of 7

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (4 weeks)
▪ Mid-September to Mid-October (4 weeks)

RADIO

Rationale:
▪ Radio is the complementary medium to television and therefore it is reasonable that if spillover
    reach is achieved for parents through the television advertising, a similar spillover will be
    achieved for parents in the radio advertising.

Strategy:
▪ Specific radio ads for parents will not be developed. The ads developed for youth are the same
    ads that will also reach parents.
▪ The detailed radio strategy is outlined in the marketing strategy for youth.

Frequency and Annual Ad Buy:
▪ 2 flights; 6 weeks each

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (6 weeks)
▪ Mid-September to October (6 weeks)

CINEMA

Rationale:
▪ There is an opportunity through cinema advertising to reach parents in the spillover from
    advertising selected to reach the youth audience.

Strategy:
▪ As outlined in the youth strategy, the television advertising spots will be used for the cinema
    advertisements. Therefore, there will be an opportunity to develop the television ad that
    includes parents into the cinema ads.

Frequency, Reach and Annual Ad Buy:
▪ 2 flights, four weeks each
▪ Advertising in 466 Famous Players theatres across Canada
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    37


Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 (4 weeks)
▪ Mid-September to mid-October (4 weeks)


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ As heavy consumers of print media, parents will be significantly reached through an effective
    media relations campaign. Throughout the campaign, media relations activities will be
    undertaken to generate awareness about skills shortage, combat misperceptions about
    careers in the skilled trades and promote events and activities. The media relations strategy
    will provide the necessary support for the advertising component of the campaign and serve to
    educate parents about skilled trades careers.

Strategy:
▪ Official Campaign Launch Event in Spring 2004
    - To kick off the campaign, a news conference will be held to make all target audiences
         aware of the importance and need to promote skilled trades given the current situation of
         negative perceptions and pending shortages. The launch will highlight the campaign
         objectives and plans going forward, introduce the campaign leaders, CAF-FCA and SCC,
         key champions and spokespeople, and reveal the campaign creative.
    - In addition to having various dignitaries (including the Human Resources Minister) and
         senior representation from various organizations from skilled trades attend the launch,
         other attendees would include youth from an area high school, parents of youth, educators
         and industry. The involvement of all target audiences will demonstrate the broad reach and
         relevance of the campaign.
    - An aspect of the launch would focus on introducing youth spokespersons that can share
         their success stories.
    - Activities could be planned that will involve demonstrating or profiling specific trades in
         demand and the value of these trades to our society and to the professionals who work in
         them.
    - Ensure there are kiosks/computer terminals for attendees to surf the website.
    - Media kits containing a news release, fact sheets and brochures will be prepared for the
         launch. It is critical that the key messages in the media kit specifically work to address and
         dispel the misperceptions that parents have about the trades and outline the rational
         benefits (high demand jobs, good pay, cost-effective investment for education) for
         exploring the skilled trades.
    - In addition, fact sheets for each jurisdiction would also be developed and distributed so
         that the relevant issues for each are addressed to regional and national media.
    - Involve the Provincial Apprenticeship branches and Skills Canada offices to distribute kits
         and liaise with their media contacts in their jurisdictions.
▪ On-going and pro-active media relations during key periods of career decision making activity,
    such as back-to-school, Canada Career Week, school course selection (February to April) that
    includes posting of news releases on newswires to reach mainstream media and on the
    Canadian Community Newspaper Association website to reach regional media. News releases
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  38


      would focus on growth areas in skilled trades sectors and projected demand for skilled trades
      occupations.
▪     Develop story ideas specifically targeted at parents and pitch them to parent magazines and
      newspapers generally. These pitches could profile “success and human interest stories” that
      would involve parents and their children. Additional stories would also revolve around current
      skills shortage or growth data and new training programs.
▪     Organize editorial board visits by campaign spokespersons to build relationships with news
      organizations and career editors, deliver the campaign’s key messages, and pitch story ideas
      related to parents.
▪     Schedule television interviews and local radio interviews by campaign spokespersons.
▪     Establish media partnerships to generate on-going media coverage and highlight campaign
      messages
▪     Create a media section for the website to post facts, news releases, etc.
▪     Ensure media coverage of campaign activities is tracked and analyzed (by region, publications,
      etc.) bi-annually to determine value and effectiveness of media relations.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.

Support Tactics and Programs
WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ As outlined in the website strategy for youth, a campaign website is required that consistently
    reflects the creative messages and imagery of the other campaign elements. This site will also
    be the key reference point for parents to seek out more information on why skilled trades may
    be a viable career option for their children.

Strategy:
▪ The website will have a parent’s page with specific content development that can be linked
    from the main landing page.
▪ The campaign website will provide top level content on the positive attributes of the skilled
    trades, the diversity of options and why skilled trades may be a viable option. Ultimately, it will
    serve as a main landing page to encourage parents to enter other, more robust websites that
    have comprehensive information on skilled trades, by region, sector, etc.
▪ The website architecture and design will seamlessly incorporate existing skilled trades
    information currently available by providing the appropriate links and incorporating existing
    databases or infrastructure directly into the website. For example the CAF-FCA Inventory
    website, SCC and HRDC career content for parents will be incorporated or linked from the
    campaign site where appropriate.
▪ Website functionality should have the ability to capture information and profiles of visitors by
    having them subscribe to an email newsletter, or in submitting requests for information.
▪ Install web tracking software onto website that will track web visits, repeat visits, pages viewed,
    linkages selected, etc. to monitor use regularly.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    39


Reach:
▪ The website URL will appear or be referenced in all marketing efforts for parents.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing youth career websites in order to drive traffic
   to the campaign website.
▪ The website will have the appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by the search engines.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch.
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.


BROCHURE

Rationale:
▪ A brochure for parents is required to support the media campaign at the grass roots level.

Strategy:
▪ English and French versions of the brochure will be developed.
▪ Design will reflect the images, and creative look and feel of the parent ads and other support
    tools.
▪ Content will reinforce the key messages with following supporting information:
       - Facts that will expand upon and support the key messaging points: How many different
           types of career opportunities are available? How much does training cost and what are
           the job prospects when training is completed?
       - Are skilled trades right for my child? Is my child right for the skilled trades? What kinds
           of qualities, interests and skills are needed to work in the skilled trades?
       - General information on “how apprenticeship works” – the training process, timeframe,
           the role of the employer - that will in turn direct them to the campaign website to find
           apprenticeship information relevant to their jurisdiction.
       - Case studies or testimonials from people who work in the skilled trades.
▪ All will be 4” x 9” vertical size, 4 colour and will open to approximately 16” x 9”.
▪ Quantities: 100,000 English; 20,000 French.

Distribution:
▪ This brochure will be distributed through the following organizations:
        - Provincial apprenticeship branches;
        - Skills Canada offices and events (including the National Skills Competition, May 2004);
        - School boards; and,
        - Other partners and events to be leveraged will be identified within the grass roots
            strategy.
▪ In August 2004 (and the fall of subsequent years), the brochure will be packaged with posters,
    information booklets and youth and educator brochures for distribution to schools.
▪ Brochures would also be available upon request through an order form accessible on the
    campaign website.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  40


Timing:
▪ March 2004 – in advance of the campaign launch.
▪ August 2004 – for school distribution. Additional brochures would be printed bi-annually before
    each wave of media advertising begins (February and July of each year) and for distribution to
    schools every fall.

GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ The targeted advertising campaign requires supporting grass roots programs for parents to
    provide local delivery of the campaign’s key messages.
▪ Existing grass roots programs for parents were identified in the research phase. Every program
    has been developed to be relevant to regional, sectoral or audience needs. The types of
    programs that are relevant for parents are:
       - Career fairs that they may attend with their children in mind
       - Presentations on skilled trades careers that would be delivered at parent teacher
           related events.

Strategy:
▪ Parent-oriented programs and activities will be developed under the umbrella of the grass roots
    framework outlined in the youth section.
▪ Since a number of programs for parents already exist, the consultation process may determine
    that some of these programs should be enhanced and shared as part of the national grass
    roots strategy
▪ The regional programs will also be promoted through reciprocal links with the websites of
    school boards, educator organizations and industry groups and on an on-going basis through
    the campaign website. As programs are developed, the “menu” of grass roots initiatives will be
    shared via the website. Organizations that are interested in developing these programs can
    download a user’s guide and outline of the program from the website. This approach will allow
    for further promotion of existing programs and allow many different groups to utilize the formats
    or templates of these successful programs.

Reach:
▪ As grass roots programs will be implemented within each jurisdiction, the type of program, the
   organizations involved, the target audience and the budget, will determine the reach of the
   programs.

Timing:
▪ As outlined previously, the development of various grass roots programs will begin in July
    2004.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    41


Educators and Guidance Counsellors Marketing Strategy

Objectives
By the end of the three-year campaign, the desired outcome is for the campaign to have
accomplished the following:

1. Reach educators and guidance counsellors with high impact, informative messages to change
   their current negative perception of skilled trades and broaden their interest to contemplate
   skilled trades as a career option for their students, creating a level of awareness of the
   campaign with a 15-20% recall of exposure to the campaign.

2. Begin shifting the current negative perception of the skilled trades within educators and
   counsellors toward a more positive perspective that would include better knowledge of the
   diversity of options, the positive attributes and benefits of the skilled trades sector. Based on a
   benchmark study to be completed prior to the campaign launch, the objective would be to
   increase by 2-3% the number of educators who would advocate a career in the skilled trades
   as a viable option for students each year over the three-year campaign to achieve a total shift
   in attitudes of 6-9% at the end of the campaign.

Rationale for Objectives
1. The objectives are based on campaign evaluation standards used by Ipsos-Reid to evaluate
   social marketing campaigns. These targets are based on the use of a combination of
   advertising tactics (television, radio and print) and the anticipated reach/Gross Rating Points
   (GRPs) for each audience.

2. The objective to shift attitudes by 6-9% at the end of the campaign is considered reasonable
   based on past evaluations conducted by Ipsos-Reid.

Marketing Considerations
Similar to parents, educators/counsellors will be provided with in-depth messages through targeted
advertising and supporting tools and programs to broaden and enrich their perspective of the
skilled trades. Research has indicated that many educators lack the time, due to a heavy workload,
to fully explore all of the career opportunities that they can make available to students. Research
has also indicated that educators lack direct and easy access to career resources for students, as
well as tools for different audiences (women, Aboriginals, visible minorities and persons with
disabilities) and different trade sectors. Educators noted that if they were provided with better
information tools and opportunities to present this information, they would be more inclined to
share it with their students. The creative approach toward educators must demonstrate why skilled
trades and apprenticeship pathways are as valuable as university or college, what is involved from
an education and training standpoint, and how diverse the career options are within skilled trades.
By giving skilled trades careers more credibility and “raising the bar”, these careers will more likely
be endorsed by educators.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   42


Key Messages for Educators and Guidance Counsellors

The following key messages will be incorporated into the campaign for educators and guidance
counsellors:

▪     Skilled Trade careers are worthwhile and valued in society
▪     Apprenticeship training programs are a viable post-secondary education pathway
▪     Skilled trade careers are in demand – they have good employment prospects
▪     Education expectations for entering a skilled trade are high –technology skills are a must
▪     Students can earn a good living
▪     Show the diverse career opportunities involved in the skilled trades and illustrate what a skilled
      tradesperson does
▪     There is information and support available for educators who want to expose their students to
      skilled trades as a career option

Marketing Approach

Based on this approach, the following targeted advertising tactics will be used to reach
educator/counsellors:
▪ Print advertising in Educator publications
▪ Television (spillover)
▪ Cinema (spillover)
▪ Media Relations
▪ Website
▪ Brochures
▪ Grass roots

PRINT ADVERTISING

Rationale:
▪ Advertising in a select magazine for educators is a highly targeted way of reaching this
    audience.
▪ Magazine advertising is a complimentary medium to television and will deliver the support
    points to the television ads.
▪ Magazines reach the low quintile television viewer
▪ PMB research indicates that 75% of adults over 35 looked at a magazine the previous day.

Strategy:
▪ Advertising in “TEACH” magazine
       - Largest national magazine that reaches the K-12 and school board market
       - Published 5 times per year

Readership and Annual Ad Buy
▪ 88,000 readers
▪ 3 times per year
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  43


Timing:
▪ Purchase Full Page, 4 colour ads
▪ September/October 2004
▪ January/February 2005


TELEVISION AND CINEMA (SPILLOVER)

▪     As with parents, educators will also be reached by the television and cinema advertising for
      youth.


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ A media relations campaign targeting educators/counsellors will also be an important part of
    the overall strategy to reach educators about skilled trades issues. Like the parent
    demographic, educators are newspaper and magazine readers and are likely to be intrigued by
    human-interest stories related to the skilled trades.

Strategy:
▪ A media launch event will kick off the campaign and will be supported by additional media
    relations activities targeted at educators throughout the three-year campaign as detailed
    below. After the launch, editorial board visits and media interviews will occur followed by the
    regular dissemination of news releases on up-coming regional events and skills shortage
    issues and as well as the distribution of stories on skilled trades career issues.

Communication activities:
Official Campaign Launch Event in Spring 2004
         - As outlined earlier, a media launch will be held to officially kick of the campaign.
         - Support media relations articles specifically for the education trade publications will be
             prepared and sent to these media to complement the media launch, i.e. Teach
             magazine.
         - Media kits tailored for the educational oriented media and related trade media
             containing a news release, fact sheets and brochures will be prepared for distribution. It
             is critical that the key messages in the media kit specifically work to address and dispel
             the misperceptions that educators will have about the trades and focus on the
             resources and linkages being made available through the national campaign.
▪ On-going and pro-active media relations, such as posting of news releases on newswires to
     reach mainstream media and on the Canadian Community Newspaper Association website to
     reach regional media.
▪ Develop story ideas specifically involving educators and educational experts and pitch them to
     various related publications and magazines. These pitches could profile “success stories” that
     involve educators/counsellors and their students. Additional stories will also revolve around
     what educators are doing to prepare for the pending skills shortage or growth data and new
     training programs.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 44


▪     Editorial board visits by key campaign spokespersons (high profile educator) with select editors
      will create an opportunity to develop a relationship with these news organizations and deliver
      the campaign’s main key messages and pitch story ideas.
▪     Schedule television interviews and local radio interviews by key note educators/counsellors.
▪     A media section of the website will also be developed to post news releases, etc. for this
      audience.
▪     Media tracking: Ensure media coverage of campaign activities is tracked and analyzed (by
      region, publications, etc.) bi-annually to determine value and effectiveness of media relations.

Timing
▪ Spring 2004 and continuing throughout the campaign.


Support Tools and Programs

WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ A campaign website is required that consistently reflects the creative messages and imagery of
    the other campaign elements (television ads, posters, brochures) but tailored for
    educators/counsellors. This site will also be the key reference point for educators to seek out
    more detailed information on why skilled trades should be considered for their students.

Strategy:
▪ The website will have an educators’ page with specific content development that can be linked
    from the main landing page.
▪ The campaign website will provide top level content on why skilled trades are a first choice
    career option and provide preliminary information on the trades. Ultimately, it will serve as a
    main landing page to encourage further exploration of other, more robust websites that have
    comprehensive information on skilled trades, by region, sector, etc.
▪ The website architecture and design will seamlessly incorporate existing skilled trades
    information currently available by providing the appropriate links and incorporating existing
    databases or infrastructure directly into the website. For example, the CAF-FCA Inventory
    website, SCC and HRDC career content for parents will be incorporated or linked from the
    campaign site where appropriate.
▪ Also, a comprehensive list of skilled trades career resources such as school presentations,
    videos, CD ROMs, educator kits developed by sector councils and career guides will be listed
    on the website.
▪ The website will also have an on-line order form through which educators can order campaign
    brochures, posters and booklets as required.
▪ Website functionality should have the ability to capture information on visitors by having them
    subscribe to an email newsletter, or in submitting requests for information.
▪ Install web tracking software onto website that will track web visits, repeat visits, pages viewed,
    linkages selected, etc. to monitor use regularly.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    45


Reach:
▪ The website URL will appear or be referenced in all advertising for educators/counsellors.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing sites for educators to drive traffic to the
   campaign website.
▪ The website will have the appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by the search engines.

Timing:
▪ Late March 2004 to coincide with campaign launch.
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.

BROCHURE

Rationale:
▪ Brochure for educators/counsellors is required to provide an overview of the issue and identify
    their key role and responsibility and reference them to the campaign and further information.

Strategy:
▪ This brochure will be distributed through grass roots programs/events, provincial
    apprenticeship branches, schools and other partners. For schools, the brochure would be
    packaged with posters, information booklets and other relevant materials for distribution each
    fall.
▪ English and French versions of the brochure will be developed.
▪ Design will reflect the images, and creative look and feel of the targeted advertising ads,
    specifically, the print ad for educators/counsellors.
▪ Content will reinforce the key messages for educators/counsellors with following support
    information:
         - Facts that will expand upon and support the key messaging points: diversity of skilled
            trade career opportunities; positive attributes of skilled trades; careers in demand; and
            educational courses required and features highlighting job prospects. An apprentice
            and employer testimonial will also be included.
         - What kinds of qualities, interests and skills are needed to work in the skilled trades?
         - General information on “how apprenticeship works” – the training process, timeframe,
            the role of the employer - that will in turn direct them to the campaign website to find
            apprenticeship information relevant to their jurisdiction
         - A recommendation to explore provincial youth apprenticeship programs and how to
            make these programs available to students
         - Case studies or testimonials from people who work in the skilled trades
▪ Most importantly, the educator brochure will contain a list of career resources such as skilled
    trades school presentations, videos, websites, educator guides, etc. that have been developed
    by educators, sector councils and jurisdictional programs across Canada. This will provide
    educators/counsellors with a comprehensive list of the many excellent resources available and
    make it easier for them to present more career options and information to their students.
▪ All will be 4” x 9” vertical size, 4 colour and will open to approximately 16” x 9”
▪ Quantities: 20,000 English; 4,000 French
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                46


Distribution:
▪ This brochure will be distributed through the following organizations:
        - Provincial apprenticeship branches;
        - Skills Canada offices and events (including the National Skills Competition in May
            2004);
        - School boards; and,
        - Other partners and events identified within the grass roots strategy.
▪ In August 2004 (and the fall of subsequent years), the brochure will be packaged with posters,
    information booklets and youth and parents brochures for distribution to schools.
▪ Brochures will also be available upon request through an order form accessible on the
    campaign website.

Timing:
▪ March 2004 – in advance of the campaign launch.
▪ August 2004 – for school distribution. Additional brochures will be printed bi-annually before
    each wave of media advertising begins (February and July of each year) and for distribution to
    schools every fall.


GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ Educators/counsellors will figure significantly in the grass roots programs developed for the
    overall campaign, as the primary target audience is students, aged 13 to 18.
▪ Existing grass roots programs for educators were identified in the research phase. The types of
    current programs that would be relevant for educators are:
       - Career fairs that they would attend with their students
       - Presentations for educators (on career development days)
       - Presentations delivered at educator symposiums

Strategy:
▪ The development of educator programs will be determined under the umbrella of the grass
    roots framework outlined in the youth section. Existing programs can be identified in the
    consultations that will enable the expansion or further development of these initiatives within
    the national campaign.
▪ Additional promotions will be provided for the grass roots programs through the print
    advertising planned in the issues of “TEACH” magazine. The advertisements could reference
    Skilled Trades Career Week during Canada Career Week and encourage educators to
    become involved by organizing their own events, or attending existing events with their
    students.
▪ Educator events/symposiums: It will be important for national campaign representatives to
    attend and distribute information at symposiums or events for educators. One such conference
    is NATCON/CONAT (National Consultation on Career Development). This is an event, which
    examines career development, and innovation practices for educators. Held in Ottawa and
    organized by the Canada Career Consortium, over 1200 delegates and 150 speakers attend
    this event annually. At this conference, keynote presentations, brochures, and information for
    educators and existing grass roots practices could be shared with attendees.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                            47


Reach:
▪ As grass roots programs will be implemented within each jurisdiction, the type of program,
   organizations involved, target audience and budget will determine the reach of the programs.

Timing:
▪ As outlined previously, the development of various grass roots programs will begin in July
    2004.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                48


Employer Marketing Strategy

Objectives
By the end of the three-year campaign, the desired outcome for employers is to have
accomplished the following:

1. Reach employers to create a level of awareness of the campaign with a 15-20% recall of
   exposure to the campaign.

2. Engage employers as spokespeople and advocates for this campaign to promote skilled trades
   by utilizing campaign materials in their internal and public communications, displaying
   campaign posters, and in some cases, seeking corporations to undertake or provide
   advertising that serves the campaign mandate.

Rationale for Objectives
1. The objectives are based on campaign evaluation standards used by Ipsos-Reid to evaluate
   social marketing campaigns. These targets are based on the use of a combination of
   advertising tactics (television, radio and print) and the anticipated reach/Gross Rating Points
   (GRPs) for each audience.

2. At regular intervals throughout the campaign, the participation of employers in various aspects
   of the campaign will be reviewed and evaluated to determine where greater focus and attention
   may be required in engaging employers.


Marketing Considerations

Central to the success of the campaign is the engagement of employers and industry stakeholders.
As outlined in the campaign goals, the employer community must be encouraged to provide
sustainable apprenticeship training opportunities for people entering the skilled trades. The
employer audience is incredibly diverse: specific characteristics of small and medium sized
business to large corporations must be considered in addition to the sectoral and jurisdictional
issues faced by these business. To effectively market to employers, the following must be
considered:

▪     Employers must be approached with the rational and business benefits of training apprentices.
▪     The information delivered must be credible and realistic. Use statistical information and
      testimonials or endorsements from other employers.
▪     Communication should explain that apprenticeship participation will contribute to their
      business’ bottom line, and explain how and what they need to do to make this happen.
▪     Human resource issues are only one of many business challenges that employers face. There
      is often only one opportunity to get their attention and make apprenticeships worth considering
      for their business.
▪     Employers have limited time, therefore develop simple, straight forward and easy to read and
      understand materials. Identify what they can do and focus on quality not quantity.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  49


▪     Focus campaign on audiences with greatest opportunity to impact – determine areas with the
      highest skilled trade demand and work with those employers first.
▪     We must be cognizant that many employers are not advocates even for their own profession
▪     Campaign will consider differences related to communicating with large corporations and small
      businesses.
▪     Campaign will be flexible and reflect regional, sectoral and jurisdictional issues and needs.
▪     The diversity of employer audiences and numerous marketing considerations demands a
      creative campaign that is somewhat generic, but with the flexibility for adaptation throughout
      the campaign. It also must focus on precise and direct messaging to clearly demonstrate the
      value and benefits (ROI) of apprenticeship programs to employers.

Key Messages for Employers

Based on the umbrella messages and repositioning strategy, the following key messages will be
incorporated into the campaign elements targeting employers:

▪     Training apprentices will enhance your business performance – profitability and
      competitiveness
▪     Training apprentices will allow you to train future employees to your specifications
▪     Better trained workforce in place means better quality work, productivity, fewer skills shortages
      in the future
▪     Tools and resources are readily available to get started on an apprenticeship program

Marketing Approach

Based on this approach, the following targeted advertising tactics will be used to reach employers:

▪     Print advertising in selected trade publications
▪     Council of Champions
▪     Media Relations
▪     Website
▪     Apprenticeship Tool Kit
▪     Brochure
▪     Direct Mail/Email
▪     Employer Recognition Program
▪     Targeted advertising campaign (spillover)

PRINT ADVERTISING IN SELECTED TRADE PUBLICATIONS

Rationale:
▪ Print advertising in business trade publications is an excellent way to reach employers as it can
    be selected by sector with trades in top demand.
▪ Magazine advertising is a complimentary medium to television and will deliver the support
    points to the television ads.
▪ Magazines reach the low quintile television viewer.
▪ PMB research indicates that 75% of adults over 35 looked at a magazine the previous day.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                    50


Strategy:
▪ Select English and French National Trade Magazines
       - The most relevant trades publications with be selected based on research of the top
          trades in demand and in consultation with the client.
▪ Full page, 4 colour ads will be developed.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004
▪ October 2004


COUNCIL OF CHAMPIONS

Rationale:
▪ The establishment of the “Council of Champions” will be the cornerstone to achieve a number
    of objectives:
        - Identify and engage key spokespeople for the campaign;
        - Begin the process to create more advocates for the skilled trades;
        - Encourage and engage all sectors to participate in the campaign;
        - Identify potential private sector partners to support the advertising campaign; and
        - Inspire all target audiences to view the skilled trades more positively

Strategy:
▪ The Council will be comprised of high profile national, jurisdictional and regional
    representatives such as employers, business/labour representatives and youth, parent and
    educator spokespersons. These individuals will represent all skilled trades industry sectors and
    will be selected in consultations with key stakeholders/jurisdictions.
▪ Members will be spokespersons for the campaign and, if needed, will receive some media
    training.
▪ Potential Council members will be identified through linkages and consultations with
    organizations with each jurisdiction. Further, an information package on the campaign and a
    questionnaire will be developed for potential members that will allow them to identify the role
    they can play and outline specific areas and activities in which they may like to contribute.
    Participation in the Council will be very flexible and will allow different levels of engagement in
    the campaign depending on their availability. For example, some individuals may wish to lend
    their name to publicly to endorse the campaign and others may want to be more active in
    participating in certain programs.
▪ Council of Champions members will be asked to participate for a minimum of one year and
    preferably for three years.
▪ A brief PowerPoint presentation and speaking notes will be developed and customized for
    industry, parents, educators and youth for members of the Council of Champions to deliver at
    select events.
▪ Council of Champions members will be encouraged to deliver the presentation as frequently as
    they can over the course of the campaign period to reach the various target audiences
    consistently.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 51


▪     The employer members of the council will be recognized publicly as leaders who support the
      skilled trades promotion project and whose role is to help change the perception of the skilled
      trades.
▪     A presentation will be developed for employers that will introduce the campaign and its goals.
      It will also explain the business benefits of apprenticeship and introduce the Apprenticeship
      Tool Kit for employers (explained in detail under Support Tools for Employers). Presentations
      will be made at industry, union, labor and business events held by national, regional and sector
      organizations.
▪     Council of Champions will be asked to provide testimonials to be used in the advertising
      campaign to employers, as well as act in an advocacy role for other relevant promotional
      materials and activities.
▪     The Council will also assist with the Partnership Strategy by leveraging key contacts with all
      levels of stakeholders, including the business community.

Reach:
▪ Council of Champions members will be identified from various jurisdictions and sectors. As the
   campaign progresses and more champions and partners are identified, the reach and roles of
   the Council of Champions will expand throughout the campaign.

Timing:
▪ Identification of potential Council Members would begin in the first quarter of 2004.


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ On-going media relations directed at employers will be pivotal to support and sustain the
    credibility of the issue and the campaign itself while establishing a call to action for this
    audience.

Strategy:
▪ The Campaign launch will include the introduction of the members of the Skilled Trades
    Council of Champions and their role in the campaign. This will immediately signal that all
    aspects of the sector are engaged in a cohesive integrated approach.
▪ In the media kits for the campaign, the Council of Champions will be highlighted and will profile
    the leaders who have joined the Council.
▪ Members of the Council of Champions will also act, where appropriate, as media
    spokespersons for the campaign. This will allow the Council members to speak to their
    regional or trade media about specific issues pertaining to their sector and give more relevance
    to the campaign issues.
▪ A news release will be sent to select employers and employer organizations about the Council
    of Champions and their role in changing the current negative attitudes regarding skilled trades.
▪ As relevant information becomes available, news releases will be developed to highlight
    growth in various trade sectors and high demand occupations in skilled trades.
▪ Story ideas on “success stories” of businesses that hire and train apprentices will be pitched to
    business editors of national and local newspapers and editors of trade publications.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               52


▪     The cooperation of jurisdictional and regional stakeholders will be necessary to help
      disseminate information to local media and trade publications and provide opportunities to
      promote regional story ideas.
▪     Media interviews with companies that train apprentices can also be organized that will include
      interviews with employers and apprentices.

Reach:
▪ The media relation’s strategy will be implemented to include national, provincial, regional and
   sector specific media outlets to capitalize on opportunities to reach the maximum number of
   communities and target audiences.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.


APPRENTICESHIP TOOL KIT

Rationale:
▪ In the research, one of the key barriers to employer participation is the lack of information on
    various aspects of apprenticeship. Many employers indicated that while they may understand
    why apprenticeships should be beneficial to their business, they do not know how to effectively
    integrate apprenticeship training practices and procedures into their business. Employers
    require tools that will guide them through the apprenticeship process with the apprentice,
    government and within their own company.

Strategy:
▪ Using information and key messages from existing programs such as, CAF/FCA’s “Making It
    Work” brochure, “RAP for employers” brochure (Alberta Learning) and the “Communicator’s
    Tool Kit” (Alberta Learning) would be produced as part of a Toolkit for employers.
▪ The kit would be developed in consultation with the apprenticeship branches in each
    jurisdiction, employers and sector councils and would comprise a presentation, brochure, fact
    sheets on how to make apprenticeship work in a business, best practice training programs and
    partnerships that have worked for other companies, where to find other resources and how to
    become involved in apprenticeship.
▪ This kit would be utilized by sector councils, apprenticeship branches, training boards and
    other organizations to deliver to employers;
▪ The tool kit would be designed to be flexible and adaptable by various sectors to suit specific
    needs.

Distribution:
    The presentation and distribution of the materials could be delivered by individuals working
    directly with employers on apprenticeship, such as training consultants at apprenticeship
    branches.


Timing:
▪ Begin development in July 2004 for completion Fall 2004
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                              53



BROCHURE

Rationale:
▪ As outlined in the marketing considerations and key messages for employers, there are a
    number of issues and factors that will impact communication to employers. Employer
    brochures are important communication tools to identify the issue, introduce the campaign and
    what it is designed to do, explain how employers can get involved, and identify further
    resources and references.

Strategy:
▪ The brochure content will be based on key messages as determined by the research.
▪ The inclusion of testimonials by Council of Champions members will provide credibility to the
    brochure.
▪ There will be one “generic” brochure developed for employers, which will also be adapted in
    subsequent years of the campaign.
▪ There will also be 5 “specific” employer brochures, which will be developed for specific trades
    based on criteria that will reflect trade demands and jurisdictional input.
▪ All will be 4”x 9” vertical size, 4 colour and will open to approximately 16”x 9”
▪ Quantities: 50,000 English; 10,000 French

Distribution:
▪ The brochure will be distributed by organizations that work directly with employers and would
    accompany the presentation to these employers.
▪ The brochure could also be distributed via direct mail through business organizations and be
    accompanied by a letter from a member of the Council of Champions.

Timing:
▪ Development through July 2004 for completion Fall 2004.


DIRECT MAIL/E-MAIL

Rationale:
▪ Every effort must be made to establish a broad reach throughout the national skilled trades
    business community. By “piggy backing” on the existing distribution channels of established
    industry associations, the campaign will be able to deliver information on skilled trades and
    apprenticeship to employers on a cost-effective basis.

Strategy:
▪ A mailing to employers included in an established newsletter by a business organization (such
    as a sector council or training board) would be a good way to introduce the campaign,
    supplement advertising in trade publications and media coverage of the establishment of the
    Council of Champions. Working with business organizations to contact their members is a
    cost-effective and targeted way of reaching the employer audience.
▪ The mailing will include the campaign brochure for employers as well as a letter signed by a
    member (depending on trade target) of the Council of Champions.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 54


▪     E-mail newsletters will also be developed, where appropriate, for distribution through partner
      organizations’ mailing lists.

Distribution:
▪ As outlined in the strategy, the direct mail and email correspondence to industry and key
    stakeholders will be included in existing direct mail programs of sector councils and key
    industry organizations.

Timing:
▪ Fall 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign as relationships are established with various
    organizations.


WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ As identified throughout this document, a core destination point is required for all target
    audiences in the campaign. As employers are being addressed and reached through a variety
    of tactics, the website provides a central location for further information and reference
    materials.

Strategy:
▪ The website will have an employer page with specific content development that can be linked
    from the main landing page.
▪ The campaign website will provide top level content, from the positive attributes of the skilled
    trades as a career option to apprenticeship training as a valuable business decision.
    Ultimately, it will serve as a main landing page to drive traffic to other, more robust websites
    that have comprehensive information on skilled trades, by region, sector, etc.
▪ The website architecture and design will seamlessly incorporate existing skilled trades
    information currently available on skilled trades by providing the appropriate links and
    incorporating existing databases or infrastructure directly into the website. For example, the
    CAF-FCA Inventory website, SCC and HRDC career content for employers will be incorporated
    or linked from the campaign site where appropriate.
▪ The website will include on-line order forms through which industry organizations can request
    brochures, the apprenticeship tool kits or presentations.
▪ The involvement of the Council of Champions will also figure prominently in the employer
    section of the website.
▪ A section of the campaign website will be dedicated to information on participation in
    apprenticeship and links to organizations that can provide supporting information.

Reach:
▪ The website URL will appear or be referenced in all advertising for employers
▪ Reciprocal links will also be established with apprenticeship/Ministry websites, provincial
   association websites, sector councils and trade association sites.
▪ The website will have the appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by the search engines
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                55


Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch.


EMPLOYER RECOGNITION PROGRAM

Rationale:
▪ In year two of the campaign, it will be important to recognize a variety of employers who have
    become involved in training apprentices. Recognition is a key element of sustaining their
    participation and reinforcing the importance of their involvement in training apprentices.

Strategy:
▪ To effectively recognize employers and track new participants, a partnership with the
    jurisdictions (apprenticeship branches) will be necessary.
▪ Regional print media advertising and media relations will be used to recognize employers who
    have participated in apprenticeship.
▪ The website will be used as a recognition tool for employers. Employer photos, corporate
    profiles, testimonials, apprentice photos and quotes can all be used to recognize new initiatives
    and interesting stories that come to light.

Reach:
▪ Throughout the campaign, the reach of the recognition program will be expanded based on the
   number of employers participating.

Timing:
▪ The employer recognition program would begin implementation after the first year of the
    campaign (Spring 2005).


TARGETED ADVERTISING (SPILLOVER)

▪     Employers will also be reached through the spillover effect from the television, radio, cinema
      and print advertising developed for youth and for parents in the campaign.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  56


Equity Seeking Groups Marketing Strategy

The sub-groups targeted in this campaign, Aboriginal groups, women, persons with disabilities,
visible minorities and populations in rural areas, are a significant segment of the Canadian
population and contribute to the diversity of our cultural and demographic landscape. It is extremely
difficult to ascertain the attitudes toward skilled trades within this segment of the population as
minimal research has been conducted on this topic within this segment. However, anecdotal
information suggests that the majority of visible minorities appear to want university education and
professional careers for their children. Aboriginals appear to be the exception to this perspective,
based on statistical information. Women, comprising the majority of the population, are subject to
gender bias, particularly as it relates to the skilled trades, and often don’t have a comprehensive
understanding of the diversity of opportunities in the skilled trades. Persons with disabilities are
often subject to low paying, low skilled jobs.

The following are the main campaign objectives for these audiences and the strategies for reaching
them.

Objective
By the end of the three-year campaign, the desired outcome is for the campaign to have
accomplished the following:

1. Create awareness among Equity Seeking groups about the campaign and help them to identify
   with the creative approach and messages of the campaign.

2. Begin to shift the negative perceptions among Equity Seeking Groups of the skilled trades
   toward a more positive attitude with a willingness to consider skilled trades careers. (The
   evaluation component of the plan, which includes cinema intercepts and phone surveys, will
   include a question to identify equity seeking groups.)

3. Attempt within the campaign advertising and grassroots initiatives to address the issues
   impacting each separate equity-seeking group.


Aboriginal Groups

Marketing Considerations

The targeted advertising approach to marketing to Aboriginal populations is similar to youth and
key influencers with the exception that many Aboriginal groups are located in rural communities –
therefore advertising reach to rural areas should be accounted for. Specific tools and programs
should be delivered by Aboriginal communities/organizations, as cultural nuances and languages
are respected and considered. Images of Aboriginal persons will be incorporated into elements of
the campaign and key messages will include those that have been identified for Aboriginal Groups.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  57


Key Messages for Aboriginal Groups

The following key messages will be incorporated into the campaign for Aboriginal Groups:

▪     Skilled trades careers will provide you with a very satisfying career and a great quality of life
▪     Skilled trades careers are professional careers that are worthwhile and meaningful
▪     Skilled trades careers will offer the opportunity to earn above average salary and be a platform
      for diverse career opportunities
▪     Skilled trades careers are in high demand with a range of job opportunities
▪     Skilled trades training will offer the opportunity to develop skills that can be used throughout
      your life
▪     Apprenticeship training involves mentorship and combines on the job and classroom training

Marketing Approach
Based on this approach, the following targeted advertising tactics will be used to reach Aboriginal
Groups:

▪     Television (spillover)
▪     Radio (spillover)
▪     Cinema (spillover)
▪     Print (spillover)
▪     Media Relations
▪     Website
▪     Grass roots


TELEVISION, RADIO, CINEMA AND PRINT (SPILLOVER)

▪     Aboriginal audiences will be reached through the targeted media developed for youth, parents,
      educators and employers.


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ The media relations strategy for the campaign (outlined in detail in the Parents Strategy) will
    include strategies and activities for Aboriginal groups.

Strategy:
▪ Aboriginal organizations, such as the Aboriginal Human Resource Development Council, and
    publications will be identified in the comprehensive media distribution/contact list for the
    campaign. These organizations will be notified along with all other media on campaign related
    activities.
▪ Media relations will feature interesting stories within the Aboriginal community and reference
    Aboriginal issues/priorities in this campaign.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   58


Reach:
▪ Aboriginal audiences will be reached in the media relations campaign through the on-going
   development of partnerships with Aboriginal organizations and the development of story ideas
   on Aboriginal issues.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.


WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ The website will be the key reference point for the campaign that is identified in all of the
    promotional materials.
▪ Many programs for Aboriginal groups were identified during the research for the campaign;
    therefore these resources should be provided on the campaign website.

Strategy:
▪ Ensure that a section of the website is dedicated to links/resources for Aboriginals.
▪ The “Think Trades” program, a marketing and training program for Aboriginal communities in
    Alberta, can be featured on the campaign website.

Reach:
▪ The website URL will appear or be referenced in all marketing efforts in the campaign.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing Aboriginal programs in order to direct traffic to
   the campaign website.
▪ The website will have appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by search engines.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch.
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.


GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ The primary grass roots strategy outlined earlier in this document includes programs related to
    Equity Seeking Groups.
▪ Grass roots outreach programs developed in partnership with Aboriginal organizations are
    essential to foster a dialogue and provide support information for existing Aboriginal Programs.

Strategy:
▪ Develop a marketing partnership with the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Council
    (AHRDC) to facilitate the delivery of information on the national campaign at a national and
    jurisdictional level through the AHRDC newsletters
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 59


▪     Develop linkages with provincial programs that are currently working in Aboriginal communities
      and provide opportunities for these initiatives to adopt elements of the campaign. These
      programs include:
         - Provincial apprenticeship branches with specific Aboriginal programs such as:
                          Nova Scotia’s work with the Membertou Band in Sydney to promote
                          apprenticeship training in construction projects on the reserve
                          Manitoba’s Aboriginal Apprenticeship Strategy
                          Ontario’s Aboriginal Apprenticeship Training Strategy
                          Saskatchewan’s Aboriginal Apprenticeship Programs
                          Alberta Aboriginal Apprenticeship Project
         - Skills Canada Programs
         - Labour Market Partnership for Trades in the North-Central region of British Columbia
         - Aboriginal Head Start Association of British Columbia

Reach:
   Grass roots programs will be developed within each jurisdiction based on the requirements
   identified in the consultation process with key stakeholders.

Timing:
▪ Consultations will be initiated in January 2004 and project development will begin in July 2004.
    A requirement of the grass roots strategy is that projects be completed within one year of the
    start of implementation.

Women

Marketing Considerations

Women will be reached as an audience of the targeted advertising campaign. They will also be
featured in the advertising campaign, thereby establishing female role models to encourage and
inspire women to begin to view the skilled trades more positively. In addition to the gender bias,
another key component in ensuring that the message is delivered to women, is to establish
partnerships with career agencies, and organizations/governments with women’s programs to
disseminate campaign information.

Key Messages
The following key messages will be incorporated into the campaign for Women:

▪     Skilled trades careers are not just for men/boys: women are very capable of doing these jobs
▪     Women who work in skilled trades careers are very satisfied in their careers
▪     Skilled trades careers are professional careers that are worthwhile and meaningful
▪     Skilled trades careers will offer the opportunity to earn above average salary and be a platform
      for diverse career opportunities
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   60


Marketing Approach

Within the umbrella strategy and based on key messages and considerations, the following
targeted advertising tactics will be used to reach Women:
▪ Television (spillover)
▪ Radio (spillover)
▪ Cinema (spillover)
▪ Print (spillover)
▪ Media Relations
▪ Website
▪ Grass roots


TELEVISION, RADIO, CINEMA AND PRINT (SPILLOVER)

▪     Women will be reached through the various targeted media developed for youth, parents, and
      educators.


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ The media relations strategy for the campaign (as outlined in detail in the Parents Strategy) will
    include strategies and activities for women.

Strategy:
▪ Women’s organizations related to trades and employment will be identified in the media list
    and notified about campaign activities throughout this campaign.
▪ Profiles and success stories of women who have trained as apprentices and work in the skilled
    trades will be developed and pitched to media as described in the media relations outlined
    previously in this document. It is extremely important that young women identify with other
    women who work in the trades; this will enable them to visualize themselves in the role and
    feel that this is a worthwhile and achievable career option.
▪ Media and trade publications for women and young girls within the target audience will be
    pitched with a variety of stories on women in the skilled trades. Specifically, women in key
    media roles, i.e. editors will be targeted to feature such stories in their respective publications/
    stations.

Reach:
▪ Women will be reached in the media relations campaign through the on-going development of
   partnerships with women’s organizations and the development of story ideas on women’s
   issues.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 61


WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ The website will be the key reference point for the campaign that is identified in all of the
    promotional materials.
▪ Many programs for women were identified during the research for the campaign; therefore
    these resources should be provided on the campaign website.

Strategy:
▪ Ensure that a section of the website is dedicated to links/resources for women.

Reach:
▪ The website URL will be referenced in all marketing efforts in the campaign.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing women’s programs in order to direct traffic to
   the campaign website.
▪ The website will have appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by search engines.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.


GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ The primary grass roots strategy outlined earlier in this document includes programs related to
    Equity Seeking Groups.
▪ Grass roots outreach to women will be an important way to more effectively reach this
    audience with face to face contact to share the hurdles, barriers and opportunities related to a
    career in the skilled trades and to provide support for existing programs and communications.

Strategy:
▪ Share campaign materials and develop partnerships with jurisdictional and regional programs
    such as:
       - The Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women’s Services in British Columbia
       - Canadian Construction Women (based in B.C)
       - Women Building Futures (Alberta)
       - Techsploration, a partnership of NS Community College, industry and school boards
           that provide young women with an opportunity to participate in trades activities and
           interact with female role models
       - The Hypatia Project (Nova Scotia) includes a number of initiatives developed in
           partnership with education and industry.
       - Provincial Women’s Directorate Programs (in each province) such as Words on Work in
           Ontario, a mentoring program for women and the Ontario Women’s Directorate (OWD)
           - The OWD will invest $5M over the next three years in pre-apprenticeship training for
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               62


             women in the manufacturing industry. Women in Skilled Trades programs will be
             established at several Ontario colleges.
         - Canadian Girls in Training (CGIT) Camps for girls, age 12-14 years
         - SCC Young Women’s Conferences for girls in Grade 11 and 12
         - Women in Resource Development Committee – Orientation to Trades and Technology
             Program
         - Women Exploring Technology Days events
         - Association of Canadian Community Colleges membership and training programs at
             colleges that have been developed for women.
▪     Arrange speaking opportunities for women members of the Council of Champions at events
      such as:
         - The Women at Work Technology Symposia, Hamilton Training Advisory Board – Since
             2000, over 200 women have attended this skilled trades career awareness event for
             women, which is supported by MTCU, school boards, training boards, colleges and
             industry.
         - SCC Networking Dinners, etc.

Reach:
▪ Grass roots programs will be developed within each jurisdiction based on the requirements
   identified in the consultation process with key stakeholders.

Timing:
▪ Consultations will be initiated in January 2004 and project development would begin in July
    2004. A requirement of the grass roots strategy is that projects be completed within one year of
    the start of implementation.

Persons with Disabilities

Marketing Considerations

Persons with disabilities encounter a number of challenges related to skills development, learning
and employment, including awareness about opportunities, workplace accommodation, access to
training, job retention, transportation and support programs. It is important that through this
campaign, persons with disabilities become more aware of potential opportunities for careers in the
skilled trades and how to access them. Employers who are provided with campaign information
should also be made aware of the benefits of employment programs that persons with disabilities
could become involved in.

Key Messages

The following key messages will be incorporated into communication material related to reaching
persons with disabilities:

▪     By training for a skilled trade, you will have the opportunity to develop new skills
▪     Skilled trades careers are professional careers that are worthwhile and meaningful
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                   63


▪     Skilled trades careers will offer the opportunity to earn above average salary and be a platform
      for diverse career opportunities
▪     In the skilled trades, there are opportunities for training supports that can be made available to
      you

Marketing Approach
Within the umbrella strategy and based on key messages and consideration, the following targeted
advertising tactics will be used to reach persons with disabilities:

▪     Television (spillover)
▪     Radio (spillover)
▪     Cinema (spillover)
▪     Print (spillover)
▪     Media Relations
▪     Website
▪     Grass roots


TELEVISION, RADIO, CINEMA AND PRINT

▪     There is an opportunity to reach persons with disabilities through some or all of the targeted
      media developed for youth and parents.


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ The media relations strategy for the campaign (as outlined in detail in the Parents Strategy) will
    include strategies and activities for persons with disabilities.

Strategy:
▪ Persons with disabilities will also be reached through the media relations strategies outlined for
    other target audiences.
▪ Publications related to people with disabilities - magazines such as “Abilities”, a national
    magazine on disabled issues, will be included in the media relations list for this project. Fact
    sheets on specific resources, issues and opportunities related to persons with disabilities and
    the skilled trades will be developed for the media kit.
▪ Develop and post articles and links on www.enablelink.org a national website containing
    resources for persons with disabilities.

Reach:
▪ Persons with disabilities will be reached in the media relations campaign through the on-going
   development of partnerships with related organizations and the development of story ideas on
   disability issues.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 64


Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.


WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ The website will be the key reference point for the campaign that is identified in all of the
    promotional materials.
▪ Some programs for persons with disabilities were identified during the research for the
    campaign; therefore these resources should be provided on the campaign website.

Strategy:
▪ A section for persons with disabilities will be developed within the Equity Seeking Groups
    section of the website.
▪ Develop information for the campaign website on employment opportunities and successful
    skilled trades training programs for persons with disabilities.

Reach:
▪ The website URL will be referenced in all marketing efforts in the campaign.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing women’s programs in order to direct traffic to
   the campaign website.
▪ The website will have appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by search engines.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.


GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Strategy:
▪ The primary grass roots strategy outlined previously will include programs related to Equity
    Seeking Groups.
▪ Grass Roots outreach will be an important way to directly reach persons with disabilities about
    careers in the skilled trades.

Rationale:
▪ Distribute relevant information on opportunities to employ and train persons with disabilities to
    employers through employer marketing tactics such as the e-mail newsletter.
▪ Ensure a dialogue with between the campaign and provincial programs such as:
       - The Government of Ontario, www.equalopportunity.on.ca - The Government of Ontario
           has developed web based information portals called the Gateway to Diversity and the
           Gateway to Accessibility with resources for business and service providers that will help
           them create inclusive workplaces and to remove the barriers which prevent full
           independence and opportunity for people with disabilities.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                  65


          - New Brunswick Department of Training and Employment Development operates the
            Visible Abilities Registry, an electronic registry of individuals with disabilities who are
            ready and able to work.
        - Alberta’s Employabilities – www.employabilities.ab.ca - mission is to promote and
            enhance employment and learning opportunities for persons with physical disabilities.
            This site is about helping people with physical disabilities find work.
▪     Ensure reciprocal links with HRDC resources and the Workplace Safety Insurance Board
      (WSIB).

Reach:
▪ Grass roots programs will be developed within each jurisdiction based on the requirements
   identified in the consultation process with key stakeholders.

Timing:
▪ Consultations will be initiated in January 2004 and project development would begin in July
    2004. A requirement of the grass roots strategy is that projects be completed within one year of
    the start of implementation.


Visible Minorities

Marketing Considerations
Visible minorities face a number of employment and training barriers, such as discrimination and
language issues, despite the fact that a large portion of this group are highly skilled and willing to
work and train. The need to proactively address these issues and create opportunities in skilled
trades for visible minorities and new Canadians has been recognized as a priority by the
Government. Therefore, contact with the various provincial programs related to working with visible
minorities and new Canadians on employment and training issues, such as Prior Learning
Assessment Programs (PLAR) will be important to reaching Visible minorities.

Also, featuring visible minorities in the creative material is an important element of developing a
campaign that is about inclusion.

Key Messages

Within the umbrella strategy, the following key messages will be incorporated into the campaign to
reach and include visible minorities:

▪     Skilled trades careers allows you to do what you like and makes you happy
▪     Skilled trades careers earn a good living and quality of life
▪     Do something you’ll be proud of
▪     Skilled trades careers are in demand – You’re needed and have great opportunities to grow
▪     Skilled trades careers are for smart people and provide a lifelong learning experience
▪     “Earn while you Learn”
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               66


Marketing Approach
Within the umbrella strategy and based on key messages and consideration, the following targeted
advertising tactics will be used to reach visible minorities:

▪     Television (spillover)
▪     Radio (spillover)
▪     Cinema (spillover)
▪     Print (spillover)
▪     Media Relations
▪     Website
▪     Grass roots

TELEVISION, RADIO, CINEMA, AND PRINT (SPILLOVER)

▪     Visible minorities will be reached through the targeted media developed for youth, parents and
      educators.



MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ The media relations strategy for the campaign (as outlined in detail in the Parents Strategy) will
    include strategies and activities for visible minorities.

Strategy:
▪ Media relations communications will include reference to the inclusion of visible minorities
    issues/priorities and promotion of any programs, such as PLAR programs in the campaign.

Reach:
▪ Visible minorities will be reached in the media relations campaign through the on-going
   development of partnerships with related organizations and the development of story ideas
   related to visible minorities.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.


WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ The website will be the key reference point for the campaign that is identified in all of the
    promotional materials.
▪ Some programs related to visible minorities were identified during the research for the
    campaign; therefore these resources should be provided listed on the campaign website.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 67


Strategy:
▪ A section for visible minorities will be developed within the Equity Seeking Groups section of
    the website.
▪ Provide information on the campaign website on employment issues and programs for visible
    minorities.

Reach:
▪ The website URL will be referenced in all marketing efforts in the campaign.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing programs in order to direct traffic to the
   campaign website.
▪ The website will have appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by search engines.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.


GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ The primary grass roots strategy outlined earlier in this document will include those programs
    developed for visible minorities.
▪ Local based initiatives will be more meaningful to engage this audience in order to gain their
    trust and foster a dialogue on skilled trades.

Strategy:
    Communicate with programs in jurisdictions that are working with visible minority groups to
    promote and develop skilled trades training and job opportunities – such as Ontario’s Bridge
    Training Program for qualified immigrants in strategic skills areas.

Reach:
▪ Grass roots programs will be developed within each jurisdiction based on the requirements
   identified in the consultation process with key stakeholders.

Timing:
▪ Consultations will be initiated in January 2004 and project development would begin in July
    2004. A requirement of the grass roots strategy is that projects be completed within one year of
    the start of implementation.

Rural Audiences

Marketing Considerations

Although rural communities will be reached through many of the targeted advertising and
supporting tools used in this campaign, there exist certain opportunities and barriers to reaching
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 68


the rural populations that must be considered in the implementation of this campaign. Many people
may need to leave home to train, which may impact retention and deter the pursuit of training; also
transportation issues also increases costs for employers to bring workers into rural areas and thus
creates a barrier for employers. Finally, many Aboriginal communities are rural and therefore rural
considerations must be taken into account in communication with Aboriginal communities as well.
We assume, as research is not available to validate this, that the skilled trades are not seen as
negatively in rural communities as they may be in urban areas, since these jobs are the source of
the majority of the communities’ livelihood.

Key Messages
Within the umbrella strategy, the following messages will be incorporated into communication with
rural communities:

▪     Identify any potential training and work opportunities that are accessible to rural areas (those
      within the home town or through distance learning)
▪     You can pursue apprenticeship training and get paid at the same time

Marketing Approach
Within the umbrella strategy and based on key messages and consideration, the following targeted
advertising tactics will be used to reach rural communities:

▪     Television (spillover)
▪     Radio (spillover)
▪     Cinema (spillover)
▪     Print (spillover)
▪     Media Relations
▪     Website
▪     Grass roots


TELEVISION, RADIO, CINEMA, AND PRINT (SPILLOVER)

▪     Rural communities will be reached through the targeted media developed for youth, parents,
      educators and employers.


MEDIA RELATIONS

Rationale:
▪ The media relations’ strategy for the campaign (as outlined in detail in the Parents Strategy)
    will include strategies and activities to reach rural communities.

Strategy:
▪ Key rural, community newspapers will be identified in the media list and story ideas that are
    specific to these communities will be pitched to these media.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                69


Reach:
▪ Rural communities will be reached in the media relations campaign through the on-going
   development of partnerships with related organizations and the development of story ideas
   related to visible minorities.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 and ongoing throughout the campaign.


WEBSITE

Rationale:
▪ The website will be the key reference point for the campaign that is identified in all of the
    promotional materials.
▪ Information available on the website will facilitate access in rural areas to local initiatives.

Strategy:
▪ Ensure that the website is enabled for HTML viewing to accommodate lower speed modems in
    rural areas that do not have high-speed Internet access.

Reach:
▪ The website URL will appear or be referenced in all marketing efforts in the campaign.
▪ Reciprocal links will be established with existing programs in order to direct traffic to the
   campaign website.
▪ The website will have appropriate meta-tags, (incorporation of key terminology such as
   “trades”, “apprenticeship”, “skills”, “careers”, “training”) to be recognized by search engines.

Timing:
▪ Spring 2004 to coincide with campaign launch
▪ Website will be regularly updated throughout the three-year campaign.


GRASS ROOTS (REGIONAL) PROGRAMS

Rationale:
▪ The grass roots strategy will be a critical component to the campaign’s effective reach into
    rural communities.

Strategy:
▪ Establish appropriate links on the campaign website to existing rural training/job programs
    within each jurisdiction; these would include distance or e-learning programs led by colleges
    such as the Algonquin College (Ottawa) and Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)
    programs.
▪ Communicate with established rural initiatives and explore a tie in with their communications
    channels and networks:
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               70


        -   The North-Central region of B.C, the Labour Market Partnership for Trades, is focused
            on creating and promoting apprenticeship opportunities for Aboriginal persons in rural
            communities.
        -   Other programs national in scope include the Canadian Rural Partnerships Initiative
            and the Pan Canadian Community Futures Network. These initiatives work to learn
            more about the issues and create economic and social development opportunities in
            rural communities and could provide a gateway to communicating effectively with
            people in rural communities in Canada about skilled trades career options.

Reach:
▪ Grass roots programs will be developed within each jurisdiction based on the requirements
   identified in the consultation process with key stakeholders.

Timing:
▪ Consultations will be initiated in January 2004 and project development will begin in July 2004.
    A requirement of the grass roots strategy is that projects be completed within one year of the
    start of implementation.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                71


PARTNERSHIPS STRATEGY
The fostering of strategic alliances and partnerships is an essential activity in developing a
successful national, multi-dimensional social marketing campaign. The leadership of the CAF-
FCA, SCC, HRDC, and the Provinces and Territories to motivate and engage all target audiences
and vested stakeholders in this campaign represents an extraordinary opportunity to not only
leverage the substantial commitment of existing resources, but to marshal significant new
resources to help create a new way of thinking and appreciation about the skilled trades in
Canada.

Building relationships and establishing partnerships is a long-term initiative for which specific
annual goals must be set in order to achieve tangible results and expanded resources for the
campaign. With the significant resources of the Government of Canada’s $12 million to initially
launch and support the ‘Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project’ along with the CAF-
FCA and SCC spearheading this Pan-Canadian campaign, it is anticipated that an additional $3
million can be secured as a minimum from a variety of other relevant stakeholders over the next
three (3) years of the campaign.

The Partnership Strategy will have a number of key principles as its foundation in moving forward
over the term of the campaign, as follows:

▪     It will engage and partner with both public and private sector organizations; consequently a
      strategy for both will be required.
▪     The main objectives of the partnerships will be to identify stakeholders, which will provide
      influence, affluence, expertise, promotional resources and delivery channels on behalf of the
      campaign.
▪     The Public Sector Partnership Strategy will primarily focus on assisting with the delivery and
      in-servicing of information at the grassroots levels predominately and to utilize and promote
      campaign advertising materials in their promotional initiatives;
                - The Public Sector Partnership Strategy will involve organizations involved in
                   apprenticeship, training, education, industry and trades and those representing
                   rural concerns and Equity Seeking Groups.
▪     The Private Sector Partnership Strategy will be predominately focused on engaging
      corporations and their relevant industry associations to incorporate the campaign materials for
      internal as well as external audiences, and to inspire them to create complimentary advertising
      that serves their related industry, while meeting our campaign objectives (a sample ad is
      provided later in this section to demonstrate such potential partnerships).
▪     The Private Sector Partnership Strategy will involve organizations such as:
                - Media groups
                - Top companies in each major sector (manufacturing, transportation, service,
                   construction trades, communication and employment/human resources)
                - Trade Associations
                - Unions
                - Business Associations
                - Sector specific business associations
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                     72


▪     The overall Partnership Strategy is designed to engage organizations at national, regional and
      local levels.
▪     The primary focus to the partnership strategy will be to leverage promotional and public
      awareness and educational resources from stakeholders on an in-kind basis, to extend the
      reach and frequency of the campaign.
▪     While securing partnership/sponsorship dollars to contribute to the campaign may occur, it will
      not be the focal point of the partnership strategy. Partnership and sponsorship will be
      consistently tailored to cover costs of producing information such as the printing of a brochure
      etc. and encouraging organizations to embrace and utilize the campaign’s advertising
      materials.
▪     The partnership strategy will utilize the advertising creative materials and the initial public
      launch of the campaign as the launch to begin the process to reach out to potential
      partners/sponsors.
▪     Partnership marketing materials, such as Power Point Presentations, and other elements, will
      be prepared highlighting the benefits of participating in the campaign and featuring concepts
      for ways in which organizations can become involved.
▪     The media industry will be approached to leverage our current advertising buy to enhance the
      overall value and expanded reach and frequency of our campaign. We will also partner with
      the media to encourage the development of promotions and public education initiatives i.e.
      MuchMusic could run a contest on Skilled Trades giving away prizes to contestants that can
      name 10 skilled trades, for example. Radio could run a contest that relates to different skilled
      trades and youth have to call in to name different trades;
▪     Establish cross promotions and proactively act as a conduit to create various partnerships both
      public and private, with different organizations to expand the reach of the campaign. For
      example, partnering with a major corporation or organization on an educational initiative to
      cover the costs to develop related educational materials specifically designed to attract
      aboriginals to the skilled trades in their industry.
▪     Relevant foundations that address youth education/careers and trades will be approached to
      financially support a specific educational awareness project for youth as well as to secure
      introductions to other prospective partners.
▪     We would propose to secure partners that have demonstrated a commitment to youth,
      education and their career development as it relates to skilled trades and that share a like-
      minded approach, similar to those of CAF-FCA and SCC.
▪     Partnership initiatives of the overall campaign, will respect existing and prospective
      relationships/sponsorships of the CAF-FCA, SCC and their respective organizations, as well as
      other relevant stakeholders involved in the campaign.
▪     The campaign, in general, will not provide industry exclusivity for a corporation in exchange for
      their partnership, as it is anticipated that numerous companies from the same industry sector
      will become involved in the campaign.
▪     The primary focus of the partnership strategy to the private sector will initially center on the top
      firms associated with the each of the key skilled trade sectors.
▪     The campaign will utilize members from the Council of Champions for referrals to meet with
      other prospective corporations and organizations.

With the principles of the Partnership Strategy well articulated, it is relevant to address the more
pragmatic elements of executing the Partnership Strategy over this critical inaugural term of the
campaign, ensuring that we optimize as many likeminded partnerships as is feasible while
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 73


capitalizing fully on each and every partnership. As previously stated, the key element of the
Partnership Strategy will be to encourage both public and private organizations to contribute
primarily in-kind resources that would significantly extend the reach and frequency of the
Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Campaign. The overall goal has been stated as $3
million in leveraged partnerships, as a minimum over the initial three-year term. The following
overview highlights the salient work tasks and deliverables of the Partnership Strategy:

Year One

▪     Prepare a detailed Partnership Strategy and Plan over the campaign term with key milestones,
      deliverables, timelines, budgets with in-kind goals, prospective partners, policies and
      guidelines, etc. that will meet the requirements of HRDC, CAF-FCA, SCC and the other
      campaign stakeholders;
▪     Develop Partnership Marketing materials, one set for the Public Sector, and another slightly
      different set for the Private Sector, (albeit both sets will share some common information) in
      both official languages;
▪     Prepare the key elements of the advertising materials, in both official languages, as both
      Presentation Materials for meetings, and as inserts for the Partnership Marketing Presentation
      Kit, as a leave behind document;
▪     Prepare a database of key contacts for all prospective partner organizations: schools, colleges,
      unions, labor, sectoral associations, educational organizations, corporations, industry
      associations, government departments at local, regional, provincial, territorial and federally,
      media etc.;
▪     Organize the Partnership Presentation Team(s) and train and prepare them (if required) for
      presentations. The Presentation Team will be comprised of the Project Manager and the
      Executive Directors of SCC and CAF-FCA;
▪     Prepare a speech and presentation material to be delivered to industry/public associations for
      their AGM’s, national conventions, conferences, seminars etc.;
▪     On the heels of the first wave of the media buy, meet with the media executives of the
      organizations where we purchased media, to present the partnership proposals, for example:
          - MuchMusic – enhance the media buy, ensure on-air promotions, receive plugs from
              VJs, and enhance any web opportunities, etc.
          - Cineplex Odeon/Famous Players – provide value-added with ads in Tribute magazine
              and with posters/displays in lobbies, run a contest to promote skilled trades and/or
              discount days for youth involved in skilled trades.
▪     Build credibility and momentum for the Campaign and the Partnership Strategy with industry
      and their respective national and regional associations by delivering presentations at their
      annual events:
          - Presentations at AGMs/events for major associations (Canadian Construction
              Association), seminars, Government events, Conferences, Conventions, etc.
          - Establish involvement of the members of the Council of Champions as partnership
              Ambassadors for this initiative who would participate in speaking engagements, media
              interviews, and meetings with various stakeholder organizations in the public and
              private sectors.
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                       74


Year Two

▪     Review and evaluate the success of the first year of the Partnership Strategy and adjust the
      strategy accordingly for year 2;
▪     Continue to support, expand and manage the relationships and partnerships established from
      year one;
▪     Given that there will have been a year of targeted advertising and grassroots initiatives by now,
      focus the partnership initiatives on the private sector and their industry associations;
▪     Begin the process of actively soliciting relevant Foundations that foster youth, education and
      career development to support elements of the campaign;
▪     Launch the ‘blockbuster’ major corporate partner publicly with significant media fanfare-this will
      send a positive message to the rest of the private sector laying the groundwork for an intensive
      marketing and partnership effort to this sector;
▪     Focus on developing and expanding partnerships with Colleges and Secondary School
      Boards;
▪     Secure in-kind partners
          - Donated advertising and exposure space from partners (i.e. major employer’s ads to
              include campaign logo and slogan);
          - Posting of campaign posters/banners on construction sites, buildings etc. inclusion of
              campaign logo/slogan on trucks, letterhead and other corporate collateral;
          - Provision of speaking opportunities/presentations/booth space (free) at industry
              association conferences; and
          - Distribution of brochures and other materials through partner network.


Year Three

▪     Review and evaluate the success of the campaign from the previous two years and adjust the
      strategy accordingly;
▪     Support, expand and manage the partnerships developed in the first two years of the
      campaign;
▪     By the third year, we will be in a position to build on the partnership alliances created in the first
      two years growing their involvement and subsequently their value, as we will have established
      credibility and momentum for the campaign and by announcing major credible partnership
      initiatives;
▪     We will continue to secure partnership initiatives with major corporations;
▪     The public sector side will continue to expand with particular emphasis on unions, educational
      organizations, regional and local governments, etc.; and
▪     We will continue to expand the partnerships with equity seeking groups and other likeminded
      organizations to expand the reach and frequency of the campaign information to these
      targeted audiences.

KEY DELIVERABLE YEAR 3: Expand and create partnerships with equity seeking organizations
and continue to expand public sector partnerships.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                     75




BENCHMARKING, MONITORING AND EVALUATION
In order to monitor the effectiveness of the campaign, initial benchmarking and ongoing monitoring
and evaluation will be conducted. The initial step will be to determine the current perceptions and
attitudes of the key target audiences towards skilled trades and apprenticeship programs. The
information that is gathered will act as a benchmark that subsequent research results will be
compared to in order to assess the effectiveness of the campaign. After the launch of the
campaign, various monitoring tools will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaign on
an on-going and regular basis. This close monitoring and evaluation is very important, as it will
provide the opportunity to adjust certain elements of the campaign in a timely manner to better
motivate or educate the targeted audience.

In the development of a monitoring and evaluation plan, a number of important elements are
considered, including the following:
▪ Key milestones of the campaign: Specific tracking elements will be timed in conjunction with
     specific activities or events during the implementation of the campaign, for example, the
     campaign launch, media buys, publicity, etc.
▪ Ability to compare data to measurable campaign objectives: The chosen method of data
     collection will be based on its ability to provide quantifiable data that can objectively track the
     success of key elements of the campaign as well as the final success of the campaign after the
     three-year period.
▪ Target audiences: The key target audiences, namely youth, parents, teachers, equity seeking
     groups, and employers, will be considered when selecting data collection methods in order to
     capture their awareness of the campaign and their shift of attitudes and perceptions. A
     multitude of data collection techniques will be used to reach the specific target audiences, and
     cost-effective methods of data collection will be considered to provide a greater opportunity to
     collect information about the audiences’ awareness of the campaign.

Monitoring Tools

APCO is recommending the use of eight different monitoring tools to benchmark and monitor the
effectiveness of the campaign. These tools are as follows:

1. Telephone Survey: A statistically representative, national telephone survey will be used as
   an effective way to initially benchmark attitudes and perception of the parents and the general
   public towards skilled trades. This benchmarking survey will be a 20-minute survey of 1000
   respondents over the age of 25. An additional national telephone survey will also be
   conducted at the end of the campaign to assess the progress towards reaching the campaign
   goals. This survey will also be a 20-minute survey of 1000 respondents.

2. On-line Survey: An Ipsos-Reid Internet panel will be utilized to effectively benchmark and
   provide annual monitoring of the attitudes and perception of youth towards skilled trades.
   Youth work very will with on-line surveys and the data collected is statistically weighted to be
   representative of youth by gender, age and region according to Statistics Canada census data.
   A survey of 1,000 respondents of youth between 13-18 years old will be completed.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                               76



3. Website Tracking: Monitoring the website traffic will be an effective and inexpensive way to
   evaluate the effectiveness of the campaign and its ability to drive the key target audiences to
   the site in order to obtain more information about skilled trades and apprenticeships. More
   specifically, the following information will be undertaken:
       a. Monitor daily/weekly/monthly visits
       b. Monitor unique visits, origin, timing
       c. Track downloaded information
       d. Assess effectiveness of links
       e. Monitor the activity of the website in direct correlation to other Campaign activities

4. Media Scans: Scans of media activity and publicity created due to the campaign will be
   closely monitored, as well as requests for interviews, value of publicity in media outlets, and
   the demographics of the audience that each media reaches. This information is very valuable
   and will be used to evaluate and assess the effectiveness of the media activity in creating
   awareness, as well as changing the perception of the skilled trades.

5. Cinema Intercept Survey: An annual 5-minute intercept survey of 500 respondents will be
   completed during the phase of cinema advertising. The purpose of this survey is to monitor
   the resonance of campaign messages, identify their reaction to the messages of the campaign,
   and to see if it was effective in beginning to shift their attitudes and perception toward the
   skilled trades.

6. Omnibus Surveys: A national omnibus survey targeted at an audience, over 25, will be a
   cost-effective way of monitoring the campaign’s progress. The survey will include
   approximately 8 questions that will measure the unaided awareness of the campaign;
   resonance of key messages; source of awareness; and any shifts in attitudes and perception.

7. Tracking of Requests for Promotional Material – Ongoing monitoring of requests by youth,
   teachers, parents, employers and other stakeholders to provide campaign
   information/promotional material.

8. Partnership Value – The overall partnership value is projected at $ 3 million over the term of
   the 3-year campaign with specific targets each of those 3 years. This partnership value will
   represent another measure of success for the campaign.
  Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 77




IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK
As indicated, the national umbrella campaign and the sub-strategies targeting each audience has
been designed for implementation over three years. The objective of this plan is to launch the
campaign, and its various tactical elements in the spring, 2004. Therefore, for the purposes of this
document, we have broken down the implementation of the campaign into two phases. Part One is
the developmental period leading-up to the campaign launch in which all campaign elements will
be developed and produced. This phase is actually very brief, covering the period from January to
the end of March 2004. Part Two will in fact be the tactical execution and implementation of the
three-year campaign.

Part One – Development
• January 04 – March 04
• The key deliverables for this part of the project is the final production of key campaign
    components including:
   - Campaign logo and tagline
   - All television, radio, cinema, print and online ads
   - Necessary print collateral for all audiences (i.e.: brochures, posters, etc) including printing
   - Landing pages for website, meta-tagging and cross-links
   - Plan for campaign launch event
   - Development of media relations program and database
  - Development of regional Grass Roots consultation process and identification of exemplary
      practices/programs
   - Development of Council of Champions program
   - Development of Partnership Strategy and Plan
   - Benchmark research study

Part Two - Campaign Execution
• Implementation of the social marketing campaign and sub-strategies is to take place over three
    government fiscal years, ending in December 06.
   - April 04 – March 05
   - April 05 – March 06
   - April 06 – December 06
• The key deliverable for Part Two of the project is the execution of proposed marketing tactics:
   - Targeted advertising
   - Campaign launch
   - Media relations
   - Grassroots (Regional) Programs
   - Council of Champions
   - Partnership strategy
• In addition, Part Two also includes monitoring and evaluation mechanisms such as:
   - Annual monitoring of campaign effectiveness and reach
  - End of campaign (March 07) evaluation research to be measured against benchmark
       research
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                                 78



Key Campaign Considerations

As one can assume with multi-stakeholder driven campaigns, there are a number of key issues
that must be considered when developing and implementing a campaign of this nature. The
following are certain key issues that should be further discussed as the campaign implementation
moves forward.

•     Trade Selection Criteria by Jurisdiction

There are over 200 potential trade occupations that can be profiled in the creative, visual and
written elements of the campaign. The advertising campaign will initially begin with a generic
approach to profiling ‘trades people’ however, to address the issue as to which trades or sectors
are used in specific initiatives through the tactical elements of the campaign, the following criteria
should be considered:

    • Provincial/territorial/jurisdictional needs
    • Feedback and recommendations from Sector Councils
    • Trade career where there is the greatest outlook for demand either nationally or in that region
    • Careers that pay in excess of $30,000 per year
    • Enrollment for apprenticeships/training is not meeting projected demand

•     Grassroots Implementation

As indicated in the marketing strategy section of this document, there is a need to avoid duplication
of current local and regional programs while finding mechanisms to more effectively coordinate
grassroots outreach initiatives and distribute and disseminate campaign information. As proposed,
we recommend consultations be held with key stakeholders in each jurisdiction to identify required
grass roots programs. The development of this strategy is suggested to take place as part of the
Developmental Phase and the outcome will likely impact the scope of the work tasks required for
the implementation framework for the campaign.

•     Advanced Booking of Advertising Time and Space

As indicated, reserving advertising space and airtime must be considered at least 12 weeks in
advance of the proposed advertising schedule. The Advertising Plan provides details of advanced
booking dates. That being said, this issue is of major consideration, especially as the proposed first
time-slot for youth related, targeted advertising, is scheduled for Spring 2004, thereby meaning that
booking of ads need to take place at the beginning of February 2004.

•     Partnership Alliances

The scope and magnitude of the partnership program and its overall success will significantly
impact the implementation program as well. Obviously, a very successful program will increase
proportionally the work tasks required to meet the needs of partners while delivering their
    Promoting Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Project - Phase I Report                           79


supported programs. This will need to be monitored and reviewed on a quarterly basis with the
Project Manager.

•     Research and Evaluation

Subject to the nature and feedback of the evaluation of the advertising program from the various
target audiences, there may be a significant impact on the scope of work required to change the
current advertising materials.



                                For further information, contact:

                                Beverlie Cook, Project Manager
                                Bev_cook@careersintrades.ca

				
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