Ranger Coordinator.pdf by tongxiamy

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 3

									                                                                                                                                                          
 
CROCODILE ISLANDS RANGERS: Maringa Ocean Patrol alludes to the waters of 
the Arafura sea linked in ceremonial alliance of Dhuwa and Yirritja Yan‐nhangu speaking clans. The barramundi (ratjuk) 
is a symbol of the Yirritja sea (dhulway), the barracuda (larratjatja) is Dhuwa. Together they provide and care for our 
lives and marine resources.                                              


Ranger Coordinator 
Mo:          0420960308                                                                                                30 October 2011
Email:       Warrick.angus2@bigpond.com  
Email:       Crocodile.Islands.Rangers@gmail.com 
Post:        CIR MOPRA PMB 122 Winnellie 
Web:         www.crocodileislandsrangers.com 
 
 
 
                                         Patron of Crocodile Islands Ranger wins $5000 prize 
 
Laurie Baymarrwangga, Yan‐nhangu nonagenarian (over 90 years old), has been awarded the NT 
Research and Innovation Awards Special Commendation. The Innovation and Research board 
celebrated the outstanding and inspiring lifetime contribution of Baymarrwangga whom they said 
‘deserves special recognition for her unique contribution to our understanding of the Northern 
Territory’. 
 
Baymarrwangga has played a crucial role in assisting the Yan‐nhangu traditional owners of the 
Crocodile Islands to establish a Ranger Program as an investment in their land and sea country for 
future generations. The aim of the Crocodile Islands Rangers (CIR) program is to re‐insert tradition 
and custom into contemporary Natural Resource Management (NRM) and sustain linguistic, 
cultural and biological diversity as a basis for sustainable livelihoods on sea country.  
 

The CII and Dictionary project 
The Northern Territory Government Department of Business and Employment not only honoured 
her lifetime achievement for the CIR but also her commitment to the intergenerational 
transmission of local language, culture and coastal knowledge through the Crocodile Islands 
Initiative (CII). The CII was a finalist in the Australian Institute of Marine Science Tropical 
Knowledge Research Awards. Together Baymarrwangga1 and Anthropologist Bentley James have 
created a multi‐disciplinary collaboration to meet the challenges of language loss, bilingual 
repression, reductions in homelands and community development support. The CII collaboration 
is about caring for this remote part of Australia’s marine estate and the Yan‐nhangu people who 
know it and own it.  
 
A significant consequence of this collaboration is the Yan‐nhangu dictionary project started in 
1994. At this time only three hundred words of Baymarrwangga’s language were documented. 
With her a team of volunteers continues to struggle to sustain the conditions promoting Yan‐
nhangu language, a vehicle for ‐and repository of‐ the intricate local knowledge of the seas and 
islands. This rare language is the gift of uncounted generations of intimate coexistence with the 
marine environment. So far they have mapped over five hundred named sites in the seas and 
some of the stories and rich meanings of this breathtaking marine heritage. The Yan‐nhangu data‐
                                                       
1
  Baymarrwangga is an NT finalist of the 2012 Australian of the Year Award. Finalists include volunteers, scientists, philanthropists and charity
champions, artists, medical researchers and campaigners, social justice advocates, carers, humanitarians, educators, civic leaders, high achievers and
community heroes. 
                                                                                                                                                     1 
 
                                                                                                        
 
base contains over a thousand proper nouns and six hundred verbs describing the coming, doings 
and goings of these islands and their people and linking them to the Argonauts who sailed here 
some 60,000 years ago. 
 
The dictionary is one of a family of projects directed at promoting continuities and innovations in 
Yan‐nhangu local knowledge and as such encouraging sustainability in the biological and linguistic 
diversity of the homelands. The Yan‐nhangu dictionary is part of the wider project to help Yan‐
nhangu children manage their natural resources, learn their local Indigenous Ecological 
knowledge (IEK), their languages, and encourage residence on their homelands. Laurie 
Baymarrwangga puts it this way 
 
 ‘Nhangu dhangany yuwalkthana bayngu bulanggitj Yolngu mitji marnggimana dhana 
gayangamana mayili mana dhangany wanggalangabu mana limalama ganatjirri wulumba 
(maramba)’.  
 
“We continue to pass on the stories of our land and sea country for the good of new generations”.  

Opportunity in difficult times 
These projects attempt to provide socially and culturally desirable opportunities for Yolngu people 
at a time when there are less chances for children. The evidence is unequivocal; culture and 
language are a necessary, but not sufficient condition for the creation of fulfilling lives and happy 
communities. In this context 95 year old Laurie Baymarrwangga has donated her life savings, 
nearly half a million dollars, to community development activities in her communities at both 
Milingimbi and Galiwin’ku.   
 
Baymarrwangga has initiated these community development projects using her own resources to 
breathe new life into practical activities for kin and their engagement with country.  In the NT 
scientists are beginning to recognise the nature and sophistication of Indigenous systems of 
kinship and relatedness as agencies for social and ecological sustainability. These projects foster 
leadership, challenge the monolingual orthodoxy and its cultural racism, and by enhancing the 
fundamental conditions for cultural, linguistic and biological resilience, work to re‐engage 
community children.  

Cultural drivers for contemporary projects 
The Crocodile Islands Junior Rangers are working to create practical partnerships to positively 
engage children with their country in a manner driven by indigenous ownership, pedagogy and 
aspirations. Baymarrwangga is working to reinvigorate pre‐existing relations to land and sea 
country and ensure strong inter‐generational transmission of local knowledge as a basis for a 
sustainable livelihoods and NCRM on the Crocodile Islands, to create a world fit to live in. 
 
The CIR program aims to provide the kind of work, training and everyday practices sustaining the 
cultural and biological diversity of the region. The dedicated group of rangers patrol just under 
10,000 km2 of the Arafura Sea defending the breeding and nesting sites of many endangered 
turtle and other species. They also protect some 250 km2 sites sacred to the Yan‐nhangu using 
state‐of‐the art I Tracker technology donated by NAILSMA to record the complex local knowledge 
that goes with it. These rangers, funded initially by Baymarrwangga, are positively reengaging 
with a pre‐existing ancestral geography invisible to the auspices of the settler state, but they are 
doing so in partnership with state of the art technologies and methods.  
 
                                                                                                      2 
 
                                                                                                      
 
Vision for the future 
Baymarrwangga's vision includes using modern technologies and innovation to build livelihood 
activities and a cultural‐based economy for her kin on her islands. She sees the urgent need to 
enhance the transfer of local culture as a complement to a formal and more appropriate 
education, bringing Indigenous language and knowledge to the centre of community and 
reaffirming its status. The Crocodile Islands Rangers are developing a database for schools to give 
children a reason to attend and commit, to start opening young eyes to career paths in 
conservation, cultural and natural resource management. The CIR aims to continue to provide 
much‐needed community and environmental services, such as removal of threatening crocodiles, 
weed and feral animal management and ocean rescue, Ghost Nets and bio security if it can attract 
secure government funding and other investment.  
 
The CIR program has joined with North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance 
(NAILSMA) and is fostering relationships with groups across northern Australia to try raise 
awareness and support for funds to continue its projects.  
 
At 95, Baymarrwangga is still looking towards the future; her next goal is to establish a 1000 km2 
turtle sanctuary in her sea country to save the turtles, and for the future of her great, great grand 
children’s children, and people everywhere.  As she says it is her vision, and the wisdom of her 
years, that prompts her to resist the creep of assimilation and reaffirm the culture and dignity of 
Indigenous people everywhere. 
 
 
Dr. Bentley James 
Anthropologist, Crocodile Islands Rangers, Linguist Yan‐nhangu Dictionary Project 
E‐mail: bentley.james.dr@gmail.com 
Mobile: 0402704354 PO Box 42393 Casuarina NT 0810 




                                                                                                    3 
 

								
To top