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					Energy Assurance
Guidelines for
States
Miles Keogh, NARUC
David Terry, Stateline Energy

April 2007


                                1
New Orleans, September 2005




                              2
What is Energy Assurance?
All Hazards Approach
 Sabotage/Terrorism

 Civil Disturbance

 Flooding

 Natural Disasters

 Infrastructure Failures

 Public Health Emergencies


                              3
    Emergency Preparedness and Response

           Planning                        Assessment
         Training/Exercises
                                        Scope and Duration
           Coordination




Reliability                                        Security
                              Mitigation
• Redundancy            Risk & Vulnerability       • Physical
• No choke points           Assessment             • Insider
• Diversity                                        • Cyber

              Protecting Critical Infrastructure
                  and Building Resiliency
                                                                4
Other Organizations to Know
in Critical Infrastructure Emergencies
             State Energy          Governors’              State & Local Police;
                Offices             Offices                   National Guard




 Public Utility                                                     Other States
 Commissions
                                   Emergency
                                   Managers

     Utilities &                                               Local Government
 Interdependent                                                    Contacts
     Systems



           Federal Lead Agencies                State Legislators
             (DOE, EPA, DHS)
                                                                                   5
Energy Emergency Assurance
Coordinators (EEAC)

   Points of contact for States, DOE and industry in
    event of and energy emergency.
   Provide assessment, notification, news and
    updates on actions taken.
   Primary and secondary contact for each sector
    (petroleum, electricity, natural gas) from each
    state
   Website: https://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/isernet/login.aspx



                                                              6
Energy Assurance Guidelines

Provide state energy and emergency
officials with tools for understanding
and reviewing how their jurisdictions
respond to energy disruptions and
how to improve the energy
emergency plans that guide this
response.
The Guidelines are a compilation of
information from many state energy
and emergency officials who have
experienced and responded to
energy emergencies.
                                         7
Where can I find them?

NASEO’s Web Page:
 http://www.naseo.org/committees/energysecurity/



NARUC’s Web Page:
 http://www.naruc.org/cipbriefs




                                                    8
Ten State Actions to Assure Energy
Emergency Preparedness
 Make sure you and your staff are prepared
  and trained to deal with the emergency
  situation.
 Know your state’s energy profile.
 Get to know the key government and
  industry contacts.
 Maintain a current file of legal authorities.
 Remember energy locations and keep them
  current.
                                              9
Ten Sate Actions to Assure Energy
Emergency Preparedness (cont.)
 Be familiar with response measures.
 Work with the private sector.
 Regular plan review and update.
 Maintain an alternative budget for
  emergencies.
 Be prepared when meeting with the media.



                                         10
      Organization of the Guidelines

I.      Energy Assurance Considerations
II.     Define and Clarify Organizational
        Relationships and Responsibilities
III.    Principal Strategies for Managing an
        Energy Shortage
IV.     Response Measures considering
        electricity, natural gas and petroleum
V.      Public Information


                                                 11
Gathering Data and
Information
   Understanding the state
    energy profile
      – Capacities & Utilization
      – Energy flows,
        consumption & prices
   Identify who in the state is
    responsible for tracking
    trends, statistics
   Know what data is collected
    and how to get it and what
    it means
   Vulnerability assessment


                                   12
Recommended Actions
Voluntary
   Monitor Supply (no shortage)
        Attention to rumors, reports, national and regional
         events
        Monitor, alert, coordinate
        Issue public advisories as needed
   Moderate shortage
        Seek input from stakeholders regarding potential
         mandatory actions
        Give special attention to supporting private sector
         recovery efforts
    – Coordinate with advisory committees, other
      stakeholders
        Conduct risk analysis, notify Governor of impending
         energy emergency                                   13
Recommended Actions
Mandatory
 Severe Shortages
      Recommend mandatory actions
      State of Disaster
       – Responsibility usually falls to state &
          local EMA, sometimes PUC
      Declaration of Energy Emergency
       – SEO or PUC should coordinate with
          EMA and federal agencies as
          appropriate:
            DOE, FEMA, DOT
            (e.g., pipelines and driver hour waivers)
                                                   14
What Happens?
Natural Gas Emergency

    PUC/PSC
     – monitors supply & infrastructure status
     – energy efficiency and demand-side measures
     – sharp price jumps may require additional low
       income energy assistance and weatherization
     – makes recommendations to the Governor

    Local Distribution Companies (LDC)
     – initiate PUC/PSC-approved gas service
       curtailment plans to protect essential human
       services
                                                      15
What Happens?
Electricity Emergency

 Public Utility Commissions (PUC)
   – Monitors for outages and emergencies
   – Examples:
          – Storm, transmission and distribution, generation
            capability,interconnections, equipment failure
 Utilities
   – Institute “Emergency Electrical Procedures”
   – Know what should be exempt from rotating
     blackouts
   – Coordinate with Control Area Operators (CAOs)
     Regional Transmission Organizations (RTO) or
     Independent Systems Operators (ISO)
   – Restoration, reports                                      16
What Happens?
Petroleum Emergency

 State Energy Office/PUC
   – Monitors area prices and other factors for signs for
     shortage.
   – Receives informal reports from associations regarding
     product allocations.
   – Evaluates and makes recommendations to governor.
   – Coordinates with industry.
   – Convenes advisory committee and stakeholders as
     needed
          – Develop recommended mandatory actions.
          – Implement, administer, and monitor.
 Industry
   – Attempts supply enhancement.
   – Repairs and restoration as needed.                 17
Public Information

   Be prepared and know who will to talk to the Press.
    If a Joint Public Information Center is established
    work through this center.
   The message should be clear and consistent.
   Only tell them what you know as fact, do not
    speculate.
   Provide authoritative, accurate and timely
    information.
   Provide background information that helps them
    understand the nature of the problem
                                                      18
Guidelines Appendices
   Appendix A - Quick Guidelines: Ten Things You
    Should Know
   Appendix B - Additional Information Pertaining to
    Federal Agencies
   Appendix C – Federal Energy Emergency Actions
   Appendix D – Monitoring Fuel Supplies
   Appendix E – Essential Pre-Crisis and Background
    Information for State Energy Emergency
    Responders
   Appendix F – Petroleum Fuel Set-Aside

                                                        19
Questions?
For more information contact:
Miles Keogh, mkeogh@naruc.org
David Terry, DTerry@StatelineEnergy.org




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