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Valparaiso University

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									       Valparaiso University
       College of Engineering

 Program Self-Study Report for
    Computer Engineering


             ABET EC2000
             June July 1, 2004


                   Submitted to the
        Engineering Accreditation Commission
                         of the
  Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology



        Engineering Accreditation Commission
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
              111 Market Place, Suite 1050
            Baltimore, Maryland 21202-4012
Valparaiso University                                                                            Computer Engineering
                                                      Table of Contents
  A. Background Information ......................................................................................... 3
  1. Degree Titles ........................................................................................................... 3
  2. Program Modes ....................................................................................................... 3
  3. Actions to Correct Previous Deficiencies ................................................................. 3
  4. Contact Information ............................................................................................. 443
B. Accreditation Summary .......................................................................................... 554
  1. Students ............................................................................................................... 554
     A. Student Evaluation .......................................................................................... 554
     B. Student Advising ............................................................................................. 554
     C. Student Monitoring ......................................................................................... 554
     D. Transfer Students ............................................................................................ 665
     E. Credit Transfers............................................................................................... 776
  2. Program Educational Objectives .......................................................................... 776
     A. Program Educational Objectives ..................................................................... 776
     B. Relationship to Institutional Mission Statement ............................................... 887
     C. Relationship to Accreditation Criteria ............................................................. 998
     D. Significant Constituencies ............................................................................... 998
     E. Processes to Establish and Review Program Education Objectives ............ 111110
     F. Relationship of Curriculum to Program Educational Objectives ................. 141412
     G. Evaluation of Program Educational Objectives and Continual Improvement
     ...................................................................................................................... 181816
  3. Program Outcomes and Assessment............................................................... 212118
     A. Program Outcomes ................................................................................... 212118
     B. Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives .... 212119
     C. Relationship of Program Outcomes to Criterion 3 Outcome Requirements 232320
     D. Processes Used to Produce and Assess Program Outcomes ....................... 242422
     E. Program Outcome Metrics and Goals ........................................................ 272725
     F. Program Outcome Assessment Data and Analysis ..................................... 313128
     G. The Process of Program Improvement....................................................... 343431
     H. Specific Program Improvements and Supporting Data............................... 363632
     I. Materials Available During Site Visit ......................................................... 414136
  4. Professional Component ................................................................................ 414137
     A. Preparing Students for Engineering Practice.............................................. 414137
     B. Engineering Standards and Realistic Design Constraints ........................... 434338
     C. Engineering Topics ................................................................................... 444439
     D. General Education..................................................................................... 444439
     E. Mathematics and Basic Sciences ............................................................... 444439
  5. Faculty .......................................................................................................... 454540
  6. Facilities ........................................................................................................ 474742
     A. Classrooms ............................................................................................... 474742
     B. Instructional Laboratories .......................................................................... 474742
     C. Computing Infrastructure ......................................................................... 494944
     D. Computing Infrastructure—Software ........................................................ 505045
     E. Course Usage of Computing Facilities ...................................................... 515146
  7. Institutional Support and Financial Resources ................................................ 525247
     A. Institutional Support.................................................................................. 525247
     B. Financial Resources .................................................................................. 525347
     C. Constructive Leadership ............................................................................ 545449
     D. Budgetary Processes ................................................................................. 545449
     E. Faculty Professional Development............................................................. 555550
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Valparaiso University                                                                     Computer Engineering
     F. Plan to Acquire, Maintain, and Operate Facilities and Equipment .............. 565650
     G. Support Personnel and Institutional Services ............................................. 565751
  8. Program Criteria ............................................................................................ 575752
  9. General Advanced-Level Program ................................................................. 595953




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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering


A. Background Information
1. Degree Titles
The title of the degree is Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering. This title appears
on the transcript. The diploma carries the name Bachelor of Science in Computer
Engineering designation.

2. Program Modes
This program is offered in the day mode only. There are a very limited number of courses
offered during the evening, but they are part of our regular offerings.

A co-op program is available to our students, and assistance in obtaining co-op jobs is
provided by the Career Services Office and the departmental Co-op Coordinator, Dr.
Alan Kraft. Co-op students spend five years completing their degree, and they spend their
fifth and eighth semesters along with three summers working for an engineering firm.
Students in this program receive seven academic credits for full participation in the co-op
program, and these credits can be used to partially satisfy free elective and professional
elective requirements. Students on co-op take the same required courses as traditional
students, but they take the “junior year” courses in the opposite order and spaced over
two years. The faculty are careful to design the curriculum in such a way that no course
in semester six has a direct pre-requisite in semester five, which allows the co-op
program to fit into the CpE curriculum without affecting course pre-requisites.

Students are encouraged to spend a semester overseas at one of the university’s fourteen
international studies programs. This would typically take place in the student’s fifth
semester. The student and his/her advisor carefully plan for such a semester so that
courses available at the international location can be taken and used to satisfy graduation
requirements for the student. Most computer engineering students who participate in an
international experience go to Reutlingen, Germany or Cambridge, England, where the
university has a resident faculty director to supervise the program.

3. Actions to Correct Previous Deficiencies
None - initial evaluationThis is the initial accreditation of the Computer Engineering
Program.

Valparaiso University had a Computer Engineering Program from 1987–1994 (it was
accredited once by ABET in 1992). There were two main reasons why the program was
canceled in 1994. First, under the former ABET accreditation policies, each program had
to have six dedicated full-time faculty. At that time, three of the faculty in the program
were from the ECE department and the other three were from the Computer Science (CS)
department. It was difficult to maintain this requirement because the three ECE faculty
were also teaching electrical courses and the support of CS department, which is in the
college of Arts and Science, was not as strong as it needed to be. This led to a number of
challenges for the department in trying to maintain a creditable program. The second
reason was the lack of student interest in the program. Causes for the lack of interest
included a perception by the constituents at that time (students and employers) that the
program was a glorified CS degree, a lack of program vision and marketing by the
college, and the national view of what a computer engineer does.

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Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering


We believe that all of the problems that caused the cancellation of the program have been
addressed. First, the CS Faculty have reorganized the CS curriculum and show an
increased willingness to work with the ECE faculty to ensure the success of the program.
We currently have six of the seven full time faculty in the ECE department and two full
time faculty in the CS department that teach at least one required course in the program.
The ECE department has four faculty who can teach a majority of the core courses in the
program. In regard to increasing interest in the program, there are a number of factors
that will help in increasing the enrollment. First, the department has a better
understanding of what a computer engineer does and what distinguishes our program
from other programs both within the college and with other universities. This
understanding will help us develop better marketing materials and help us talk with
potential students about the differences between computer science, electrical engineering
and computer engineering. Second, the interest in the program from different constituents
has increased significantly over the last five years. A large number of perspective
students have expressed interest in the program along with potential employers who are
looking for qualified engineers that have more of a computer background.

4. Contact Information
Department Chair and Assessment Coordinator:
Dr. Douglas Tougaw
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
187 Gellersen Center
Valparaiso University
Valparaiso, IN 46383
Phone: (219) 464-5027
Fax: (219) 464-5065
Electronic Mail: Doug.Tougaw@valpo.edu




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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering

B. Accreditation Summary
1. Students
A. Student Evaluation
The department uses the standard A-F scale in grading students, including plus and minus
grades for greater resolution. The grade of A+ is not used; a grade of A is the highest
possible. Each instructor sets the grading policy for his or her course. All courses are
graded numerically, with the final grade assignment given by the instructor for the course
based upon a grading scale to convert the numeric grades to their final letter grade. Many
of the professors give a grading scale at the beginning of the course setting minimum
numeric thresholds to reach each letter grade, but reserve the right to decrease (but not
increase) these thresholds to account for the difficulty of the class and other factors.

B. Student Advising
Incoming freshman students have an opportunity to meet with representatives of the
College of Engineering in the summer prior to the first day of classes to discuss advising
issues and class concerns. All incoming freshmen students attend FOCUS, either for a
day in the summer or immediately before the semester begins. Those who do not attend
in the summer are phoned for advising and course selection. These representatives
usually include of the Dean of Engineering and the Freshman Coordinator, but may
include other advisors. Upon beginning their program of study, the College of
Engineering freshmen do not choose a discipline of study in their first semester. All
freshmen are initially classified as exploratory engineering majors. During their first
semester, students are advised by the Freshman Engineering Coordinator, who also
administers the Introduction to Engineering coursethe Freshman Engineering
Coordinator, who also administers the Introduction to Engineering course, advises
students. This course addresses many advising issues on a general scale for freshmen
students.

Near the end of their first semester, freshmen choose a discipline of study and are then
assigned an advisor in the corresponding department who will advise them for the
duration of their study. Students are required to meet with their advisor each semester to
receive approval for their selection of courses for the upcoming semester. Usually these
sessions include one-on-one conversation about the student’s progress in their studies and
their performance. Students are also encouraged to meet with their advisor throughout
the semester to address any concerns they may have. Every faculty of the College follows
and open-door policy for students to come and discuss career issues and program
progress. The advisor for each student receives copies of all communication to that
student from the Dean’s Office and Registrar concerning grade-point average, course
failures, Dean’s List achievement, and so forth, so that the advisor will be well in touch
with the student’s progress.

C. Student Monitoring
Students are monitored in many ways to assess their progress and their abilities to meet
the objectives of the department. Of course, collective monitoring of student progress
takes place as a routine part of the departmental assessment plan at the bi-annual
assessment meetings. Students are also given the opportunity to perform an annual self-
assessment to gauge their abilities to satisfy the outcomes of the department.

Students are individually monitored by their advisor, the department chair, the dean, and
the Registrar’s Office. Each semester, the advisor checks the progress of the student
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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
toward their degree. Grade reports and notices of deficiencies are sent to each advisor
each semester to help them monitor their advisees’ performance in classes.

Additionally, the student, their advisor, and the department chair have access to DataVU,
an on-line academic advising software package that details an up-to-date report of the
student’s progress toward completion of degree requirements both as to course and grade
average requirements. In-progress courses, those in which the student is either enrolled
or those upcoming courses for which the student is already registered, are also reported.

Students not meeting the objectives of the department are monitored by the policy of
academic deficiency and probation. Students whose cumulative resident grade-point
average in any of the four categories (overall cumulative, engineering major, general
education, and math/science/general engineering) falls below 2.00 are considered
academically deficient. Such students are placed on probation and may be suspended
from the College of Engineering unless they succeed in improving the quality of their
work to the satisfaction of the dean during the following semester. These students on
probation may be required by the department to take certain prescribed courses and to
meet specific standards in order to continue in enrollment. It is the policy of the College
of Engineering that suspended students may not request reinstatement for one calendar
year.

Departmental academic advisors meet with students to review the student’s DataVU
audits and help in course selection for subsequent semesters. This action by the advisors
helps to assure that each student follows the prescribed curriculum. Faculty advise
students on a rotating basis beginning in the freshman year of studies and following the
same group of students through until graduation. The department chair, who plans the
daily course schedule for the department, develops a schedule that accommodates student
needs based on courses for which students have completed a departmental pre-
registration request form. This minimizes conflicts between courses, especially those
needed by seniors for graduation.

Ms. Ann Trost, University Registrar, certifies that each student meets all degree
requirements prior to graduation. All deviations from the graduation requirements
spelled out in the University Catalog must be presented with justification by the dean of
the college to the University’s Committee on Academic and Professional Standards,
CAPS, for approval. Graduation requirements are never waived, rather suitable
substitutions may be approved upon the recommendation of the department.

D. Transfer Students
Academic work taken at other institutions is evaluated for advanced standing granted by
the Registrar. The appropriate departmental chair then determines which credits apply
toward the major and a Statement of Equivalence form is completed. Transfer students
are urged to communicate with the chair of the department prior to formally applying for
admission to obtain a preliminary assessment of the duration of their course of study.

Upon application for admission to the University, a transfer student submits official
transcripts from all universities attended. These transcripts are initially reviewed by the
Registrar's Office to determine accreditation status of the transferring institution and to
determine which courses are of appropriate college level and which are accepted based
upon grades earned. Advanced standing is granted for equivalent courses from
accredited colleges. In general, few of our transfer students have completed more than
one year of college-level engineering work. Credits from EAC-accredited schools and
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Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
from junior colleges that have articulation agreements with EAC-accredited schools are
accepted for direct equivalencies. Credits from non-EAC schools may be accepted to
meet general education requirements. Rarely will a student from a non-accredited
college be considered for admission to the college. Most often these are international
students. When such a student is admitted, credit for work done is granted upon
recommendation of the Dean of the College and approval of the VU Committee on
Academic and Professional Standards. For international students, credits are granted only
after satisfactory performance at Valparaiso is demonstrated. In cases of doubt
concerning the acceptance of credits from non-accredited programs, the Registrar asks for
advice from an engineering college with accredited programs in the state where the
college in question is located. Credits earned in Engineering Technology courses, while
accepted for general credit by VU, are not accepted for equivalency for engineering
courses. Only courses with grades of C- or higher are accepted for credit. Grades are not
transferable; only credit for those courses transfers. Credit by Examination, namely
Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) credits are accepted as
detailed in the University Catalog.

After courses for advanced standing are accepted by the University Registrar, Ms.
Barbara Engerer, the Freshman Engineering Coordinator, evaluates transfer credit
equivalency appropriate to the general education and General Engineering portions of the
program. Next, the department chair determines what transfer credit will be allowed in
the major by evaluating the catalog copy from the other college. In some cases, course
outlines, textbooks, and/or samples of student work are required to clarify
appropriateness of courses to be transferred. Finally, the Statement of Equivalence form
is used to summarize courses approved for transfer. Copies of the equivalency statement
are given to the student, advisor, and the Registrar's Office. Until this form with
appropriate approval is submitted to the registrar, the DataVU analysis will show that the
requirement is not met.

E. Credit Transfers
The University Registrar evaluates all credits presented for transfer to determine their
suitability as university-level courses. From this list of credits acceptable for Valparaiso
University credit, the Freshman Engineering Coordinator, after interviewing the transfer
student, prepares a list of the specific mathematics, science, general studies or general
engineering course requirements at Valparaiso University which are satisfied by these
transfer credits. The department chair or a designated advisor investigates any ECE
Department courses that may be satisfied by transfer credits.

Matriculated students of the University are requested to obtain prior approval for courses
to be transferred from another institution. Determination of course equivalency is made
by the Chair of the Department offering the course at VU and acknowledged by the
student's academic advisor on the Course Equivalency Form for Transfer Credit.

2. Program Educational Objectives

A. Program Educational Objectives
The electrical and computer engineering faculty have identified the following seven
Program Educational Objectives for the computer engineering program:

1. Prepare students to practice computer engineering in such areas as as digital system
   design, embedded systems, computer architecture, or software design and
11/2/2003                                                                                   7
Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
   developmentdigital systems design, electronics, embedded microcontrollers, software
   development, power systems, communication systems, or signal processing.

2. Prepare students to communicate effectively in a wide variety of situations using
   appropriate tools.

3. Prepare students to work effectively on teams in a variety of roles.

4. Prepare students to design computer engineering systems using creativity, technical
   competence, and problem-solving skills.

5. Prepare students to assume their ethical and professional responsibilities to meet the
   needs of society.

6. Prepare students to function in a competitive business environment by understanding
   the necessary economic and business practices.

7. Prepare students to appreciate the need for and to engage in continuous independent
   learning activities.

These objectives were identified by the departmental faculty in consultation with the
constituents identified in section B.2.D. This process involved selecting those behaviors
and skills that were believed to be critically important for the success of professional
engineers. While this has led to the selection of objectives that are somewhat similar to
the outcomes identified in section B.3.A, these objectives have the strong support and
endorsement of the department faculty and constituents.

B. Relationship to Institutional Mission Statement
The mission statement of Valparaiso University is: “Valparaiso University, a private
institution of higher learning distinguished by its Lutheran heritage of scholarship,
freedom, and faith, provides strong programs of liberal and professional studies well
grounded in the arts and sciences by a faculty dedicated to challenging teaching and care
for the individual in a residential setting where its students can develop as whole persons,
prepared to lead in their professions and to serve both church and society.” (Emphasis
added.)

This mission statement can be broken down into several objectives that are relevant to the
computer engineering program:
 A strong program of professional studies: To prepare students for professional
   practice in the field of computer engineering, they must be technically competent,
   they must be able to communicate effectively, they must be able to work in a variety
   of teams, and they must be able to design computer engineering systems. In addition,
   they must have the ability and motivation to continue learning throughout their career
   in order to maintain their technical competence. Thus, objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7
   directly support this aspect of the mission statement.
 Grounded in the Arts and Sciences: A strong grounding in the Arts and Sciences is
   necessary to develop many of the non-technical skills essential for a successful career
   and a successful life. Among these skills are the ability to communicate in writing
   and verbally, to recognize the ethical implications of engineering work, and to
   understand the economic impact of their work. Thus, objectives 2, 5, and 6 promote
   this aspect of the mission statement.

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Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
   Develop students as whole persons: Part of our mission is to develop students who are
    not only technically competent but who are also well-rounded individuals who can
    bring many skills to their career. This implies an ability to communicate effectively,
    to serve on teams as both leaders and as followers, and to become engaged as active
    lifelong learners. Thus, objectives 2, 3, and 7 promote this aspect of the mission
    statement.
   Prepare students to lead in their professions: Leadership requires an ability to
    communicate effectively, to work on a variety of teams, to behave ethically and
    professionally, and to understand the business and economic environment in which
    their organization operates. Thus, objectives 2, 3, 5, and 6 directly support this aspect
    of the mission statement.
   Prepare students to serve society: Preparing students to serve society implies that they
    will be technically competent and that they will pursue continuing education
    opportunities so as to learn about new ways to benefit society. Most importantly,
    however, they must behave ethically in all of their work, protecting the safety, health,
    and welfare of the public if they are to truly serve society. Thus, objectives 1, 5, and
    7 promote this aspect of the university’s mission.


C. Relationship to Accreditation Criteria
The program objectives describe the skills and attitudes that a young professional
engineer should exhibit, namely technical competence in the analysis and design of
computer engineering systems, an ability to communicate effectively and serve as a
member of a team, to relate their engineering solutions to the larger context of their
economic impact, to act ethically and professionally, and to continue to develop their
skills and knowledge throughout their lives. These objectives embrace the vision of the
outcomes enumerated in criterion 3, which describe a student who is first and foremost
technically skilled but who is also able to communicate and participate effectively in
teams and who is thoughtful, creative, ethical and well-rounded. They imply the
importance of recruiting, advising, and evaluating excellent students and creating and
updating a state-of-the art curriculum that is taught by dedicated faculty in first-rate
facilities.


D. Significant Constituencies
The significant constituencies of the computer engineering program include:

   Undergraduate Computer Engineering Students: Perhaps our most immediate
    constituents are the current students of the program. Every change we make to the
    curriculum and every improvement we make to a laboratory space affects these
    students immediately, and if it were not for them the program would not exist.
    Students are given an opportunity to provide feedback directly to the department as
    part of an annual student survey, as part of the senior exit survey, and through the bi-
    weekly meetings of the Dean’s Student Advisory Committee (DSAC). The DSAC is
    composed of the president and vice-president of each student organization within the
    college (IEEE, ASCE, ASME, SWE, SAE, and Tau Beta Pi), who meet regularly
    with the dean to discuss items of interest to all students. These students are also
    integrally involved in planning college-wide events and in promoting those events to
    their members.

   Computer Engineering Alumni: Of course, once students graduate and leave the
    program, they do not break their constituency ties with the program. Our alumni
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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering
    have a vested interest in ensuring that their alma mater continues to maintain and
    improve the program that gave them their start. These alumni also serve to help the
    program by recruiting graduates, helping to encourage talented high school students
    to consider the program, and by providing important guidance and feedback to the
    faculty as we make decisions about the program, its objectives, and its outcomes.
    The alumni are given an opportunity to provide us with feedback as part of our
    annual survey to each alumnus on his/her five year graduation anniversary and by
    participating on the department’s Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and the
    college’s National Council. These members consist of both practicing electrical and
    computer engineers. Current members of the department’s TAC include:

        o Becky Banicki (’94), Principle Principal Engineer, L-3 Communications, Salt
          Lake City, UT
        o Carl Bormet (’98), Software Process Engineer, Velox Development Group
        o Susan Gaugush (’96), Design Engineer, Caterpillar, Chicago, IL
        o John Hutton (’91), R&D Engineer, Hewlett-Packard, Fort Collins, CO
        o Paul Krause (’97), Systems Engineer, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN
        o Mike Kurzeja, Retired, Commonwealth Edison, Chicago, IL
        o Deborah Leavitt, Process Engineer, Intel
        o Andy Nunemaker (’91), Division Manager, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee,
          WI
        o Jim Pomeroy (’99), Senior Design Engineer, Stryker Corporation
        o Ken Roll (’64), Self-employed consulting engineer.
        o Dennis Thompson, Director of Engineering for ICSD at Motorola,
          Schaumburg, IL
        o Dave Wangrow (’84) Director of Business Management for North American
          Cellular Infrastructure, Motorola, Schaumburg, IL
        o Sara Williams (’00), Software Test Engineer for CDMA Systems, Motorola,
          Schaumburg, IL

    Several of the members of the TAC have developed extremely close relationships to
    the university. For example, Andy Nunemaker has recently accepted an invitation to
    join the college’s National Council, Dave Wangrow is currently serving as a part-time
    adjunct instructor to teach an evening course on Wireless Communications, and Kraig
    Olejniczak, a former member of the TAC, was removed from the list once he was
    selected to be our new dean for the College of Engineering.

   Potential Employers of Computer Engineering Graduates: Of course, these
    organizations are very important constituents of the program, because they directly
    benefit from the skills demonstrated by our students after they graduate and enter the
    workforce. In addition to carefully As a result, we carefully selecting the members of
    the departmental Technical Advisory Committee, listed above, to reflect major
    historical employers of our students., we also seek input from potential employers at
    the annual Career Fair held on campus each September. These potential employers
    are asked to provide us with feedback about the skills and attitudes they seek in new
    employees. Also, existing co-op employers of our students are asked to evaluate both
    the validity of our Program Educational Objectives and our success at accomplishing
    them.

   ECE Departmental Faculty: In a collegial environment characterized by substantial
    levels of self-governance, the faculty of the ECE department can also be considered
    constituents of the program. As such, they are each given an explicit opportunity to
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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
    provide individual feedback on the program outcomes and objectives each year as
    part of the faculty survey. Of course, their participation throughout the entire
    evaluation and assessment process also ensures substantial opportunity to provide
    input and feedback to the process.

   The Profession of Computer Engineering and Practicing Computer Engineers: Of
    course, practicing computer engineers have a vested interest in ensuring that only
    qualified and competent individuals enter their field. For this reason, a large
    proportion of the individuals being asked for feedback on our Program Educational
    Objectives are practicing electrical engineers. A majority of the Technical Advisory
    Committee, many of the potential employers, and the entire departmental faculty are
    electrical or computer engineers, giving the profession a significant voice in updating
    our department’s Program Educational Objectives. Of course, accreditation bodies
    such as ABET also provide an opportunity for the profession as a whole to validate
    our objectives or to make recommendations for revisions.

E. Processes to Establish and Review Program Education Objectives
The first work to develop Program Educational Objectives occurred in the Fall of 2002.
At that time, the objectives from the Electrical Engineering program were studied to
identify which objectives should also be associated with the Computer Engineering
program. When the objectives for the Electrical Engineering program were first
developed, was on December 29, 1998. At that first meeting, several faculty discussed
the skills considered to be important for our alumni and how we could measure those
skills. . It was soon decided that we needed to seek more input from constituents and to
develop a structured program for periodic evaluation of our success at meeting the
objectives and of their validity. The entire department faculty met twice more to discuss
the Program Educational Objectives on November 18, 1999, and February 1, 2000. By
the completion of that third meeting, tThe faculty had defined six initial Program
Educational Objectives based on initial input from key constituency groups including
alumni, potential employers, and faculty. We had also defined the process by which
those objectives would be evaluated and potentially updated. Given those six objectives,
the faculty determined that computer engineers should meet five of the six as they were
worded. The first objective, which listed areas of computer engineering, was changed to
reflect the areas that we believe our students should be prepared in.

That process has continued now for over three the past two yearss, and it consists of a
meeting of the entire department faculty each semester on the Monday before classes
begin. Prior to that meeting, each member of the department is responsible for preparing
several reports, each of which is designed to provide information to the faculty about our
Program Educational Objectives and Program Outcomes. Several of these reports are
designed to assess our success at meeting Program Outcomes or to evaluate success at
meeting Program Educational Objectives, but an equally important purpose of the
meeting is to consider whether any changes need to be made to the existing outcomes or
objectives. The minutes of all of these assessment meetings will be available to the
ABET team.

In particular, our departmental assessment plan indicates the following five items are to
be reviewed annually in an effort to ensure that the Program Educational Objectives meet
the needs of our constituents:

      “In addition to evaluating our success in meeting the program educational
      objectives, it is also important to verify that they are truly representative of the
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Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
      needs and desires of our constituencies. Since these needs and desires will likely
      change as rapidly as the field of computer engineering, we have set up the following
      plan for occasionally revising the program objectives:

      1. The annual five-year alumni survey will also include questions about the validity
      of the program educational objectives. The answers to these questions could be
      used to add, delete, or modify existing objectives. The results of this feedback will
      be presented to the department faculty each year in January.

      2. Input from the technical advisory committee will be very important in this
      revision process. Every year, they will be presented with an opportunity to make
      suggestions for objective revisions. This feedback will be presented to the
      department faculty each January.

      3. All department faculty will also be asked to make recommendations for the
      revision of program objectives once a year. This opportunity will come during
      Christmas break, and the results will be forwarded to the department faculty in
      January.

      4. All students will be asked to evaluate the validity of the program objectives as
      part of an annual student survey to be given to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors
      in December of each year.”

      1. The annual five-year alumni survey will also include questions about the validity
      of the program educational objectives. The answers to these questions could be
      used to add, delete, or modify existing objectives. The results of this feedback will
      be presented to the department faculty each year in January.

      2. Input from the technical advisory committee will be very important in this
      revision process. Every year, they will be presented with an opportunity to make
      suggestions for objective revisions. This feedback will be presented to the
      department faculty each January.

      3. A survey will be given to potential student employers at the annual career fair.
      This survey will ask for their suggestions to add, delete, or modify existing
      objectives. The results of this feedback will be presented to the department faculty
      in January.

      4. All department faculty will also be asked to make recommendations for the
      revision of program objectives once a year. This opportunity will come during
      Christmas break, and the results will be forwarded to the department faculty in
      January.

      5. Cooperative education employers will be given an opportunity to provide
      feedback in the revision of our objectives. This will occur at the end of a particular
      student’s co-op period, since the employer will have an excellent idea at that point
      of the skills we are trying to instill in our graduates. The results of this feedback
      will be presented to the department faculty in September.”

      -Computer Engineering Program Assessment Plan, Updated August 25,
2003January 5, 2004.

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             Valparaiso University                                                                                      Computer Engineering
             Each of these five items is the subject of a written report and an oral presentation given
             by a faculty member assigned to it. The written reports are included as part of the bound
             report of the computer engineering program assessment meeting, which forms the record
             of our assessment meeting, decisions made, and the data used to make those decisions.

             After the reports are made, the faculty review the results of those reports to determine
             whether any changes need to be made to the Program Educational Objectives, the
             Program Outcomes, the curriculum, or to the assessment plan itself. For example, the last
             several items of the agenda for the program assessment meeting on August 25, 2003
             were:

                        “Discussion of Actions to be Taken

                        1. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE program objectives.
                        2. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE program outcomes.
                        3. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE assessment plan.
                        4. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE curriculum and/or courses to
                        better meet the outcomes and objectives.”

                        -Agenda for the EE CpE program assessment meeting, August 25, 2003.

             As part of the decision-making process to determine whether or not the objectives need to
             be updated, the EE electrical and computer engineering faculty review each report that
             was relevant to the decision, determining whether any of these reports indicated
             constituent feedback that would necessitate such a revision. This is done in a matrix
             format, with each box filled in green light green if no revision is needed, yellow if
             revision is mildly recommended, and red if revision is strongly indicated. Measurands
             shown in white have yet to be collected.

             The appropriate elements of the matrix for the 2003-2004 academic year are shown
             below:


            Computer Engineering Program Objective Validity
                             2003-2004
Measurand #1                    Measurand #2                        Measurand #3                     Measurand #4                     Measurand #5
The annual five-year alumni     Input from the technical            A survey will be given to        All department faculty will be   Cooperative education employers
survey will include questions   advisory committee will be very     potential student employers at   asked to make                    will be given an opportunity to
about the validity of the       important in this revision          the annual career fair. This     recommendations for the          provide feedback in the revision of
program educational             process. Once a year, they will     survey will ask for their        revision of program              our objectives. This will occur at
objectives. The answers to      be presented with an opportunity    suggestions to add, delete, or   objectives once a year.          the end of a particular student’s co-
these questions could be used   to make suggestions for             modify existing objectives.                                       op period, since the employer will
to add, delete, or modify       objective revisions. This                                                                             have an excellent idea at that point
existing objectives.            feedback will be presented to the                                                                     of the skills we are trying to instill
                                department faculty each January.                                                                      in our graduates.




             These constituent feedback mechanisms differ slightly from those listed above because
             changes were made at the January 5, 2004 assessment meeting to modify the feedback
             used. It was determined that the surveys distributed at the career fair and those
             distributed to cooperative education employers were not providing useful guidance, and
             so the decision was made to focus on the more complete feedback from students, alumni,
             advisory committee, and faculty. These changes will be reflected in the measurement
             matrix for 2004-2005.
             11/2/2003                                                                                                                                   13
    Valparaiso University                                                                                      Computer Engineering


    Measurands 2, 3, and 4 were found to support the existing objectives at the January 2004
    assessment meeting. The first and last measurand, in white, has yet to be colected due to
    the newness of the computer engineering program.

    For historical comparison, Tthe appropriate elements of the matrix for the 2002-2003
    academic year are shown below:


      Computer Engineering Program Objective Validity
                       2002-2003
      Measurand #1                  Measurand #2                     Measurand #3                     Measurand #4                   Measurand #5
The annual five-year alumni Input from the technical          A survey will be given to         All department faculty will   Cooperative education
survey will include questions advisory committee will be      potential student employers       be asked to make              employers will be given an
about the validity of the     very important in this          at the annual career fair. This   recommendations for the       opportunity to provide
program educational           revision process. Every year,   survey will ask for their         revision of program           feedback in the revision of
objectives. The answers to they will be presented with        suggestions to add, delete, or    objectives once a year.       our objectives. This will
these questions could be used an opportunity to make          modify existing objectives.                                     occur at the end of a
to add, delete, or modify     suggestions for objective                                                                       particular student’s co-op
existing objectives.          revisions. This feedback will                                                                   period, since the employer
                              be presented to the                                                                             will have an excellent idea at
                              department faculty each                                                                         that point of the skills we are
                              January.                                                                                        trying to instill in our
                                                                                                                              graduates.


    As this matrix demonstrates, the faculty review of the reports associated with each of
    thesethe last three measurands, shown in light green, indicated that the constituent group
    did not feel a need to update the Program Educational Objectives at this time..

    Seeing that our constituents indicated no strong need to update the Program Educational
    Objectives during the 2002-2003 academic year might lead one to believe that the
    process does not actively seek input and feedback from those groups. Reviewing the
    same results for the 2001-2002 academic year, just the second full year of the revision
    process, tells a different story. Although we did not use a matrix like that shown above to
    represent revision recommendations during that year, it would have looked like this:


     As a result of the recommendations for revision of the Program Educational Objectives
    made during the 2001-2002 academic year, the faculty made three changes to the
    objectives at our January 8, 2002 assessment meeting. First, a seventh objective was
    added on the recommendation of the Technical Advisory Committee, which felt that it
    was essential that graduates have a better appreciation of the need for lifelong learning.
    Also, two of the existing objectives were modified upon recommendation of the
    departmental faculty.

    These results demonstrate that the process engages our program constituents and
    seriously considers their input and feedback in updating the Program Educational
    Objectives. As a result of the most recent revisions, constituents are currently very
    satisfied with our objectives, and the process will help us to identify when changes to the
    environment or the discipline necessitate additional changes.

    F. Relationship of Curriculum to Program Educational Objectives
    Each of the seven Program Educational Objectives are is directly addressed at several
    points throughout our curriculum. These relationships are summarized individually as
    follows:

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Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering


Objective 1: : Prepare students to practice computer engineering in such areas as digital
system design, embedded systems, computer architecture, or software design and
development.Prepare students to practice computer engineering in such areas as digital
systems design, electronics, embedded microcontrollers, software development, power
systems, communication systems, or signal processing.

This objective is integrated completely throughout our curriculum, beginning with the
freshman year and extending to elective courses in the senior year:
 As freshmen in GE 100, students perform their first experiments and projects
    involving digital systems and electronic devices.
 As freshmen in ECE 110 and ECE 111, students perform weekly experiments
    designed to introduce them to the fundamentals of various electrical and computer
    engineering topics.
 As sophomores in ECE 221 and ECE 222, students learn the essential skills of digital
    logic system design and analysis.
 As sophomores in ECE 263 and ECE 264, students learn the essential skills of analog
    circuit design and analysis that are used in upper level electives.
 As sophomores in ECE 155, ECE 258, ECE 357 and CS 257, students learn the
    fundamentals of software developmentprogramming and design.
 As juniors in ECE 360, students learn the underlying knowledge necessary for
    communication systems and signal processing.
 As juniors in ECE 342, students learn the essentials of electronic circuit design and
    analysis.
 As juniors in ECE 322, students learn the essentials of programming and interfacing
    embedded microcontrollers.
 As juniors and seniors, students in CS 347 learn the essentials of interfacing hardware     Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
    and softerware by studying operating systems and network communications.
 As juniors and seniors, students in CS 358 learn the essentials the design and
    development of large software systems.
 As juniors and seniors, students taking ECE 424 learn the essentials of computer
architecture.
 As juniors and seniors, students taking ECE 453 429 learn the essentials of
    communication system design and analysisVLSI Design.
As juniors and seniors, students taking ECE 372 learn the essentials of power system
    design and analysis.
 As juniors and seniors, students taking ECE 450 learn the essentials of digital
    communication systems.
 As juniors and seniors, students in ECE 452 learn the essentials of digital signal
    processing.
As juniors and seniors, students in ECE 471 learn the essentials of power electronics.       Formatted: Bullets and Numbering


2. Prepare students to communicate effectively in a wide variety of situations using
appropriate tools.

Students have many opportunities to practice, develop, and demonstrate their
communication skills throughout the curriculum:
 As freshmen in CORE 110 and CORE 115, students are frequently asked to write
   papers and to speak in class.
 As freshmen in ECE 110 and 111, they are asked to write weekly laboratory reports.

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Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
   As freshmen in PHYS 141 laboratory, they are asked to write weekly laboratory
    reports.
   As sophomores in ENGL 200 and in their social analysis elective, students are asked
    to write several papers.
   As sophomores in ECE 221, 222, 263, and 264, they are asked to write weekly
    laboratory reports.
   As juniors in CHEM 115, they are asked to write weekly laboratory reports.
   As juniors in ECE 342, they are asked to write bi-weekly laboratory reports and two
    design project reports.
   As juniors in ECE 322, they are asked to write bi-weekly laboratory reports and to
    deliver a final written and oral report on their course project.
   As juniors in GE 301, they are asked to write three term papers on ethics, safety, and
    sociopolitical factors associated with engineering work.
   As seniors, they are asked to frequently prepare and deliver many written and oral
    reports associated with their senior project in GE 497 and GE 498.

3. Prepare students to work effectively on teams in a variety of roles.

Students have many opportunities to develop their teamwork skills throughout the
curriculum:
 As freshmen in GE100, PHYS 141 laboratory, and ECE 111, they have the
    opportunity to work with laboratory partners on their weekly experiments and design
    projects.
 As sophomores in ECE 221, 222, 263, and 264, they have the opportunity to work
    with laboratory partners on their weekly experiments and design projects.
 As juniors in ECE 342, ECE 322, and CHEM 115, they have the opportunity to work
    with laboratory partners on their experiments and design projects.
 As juniors in GE 301, they have the opportunity to work with partners from other
    disciplines on their term papers and in-class projects.
 As seniors in GE 497 and GE 498, they work closely with a multidisciplinary team of
    four to five other students and a faculty advisor over the period of a year on their
    capstone design project.

4. Prepare students to design computer engineering systems using creativity, technical
competence, and problem-solving skills.

Design experiences are integrated throughout the curriculum:
 As freshmen in GE 100, ECE 110, and ECE 111, students complete simple design
   projects to introduce them to the philosophy of design.
 As sophomores in ECE 221, 222, 263, and 264, they have the opportunity to complete
   many design projects as both written assignments and as part of their laboratory
   exercises.
 As juniors in ECE 342 and ECE 322, students have the opportunity to complete
   significant design projects associated with electronic circuits and embedded
   microcontrollers.
 As seniors in GE 497 and GE 498, students spend the year working with a team to
   complete their capstone design project.

5. Prepare students to assume their ethical and professional responsibilities to meet the
needs of society.

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Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering
Students are given the skills necessary to approach their engineering work ethically and
professionally:
 As freshmen in GE 100, students are presented with an introduction to the key aspects
    of engineering ethics.
 As freshmen in CORE 110 and CORE 115, students are given an introduction to
    philosophy and theology, which helps them develop their personal ethical skills and
    understanding.
 As sophomores in their Social Analysis elective, students have the opportunity to see
    how both ethical and unethical actions affect society.
 As juniors in their theology elective, students learn more about ethical actions in the
    context of a religious perspective and foundation.
 As juniors in GE 301, students spend approximately three weeks of the course
    studying the details of engineering ethics, ethical problem-solving methods, and case
    studies of ethical and unethical acts by engineers.
 As seniors in GE 497 and GE 498, students have the opportunity to demonstrate their
    mastery of engineering ethics by incorporating it into their capstone design project.

6. Prepare students to function in a competitive business environment by understanding
the necessary economic and business practices.

Students receive a good introduction to engineering economics and finance in their junior
and senior years:
 As juniors in GE 301, students spend approximately five weeks studying the details
   of engineering economics and the economic impact of their engineering decisions.
 As seniors in GE 497 and GE 498, students work with a customer to set a budget for
   their project and then must follow that budget throughout the course of their project.

7. Prepare students to appreciate the need for and to engage in continuous independent
learning activities.

Students are given frequent opportunities to develop their independent learning skills
through the use of research assignments throughout the curriculum:
 As freshmen in CORE 110 and CORE 115, students are asked to write several papers
    that require independent research and learning.
 As sophomores in ECE 221, 222, 263, and 264, students are required to perform
    independent learning about the components and systems they are designing.
 As juniors in GE 301, students are given explicit instruction on lifelong learning and
    its importance in their careers. They are also required to locate, summarize, and
    analyze articles of significance to the course topics.
 As seniors in GE 497 and GE 498, students spend almost the entire year engaging in
    frequent independent learning exercises to choose components, learn about them, and
    integrate them into their capstone design projects.

This information is summarized graphically in the following table, which demonstrates
that our program objectives are integrated throughout the curriculum:




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  Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering


                Objective Objective Objective Objective Objective Objective Objective
  Course
                   1         2         3         4         5         6         7
PHYS 141                              
  GE 100                                                  
CORE 110/
CORE 115                                                                                
 ECE 110/
 ECE 111                                       
 ECE 155/
 ECE 258/
 ECE 357/           
  CS 257
 ECE 221/
 ECE 222                                                                            
 ECE 263/
 ECE 264                                                                            
  Social
                                                              
Analysis El.
ENGL 200                    
 ECE 360            
 ECE 342                                       
 ECE 322                                       
  CS 347                                          
  CS 358                                          
CHEM 115                              
 Theology
                                                               
 Elective
ECE 372424          
 ECE 429            
 ECE 450            
 ECE 452            
  GE 301                                                                            
 GE 497/
 GE 498                                                                           

  Table 1: Relationship between Curriculum and Program Educational Objectives

  G. Evaluation of Program Educational Objectives and Continual Improvement

  Program Educational Objectives are reviewed using the same bi-annual assessment
  meeting schedule established for their revision and updating. As described in section 3B
  of this self-study, the Program Outcomes, which are skills and attitudes students will
  11/2/2003                                                                                 18
Valparaiso University                                                                                        Computer Engineering
possess upon graduation, are very closely tied to the Program Educational Objectives,
which alumni will demonstrate during their first few years as professional engineers.
Thus, assessing the outcomes and confirming that they are being met is an important
indirect indication of success at meeting the objectives. In addition to this indirect
measurement, the faculty use three direct measurements each year to evaluate our success
at meeting the objectives:

        1. An alumni survey will be sent to each graduate five years after graduation. This
           survey will request opinions about the success of the program in meeting its
           objectives, but it will also request factual information about the graduate’s
           career that can also be used to evaluate the program’s success. Such factual
           information will include promotions, raises, publications, continuing education,
           advanced degrees earned, and patents. The results of this survey will be
           reviewed every summer by the assessment and evaluation committee, which will
           forward its recommendations to the entire department faculty in September.

        2. Placement data, starting salary data, and the number of recruiters coming to
           campus are all good measures of how industry views the preparation of our
           students. It is also a measure of the performance of recent graduates, since
           companies who are pleased with recent graduates will try to recruit more of
           them. This data will also be compiled and presented to the department faculty in
           September.

        3. Input from the technical advisory committee will be requested every year, to
        verify that their interactions with our graduates support the successful meeting of
        our objectives.

           -Computer Engineering Program Assessment Plan, Updated August 25, 2003.

Thus, one indirect and three two direct measurements of the level of achievement of the
objectives is are made each year. Again, the measurement tools used to evaluate
successful achievement of the objectives were modified at the January 2004 assessment
meeting, so the measurand matrix for the 2003-2004 academic year does not align
completely with the list of measurements given above.



              Computer Engineering Program Objective
                      Evaluation 2003-2004
Measurand #1                  Measurand #2                                   Measurand #3                          Measurand #4
Successfully meeting all of   The alumni survey will be sent to each         Placement data, starting salary data, Input from the technical advisory
the program outcomes will     graduate five years after graduation. This     and the number of recruiters          committee will be requested every
serve as a very strong        survey will request opinions about the         coming to campus are all good         year, to verify that their interactions
indicator of success in       success of the program in meeting its          measures of how industry views the with our graduates support the
meeting program               objectives, but it will also request factual   preparation of our students. It is    successful meeting of our objectives.
objectives.                   information about the graduate’s career        also a measure of the performance
                              that can also be used to evaluate the          of recent graduates, since
                              program’s success. Such factual                companies who are pleased with
                              information will include promotions,           recent graduates will try to recruit
                              raises, publications, continuing               more of them.
                              education, advanced degrees earned, and
                              patents.




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Valparaiso University                                                                                 Computer Engineering


Measurand #1 was removed from this plan for the 2004-2005 academic year because the
faculty found that its use confused the boundaries between objectives evaluation and
outcome assessment. Measurand #4 was removed because it was determined that
members of the Technical Advisory Committee were not necessarily in a position to
routinely interact with alumni in their first five years after graduation. This change also
allowed the TAC to focus their efforts more completely on the validity of the objectives,
while the department used other mechanisms to confirm the achievement of those
objectives.

During the 2002-2003 academic year, each of these measurements used indicated that the
objectives were being successfully achieved:




             Computer Engineering Program Objective
                     Evaluation 2002-2003
          Measurand #1                           Measurand #2                          Measurand #3                      Measurand #4
Successfully meeting all of the       The alumni survey will be sent to each Placement data, starting salary data, Input from the technical
program outcomes will serve as a      graduate five years after graduation. and the number of recruiters           advisory committee will be
very strong indicator of success in   This survey will request opinions        coming to campus are all good       requested every year, to
meeting program objectives.           about the success of the program in      measures of how industry views the verify that their interactions
                                      meeting its objectives, but it will also preparation of our students. It is  with our graduates support the
                                      request factual information about the also a measure of the performance successful meeting of our
                                      graduate’s career that can also be used of recent graduates, since           objectives.
                                      to evaluate the program’s success.       companies who are pleased with
                                      Such factual information will include recent graduates will try to recruit
                                      promotions, raises, publications,        more of them.
                                      continuing education, advanced
                                      degrees earned, and patents.




Again, light green indicates a positive evaluation of our graduates’ success at achieving
the Program Educational Objectives, and the white signifies a measurand that has yet to
be measured.
Here, green indicates a positive evaluation of our graduates’ success at achieving the
Program Educational Objectives, yellow would indicate some concern about their level of
achievement, and red would indicate strong concern about that level of achievement.

However, a similar analysis of the 2001-2002 academic year would have revealed the
following results:


During this academic year, both alumni and the Technical Advisory Committee provided
feedback that our students needed somewhat stronger business skills, and the Technical
Advisory Committee also indicated a need for slightly improved teamwork skills and
lifelong learning skills. As a result of this feedback, the following changes were made:
GE 301 was modified to use a state-of-the-art engineering economics textbook and the                                                               Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
     emphasis on engineering economics as an important part of systems engineering was
     increased.
A lecture on lifelong learning and another lecture on professional registration were
     added to GE 301.
The teamwork evaluation methods established for the capstone design sequence were
     modified and each team was required to create a team charter.
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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
Independent learning activities were added to ECE 221/222 and ECE 263/264.

Clearly, changes made in 2002 could not have been the cause for improvements in the
five-year alumni survey and the Technical Advisory Committee feedback in 2003, but
improvements to the associated outcomes, to be seen in section 3G, indicate that these
changes have had a positive effect.

3. Program Outcomes and Assessment

A. Program Outcomes

The computer engineering program has identified the following twelve outcomes:

 Upon completion of the program, the graduate will be prepared to enter the practice of
computer engineering or pursue an advanced degree and will have demonstrated:

(1) technical competence in several areas of computer engineering such digital system
    design, embedded systems, computer architecture, or software design and
    development;as embedded microcontrollers, analog and digital circuits,
    communication systems, power systems, or electronics;

(2) an ability to use math, science, and modern engineering tools to solve engineering
    problems;

(3) a knowledge of the design process, including experimental design;

(4) a knowledge of advanced mathematics, including differential equations, linear
    algebra, probability and statistics, and complex numbers;

(5) a knowledge of circuit analysis and electronics.a knowledge of computer organization
    and software design.

(6) skill with oral, written, and multimedia communications;

(7) an ability to conduct experiments and to effectively evaluate, organize and present
    data and information;

(8) that they can function as a member of a team, including multi-disciplinary teams;

(9) an exposure to non-technical areas that enhance their appreciation of the engineer’s
    place in society;

(10) an understanding of engineering economics;

(11) a recognition of the need for continuous, career-long learning and career planning;

(12) an understanding of the ethical framework within which electrical and computer
   engineers function with emphasis on the safety, health, and welfare of the public;


B. Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives
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           Valparaiso University                                                        Computer Engineering


           For our program, the following definitions are used for Program Outcomes and Program
           Educational Objectives:

           Program outcomes are statements that describe “what students are expected to know or
           be able to do by the time of graduation from the program.”

           Program educational objectives are statements that describe “the expected
           accomplishments of graduates during the first several years following graduation from
           the program.”

           From these definitions, it is clear that the program only has direct control over program
           outcomes, since program objectives are only projections of expected accomplishments of
           graduates after they leave the university. However, by carefully choosing the program
           outcomes and ensuring that they are accomplished by students still on campus, successful
           completion of program education objectives is very likely.

           Clearly, then, it is important that the Program Outcomes support and grow from the
           Program Educational Objectives. The following table illustrates the relationship between
           our Program Outcomes and our Program Educational Objectives:




                   Objective 1:                     Objective 3:                  Objective 5:   Objective 6:    Objective 7:
                                    Objective 2:                   Objective 4:
                     Practice                        Work in                      Ethical and    Economic/        Continuous
                                   Communicate                      Design EE
                    Computer                          Teams                       Professional    Business       Independent
                                    Effectively                    CpE Systems
                   Engineering                      Effectively                    Behavior       Practices        Learning
  Outcome 1:          Direct
   Technical        Correlation
  Competence       to Objective
  Outcome 2:       Contributes                                     Contributes
Problem Solving    to Objective                                    to Objective
  Outcome 3:                                                          Direct
    Design                                                          Correlation
    Process                                                        to Objective
  Outcome 4:
                   Contributes                                     Contributes
   Advanced
                   to Objective                                    to Objective
  Mathematics
  Outcome 5:
   Computer
                   Contributes
   Hardware/
                   to Objective
SoftwareAnalog
Circuit Analysis
  Outcome 6:                          Direct
Communication                      Correlation to
     Skills                         Objective
  Outcome 7:       Contributes        Direct
Conduct/Report     to Objective    Correlation to
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           Valparaiso University                                                      Computer Engineering
 Experiments                       Objective
 Outcome 8:                                           Direct
Multi-discipline                                    Correlation
    Teams                                          to Objective
 Outcome 9:
                                                   Contributes               Contributes      Contributes     Contributes
Non-technical
                                                   to Objective              to Objective     to Objective    to Objective
 Appreciation
 Outcome 10:                                                                                     Direct
 Engineering                                                                                   Correlation
  Economics                                                                                   to Objective
 Outcome 11:                                                                                                     Direct
 Continuous                                                                                                    Correlation
   Learning                                                                                                   to Objective
 Outcome 12:                                                                    Direct
    Ethical                                                                   Correlation
 Framework                                                                   to Objective
           Table 2: Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives

           As can be seen from Table 2, each Program Educational Objective is supported by at
           least one Program Outcome that directly correlates to that objective as well as one or
           more Program Outcomes that Contribute to student success in that Objective.


           C. Relationship of Program Outcomes to Criterion 3 Outcome Requirements

           In addition to supporting the Program Educational Objectives, the Program Outcomes
           must also at least span the space identified in Criterion 3:

           Engineering programs must demonstrate that their graduates have:
           (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
           (b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
           (c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs
           (d) an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
           (e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
           (f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
           (g) an ability to communicate effectively
           (h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a
           global and societal context
           (i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
           (j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
           (k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for
           engineering practice.

            Table 3 graphically illustrates the relationship between our Program Outcomes and the
           outcomes required in Criterion 3.

                                                           Criterion 3 Requirements

                            A       B          C       D          E   F      G         H        I        J        K
         Outcome 1                             3                  2                                      3        2
         Outcome 2           1                                    1                                      3        1
         Outcome 3                  2          1

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  Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering

Outcome 4           1                                                                             3
Outcome 5                         3               2                                     3         2
Outcome 6                                                        1
Outcome 7                 1
Outcome 8                                 1
Outcome 9                                                               1               2
Outcome 10                                                                                        2
Outcome 11                                                                      1
Outcome 12                                                1

                              1=Direct         2=Contributes    3=Related to
                              Correlation to   Significantly    Criterion 3
                              Criterion 3      to Criterion 3   Outcome
                              Outcome          Outcome

  Table 3: Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives.

  As demonstrated by Table 3, each outcome required by Criterion 3 is covered by one or
  more of our Program Outcomes. In some cases, the requirement is met by very close
  alignment with a single Program Outcome, such as with requirements d, f, g, h, and i. In
  other cases, a single required outcome is met by a combination of elements from several
  of our Program Outcomes. An example of this is required outcome j, “a knowledge of
  contemporary issues.” Contemporary issues can be interpreted to mean contemporary
  technical issues related directly to the engineering profession, contemporary engineering
  tools and software packages, or contemporary issues in society that impact engineering
  work. Each of these interpretations is related to one of our Program Outcomes, so several
  boxes in that column are filled.

  D. Processes Used to Produce and Assess Program Outcomes

  The process to create our Program Outcomes was similar to the Program Objectives
  process. The Electrical Engineering Program Outcomes were reviewed in the Fall of
  2002 to determine which were applicable to the Computer Engineering Program. The EE
  Outcomes were developed after college faculty had participated in training sessions to
  learn about characteristics of a good outcome, and two of the departmental faculty had
  attended outcomes assessment conferences at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and
  in Baltimore, MD. After reviewing the EE Outcomes, all but two were used as Computer
  Engineering Outcomes. The first outcome was again changed to reflect the student’s
  competence in Computer Engineering and an outcome regarding the knowledge of analog
  circuit analysis was added to reflect the hardware focus of the degree and the strong link
  between the analog and digital world.Our Program Outcomes were developed over a
  period of two years in an iterative process involving the departmental faculty and
  program constituents. The first effort to define Program Outcomes was on December 29,
  1998. Prior to this meeting, college faculty had participated in training sessions to learn
  about characteristics of a good outcome, and two of the departmental faculty had attended


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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
outcomes assessment conferences at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and in
Baltimore, MD.

At that first meeting, it was decided that we needed to seek more input from constituents
and to develop a structured program for periodic evaluation of our success at meeting the
outcomes and of their validity. The entire department faculty met twice more to discuss
the Program Outcomes on November 18, 1999, and February 1, 2000. By the completion
of these three meetings, the initial Program Outcomes were fully defined along with a
procedure for evaluating their validity and assessing our success at accomplishing them.

The departmental faculty took great pains to define Program Outcomes that did not
simply restate the outcomes required in Criterion 3 but that incorporated all of the skills
identified in those requirements.

This procedure, which is concurrent with the procedure to evaluate and update the
Program Educational Objectives, involves bi-annual program assessment meetings on the
Monday before classes begin each semester. As described in section 2E, these meetings
begin with a series of reports by individual faculty members who have assessed particular
aspects of one or more outcomes for validity or achievement. As the faculty reviews
each individual report, they are categorized as “GOOD,” “OF CONCERN,” or “POOR.”
The exact nature of each metric and the thresholds defined for each level of evaluation
will be described in detail in section 3E.

After the individual reports are complete, the meeting transitions to the decision-making
phase, in which the following five agenda items are addressed:

        “Discussion of Actions to be Taken
        1. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE program objectives.
        2. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE program outcomes.
        3. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE assessment plan.
        4. Discussion of possible changes to the EE CpE curriculum and/or courses to
        better meet the outcomes and objectives.”

        -Agenda for the EE CpE program assessment meeting, August 25, 2003.

As this excerpt from our assessment meeting agenda indicates, we consider updating the
Program Outcomes, the curriculum and courses used to achieve those outcomes, and the
assessment plan used to assess our achievement of the outcomes.

The validity of the Program Outcomes is assessed each year using five tools, which
solicit feedback from each of four constituency groups:
Graduating seniors are asked to complete an exit survey, which is used to assess the           Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
    validity of all twelve outcomes.
The Technical Advisory Committee provides feedback recommending any necessary
    revisions to the outcomes.
Potential student employers are asked for feedback on the program outcomes at the
    annual Career Fair.
Department faculty are asked for feedback on the revision of the outcomes.
All students (from freshmen to seniors) are asked to evaluate the validity of the
    outcomes once a year.


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Valparaiso University                                                                               Computer Engineering
The results of these evaluations for the 2002-2003 academic year are shown below,
indicating that none of the constituent groups recommended significant changes to the
Program Outcomes:


                     Computer Engineering Program
                      Outcome Validity 2002-2003
      Measurand #1              Measurand #2             Measurand #3               Measurand #4              Measurand #5
  Every graduating senior   Input from the technical A survey will be given     All department faculty   All students will be asked
  will be given a senior    advisory committee will to potential student        will also be asked to    to fill out a survey every
  exit survey shortly       be very important in this employers at the annual   make recommendations     December. One component
  before graduation. This   revision process. Each career fair. This survey     for the revision of      of this survey will be a
  survey will ask the       year, they will be        will ask for their        program outcomes once    request for feedback on the
  graduating seniors for    presented with an         suggestions to add,       a year.                  validity of the program
  their feedback in         opportunity to make       delete, or modify                                  educational outcomes.
  revising the outcomes.    suggestions for outcome existing outcomes.
                            revisions.


During the 2001-2002 academic year, two of the constituent groups recommended
changes to the Program Outcomes:


As a result of these recommendations, changes were made to outcomes 1, 5, 9, and 10 at
the January 8, 2002 assessment meeting.

Until January 2004, the faculty sought constituent feedback regarding the validity of
program outcomes. After careful review of the accreditation criteria following
discussions with Dr. Ed Jones, the consultant we hired to review our accreditation
application, the faculty realized that constituent feedback is required only for the revision
of program objectives. Of course, as Program Objectives are modified, it will likely
require corresponding changes to the Program Outcomes, so it is important that we
continue to review the Program Outcomes at each bi-annual assessment meeting.


As expected, Cchanges to our Program Outcomes happen more frequently than changes
to our Program Educational Objectives. Changes to courses, curriculum, and the
assessment plan happen even more frequently than changes to the Program Outcomes.
This is expected, since the courses and curriculum lead to successful achievement of the
Program Outcomes, which in turn lead to successful achievement of the Program
Educational Objectives:




                                                             Program
                                                           Educational
                                                           Objectives
                                                            Program
                                                           Outcomes

                                                    Courses, Curriculum,
                                                     and Instructional
                                                         Methods


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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering
Figure 1. Relationship between Courses and Curriculum, Program Outcomes, and
          Program Educational Objectives.

When viewed from this perspective, it is entirely natural that changes be made more
frequently to the items lower on the cause and effect pyramid.

The entire system used by the department to review the validity of Program Outcomes, to
determine our success at achieving them, and to improve the curriculum and courses to
better achieve them are illustrated below in Figure 2.
                        Feedback                             Results



   Program                                                                 Courses and
  Constituents                                                             Curriculum
                                                        Improvement




                                                                                   Measure
                                      Departmental
   Review




                                      Assessment
                                        Meeting
                                                          Review

    Program                                                                Assessment
    Outcomes                                                                  Tools


                        Update                               Revise

Figure 2. Program Outcome Assessment and Validation Flowchart

As this figure shows, the departmental assessment meeting is at the center of the process.
Program Outcomes are reviewed by constituents, who provide feedback to the
department. This feedback is then used to update the outcomes as necessary.
Simultaneously, assessment tools are used to measure the success of students at achieving
the Program Outcomes through the courses and curriculum. The results of these
assessments are then used to determine necessary changes to the courses and curriculum.
Finally, faculty also review the assessment tools themselves for effectiveness and
feasibility, performing revision as necessary.



E. Program Outcome Metrics and Goals

Each Program Outcome is measured by four to six metrics (also called measurands in our
documentation). The metrics are selected to assess each outcome at various points in the
curriculum appropriate for that outcome and to measure different aspects of each
outcome whenever possible.

The particular metrics used for each of the twelve outcomes is numbered according to the
outcome being assessed. A letter is appended to the outcome number to represent the
ordinal number of the metric being considered. For example, Metric 8c is the third
metric used to assess Outcome #8. Whenever possible, metrics are arranged according to
the order in which they are applied in the curriculum for each student.



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Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering
Fifty-two metrics are used to assess our twelve outcomes each year. The specific metrics
used for each outcome are listed below:

Outcome #1: Technical competence in several areas of computer engineering such
as embedded microcontrollers, digital system design, computer architecture, or
software developmentTechnical competence in several areas of computer
engineering such as embedded microcontrollers, analog and digital circuits,
communication systems, power systems, or electronics

1a. Exam questions from ECE 221 covering the analysis of digital circuits.
1b. A programming assignment from ECE 258, which will be graded using a
standardized score sheet to assess the students’ ability to develop software
programs.Exam questions from ECE 263 covering the analysis of analog circuits.
1c. Exam questions from ECE 322 covering the development of embedded computer
    systems.
1d. Exam questions from ECE 424 covering topics in computer architecture.questions
    from ECE 342 covering the analysis of electronic circuits.
1e. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.
1f. Performance on the Electrical Engineering and computer Computer engineering
    portions of the FE exam.

Outcome #2: An ability to use math, science, and modern engineering tools to solve
engineering problems

2a. Exam questions from ECE 202 covering the ability to use computer tools to solve
    engineering problems.
2b. The final design project from ECE 222, which will be graded using a standardized
    score sheet to assess students’ ability to use a diverse set of engineering tools.
2c. Exam questions from ECE 357 covering the ability to use math to solve computer
engineering problems. Exam questions from ECE 430 covering the ability to use math
and science to solve engineering problems.
2d. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #3: A knowledge of the design process, including experimental design

3a. A selected laboratory report from ECE 264, which will be graded using a
    standardized score sheet to assess students’ ability to design an experiment.
3b. The final design project in ECE 322, which will be graded using a standardized score
    sheet to assess students’ ability to design a system.
3c. The final design project in GE 498, which will be graded using a standardized score
    sheet to assess students’ ability to design a system.
3d. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #4: A knowledge of advanced mathematics, including differential
equations, linear algebradiscrete mathematics, probability and statistics, and
complex numbers

4a. Exam questions from ECE 263 covering the ability to solve differential equations.
4b. Exam questions from ECE 263 covering the ability to solve problems using complex
    numbers.
4c. Exam questions from ECE 357 covering the ability to solve problems using discrete
    mathematics.
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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
4c4d. Exam questions from ECE 465 covering the ability to apply probability to the study
   of computer engineering.
4d4e. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #5: A knowledge of analog circuit analysis and electronicsknowledge of
computer organization and software design

5a5a. Exam questions from ECE 263 covering the analysis of analog circuits.
5b. Exam questions from ECE 342 covering the analysis of electronic circuits.
5c. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.
5d. Performance on the Electrical Engineering portion of the FE exam.
. Exam questions from ECE 155 covering the ability to write computer software to solve
    an computer engineering problem.
5b. The final design project in ECE 322, which will be graded using a standardized score
    sheet to assess students’ knowledge of software design.
5c. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.
5d. Performance on the computer software and computer hardware engineering portions
    of the FE exam.

Outcome #6: Skill with oral, written, and multimedia communications

6a. An executive summary written in ECE 264 will be graded using a standardized score
    sheet to assess students’ ability to communicate succinctly in writing.
6b. The final project written report from ECE 342, which will be graded using a
    standardized score sheet to assess students’ ability to effectively write a technical
    report.
6c. The final oral reports in GE 498, which will be graded by all attending department
    faculty using a standardized score sheet to assess students’ ability to communicate
    orally.
6d. The final written report for the senior design project in GE 498, which will be graded
    using a standardized score sheet.
6e. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #7: An ability to conduct experiments and to effectively evaluate, organize
and present data and information

7a. A selected laboratory report from ECE 111, which            will be graded using a
    standardized score sheet to assess students’ ability to     conduct experiments and
    present the results.
7b. A selected laboratory report from ECE 264, which            will be graded using a
    standardized score sheet to assess students’ ability to     conduct experiments and
    present the results.
7c. A selected laboratory report from ECE 342, which            will be graded using a
    standardized score sheet to assess students’ ability to     conduct experiments and
    present the results.
7d. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #8: An ability to function as a member of a team, including multi-
disciplinary teams

8a. The team self-evaluations filled out at the end of GE 497 by senior project teams.
8b. The team self-evaluations filled out at the end of GE 498 by senior project teams.
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Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
8c. The team evaluations by the project technical advisor at the end of GE 498.
8d. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #9: An exposure to nontechnical areas that enhance their appreciation of
the engineer’s place in society

9a. Student essays written in ECE 222 will be graded to assess students’ ability to
    describe the engineer’s place in society.
9b. Factual responses from the senior exit survey used to indicate the fraction of students
    who participate in campus activities such as arts, music, theater, athletics, or student
    government.
9c. Course grades received in CORE 110 and CORE 115 will be assessed at the end of
    the freshmen year to determine students’ understanding of nontechnical areas within
    the curriculum.
9d. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #10: An understanding of engineering economics

10a. Standardized problems from GE 301 covering the ability to apply engineering
   economics to a real-world problem.
10b. Budget analysis from GE 498 final report will be graded using a standardized score
   sheet to assess students’ ability to write an accurate budget and to follow that budget.
10c. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.
10d. Performance on the engineering economics portion of the FE exam.

Outcome #11: A recognition of the need for continuous, career-long learning and
career planning

11a. Overall membership in the student branch of IEEE will be used to assess students’
   interest in career-long learning.
11b. Attendance at the annual Student Professional Awareness Conference will be used
   to assess students’ interest in career-long learning and career planning.
11c. Attendance at the annual Student Night Dinner technical presentation will be used to
   assess students’ interest in career-long learning.
11d. Attendance at Career Center events will be used to assess students’ interest in career
   planning.
11e. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.

Outcome #12: An understanding of the ethical framework within which electrical
and computer engineers function with emphasis on the safety, health, and welfare of
the public

12a. Exam questions from GE 301 will be used to assess students’ ability to recongnize a
   situation requiring ethical judgment and to select the appropriate action given a list of
   alternatives.
12b. An ethics case study paper in GE 301, which will be graded using a standardized
   score sheet to assess students’ ability to recognize ethical dilemmas and apply the
   appropriate judgement to solve them.
12c. Self-assessment responses provided on senior exit survey.
12d. Performance on the ethics portion of the FE exam.



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Given the varying nature of these metrics, no one goal will be appropriate for all of them.
Therefore, the following guidelines have been established based on the nature of each
metric:

 Metric Category         GOOD Rating        OF CONCERN Rating             POOR Rating
                         >75% of points        60-75% of points           <60% of points
  Exam questions           possible on       possible on questions          possible on
                        questions studied           studied              questions studied
 Self-assessment
                          Performance       Performance Index 3.0-      Performance Index
  responses on
                         Index >3.5/5.0            3.5/5.0                   <3.0/5.0
senior exit survey
                        >70% of points
                                              60-70% of points on       <60% of points on
FE exam questions        on categories
                                               categories studied       categories studied
                            studied
      Course
   assignments
   graded using         Score > 3.7/5.0        Score 3.0-3.7/5.0          Score < 3.0/5.0
standardized score
       sheet
Team evaluations        Score > 4.0/5.0        Score 3.0-4.0/5.0          Score < 3.0/5.0
      Student
                         > 25% of ECE                                      <20% of ECE
  participation in                          20-25% of ECE students
                            students                                         students
 campus activities
  CORE 110 and          Average CORE         Average CORE GPA             Average CORE
CORE 115 grades           GPA >3.0                 2.5-3.0                  GPA < 2.5
IEEE membership
                         > 25% of ECE                                      <20% of ECE
     and event                              20-25% of ECE students
                            students                                         students
    attendance

Table 4. Metric goals for outcome assessment processes.

These metric goals were established by the department faculty as a whole, and were
selected to represent the level of accomplishment felt necessary to ensure successful
achieve the Program Educational Objectives. As the program continues to improve, these
metric goals will be revisited and will, no doubt, be raised to recognize the increased
expectations by the faculty of student performance.

F. Program Outcome Assessment Data and Analysis

For the 2002-2003 academic year (the last year for which complete data is are available
at the time of this report preparation), 43 46 of the 52 53 assessment metrics were found
to be GOOD, 8 6 were found to be OF CONCERN, and one was not completed. These
results are summarized in the following table. For each cell, the measurand is indicated
within the cell, the result of the measurement is given in parentheses, and the color of the
cell indicates the determination of the faculty whether that measurand was GOOD (light
blue), OF CONCERN (yellow), or POOR (red), or NOT YET MEASURED (white). The
data reflects the responses of both electrical and computer engineering students due
newness of the program and the small numbers of current Computer Engineering
students. Future matrices will have the data split..



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     Valparaiso University                                                                                       Computer Engineering




           Computer Engineering Program Assessment
                 Measurand Matrix 2002-2003
     Outcome             Measurand A          Measurand B          Measurand C             Measurand D             Measurand E          Measurand F
(1) technical         Multiple-choice       A programming        Multiple-choice        Multiple-choice          Self-assessment      Performance on the
competence in         questions from        assignment from      questions from         questions from ECE       responses provided   computer electrical
several areas of      ECE 221 covering      ECE 258, which       ECE 320 covering       424 covering topics in   on senior exit       engineering and
computer              the analysis of       will be graded using the development of     computer architecture.   survey.              computer portions
engineering such as digital circuits.       a standardized score embedded               (77% average             (4.53/5.0)           of the FE exam.
embedded              (78.6% correct)       sheet to assess the computer systems.       score)Multiple-choice                         (EE - 78%, 40%,
microcontrollers,                           students’ ability to (range 28%-            questions from ECE                            82% correct)
digital system                              develop software 100%, average              342 covering the                              (Computers -
design, computer                            programs.            76%)                   analysis of electronic                        82%, 79%, 81%)
architecture, or                            (3.88/5.0)Multiple-                         circuits.
software                                    choice questions                            (77% average score)
development;(1)                             from ECE 263
technical                                   covering the
competence in                               analysis of analog
several areas of                            circuits.
computer                                    (76.1% correct)
engineering such as
embedded
microcontrollers,
analog and digital
circuits,
communication
systems, power
systems, or
electronics;
(2) an ability to use Exam questions        The final design     Multiple-choice        Self-assessment
math, science, and from ECE 202             project from ECE     questions from         responses provided on
modern engineering covering the ability     222, which will be   ECE 357 covering       senior exit survey.
tools to solve        to use computer       graded using a       the ability to use     (4.60/5.0)
engineering           tools to solve        standardized score   math to solve
problems;             engineering           sheet to assess      computer
                      problems.             students’ ability to engineering
                      (80.3% correct)       use a diverse set of problems.
                                            engineering tools.   (85.4%
                                            (3.73/5.0)           correct)Multiple-
                                                                 choice questions
                                                                 from ECE 430
                                                                 covering the ability
                                                                 to use math and
                                                                 science to solve
                                                                 engineering
                                                                 problems.
                                                                 (80.9% correct)
(3) a knowledge of     A selected           The final design     The final design       Self-assessment
the design process,    laboratory report project in ECE 320, project in GE 498,         responses provided on
including              from ECE 264,        which will be        which will be          senior exit survey.
experimental           which will be        graded using a       graded using a         (4.27/5.0)
design;                graded using a       standardized score standardized score
                       standardized score sheet to assess        sheet to assess
                       sheet to assess      students’ ability to students’ ability to
                       students’ ability to design a system.     design a system.
                       design an            (4.31/5.0)           (4.28/5.0)
                       experiment.
                       (90% average
                       score)
(4) a knowledge of     Multiple-choice      Multiple-choice      Multiple-choice        Multiple-choice       Self-assessment
advanced               questions from       questions from ECE questions from           questions from ECE responses provided
mathematics,           ECE 263 covering 263 covering the         ECE 357 covering       465 covering the     on senior exit
including              the ability to solve ability to solve     the ability to solve   ability to apply     survey.
differential           differential         problems using       problems using         probability to the   (4.07/5.0)
equations, linear      equations.           complex numbers. discrete                   study of computer
algebra, probability   (84% correct)        (70% correct)        mathematics.           engineering.
and statistics, and                                              (73.5%                 (Range=62-92%,
complex numbers;                                                 correct)Multiple-      Average=75.6%)Self-
                                                                 choice questions       assessment responses
                                                                 from ECE 465           provided on senior
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      Valparaiso University                                                                                      Computer Engineering
                                                                 covering the ability exit survey.
                                                                 to apply probability (4.07/5.0)
                                                                 to the study of
                                                                 computer
                                                                 engineering.
                                                                 (Range=62-92%,
                                                                 Average=75.6%)



(5) a knowledge of     Multiple-choice      Multiple-choice        Self-assessment       Performance on the
analog circuit         questions from       questions from ECE responses provided Electrical Engineering
analysis and           ECE 263 covering 342 covering the           on senior exit        portion of the FE
electronics;(5) a      the analysis of      analysis of            survey. Self-         exam. (78%, 40%,
knowledge of           analog circuits. (   electronic circuits. ( assessment            correct)Performance
computer               76.1%                77% correct)The        responses provided on the computer
organization and       correct)Multiple- final design project on senior exit             software and
software design.       choice questions     in ECE 320, which survey.                    computer hardware
                       from ECE 155         will be graded using (4.13/5.0)              engineering portions
                       covering the ability a standardized score                         of the FE exam.
                       to write computer sheet to assess                                 (78% correct)
                       software to solve an students’
                       computer             knowledge of
                       engineering          software design
                       problem.             (3.12/5.0)
                       (66.1% correct)
(6) skill with oral,   An executive         A web page created The final oral            The final written       Self-assessment
written, and           summary written in by students in ECE reports in GE 498, report for the senior            responses provided
multimedia             ECE 110/111 will 315 will be graded which will be                 design project in       on senior exit
communications;        be graded using a using a                   graded by all         GE498, which will be    survey.
                       standardized score standardized score attending                   graded using a          (4.80/5.0)
                       sheet to assess      sheet to assess        department faculty standardized score
                       students’ ability to students' ability to using a                 sheet. (4.2/5.0)
                       communicate          use multimedia         standardized score
                       succinctly in        communications. sheet to assess
                       writing.             (4.23/5.0)             students' ability to
                                                                   communicate
                                                                   orally. (4.29/5.0)
(7) an ability to      A selected           A selected             The formal            Self-assessment
conduct                laboratory report laboratory report         laboratory report     responses provided on
experiments and to     from ECE 111,        from ECE 264,          from ECE 342,         senior exit survey.
effectively            which will be        which will be          which will be         (3.93/5.0)
evaluate, organize     graded using a       graded using a         graded using a
and present data       standardized score standardized score standardized score
and information;       sheet to assess      sheet to assess        to assess students'
                       students' ability to students' ability to ability to conduct
                       conduct              conduct                experiments and
                       experiments and      experiments and        present the results.
                       present the results. present the results. (3.4/5.0)
                       (XXX/5.0)            (89% average
                                            score)
(8) that they can      The team self-       The team self-         The team              Self-assessment
function as a          evaluations filled evaluations filled evaluations by the responses provided on
member of a team,      out at the end of    out at the end of GE project technical       senior exit survey.
including multi-       GE 497 by senior 498 by senior              advisor at the end (4.33/5.00)
disciplinary teams;    project teams.       project teams.         of GE 498.
                       (4.16/5.0)           (4.71/5.0)             (3.85/5.0)
(9) an exposure to     Student essays       Factual responses Responses to an            Self-assessment
non-technical areas    written in ECE 222 from the senior exit annual survey given responses provided on
that enhance their     will be graded to survey used to            to department         senior exit survey.
appreciation of the    assess students'     indicate the fraction chairs in the          (3.47/5.0)
engineer’s place in    ability to describe of students who         College of Arts and
society;               the engineer's place participate in         Sciences. This
                       in society.          campus activities survey will ask the
                       (4.0/5.0)            such as arts, music, department chairs
                                            theater, athletics, or to indicate whether
                                            student                ECE students are
                                            government.            active and
                                            (78% participated) interested
                                                                   participants in their
                                                                   program.
                                                                   (Qualitative)




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     Valparaiso University                                                                                     Computer Engineering
(10) an             Standardized        Budget analysis       Self-assessment         Performance on the
understanding of    problems from       from GE 498 final responses provided          engineering
engineering         GE301 covering the report will be         on senior exit          economics portion of
economics;          ability to apply    graded using a        survey.                 the FE exam.
                    engineering         standardized score (3.47/5.0)                 (62% correct)
                    economics to a      sheet to assess
                    real-world problem. students' ability to
                    (67.4% correct)     write an accurate
                                        budget and to
                                        follow that budget.
                                        (4.12/5.0)
(11) a recognition Overall              Attendance at the Attendance at the           Attendance at Career     Self-assessment
of the need for     membership in the annual Student          annual Student          Services events such     responses provided
continuous, career- student branch of Professional            Night Dinner            as the Career Fair,      on senior exit
long learning and IEEE will be used Awareness                 technical               Etiquette Dinner, and    survey.
career planning;    to assess students' Conference will be presentation will be       Resume Workshop          (4.13/5.0)
                    interest in career- used to assess        used to assess          will be used to assess
                    long learning.      students' interest in students' interest in   students' interest in
                    (29/92=31%)         career-long learning career-long              career planning.
                                        and career planning learning.                 (70% used Career
                                        (39/125=31%)          (40/125=32%)            Center)

(12) an              Multiple-choice       An ethics            Self-assessment       Performance on the
understanding of     questions from an assignment from          responses provided    ethics portion of the
the ethical          exam in GE 301        GE 497 will be       on senior exit        FE exam.
framework within will be used to           graded using a       survey.               (82% correct)
which electrical and assess students'      standardized score (3.73/5.0)
computer engineers ability to recognize sheet to assess
function with        a situation requiring students' ability to
emphasis on the      ethical judgment      recognize ethical
safety, health, and and to select the      dilemmas and apply
welfare of the       most appropriate the appropriate
public;              action given a list judgment to solve
                     of alternatives.      them.
                     (83% correct)         (88% correct)


     Note that any differences between the elements of this table and the enumeration of the
     metrics in section 3E is due to revisions to the assessment plan during the 2002-2003
     academic year. The results shown in this section reflect the plan as it stood at the
     beginning of the academic year, while the list in section 3E shows the plan as it existed at
     the end of the academic year. An example of such a change is in Metric 9c, which was
     replaced with a different metric when we received weak response to the survey
     referenced.

     Based on the results shown above, the faculty felt that some specific improvements to
     individual courses were merited. In particular, new instructors were assigned to ECE 430
     and ECE 465 as a result of Professor Gelopulos’s retirement. Also, entirely new
     hardware was selected for ECE 320, and a new professor was assigned to that course.

     More significant work needed to be done to improve student performance on Program
     Outcome #10, which is associated with engineering economics. The primary course in
     which students encounter this material is GE 301, which was redesigned in Fall 2003.
     Rather than being team taught by five faculty from three different departments, a single
     professor will now teach the course. Also, a newly published textbook on engineering
     economics was selected for use with the course, and an entirely new set of lecture notes is
     being developed to accompany the textbook. Active learning exercises will be integrated
     throughout the course, and new interactive polling hardware has been installed in the
     room where the course is to be taught..

     G. The Process of Program Improvement
     As described earlier in this section, the faculty of the ECE department meet twice a year
     on the Monday before classes start each semester to review the assessment results
     collected in the previous semester and to make decisions about actions to be taken to

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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering
improve the program. In our opinion, this is the most important part of the process,
because if measurement, assessment, and feedback are not tied to program improvement,
then students will see no benefit from the effort.

The Departmental Assessment Meeting is held in two phases. In the first phase,
individual faculty members present reports concerning particular assessment tools for
which they were responsible in the previous semester. Frequently, these will be
associated with a course that person taught, but program-wide assessment tools, such as
the senior exit survey and the alumni survey, are also assigned to individual people to
help balance workload and to provide accountability.

In the second phase of the meeting, the entire department discusses the results presented
earlier. We consider the following four items:

        “Discussion of Actions to be Taken
        1. Discussion of possible changes to the CPE CpE program objectives.
        2. Discussion of possible changes to the CPE CpE program outcomes.
        3. Discussion of possible changes to the CPE CpE assessment plan.
        4. Discussion of possible changes to the CPE CpE curriculum and/or courses to
        better meet the outcomes and objectives.”

        -Agenda for the CPE CpE program assessment meeting, August 25, 2003.

Since the Computer Engineering Program is a relatively new program, changes to the
objectives, outcomes, and courses have occurred at each of the two While changes to the
objectives are very rare (having only happened one time in the three years we have been
following this process), changes to outcomes are somewhat more common (having
happened twice in two years), and changes to the assessment plan, curriculum, and
courses occur at almost every Departmental Assessment Meetings.

In order to increase accountability for following through on those changes, the very first
item on the agenda for each assessment meeting is a report from the department chair,
who assumes ultimate responsibility for implementing all changes recommended by the
faculty. In this report, actions taken as a result of the decisions made at the previous
meeting are announced, ensuring that those decisions and action items are not simply
written down and then forgotten.

In deciding what changes to make to the assessment plan, faculty consider the quality of
the measurement being performed as well as the amount of effort being put forth to
perform the measurement. If it is felt that the results are not worth the amount of work
being performed, we brainstorm methods to increase the quality of the output or to
decrease the amount of effort being expended. Surprisingly, these changes have
occasionally pointed to using lower levels of technology to perform the assessment than
we had originally selected. For example, rather than using an Internet form to implement
the alumni survey in the summer of 2003, we simply mailed the forms out on paper with
a business reply envelope. For the relatively small number to be polled, it was decided
that this was a less time-consuming method to achieve the same quality of results.

In deciding how to change the curriculum and/or the courses in the department, the
faculty first look for outcomes in which two or more of the measurands were found to be
“OF CONCERN” or “POOR.” Such a situation would call for at least the revision of a
single course, if not a change to the curriculum.
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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering


Once significant shortcomings in a particular category have been addressed, we also
consider ways to improve individual courses that have yielded assessment results of
“POOR” and “OF CONCERN.” Other systematic assessment results, such as
teacher/course evaluations and student self-assessments of achieving course learning
objectives, can recommend changes to individual courses as well. Such changes tend to
be less dramatic, but of equal importance to the philosophy of continual program
improvement.

Occasionally, a change to a course suggests a subsequent change to the curriculum. For
example, when we decided to shift our embedded microcontrollers course from a
Motorola HC11 chip programmed exclusively in assembly language to a PowerPC 555
evaluation board programmed primarily in C, it was also clear that students would be
able to complete similar experiments and learn similar levels of programming skill in
significantly less time. For this reason, we decided to decrease the number of credits
associated with this course, which balanced a need to increase the credits assigned to the
senior design project sequence.

H. Specific Program Improvements and Supporting Data
As of the preparation of this report, the ECE department has held five bi-annual
Departmental Assessment Meetings. Of course, now that the system has been well
established, these meetings will continue to occur regularly, leading to continuing
program improvements every year.

Specific recommendations for program improvement from each of the past five three
meetings is summarized below:

                        Improvements Recommended on August 27, 2001

Recommendation: “In order to support the efforts of Career Services for engineering
students, we should set up listservs of email addresses for our sophomore, junior, and
senior computer engineering majors. This will allow Career Services to directly contact
our students regarding career opportunities.” Supporting Data: This recommendation
was made as a result of the poor assessment given to Career Services on the senior exit
survey. Result: The requested listservs were created, and Career Services used them
until improving campus network resources made them obsolete.

Recommendation: “In order to more closely tie the material in GE 301 to the material
in GE 497 and GE 498, we will consult with the mechanical engineering department in
an attempt to make GE 301 a prerequisite for GE 497. Also, the instructors of those two
courses should work very closely together to ensure that the content of GE 497 builds on
the content of GE 301.” Supporting Data: This recommendation was made as a result
of the realization by the department faculty that the material in GE 301 is a natural pre-
requisite of the senior capstone design sequence. Although this realization did not come
from a particular piece of assessment data, it was made clear by the process of working
with the assessment results of both courses. Result: A discussion was held concerning
the use of GE 301 as a pre-requisite for GE 497. At the time, it was decided that this
would be a poor choice, because we had several students who were still out of sequence
and would have been adversely affected by the change. Now that those students have
graduated and that part of the curriculum has stabilized, this issue will again be brought
before the two departments. For the past two years, the instructor of GE 301 has also
been one of the instructors for GE 497, providing a direct link between the two courses.
11/2/2003                                                                                 36
Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering


Recommendation: “We will strive to find ways to change the curriculum so that
applications of advanced mathematics are emphasized. This could include the addition of
a solid-state semiconductor physics course or an advanced system analysis course.”
Supporting Data: Poor rating of the importance of advanced mathematics on senior exit
survey. Result: Since this recommendation was made, the department has worked to add
new upper-level elective courses such as those described. In particular, we have offered
ECE 490G: Control Systems each of the past two years, and the content of the required
course ECE 360: Sampled Linear Systems has been entirely revised, introducing new
mathematical concepts to the course.

Recommendation: “Based on the model presented by Professor Johnson, all faculty are
encouraged to develop course learning objectives for each of their courses and to include
questions about students’ self-assessment regarding these objectives on their course
evaluations.” Supporting Data: Again, at this early stage of our assessment efforts,
simply working with the courses and learning about new assessment tools recommended
some immediate changes. In this case, Eric Johnson was the first member of the
department to write course-level learning objectives and to include them on his course
evaluations. Result: Course-level learning objectives were written for every course, and
they are each included as a separate question on the teacher/course evaluation form.

Recommendation: “We will require significant writing experiences by our students in
every feasible computer engineering course. This may include ECE 202, ECE 263, ECE
264, ECE 221, ECE 222, ECE 315, ECE 320, ECE 342, GE 301, GE 497, and GE 498.”
Supporting Data: This recommendation was made as a result of relatively poor writing
performance on the formal laboratory report in ECE 342. Result: More significant
writing experiences were added to at least ECE 263, ECE 264, ECE 222, and ECE 320.
Three term papers and other shorter writing assignments have been added to GE 301, and
very substantial writing requirements remain in GE 497 and GE 498.

Recommendation: “Stochastic processes will be removed from the learning objectives
for ECE 465.” Supporting Data: This recommendation was based on poor student
performance in ECE 465 and Professor Gelopulos’s perception that the students were
being asked to accomplish too much in too little time in that course. Result: The
learning objective was removed and more time was spent on the remaining course
objectives.


                        Improvements Recommended on January 8, 2002

Recommendation: “The department will work to develop a standardized course
evaluation form that can be administered by the Learning Resource and Assessment
Center. This standardized form will include self-assessment of each student’s ability to
meet all desired outcomes of the course.” Supporting Data: This recommendation was
made based on the wide variety of course evaluation forms being used in the department
at the time. It was felt that, since it would benefit the assessment program to ask
students’ self-assessments of each course learning objective on each evaluation form, a
more standardized format would be desirable and would provide more accurate
assessment results. Result: A standardized course evaluation form was developed and
has been in use since this time.



11/2/2003                                                                                37
Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
Recommendation: “Lifelong learning will be emphasized wherever possible in our
curriculum. This may include GE 497, ECE 315, and ECE 264.” Supporting Data:
This recommendation was made as a result of feedback from the Technical Advisory
Committee. Result: Lifelong learning skills have been encouraged throughout the
curriculum, with increasing responsibility being placed on students in laboratory courses
to perform their own background research and to design their own experiments. Even
more pertinently, explicit instruction and an assignment have been added to GE 301 to
encourage students to develop their lifelong learning skills.


                        Improvements Recommended on August 26, 2002

Recommendation: “Ethics case studies will be emphasized a great deal more in GE
301. It is felt that case studies are the most effective way to teach students about
engineering ethics, so minimum theoretical background will be provided and then
followed with many active learning exercises, examples, and case studies.” Supporting
Data: Poor performance on the engineering ethics section of the FE exam and on an
ethics writing assignment in GE 301. Result: The engineering ethics content of GE 301
has been dramatically modified as recommended above, leading to significant
improvements in student performance.

Recommendation: “It is felt that there is a great deal of content variability between
sections and instructors of math courses taken by our students, and this weakens their
preparation for mathematically oriented courses in our curriculum. The department
recommends that the ECE department chair work with the Dean of Engineering and the
chair of the department of Mathematics and Computer Science to create a set of
standardized learning objectives for MATH 131, MATH 132, MATH 253, and MATH
234. In addition, a standardized method for assessing students’ progress toward meeting
the stated objectives at the end of each of those courses should be developed. The
departmentally standard course evaluations in the ECE department can serve as a good
model for such assessment. Based on the results of this standardized assessment,
appropriate corrective actions can be taken.” Supporting Data: Poor performance on
mathematically demanding measurands from ECE 430 and ECE 465, along with poor
self-assessment report on mathematical skill from senior exit survey. Further
investigation of the causes of these poor results led to the conclusion that a great deal of
variation existed among sections of mathematics courses. Result: This recommendation
met with some initial resistance from the faculty and administration of the mathematics
department, who felt that our department was trying to impose our demands on their
faculty. This perception was created partly by a breakdown in communication between
the two departments, which was eventually solved. The negative reaction to this
recommendation shifted over the next semester, as demonstrated by the result of the third
recommendation for January 7, 2003.


                        Improvements Recommended on January 7, 2003

Recommendation: “In an effort to increase student writing experience, an ethics case
study should be added to GE 301. In addition, an executive summary to be graded using
a standardized score sheet should be added to ECE 110.” Supporting Data: As part of
the revision of the assessment process, it was decided that the ethics assignment from GE
497 was artificially inserted in that course, and it would be more appropriately included
in GE 301. GE 301 is now used to measure students’ ethical skills in two ways: once
11/2/2003                                                                                   38
Valparaiso University                                                         Computer Engineering
using multiple-choice questions based on case studies, and once using a paper written to
address an ethical issue. While considering the assessment plan, it was also noted that
writing experience was not assessed in the freshman year, leading to the addition of an
executive summary in ECE 110. Result: An ethics case study paper has been added to
GE 301. It was well received by students, who performed well on it, receiving an
average score of 94%. After the assessment meeting, it was decided that ECE 110
already had enough content and assignments, and that it would be better not to add the
executive summary to that course.

Recommendation: “In an effort to increase the number of and focus of engineering
economics examples in GE 301, a systemic review of the learning objectives and syllabus
of that course should be performed. The use of self-paced electronic references and best-
of-class textbooks for other topics in the course should be considered.” Supporting
Data: Poor performance on the engineering economics assessment from GE 301.
Result: A review of the syllabus was performed, leading to an increased number of
engineering economics lectures. A new engineering economics textbook was selected,
and textbooks and handouts were used to help improve student performance in the other
areas of the course. The results of this intervention are demonstrated in the following
graph, which shows a significant improvement in student performance after the changes
were made.
                                    Program Improvement in Engineering Economics

                                   100%


                                   80%
                   Average Score




                                   60%
                                                                          GE 301 Exam
                                                                          scores
                                   40%
                                                    Intervention
                                   20%


                                    0%
                                          2001-02    2002-03   2003-04
                                                      Year




Recommendation: “In discussing concerns about the mathematics preparation of our
students, the faculty briefly considered the option of teaching our own mathematics
courses within the College of Engineering. However, it was decided that it would be in
the best interest of our students to instead work very closely with the department of
Mathematics and Computer Science to monitor and continually improve the overall
mathematics experience of our students. This communication will include working with
faculty from the department of Mathematics and Computer Science to determine the
appropriate learning objectives for each of the math courses taken by engineering
students and developing a mechanism for effectively assessing those objectives. Also, the
ECE department chair will schedule a conference with the MCS department chair shortly
after each assessment meeting of the ECE department in order to present the results of
the previous semester’s mathematics assessment efforts.” Supporting Data: Continuing
poor performance in the mathematically intensive assessment results associated with ECE
430. Result: The faculty of the mathematics department has worked to develop learning
objectives associated with each of the four courses required of EE students. These
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Valparaiso University                                            Computer Engineering
objectives are each assessed using student work in the four courses, and students are
required to pass a “gateway” exam in Calculus I and II before receiving a passing grade
in the course.

                        Improvements Recommended on August 25, 2003

Recommendation: “It was recommended that the College continue to review the
contents and structure of GE 100. This course is very resource-intensive, and it is also
the best opportunity we have to introduce important skills to freshman engineers.”
Supporting Data: This recommendation was made as a result of the course evaluations
in GE 100 along with increasing pressure to maintain our freshmen retention. Result:
The newly formed College of Engineering Curriculum Committee will consider this
recommendation at one of their first meetings.

Recommendation: “It was recommended that the hardware and software in ECE 320 be
replaced with more modern systems that will enable the students to program in both
assembly language as well as a high-level language.” Supporting Data: Poor
performance on measurands associated with ECE 320. Result: New hardware is being
purchased for this laboratory at a cost of $25,000 and will bewas installed before the
beginning of the Spring 2004 semester.

Recommendation: “It was recommended that the course learning objectives for each
course in our department be placed on the College web page for easy access by students
and faculty.” Supporting Data: On the course evaluation forms, students are not only
asked about their self-assessment of ability to complete each course learning objective,
but they are also asked about whether they were aware of the learning objectives for the
course. The results of these “awareness” questions have varied between courses. Result:
A web page is being created on the College of Engineering web site to list the course
learning objectives for each course.

                        Improvements Recommended on January 4, 2004

Recommendation: “Consider possible curriculum changes that could increase student
understanding of business skills and their relationship to engineering topics. Possible
solutions could include the addition of a second General Engineering course (GE 302),
splitting of GE 301 into two courses (2cr + 2cr, 2cr + 1cr, 3cr + 2cr, etc.), or
requirement of a business or engineering management minor. Supporting Data: This
recommendation is made as a result of feedback from the Technical Advisory Committee
and the Student Survey. Result: Not yet available.


In addition to these improvements to courses and curriculum, many changes have been
made to the assessment process as our experience and understanding of the process has
evolved over the past four two years. We are approaching a system of assessment that
will help us to continually strive for improvement of our educational system while
requiring a sustainable level of effort and time by faculty and staff.

During the past academic year (2003-2004) three CS courses were added to the
curriculum to improve the breadth of the program. These changes were not made due to
the assessment of the existing program but because the courses would help meet our
program objectives and outcomes. These changes occurred at this time and not at the
inception of the program because the CS curriculum has been changing over the past four
11/2/2003                                                                               40
Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering
years. During that time, the CS Department has been in the process of updating their
curriculum to meet the objectives of the Computing Curriculum 2001, which was
developed jointly by the Computer Science Special Interest Group of the ACM (ACM-
SIGCSE) and the IEEE Computer Society. Given the goals and limitations of the CS
Department within the College of Arts and Sciences, they decided on a compressed
approach for teaching intermediate courses that involved covering two knowledge-units
in a single class. The University approved the updated CS curriculum during the 2002-
2003 school year and the first courses in that program were offered during the 2003-2004
school. After reviewing those new courses, the ECE department determined which ones
should be included to meet the computer engineering program objectives and outcomes.
CS 257 (Data Structures and Programming Languages) was chosen to further develop
students’ knowledge and use of data structures, CS 347 (Operating Systems and
Networks) was chosen to increase the students’ knowledge of hardware/software
interface and CS 358 (Software Design and Development) was chosen to give the
students the opportunity to design and develop large computer systems.

I. Materials Available During Site Visit

During the site visit, the following materials will be made available to the visit team:
 Examples of student work separated into twelve different notebooks, corresponding
   to the twelve Program Outcomes. Within each binder notebook will be examples of
   student work for each course that listed that Program Outcome on its syllabus.
 Reports for each of the last six three computer engineering program assessment
   meetings, held each semester the Monday before classes begin. These reports will
   summarize assessment activities for the 2000-01, 2001-02, and 2002-03 academic
   yearsyear and the first half of the 2003-2004 academic year. They will include the
   individual reports prepared by individual faculty members used to assess the validity
   of the Program Outcomes and our success at achieving them as well as the validity of
   the Program Educational Objectives and our success at achieving them.
 Updated data representing the results of assessment activities for the 2003-2004
   academic year.
 Examples of student design work, including design projects completed in the senior           Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
   design course in 2003-04.

4. Professional Component
A. Preparing Students for Engineering Practice

Students are prepared to practice engineering through a carefully constructed curriculum
that includes a wide variety of both technical and non-technical courses. As seen in Table
I-1, the program curriculum devotes a significant amount of total time to professional
topics in a number of areas. While fifty percent of the program (65 out of 130 credits)
involves engineering courses, twenty five percent (33 credits) of the program’s courses
are Math and Basic Science, and eighteen percent (23 credits) are devoted to General
Education. The remaining seven credits can also include courses in any of the three areas.

The curriculum begins with a strong foundation in mathematics and basic sciences along
with a core of general education courses in the freshmen year. These courses are
supplemented by two engineering courses, GE 100 (Exploring Engineering) and ECE
110/111 (Exploring Electrical and Computer Engineering). These first two engineering
courses are designed to allow students to see how the mathematics and science they are
learning can be applied to real-world engineering problems through the extensive use of
11/2/2003                                                                                 41
Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering
design projects that emphasize teamwork and allow students to investigate different
aspects of engineering.

In the sophomore year, students take a full year of analog circuit analysis and design
(ECE 263 and 264) as well as a full year of digital circuit analysis and design (ECE 221
and 222). Each of these courses is associated with a bi-weekly laboratory, so students
also develop significant skill with appropriate testing equipment. At the same time, they
take ECE 155 and 258, which introduces them to the fundamentals of software
development and algorithms, and ECE 202, which shows them how to use software
simulation packages essential for computer engineering work. Students also take ECE
357, a course in Discrete Mathematics. Their mathematics and general education courses
also continue throughout this year.

In their junior year, students build on the strong foundation of sophomore-level courses
with ECE 342, Electronics, ECE 360, Sampled Linear Systems, and ECE 322, Embedded
Microcontrollers. ECE 465 introduces them to the fundamentals of probability and
statistics, and CS 257 and CS 358 continue to provide depth in computer programming.
an ECE elective can be used for the first time to develop a specialization in a particular
area of interest. They continue to take mathematics and science courses, and GE 301
introduces them to a variety of realistic design constraints such as engineering ethics,
safety, and economics.

The senior year is anchored by the senior design project sequence, GE 497 and GE 498.
In these two courses, students work with a multidisciplinary team of electrical and
mechanical engineering students and a faculty advisor to complete a significant design
project. Several projects are sponsored by local businesses, others are associated with
national design competitions, and some are sponsored by individual faculty members. In
addition to the senior design project courses, senior students also complete two
professional electives, an engineering science elective, a free elective, and one final
general education course. ECE 430 (Electromagnetic Field Theory), ECE 424 (Computer
Architecture), CS 347 (Operating Systems and Networks) and two one computer
engineeringECE electives completes their preparation for engineering practice.



The CPE curriculum is shown graphically in Figure 3:




11/2/2003                                                                                 42
          Valparaiso University                                                                              Computer Engineering

                   COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FLOW CHART
                                                  (2003-2004 Catalog, revised October 7, 2003)

                                                                     SEMESTER
   1                    2                  3                   4                    5              6                  7                 8


PHYS141L                                                   ECE357                CHEM115



PHYS141             PHYS142                                                      PHYS243         *GE301            #GE497             GE498



                                                                                                                                    Engineering
MATH131            MATH132              MATH234           MATH253                ECE342
                                                                                                                                    Science El.
                                                                         C

                                                     C                                                                                  CPE
 GE100              ECE110              ECE263             ECE264                ECE360          ECE465           ECE430
                                                                                                                                      Elective


                                                                                                                    CPE                 Free
                    ECE111              ECE202
                                                                                                                   Elective           Elective
                                                                             C

                                                    C                                                                               Professional
                                        ECE221             ECE222                                ECE322           ECE 424
                                                                                                                                      Elective


                                                                                 Theology        Academic        Professional
                       PE               ECE155             ECE258
                                                                                 Elective        Area El.          Elective

                                                                                                                   Social
CORE110             CORE115                                                                      ENGL200
                                                                                                                 Analysis El.

            Indicates a COREQUISITE        General          Math/
                                                                                                        CPE Electives (Pre-requisites)
           Indicates a PREREQUISITE        Education       Science
         *  Indicates Junior Standing                                                              ECE429        ECE450           ECE452
         # Indicates Senior Standing        Electrical     General                                (221,263)        (360)         (ECE360)
         C Indicates Min. Grade “C”        Engineering   Engineering




          Figure 3. A graphical representation of the Computer Engineering curriculum.


          B. Engineering Standards and Realistic Design Constraints

          Students are exposed to engineering standards throughout their curriculum, and these
          standards are integrated into their senior design projects. As sophomores, students learn
          to design analog circuits using standard resistor and capacitor values, they learn to design
          digital circuits using standard programmable logic devices, and they learn about many
          engineering standards used in circuit simulation software packages such as PSpice and
          LabVIEW. As juniors, they expand on this knowledge through the introduction of
          standards associated with engineering ethics, safety analysis, and systems engineering.
          As part of the senior design course sequence, students receive additional explicit
          instruction concerning engineering standards and the importance of incorporating those
          standards into their projects. Along with their mechanical engineering partners, who
          bring a wide variety of their own discipline’s standards to the project, they are required to
          include all appropriate standards into their project. They are also required to include a
          description of the engineering standards associated with their project in the final written
          report.

          Realistic design constraints are also included in student design projects whenever
          feasible. In particular, junior electrical engineers are introduced to engineering
          economics, environmental issues, sustainability issues, ethical issues, health and safety
          issues, and sociopolitical issues in GE 301, Principles of Engineering Practice. In the
          11/2/2003                                                                                                                           43
Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
next semester, they are asked to consider each of these elements in their senior design
project as appropriate. The first step of each design group’s work is to define System
Design Requirements in cooperation with their advisor and project customer. Every team
is required to have a design requirement that specifies the budget for their project,
another that addresses the environmental impact of their project once it is recycled, and
one or more requirements that address health and safety aspects of their project. In
addition, each group completes a preliminary hazard analysis for their project
approximately halfway through the first semester, incorporating even more safety
considerations into the design. As part of the project proposal that each group writes at
the end of the first semester, they are asked to write a section that discusses the ethical
and sociopolitical implications of their project if it were to be manufactured. Thus, the
capstone design sequence incorporates economic, environmental/sustainability, ethical,
health and safety, and social/political design constraints in every project.

C. Engineering Topics

The curriculum devotes much more time to engineering topics than the minimum
required by the accreditation criteria. Sixty-nine credits, more than one half of the total
in the curriculum, are spent on engineering topics. Ten of these credits are taken along
with students from other engineering programs, giving students ample opportunity for
multidisciplinary experience. Of the fifty-nine credits taken within the department,
students receive a balance of required foundational courses and elective specialization
courses. This gives them the combination of breadth, which will allow them to apply
first principles to solve problems throughout their careers, and depth, which provides
them with specially detailed knowledge in a few selected areas.

D. General Education

Since the College is a part of a strong comprehensive university, the general education
component is an important component of the overall program. The general education
requirements include a two-course, ten-credit common freshman experience involving
reading, writing and speaking. The requirements also include a social analysis course
such as economics, an academic area studies course that includes a wide range of liberal
arts courses, and an upper division theology course. The students can also use their six
credits of professional electives on a large number of general education courses. As an
example, many of our students take extra foreign language courses with those credits to
achieve a minor in another language.

E. Mathematics and Basic Sciences

Students obtain a solid background in both mathematics and the basic sciences. In the
program, students typically take at least one math or science course in their first three
years (many also choose to take additional math or science electives to complete a
minor). Many of the math and science courses in the program support courses in the
engineering curriculum and are required as prerequisites.

Four courses (sixteen credits) of mathematics are required in the program. These include
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I, I and III as well as Differential Equations and Linear
Algebra. The probability and statistics course, ECE 465, and the Algebraic and Discrete
Mathematics course, ECE 357, are not included in this total because thesebecause these
courses are taught by the ECE department, even though the course content is entirely
composed of mathematics and its applications. Four Three courses or fourteen eleven
11/2/2003                                                                                  44
Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering
credits of Basic Science are also required. The science component of the program
includes three two courses of physics including laboratory work in the first semester and
one course in chemistry. All students are required to take one extra math/science course
of their preference.

5. Faculty
Valparaiso University’s ECE department consists of seven full-time faculty members—
five who are tenured and two who are tenure-track. The department also employs two
adjuncts. All full-time faculty have Ph.D.s. One full-time faculty member and two
adjuncts have an MBA, and another full-time member is in the process of completing an
MBA program. Four faculty have full-time experience in industry. All faculty have prior
consulting experience, and two are currently active. Three full-time and one adjunct
faculty are registered professional engineers.

We have a good combination of junior and senior faculty, and all are qualified to teach a
variety of courses to meet the needs of our students. The size of our faculty is adequate to
meet the present workload of courses in our curriculum, and the department has sufficient
depth to accommodate leaves and sabbaticals. The items listed below are the four
strategic areas of excellence identified by our department. Faculty who are active in
these areas are identified.

1. Computer Hardware/Software Design. This area is one of the most important of
electrical and computer engineering, and it has grown very rapidly over the past thirty
years. The last four faculty to join our department, Professors Johnson, Tougaw, Will,
and Freeman, have expertise in this area of ECE. Professor Kraft is also able to teach
courses in this area, due to his professional development efforts over the past decade. Of
special note is the computer visualization sub-area, which is an active topic of research
for Professor Will and has been awarded an NSF grant (NSF-0311088). Professor
Johnson has full-time industrial experience in this area.

2. Analog Circuit Design. This is the foundation for almost all of computer engineering,
especially those parts not directly involving computers. We have an excellent foundation
in this area, with Professor Hart providing a great deal of leadership in its teaching and
scholarship. All of the other faculty in the department can contribute to this area as
needed, since many of the other courses we teach are based on these courses. Of special
note in this area is power electronics, which is the topic of a textbook written by
Professor Hart.

3. Communications System Design. This area of the discipline prepares students for a
variety of careers in the communication field, many of which are very actively expanding
and developing. Of the strategic areas of excellence identified, this is the area in which
we have the least expertise. One adjunct faculty member teaches the communication
theory course. We have also addressed the current need in this area by hiring another
adjunct who is a full-time employee of Motorola to teach a wireless communication
course.

4. Power System Design. Professor Kraft provides leadership in this area, and Professor
Hart provides support. Both Professors Kraft and Hart have full-time experience in the
electric power industry.



11/2/2003                                                                                  45
Valparaiso University                                                    Computer Engineering
An assessment of current areas of expertise is summarized in Figure 4. Two values are
shown for each area. The first is the highest level of expertise of any member of the
department (on a scale from 0-10), which demonstrates the depth of knowledge our
department has in that area. The second value shows how many faculty within the
department are competent to teach a course in that field, which shows the breadth of
knowledge possessed in that area.


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                                                     Topics
                              Maximum Expertise    Number with Teaching Competence
                 Figure 4. Current faculty expertise in areas of computer engineering.

Faculty interaction with undergraduate students is a major strength of the program.
Faculty teach all classes and laboratories. Valparaiso University’s highest teaching
awards, the Caterpillar Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Alumni Association
Outstanding Teaching Award, have been awarded to two of the ECE faculty.

Faculty members share academic advising responsibilities. Each faculty member takes
an entering ECE freshman class on a rotating basis and advises those students throughout
their academic program. Faculty are active in advising the IEEE student chapter, the
Society of Women Engineers, and the Tau Beta Pi chapter. Professor Kraft is the Air
Force ROTC Faculty Sponsor.

Several faculty are active in the local IEEE section, and Professors Johnson and Tougaw
have each recently been Chair of that organization. Presently, Professor Will is the Vice-
Chair of the section, and has served as an officer for 3 years. Several faculty are active in
ASEE. Professor Tougaw recently served as chair of the Illinois-Indiana ASEE section.

Professor Johnson managed a software development project called Time Engineers that
promotes engineering to secondary school students. Professor Tougaw also contributed to
the project. Three faculty were very active in advising the FIRST robotics project at a
local high school.
11/2/2003                                                                                       46
Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering




6. Facilities

A. Classrooms

All lecture classes are held in classrooms in Gellersen. All the standard classrooms have
network access. More than half (six of eleven) of these lecture rooms have full computer,
VCR, sound system and electronic notepad projection facilities. It is common to
supplement lectures with demonstrations of simulations such as MATLAB, VHDL,
PSpice and LabVIEW. Computer-based presentations in PowerPoint are also common.
Student presentations routinely use computer projection. An interactive Classroom
Polling System is installed in all the electronically enhanced classrooms.

B. Instructional Laboratories

The primary objective in the Electrical and Computer Engineering laboratory program is
to develop skills in the use of standard laboratory and computer equipment so students
will be able to test and evaluate prototype designs that they develop in several ECE
courses. A second objective is to be able to observe and interpret the hardware
realization of theory. Emphasis is placed on maintaining good basic equipment in
multiple quantities and having one or two items of specialized equipment that can be used
in an “open laboratory” arrangement.

In general, the equipment and instrumentation for the required laboratory courses is
adequate to excellent. Laboratory space is sufficient to generous. An assessment by
laboratory follows in Table 5.




11/2/2003                                                                                47
      Valparaiso University                                            Computer Engineering


                                                                  Adequacy for Number Of Area
GEM                 Courses Taught              ECE   Condition    Instruction  Stations (sq. ft.)

        Algorithms and Programming               155
        Algorithms and Abstract Data Types       258    Very
135                                                                Adequate        1220            488
        Algebraic and Discrete Structures I      357   Good
        Software Design and Development        CS 358
        Exploring ECE Laboratory                 111
        Computational Methods for ECE            202
        Digital Systems I & II                  221,2
        Linear Circuits I & II (263 and 264)    263,4
185                                                   Excellent    Adequate
        Electronics                              342
        Signals and Systems (demos)              360
        Power Electronics                        471
        Communication Theory (demos)             453                                12             998
        Exploring ECE                            110
        Computational Methods For ECE            202 Excellent
186                                                                Adequate
        (+All Calculus Courses)                MATH                                 16             600
        Digital Systems                         452                                 3
                                                      Very
        Exploring Engineering                  GE100               Adequate         11
                                                     Good
188     Systems On A Chip                       490J                                11             488
189     Microcontrollers                        322 Excellent      Adequate         10             488
                                               GE497  Very
192      Project Laboratory                                        Adequate
                                               GE498 Good                            8             434

                       Table 5. Instructional Laboratories                        Compiled Oct 2003




      11/2/2003                                                                               48
   Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering
   C. Computing Infrastructure

   The computing infrastructure in the department is adequate to support the objectives of the
   undergraduate program, although continual support and upgrading is required.

   A survey of computing facilities detailing equipment devoted to the support of Electrical and
   Computer Engineering is summarized in Table 6 below. While most of the equipment was
   purchased for use by ECE students, generally these facilities are open to any student in the
   University. Some rooms (135, 186 and 200) are specifically designated as general computing
   laboratories for all students.

                                                         Age                      Other                     Age
Room #     Lab Name                 Computers            (yrs)                 Equipment                    (yrs)
 135   Sun Workstation 20 Sun Ultra 5 (350MHz, 128M, 8G)   3                 HP LaserJet 4100                 1
 181        Robotics       Pentium 4 (2.4G, 512M,100G)
 182   Sci. Visualization  Dual-Xeon (2.2GHz, 1G,100G)     1                 8' x 6' Display                 0
                          Pentium II (400 MHz,256M,10G)    1           2 Panasonic LCD Projectors            0
                                                                          Motion Tracking System             0
                                                                       Flock-of-Birds Motion Sensor          0
                                                                         2 15" Flat Panel Displays           0
 185        Electronics     12 Pentium 4 (2.4GHz, 512M, 80G)      0     12 15" Flat Panel Displays           0
                                                                       12 Oscilloscopes (AG 54621D)          2
                                                                      12 Function Generators (HP33120A)      4
                                                                      12 Triple Power Supplies (HPE3630A)    5
                                                                      12 Single Power Supplies (HPE3610A)    5
                                                                         4 LaserJet 1100 Printers            1
                                                                         6 NI 6024E DAQ Boards               3
                                                                         6 NI 6024E DAQ Boards               0
 186       PC Laboratory    18 Pentium III (933 MHz, 256M, 20G)   2      HP LaserJet 5M Printer              5
                                                                            Projection System                0
 188      Digital Systems 12 Pentium III (500 MHz, 192M, 7.6G)    3      HP LaserJet 5M Printer              5
                                                                        3 HP 601A Oscilloscopes.             7
                                                                          6 Frequency Counters               7
                                                                          3 Function Generators              7
 189     Microcontrollers   11 Pentium II (400 MHz, 128M, 4G)     4   11 Oscilloscopes (LG OS-5020G)         4
                              11 Power PC 555 Power Boxes         0
 190       Aux. Sun Lab     5 Sun Ultra 5 (350MHz, 128H, 8G)      3
                             3 Sun Ultra 1 (167MHz, 64M, 2G)      7
                               4 Sunray Network Appliances        4
 191      Power Systems        Pentium 4 (2.4G, 512M, 6.4G)       1
 192      Senior Projects   14 Pentium II (450MHz, 128M, 6.4G)    4
 200      Student Lounge     4 Sun Ultra 1 (167MHz, 64M, 2G)      7           HP LaserJet 4Si                7
                            3 Pentium III (866MHz, 128M,18.6G)    3

       Table 6: Major Laboratory And Computing Hardware                        Compiled: Oct 2003




   11/2/2003                                                                                           49
Valparaiso University                                             Computer Engineering

D. Computing Infrastructure—Software

All the PCs in the building have access to the following major software packages:
MATLAB 6.5
PSpice 9.1
LabVIEW 7.0
Word Office 2000 Professional
StarOffice

All the Sun workstations in the building have access to the following major software packages:
MATLAB 6.5
Mentor Graphics
StarOffice




11/2/2003                                                                                   50
            Valparaiso University                                                 Computer Engineering


            E. Course Usage of Computing Facilities

            Table 7 summarizes the manner in which computer facilities are used in the curriculum.

 ECE                  Course Title                                  Platform And Software Used

 110*      Exploring Elect & Comp Engr               PC             PS

 111*      Exploring Elect & Comp Engr Lab

 155*      Algorithms and Programming          Sun                                                     J

 202*      Comp Tech For Elect & Comp Engrs          PC    ML       PS     LV

 221*      Digital Logic Design                Sun   PC                            MG                       A

 222*      Advanced Logic Design               Sun   PC                            MG                       A

 258       Algorithms & Abstract Data Types    Sun                                         C           J

 263*      Linear Circuit Theory I                   PC    ML       PS

 264*      Linear Circuit Theory II                  PC    ML       PS     LV

 322*      Embedded Microcontrollers                 PC                                                              CW

 342*      Electronics                               PC    ML       PS
CS         Software Design and Development     Sun                                                 J
358*
 360*      Signals And Linear Systems                PC    ML

 372       Energy Conversion & Transmission    Sun                                                     J

 424       Computer Architecture               Sun                                                     J

 429       VLSI Design                                                             MG

 430       Electromagnetic Field Theory              PC

 450       Digital Communication Systems       Sun   PC                                                J

 452       Digital Signal Processing                 PC    ML              LV              C

 453       Communication Theory                      PC

 465*      Probability for Elec & Comp Engr          PC    ML

 471       Power Electronics                         PC             PS

490G       Intro To Control Systems                  PC    ML

 490J      Systems On A Chip                   Sun   PC                                    C                A        I

490W       Wireless Communication

GE497*     Senior Design Project I             Sun   PC    ML       PS     LV      MG      C           J    A        I

GE498*     Senior Design Project II            Sun   PC    ML       PS     LV      MG      C           J    A        I


Required
                                  Table 7. Course Computing Usage                                Compiled Oct 2003
 Course




            11/2/2003                                                                                           51
      Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering


*



                                                Legend
ML   MATLAB                   PS   PSpice               LV    LabVIEW               MG     Mentor Graphics

C    C Compiler               J    JAVA                  A    Altera                  I    IBM Rational Rose

CW   MetroWerks
     Code Warrior 8.0




      7. Institutional Support and Financial Resources

      A. Institutional Support

      The university is very supportive of the College of Engineering and of the Department of
      Electrical and Computer Engineering. The facilities are attractive and well maintained,
      admissions does an excellent job of recruiting a qualified and diverse group of new students
      each year, and financial resources provided by the university are sufficient for our needs.
      Other academic departments such as Mathematics and Computer Science, Physics, Chemistry,
      English, and Theology work diligently to educate our students in those areas. The College of
      Engineering itself is devoted to the success of our program, and faculty from mechanical and
      civil engineering contribute a great deal to the success of our students. Administration is
      supportive of efforts to improve the educational experience of our students, and they make this
      support known publicly.

      Several concrete examples of this support include:
       Supporting new faculty through a series of orientation programs culminating in a trip to
         Cambridge, England.
       Supporting tenure-track faculty through a series of seminars designed to help them
         understand the tenure process and to maximize their likelihood of success.
       Providing free use of significant university resources for the annual IEEE Student Night
         and the Student Professional Awareness conference.
       Establishing an Air Force ROTC program on campus largely in response to urging from
         engineering faculty who perceived that it would benefit our programs.
       Attendance and participation by upper administration at our strategic planning workshop
         and at National Council meetings.
       Establishment of a new Computer Engineering major at the recommendation of
         departmental faculty in 2001.

      In our assessment, institutional support of the program is quite strong and entirely sufficient to
      ensure the achievement of our Program Objectives.

      B. Financial Resources


      11/2/2003                                                                                       52
Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering



Each year, the ECE Department requests finances from the University based on its needs and
priorities. The money allocated to the ECE Department is divided into different accounts. The
accounts and amount of support are listed below for the 2003-2004 academic year. Based on
the amount allocated to each account and the department’s priorities, the funds are spent
accordingly.

        ECE Research (perennial account)      $49,565.03

        Faculty Salaries (annual)         $472,300.00
        Capital Equipment (annual)         $10,000.00
        Professional Development (annual)   $4,000.00
        Supplies (annual)                   $7,035.00
        Small Equipment (annual)            $1,000.00
        All other (annual)                  $1,400.00
        Student Aid Wages (annual)          $4,020.00

The ECE Research and Capital funds are typically used to purchase new equipment for ECE
laboratories. For example, funds from this account have been used over the past five years to
upgrade the equipment (oscilloscopes, function generators, power supplies, and PCs) in the
electronics laboratory.

The Professional Development account is used to support faculty travel to conferences,
workshops, seminars, etc. In addition, the Dean of Engineering has been very supportive of
faculty development and often provides additional funds in this area.

Members of the department also receive annual spending allowances for holding
professorships. During the 2003-2004 academic year, these funds totaled $15,000 for three
members of the department.

In addition to the resources listed above, the department has received two major research
grants over the past year, one from the National Science Foundation to pursue pedagogical
research in Scientific Visualization and one from the Indiana 21 st Century fund to pursue
scientific research in nanotechnology. Taken together, these grants provide nearly $300,000
for use by department faculty to purchase equipment and to pay student and faculty summer
research salaries.

Also, the entire college is benefiting from funds made available by the most recent university-
wide capital campaign, “Three Goals, One Promise.” This campaign was responsible for the
creation of the Hesse Learning Resource and Assessment Center, and one and a half million
dollars have also recently been made available from that campaign for the renovation of
Gellersen Center and the purchase of new laboratory equipment. These funds will provide us
with the opportunity to greatly improve the laboratory resources we can make available to our
students.




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Valparaiso University                                                Computer Engineering


Taken together, funds from the perennial “ECE Research” account, annual accounts, capital
equipment budgets, discretionary spending accounts, externally financed research budgets, and
significant funding from the recent university capital campaign provide more than enough
financial resources for the program to achieve its Program Objectives.

C. Constructive Leadership

The program is fortunate to have a dedicated and constructive leadership team in place. Of
course, in a small academic department such as ours, every member of the department faculty
serves an important leadership role. In the academic tradition of faculty governance, a majority
of decisions are made in direct consultation with the entire department faculty at our weekly
meetings. Administrative responsibility for these decisions lies with the department chair,
Doug Tougaw, who has held this position since 2001. The College of Engineering leadership
team is composed of the three department chairs and the Dean of Engineering, Kraig
Olejniczak, who assumed this position in 2002. This leadership team meets weekly to discuss
issues of critical importance to the entire college, and the chairs then bring key issues to their
faculty meetings for further discussion. Concrete examples of the constructive leadership
provided to the program include the planning and implementation of a strategic planning
workshop in August 2003, substantial renovations to classrooms, laboratories, and public
spaces performed under the direction of the department chair, and establishment of a strategic
staffing plan and a strategic laboratory plan. In addition, several previously ad hoc policies
and procedures have become more systematized under this leadership team, including the
faculty evaluation process, the course evaluation process, and the assessment plan. The
leadership team is also working to reduce teaching loads across the college, with positive
results in the ECE faculty workload for the 2003-2004 academic year. Based on these results,
we believe that the necessary level of constructive leadership is in place to achieve our
Program Objectives.

D. Budgetary Processes

The budgetary process for academic year 2004-2005 begins in November 2003, when the dean
and chairs of the college prepare a list of capital equipment requests and annual budget
pressures and reliefs. These requests are based on the College of Engineering strategic plan
and the departmental strategic staffing plans and strategic laboratory plans.

In October and November, the Budget Advisory Committee (BAC), a university-wide
committee composed of senior faculty and administrators with a high level of experience with
the university budget, meets to decide what the funding priorities are for the next academic
year. These priorities are based on the University Strategic Plan. The BAC makes a
recommendation to the University President on tuition, room and board, and fee structure for
the next academic year.

In December, the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors receives the President’s
recommendation on tuition, room and board, and fees. They also receive the President’s
recommendation on merit increases for faculty and staff. They accept, modify, or reject the
President’s recommendation.



11/2/2003                                                                                      54
Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering



In January 2004, the entire Board of Directors acts upon the recommendation of the President
and the Executive Committee concerning tuition, room and board, fees, and merit increases for
faculty and staff. Again, they can accept, modify, or reject.

After these decisions are made, the Vice-President for Administration and Finance can
determine, based on enrollment projections, how much money is available to fund requests
from various budget units, such as the College of Engineering. He presents this amount of
money to the BAC, which decides how to allocate it for capital purchases by various units.
These decisions are based on the priorities set by the committee in October and November.

Substantial funds are always set aside for technology, and these funds are controlled by
Electronic Information Services (EIS). The Director of EIS and the Associate Provost work
together to assign these funds to various units based on the priorities set by the BAC and the
perceived need of the unit.

Funds from BAC and EIS are allocated to the College of Engineering, and the dean allocates
funds to individual programs and projects. Department chairs work with faculty members to
determine which of their requests have highest priority and should be purchased with capital
equipment funds.

E. Faculty Professional Development

Faculty are strongly encouraged to continue to pursue creative work and professional
development. Although Valparaiso University is a primarily undergraduate institution, we
recognize the importance of maintaining professional excellence and currency among our
faculty. Funds for professional development, such as attending workshops, conferences, and
short courses, are requested and allocated as part of the annual budgeting process. This
funding is included as a separate line item in the budget each year, and the level of funding is
sufficient for each member of the department to attend at least one conference or workshop
each year. In addition to this annual funding, the department frequently uses funds from its
“Research Fund” to support faculty who wish to pursue additional training in new engineering
tools, methods, or techniques. Finally, additional resources are available to individual faculty
who are selected to receive college-wide professorships. Currently, three of the seven full-time
members of the department hold such professorships, which provide several thousand dollars
each year for professional development opportunities.

Through the use of these funds in the past several years, ECE faculty have presented papers at
ASEE national conferences, they have attended short courses and workshops to learn about
LabVIEW, they have attended the American Power Conference in Chicago, and they have
attended workshops and conferences to learn about design automation and mixed-signal
integrated circuits.

Faculty are also encouraged to apply for regional and national grant opportunities such as those
made available by the National Science Foundation.




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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering



F. Plan to Acquire, Maintain, and Operate Facilities and Equipment

Based on the financial resources described in section 7B, the department should be very
capable of acquiring, maintaining, and operating our facilities and equipment for the
foreseeable future.

The department has developed a strategic staffing plan and a strategic laboratory plan, which
outline areas of excellence for our department. Using these plans and these areas of excellence,
we have identified the following purchases that will better enable us to achieve our Program
Objectives over the next five years:

12 Power PC Power Boxes                      $25,000
12 new computers for microcontrollers        $18,000
12 new computers for senior projects         $18,000
6 new data acquisition boards for electronics $4,800
Projection technology                         $6,000
Control Systems Equipment                    $10,000
Communications Equipment                      $5,000
Power Systems Equipment                       $5,000

These financial resources will be made available through a combination of our annual capital
equipment budget, our perennial ECE Research account, and the funds for new equipment
made available by the “Three Goals, One Promise” capital campaign.

Maintaining equipment in our laboratories is essentially a matter of replacing obsolete
equipment, since most equipment in our disciplines becomes obsolete before it wears out. In
addition to the purchases described above, the department will need to account for the
replacement of the following equipment:

11 computers in the DSP lab                  $16,500        replace in 2006
12 computers in the electronics lab          $18,000        replace in 2008
12 stations of oscilloscopes                 $30,000        replace in 2010

These purchases will require an average of approximately $9000 per year over the next seven
years. This is in alignment with our existing $10,000 capital equipment budget, demonstrating
that we will be able to maintain this equipment without directly relying on any other budgetary
source.

Operating equipment in computer engineering is relatively inexpensive. Our $7035 supplies
budget is adequate for the expenses we typically incur, such as purchasing new components to
be used in experiments.

G. Support Personnel and Institutional Services




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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering


The ECE Department has support staff common to all programs within the College of
Engineering. The support staff includes Ms. Cami Gudino, a full-time engineering
administrative assistant, Ms. Pam Becka, a full-time administrative assistant to the Dean, Mr.
Rich Gudino, a full-time mechanical technician, Ms. Laura Sanders, the full-time Director of
the Hesse Learning Resource and Assessment Center (HLRAC), and Mr. Jon Sanders, a full-
time computer systems administrator.

Jon Sanders is a Sun Certified System and Network Administrator for Solaris 8 and 9 and is
A+ certified. He maintains the building’s network and the more than 200 computers in
Gellersen Center.

As the director of the HLRAC, Laura Sanders is an integral part of our assessment plan. She
distributes and collects many of the department’s assessment tools and also compiles data and
summarizes results according to the department’s schedule. She is also responsible for
scheduling and hiring exceptional students to tutor in the HLRAC, which provides a service
that is beneficial to many of our students and helps to maximize our retention of at-risk
students.

Rich Gudino is another full-time employee whose expertise is available to assist students
involved in research and/or independent study projects, faculty who need help fixing,
installing, or renovating lab equipment, or any other projects involving the Manufacturing Lab,
construction, maintenance, etc. of equipment or the building itself.

Cami Gudino and Pam Becka are the engineering and Dean’s administrative assistants,
respectively, and work together to support the faculty in many areas such as document
production, purchases, copies, etc. Both of these support personnel have student aides to assist
them on a regular basis.

Institutional services that support the program include Admissions, Career Services, Electronic
Information Systems, Housekeeping, and Physical Plant. Our department works closely with
each of these departments to ensure that necessary resources are made available to support the
needs of our students and faculty and to ensure the achievement of our Program Objectives.



8. Program Criteria
The Computer Engineering Program provides a wide variety of topics through required courses
in digital logic design (ECE 221 and ECE 222), linear circuit theory (ECE 263 and ECE 264),
embedded microcontrollers (ECE 322), electronics (ECE 342), sampled linear systems (ECE
360), and electromagnetic field theory (ECE 430).

The curriculum also provides depth in several the major fields of computer engineering. In the
area of computerscomputer hardware, required courses in basic digital design (ECE 221 and
ECE 222), courses inand computer architecture (ECE 424), are complemented by elective
courses in VLSI design (ECE 429) or digital signal processing (ECE 452). , and digital
computer networking theory (ECE 450) provide such depth. In the area of computer software
design, required courses in basic programming (ECE 155 and ECE 258), data structures (CS


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Valparaiso University                                              Computer Engineering


257) and software design and development (CS 358) provide such depth. Finally, in the area of
the hardware/software interface, required courses in operating systems (CS 347) and embedded
microcontrollers (ECE 322) are complemented by an elective course in digital computer
networking theory (ECE 450).

Depth in the computer hardware or hardware/software area can be enhanced through the
program’s elective course selection system. All computer engineering students are required to
take 3 hours of Computer Engineering Electives to graduate. Students can choose from VLSI
design (ECE 429), digital computer networking theory (ECE 450) or digital signal processing
(ECE 452).In the area of communications, courses in general communication theory (ECE
453) and wireless communications (ECE 490W) provide a sequence of depth. In the area of
power systems, an introduction to power system analysis and protection (ECE 372) and power
electronics (ECE 471) provide depth in this area.

The program provides the students with course work in probability and statistics through ECE
465. This course is designed and taught by the electrical and computer engineering faculty.
This course structure provides a focus on electrical and computer engineering applications. In
the area of mathematics, all computer engineering students must take MATH 131 and MATH
132 (or MATH 151 and MATH 152 for students who enter the program with advanced
mathematical skills). These courses cover topics up to and including differentiation and
integration of single-variable functions. The students must also take MATH 234, which covers
differential equations and linear algebra. All students receive instruction covering complex
variables and their applications in ECE 263 (Linear Circuit Theory I) and ECE 264 (Linear
Circuit Theory II). All computer engineering students are required to take MATH 253, which
covers topics in vector algebra, calculus of functions with several variables, multiple
integration, and calculus of vector fields. The program provides the students with course work
in probability and statistics through ECE 465. This course is designed and taught by the
electrical and computer engineering faculty. This course structure provides a focus on
electrical and computer engineering applications. All computer engineering students must take
courses in physics (PHYS 141, PHYS 141L, and PHYS 142), which cover topics from basic
mechanics to electromagnetic fields. All computer engineering students must complete a
course in chemistry (CHEM 115 or CHEM 121). All of these courses provide the foundation
in basic engineering mathematics and science topics needed by the student to succeed in the
major design project which the student is required to complete (GE 497 and GE 498) during
his/her senior year.

In the area of mathematics, all computer engineering students must take Calculus I and II.
These courses cover topics up to and including single-variable integration. The students must
also take MATH 234, which covers differential equations and linear algebra. All students
receive instruction covering complex variables and their applications in ECE 263 (Linear
Circuit Theory I) and ECE 264 (Linear Circuit Theory II). All computer engineering students
are required to take MATH 253, which covers topics in vector algebra, calculus functions with
several variables, multiple integration, and calculus of vector fields. All computer engineering
students must take PHYS 141 or 151 (honors), PHYS 141L, PHYS 142 or 152 (honors), and
PHYS 243, which cover topics from basic mechanics through atoms and nuclei. All computer
engineering students must complete CHEM 115 or CHEM 121.


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Valparaiso University                                               Computer Engineering



Computer engineering students are required to take ECE 155, which introduces them to the
fundamentals of computer science, and ECE 258, which introduces them to more complex
program development and data structures. Computer Engineering students are also required to
take ECE 357, a course in Discrete Mathematics. The discrete mathematics course is taken in
the same semester as ECE 258, and the same instructor teaches these two courses. The tight
connection and coordination between these courses allows the students to immediately see
applications of their discrete mathematics topics in their programming course. Finally,
computer engineering students are required to take CS 257, CS 347, and CS 358 which allows
them further development of their programming skills.

Additionally, all computer engineering students are required to complete a course in
engineering science.     All of these courses provide the foundation in basic engineering
mathematics and science topics needed by the student to succeed in the major capstone project
which the student is required to complete in GE 497 and GE 498 during his/her senior year.

All computer engineering students receive instruction in advanced mathematical topics such as
differential equations in MATH 234 and in the application of differential equations in Linear
Circuit Theory, ECE 263 and ECE 264. They receive instruction in linear algebra in MATH
234 and in the application of linear algebra in ECE 263 and ECE 264. All computer
engineering students receive instruction in complex variables in ECE 263 and ECE 264.
Finally, all computer engineering students receive instruction in advanced calculus topics such
as vector algebra, space curves, and calculus of vector fields in MATH 253, and the students
receive instruction in the application of these advanced calculus topics in electromagnetic field
theory, ECE 430.

9. General Advanced-Level Program
The computer engineering program at Valparaiso University is exclusively undergraduate, so
accreditation of an advanced-level program does not apply.




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