A Growing Challenge_ Psychosocial and Mental Health Support for

Document Sample
A Growing Challenge_ Psychosocial and Mental Health Support for Powered By Docstoc
					   A Growing Challenge:
 Psychosocial and Mental
Health Support for Refugees
 and Migrants in an Urban
          Setting
Psycho-Social Services and Training Institute in Cairo
 PSTIC Welcomes you to Cairo!
        EMERGENCY NUMBERS

Yumna    0100 504 7970

Marwa    0127 282 2076

Nancy    0100 854 5264

PSTIC Emergency Number   0106 439 0175
    CONFERENCE DAILY PLAN
DAYS 1 AND 2

9 – 1030            Morning Panel
1030            Coffee-Tea Break (Time varies with program)
1100 – 1200         Morning Panel
1200 – 1330         Lunch / Optional Lunchtime Discussion
1330 – 1500         Afternoon Small Group Discussion
1500                Coffee-Tea Break
1515 – 1645         Afternoon Panel
1645 – 1700         Summary

DAY 3

Program times vary and conference ends at 1500
     LUNCHTIME DISCUSSIONS
DAY 1
CHAIR: Peter Ventevogel
Editor Intervention Journal

Planning publications based on content and discussion
from this conference including:
  A Guide for Best Practices in the Urban Setting
  YOUR professional publication about MHPSS in urban
   settings.

DAY 2
CHAIR: Sarah Harrison
Co-Chair of IASC MHPSS Reference Group

IASC Guidelines On MHPSS in Emergency Settings
 How effective are they in the urban context?
 What more is needed?
          EVENING EVENTS
DAY 1: Boat with refreshments on the Nile
 Leave AUC 17:30pm to walk to boat / 20 minutes

 Boat leave from pier outside of Sofitel

 End 20:30pm



DAY 2: Theater / Dinner / Music At AUC
 18:00 (Refreshments)

 18:30 Theater

 20:00 Dinner / Music

 End 20:00pm
         SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
10th April / Field activities

13th April / Field activities
1500 – 1700           Children’s art activities
1800 – 2000           Women’s support group
1800 – 2000           Community workshop

14th April / Tourist trip
8am – evening
Pyramids / National Museum / Old Cairo
Worldwide process of urbanization
   In 1950,
    Less than 30% lived in urban area;
    Now over 50%;
    Expect 60% by 2030.

   730 million lived in urban area;
    Now 3.3 billion.
   REFUGEE TREND TOWARD
       URBANIZATION
43.7 million displaced worldwide

Includes 15.4 million refugees
 10.55 million under UNHCR

 4.82 million Palestinians under UNRWA



Of the 10.5 million, half live in urban centers
  with only one-third in camps.
DAY 1: PANEL PRESENTATIONS

11:00 – 12:00 PANEL 1:
SPECIAL PROBLEMS of urban
context

15:15 – 16:40 PANEL 2:
RESEARCH about MHPSS
consequences of urban life on
refugees and migrants
DAY 1: SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION

Group 1) INTEGRATION IS IMPOSSIBLE THE NATIONAL PEOPLE
         HATE ME!

Group 2) DEAD DREAMS: THE DISAPPOINTMENT OF RESETTLEMENT

Group 3) NO RISK IS TOO GREAT IN THE SEARCH OF A BETTER LIFE

Group 4) WHEN IS A CHRONIC MISERABLE LIFE A PREDISPOSITION
         FOR MENTAL ILLNESS?

Group 5) THE HEIGHT OF EXPECTATIONS /No one helps me enough.

Group 6) WHO AM I? THE PROBLEMS OF CHILDREN BORN AND
          RAISED IN SOMEONE ELSE’S COUNTRY
DAY 2: PANEL PRESENTATIONS

9:00 – 10:00    PANEL 3:
ASSESSMENT of MHPSS needs, problems,
resources of refugees and migrants in urban
context.

10:00 – 10:40 PANEL 4:
HOST COUNTRY SUPPORT

15:15 – 16:45 PANEL 5:
INTERVENTIONS for MHPSS for refugees and
migrants in urban context.
DAY 2: SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION
Group 1) BUILDING COMMUNITY AWARENESS IN REFUGEE
         COMMUNITIES ABOUT MHPSS

Group 2) IDEAS FOR MANAGING COMMUNITY CONFLICTS:
         REFUGEES AGAINST REFUGEES

Group 3) ACTIVITIES FOR REFUGEE CHILDREN IN THE URBAN
         SETTING

Group 4) BUILDING POSITIVE RELATIONS BETWEEN REFUGEES
         AND NATIONAL POPULATIONS

Group 5) ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF TRAINING
         REFUGEES TO BE THE PSYCHOSOCIAL WORKERS
         ASSISTING THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES

Group 6) THE MHPSS CONSEQUENCES FOR REFUGEES AND
         MIGRANTS DUE TO THE PRESSURE TO CHANGE
         CULTURE AND TRADITION DUE TO URBAN LIFE
DAY 3: PANEL PRESENTATIONS
9:00 – 9:45    PANEL 6:
INTERVENTIONS for MHPSS continued

9:45 – 10:45   PANEL 7:
INTERVENTIONS for MHPSS continued

12:00 – 12:20  PANEL 8:
TRAINING AND SUPERVISION of urban
MHPSS Teams
DAY 3: SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION
BEST PRACTICIES GUIDE for providing MHPSS
support in the urban context:
What should be included?

Group   1)   PROBLEMS
Group   2)   ASSESSMENT
Group   3)   HOST COUNTRY SUPPORT
Group   4)   COORDINATION
Group   5)   TRAINING / INTERVENTIONS
Group   6)   RESEARCH / MONITORING – EVALUATION


POST CONFERENCE MEETING
Small group facilitators review key findings to be
included in Best Practices Guide publication.
UNHCR policy on refugee
protection and solutions
    in urban areas

   September 2009

   www.unhcr.org
            UNHCR in 2010
   7.2 million, almost half refugees
    under its mandate displaced at least
    5 years.
   Only 197,600 people were able to
    return home; lowest number since
    1990.
   4/5 world's refugees hosted by
    developing countries.
IASC MHPSS Guidelines (2007) developed to fill
the gap and provide a global framework from which
to help organizations work alongside affected
communities to offer mental health and
psychosocial support across all sectors of assistance.
IASC Guidelines on Mental
Health and Psychosocial Support
in Emergency Settings

GUIDE
AND
CHECKLIST FOR FIELD USE
 IASC MHPSS Guidelines (2007) :
“Armed conflicts and natural disasters cause
 significant psychological and social suffering to
 affected populations.

The psychological and social impacts of emergencies
 may be acute in the short term, but they can also
 undermine the long-term mental health and
 psychosocial well-being of the affected population.

 These impacts may threaten peace, human rights and
 development. One of the priorities in emergencies is
 thus to protect and improve people’s mental health
 and psychosocial well-being. Achieving this priority
 requires coordinated action among all government
 and non-government humanitarian actors.”
As MH / PSS response increased became obvious that
   “a significant gap existed in how to provide a multi-
   sectoral, inter-agency framework that enabled
   effective coordination, identified useful practices and
   flagged potentially harmful practices, and clarified
   how different approaches to mental health and
   psychosocial support complement one another…
   (IASC MHPSS 2007)
The guidelines were prepared at the request of the
  Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC).

The IASC was established in response to General
  Assembly Resolution, which called for strengthened
  coordination of humanitarian assistance.

Formed by heads of broad range of UN and non-UN
  humanitarian organizations and the Federation of Red
  Cross/Red Crescent Societies, the International
  Committee of the Red Cross, and consortia of
  international NGOs.

                                                     21
The IASC MHPSS “guidelines reflect
  the insights of practitioners from
  different geographic regions,
  disciplines and sectors, and reflect
  an emerging consensus on good
  practice among practitioners.
 Task force members who developed guidelines include:
Action Contre la Faim (ACF)                               Church of Sweden
Global Psycho-Social Initiative (GPSi)                    Christian Children's Fund (CCF)
InterAction (through: American Red Cross (ARC)            CARE Austria
International Catholic Migration Commission               International Medical Corps (IMC)
International Rescue Committee (IRC)                      Mercy Corps
Save the Children USA (SC-USA)
Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE)
International Council of Voluntary Agencies (ICVA)        Oxfam (GB)
Action Aid International                                  HealthNet-TPO
Médicos del Mundo (MdM-Spain)
Médecins Sans Frontières Holland(MSF-Holland)             World Vision International (WVI)
Refugees Education Trust (RET)                            Save the Children UK (SC-UK)
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Terre des hommes (Tdh)
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs       Queen Margaret University
Institute of International Health and Development (IIHD)
Regional Psychosocial Support Initiative for Children (REPSSI)
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
World Health Organization (WHO)
World Food Programme (WF
United National Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA)
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Different ways to use the guidelines
    Advocacy for better practice.
    Resource book on specific
     interventions
    Coordinating tool
    Checklist to identify gaps
    Structure to facilitate agencies to
     work together to address diverse
     needs
    Programme planning and design
The IASC guidelines provide a
comprehensive framework for
Mental Health and Psycho Social
Support (MHPSS) by:

Protecting or promoting
psychosocial well-being and

Preventing or treating mental
disorder.
         Guideline framework:
   Focus on MINIMUM FIRST RESPONSE and
    COMPREHENSIVE RESPONSES
    OVERTIME..

   Focus on practical actions and social
    interventions.

   Provide action sheets on 25 key
    interventions by different sectors.

   Recommended to be implemented flexibly
    in accordance with context and culture
    and in cooperative inter-agency manner.
Guidelines not intended solely for mental
health and psychosocial workers.

Protection of psychosocial well-being
recommended as shared responsibility of all
sectors of humanitarian response.

Designed for use by all humanitarian actors,
including community-based organisations,
government authorities, United Nations
organisations, non-government
organisations (NGOs) and donors operating
in emergency settings at local, national and
international levels.”
IASC MHPSS Core Principles:
      Human rights and equity
      Participation
      Do No Harm
      Building on available resources
       and capacities
      Integrated support systems
      Multi-layered supports
                   …


People have different responses to
  emergencies even if they are similar
  situations.

Different responses require a range of
  support and intervention…
IASC MHPSS recommends use of
  multiple layers of intervention to
  be done simultaneously.

Pyramid describes a layered
system of complementary supports
and the likely scale of demand for
each of those layers.

These supports should be offered
simultaneously.
                        IASC MHPSS Intervention Pyramid
  Layer 4: Small percentage (3-4%); but desperate need
  and problems in daily functioning. Possible services:
  •Mental health care by specialized mental health staff.
                                                                   Layer 4: Specialised Services

  Layer 3: About 10-20% require additional help. Services:
                                                                    Layer 3: Focused
  •Psychological first aid                                          Non-Specialised Supports
  •Basic mental health care by primary health care workers.
  •Basic counselling by community workers.                          (person-to-person)

 Layer 2: Community - family support is valuable for all but
                                                                     Layer 2: Community and
necessary to reestablish wellbeing for some who cannot access supports
                                    Community and family
these alone. Possible services:
                                                                     family supports
• Facilitation of traditional, cultural, religious, leisure activities.
• Mobilization / facilitation / activation of community leadership
  and social support structures.


                                        Basic services and security         Layer 1: Social
  Layer 1: Wellbeing of most people protected by re establishing security
  and providing basic services. Possible services:                          considerations in basic
  •Advocacy for basic services that are safe, socially appropriate and
  protect dignity to enhance wellbeing and avoid doing harm.                services and security

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:9/7/2012
language:English
pages:31