VI

Document Sample
VI Powered By Docstoc
					         Commission on Colleges
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools




  Report of the Reaffirmation Committee
        Old Dominion University
             Norfolk, Virginia



           February 25-28, 2002




         Dr. Roseann Runte, President

        Dr. Charles Ray Nash, Chairman

  Dr. Rudolph S. Jackson, COC Representative
                           Commission on Colleges
                  Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

        REPORT OF THE REAFFIRMATION COMMITTEE TO
                 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY
                                     Norfolk, Virginia
                               Dr. Roseann Runte, President
                                   February 25-28, 2002

                   VISITING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

                            Dr. Charles Ray Nash, Chairman
                          Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
                            The University of Alabama System
                                 401 Queen City Avenue
                               Tuscaloosa, AL 35401-1551
                     PHONE: (205) 348-8347        FAX: (205) 348-5206
                             E-Mail: cnash@uasystem.ua.edu

Dr. James Allen Anderson      Dr. Stephen W. Harmon           Dr. Carla L. Relaford
Dean, School of Engineering   Associate Professor/Director    Director of Distance and
 Technology & Sciences        of Educational Technology       Distributed Learning
South Carolina State          Georgia State University        Georgia State University
University
                              Dr. James A. Hefner             Dr. Thomas C. Robinson
Dr. Suzanne M. Bean           President                       Dean, Coll. of Allied Health
Professor of Education        Tennessee State University      Professions
Mississippi University for                                    University of Kentucky
                              Dr. William D. Lawson
Women
                              Dean, College of Arts &         Dr. Dan Seymour
Dr. Suzzette F. Chopin        Sciences                        Vice President for Student
Professor of Biology          Tennessee State University      Affairs & Assistant Professor
Texas A&M University-                                         Northwestern State University
                              Dr. Theodore (Ted) K. Miller
Corpus Christi
                              Professor Emeritus, School      Mr. John L. Stegall
Dr. James (Drew) A. Clark     of Professional Studies         Vice President for Business &
Director of Assessment        The University of Georgia       Finance
Auburn University                                             Armstrong Atlantic State
                              Dr. Darrell F. Parker
                                                              University
Dr. Alexander Fluellen        Professor of Economics
Professor of Math Sciences    Georgia Southern University     Dr. Caryl A. Yzenbaard
Clark Atlanta University                                      Professor of Law
                                                              Northern Kentucky University
Dr. Coy L. Harmon
Dean of Libraries
Murray State University
                    Dr. Rudolph S. Jackson, Associate Executive Director
                                  Commission on Colleges
                        Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
                                    1866 Southern Lane
                                    Decatur, GA 30033
                  PHONE: (404) 679-4501 ext. 556      FAX: (404) 679-4558
                              E-MAIL: rjackson@sacscoc.org
                                                                                                                                i



                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                                                                                        Page

INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 1

SECTION I: PRINCIPLES AND PHILOSOPHY OF ACCREDITATION .............. 3
   1.1       INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE
             ACCREDITATION PROCESS ................................................................................... 4
   1.2       APPLICATION OF THE CRITERIA ........................................................................... 4
   1.3       SEPARATELY ACCREDITED UNITS ........................................................................ 4
   1.4       CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY ................................................................................ 4
   1.5       INITIAL MEMBERSHIP........................................................................................... 5
   1.6       REPRESENTATION OF STATUS .............................................................................. 5
SECTION II: INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE ................................................................ 6

SECTION III: INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS ................................................ 8
   3.1       PLANNING AND EVALUATION: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS................................... 8
   3.2       PLANNING AND EVALUATION: ADMINISTRATIVE AND EDUCATIONAL
             SUPPORT SERVICES .............................................................................................. 9
   3.3       INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH ................................................................................ 10
SECTION IV: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM ............................................................. 13
   4.1     GENERAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM ............................. 14
   4.2     UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM ............................................................................. 14
      4.2.1 Undergraduate Admission ............................................................................ 14
      4.2.2 Undergraduate Completion Requirements .................................................... 16
      4.2.3 Undergraduate Curriculum ........................................................................... 17
      4.2.4 Undergraduate Instruction ............................................................................ 19
      4.2.5 Academic Advising of Undergraduate Students ........................................... 20
   4.3     GRADUATE PROGRAM ........................................................................................ 21
      4.3.1 Initiation, Operation and Expansion of Graduate Programs ......................... 21
      4.3.2 Graduate Admission...................................................................................... 24
      4.3.3 Graduate Completion Requirements ............................................................. 27
      4.3.4 Graduate Curriculum .................................................................................... 27
      4.3.5 Graduate Instruction...................................................................................... 29
      4.3.6 Academic Advising of Graduate Students .................................................... 29
   4.4     PUBLICATIONS ................................................................................................... 31
   4.5     DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAMS ...................................................................... 31
   4.6     CONTINUING EDUCATION, OUTREACH AND SERVICE PROGRAMS ...................... 32
   4.7     STUDENT RECORDS ............................................................................................ 34
   4.8     FACULTY ........................................................................................................... 34
      4.8.1 Selection of Faculty ...................................................................................... 34
      4.8.2 Academic and Professional Preparation ....................................................... 34
                                                                                                                                 ii


        4.8.2.1 Associate ............................................................................................... 35
        4.8.2.2 Baccalaureate ........................................................................................ 35
        4.8.2.3 Graduate ................................................................................................ 35
        4.8.2.4 Distance Learning Programs/Activities ................................................ 36
     4.8.3 Part-time Faculty........................................................................................... 37
     4.8.4 Graduate Teaching Assistants ....................................................................... 38
     4.8.5 Compensation ............................................................................................... 39
     4.8.6 Academic Freedom and Professional Security ............................................. 40
     4.8.7 Professional Growth...................................................................................... 41
     4.8.8 The Role of the Faculty and Its Committees ................................................ 44
     4.8.9 Faculty Loads ................................................................................................ 45
     4.8.10    Criteria and Procedures for Evaluation ..................................................... 45
  4.9      CONSORTIAL RELATIONSHIPS AND CONTRACTUAL AGREEMENTS ..................... 46
     4.9.1 Consortial Relationships ............................................................................... 46
     4.9.2 Contractual Agreements................................................................................ 47
ACADEMIC AREA REPORTS
             Arts and Humanities ......................................................................................... 49
             College of Business and Public Administration ............................................... 51
             College of Engineering and Technology .......................................................... 52
             College of Health Sciences ............................................................................... 55
             Computer Science Undergraduate/Graduate Program ...................................... 58
             Criminal Justice ................................................................................................ 61
             Darden College of Education ............................................................................ 63
             General Education Program .............................................................................. 66
             Mathematics and Statistics Undergraduate and Graduate Programs ................ 66
             Natural and Physical Sciences .......................................................................... 68
             Social Science and Behavioral Sciences ........................................................... 71
SECTION V: EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES ............................................ 75
  5.1      LIBRARY AND OTHER LEARNING RESOURCES ................................................... 76
     5.1.1 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................ 76
     5.1.2 Services ......................................................................................................... 76
     5.1.3 Library Collections ....................................................................................... 77
     5.1.4 Information Technology ............................................................................... 78
     5.1.5 Cooperative Agreements ............................................................................... 78
     5.1.6 Staff ............................................................................................................... 79
     5.1.7 Library/Learning Resources for Distance Learning Activities ..................... 79
  5.2      INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT .................................................................................. 80
  5.3      INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES AND SYSTEMS .................................. 80
  5.4      STUDENT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ................................................................... 82
     5.4.1 Scope and Accountability ............................................................................. 82
     5.4.2 Resources ...................................................................................................... 84
     5.4.3 Programs and Services .................................................................................. 85
        5.4.3.1 Counseling and Career Services ........................................................... 85
        5.4.3.2 The Student Government, Student Activities and Student
                 Publications ........................................................................................... 86
                                                                                                                              iii


         5.4.3.3 Student Behavior ................................................................................... 86
         5.4.3.4 Residence Halls ..................................................................................... 86
         5.4.3.5 Student Financial Aid ........................................................................... 87
         5.4.3.6 Student Health Services ........................................................................ 87
         5.4.3.7 Intramural Athletics .............................................................................. 88
   5.5      INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS ........................................................................... 88
      5.5.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................... 88
      5.5.2 Administrative Oversight .............................................................................. 88
      5.5.3 Financial Control .......................................................................................... 89
      5.5.4 Academic Program........................................................................................ 89
SECTION VI: ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES .................................................... 90
   6.1     ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION ............................................................. 90
      6.1.1 Description Titles and Terms ........................................................................ 90
      6.1.2 Governing Board ........................................................................................... 90
      6.1.3 Advisory Committee ..................................................................................... 91
      6.1.4 Official Policies ............................................................................................ 91
      6.1.5 Administrative Organization ......................................................................... 92
   6.2     INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT ........................................................................ 92
      6.2.1 Alumni Affairs .............................................................................................. 92
      6.2.2. Fundraising ................................................................................................... 93
   6.3     FINANCIAL RESOURCES ..................................................................................... 93
      6.3.1 Financial Resources ...................................................................................... 93
      6.3.2 Organization for the Administration of Financial Resources ....................... 93
      6.3.3 Budget Planning ............................................................................................ 95
      6.3.4 Budget Control .............................................................................................. 95
      6.3.5 The Relation of an Institution to External Budgetary Control ...................... 95
      6.3.6 Accounting, Reporting and Auditing ............................................................ 96
      6.3.7 Purchasing and Inventory Control ................................................................ 96
      6.3.8 Refund Policy................................................................................................ 96
      6.3.9 Cashiering ..................................................................................................... 96
      6.3.10    Investment Management ........................................................................... 97
      6.3.11    Risk Management and Insurance .............................................................. 97
      6.3.12    Auxiliary Enterprises ................................................................................ 97
   6.4     PHYSICAL RESOURCES ....................................................................................... 97
      6.4.1 Space Management ....................................................................................... 98
      6.4.2 Buildings, Grounds and Equipment Maintenance ........................................ 98
      6.4.3 Safety and Security ....................................................................................... 98
      6.4.4 Facilities Master Plan .................................................................................... 98
   6.5     EXTERNALLY FUNDED GRANTS AND CONTRACTS ............................................. 99
   6.6     RELATED CORPORATE ENTITIES ........................................................................ 99
RECOMMENDATIONS.............................................................................................. 100

SUGGESTIONS ............................................................................................................ 102
                                                                                          1


          REPORT OF THE REAFFIRMATION COMMITTEE

                        OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY

                              NORFOLK, VIRGINIA

                         INTRODUCTION
       A Reaffirmation Committee from the Commission on Colleges (COC) of the

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools visited Old Dominion University (ODU) in

Norfolk, Virginia on February 25-28, 2002.

       Old Dominion University is an institution offering 64 bachelor’s degrees in the basic

arts and sciences and in selected professional and pre-professional areas of study, 66

master’s, two educational specialist, and 22 doctoral degrees in a variety of fields. The

institution was founded in 1930 and enrolls approximately 20,000 students.

       The chief executive of ODU is its President who reports directly to the Board of

Visitors, the institution’s governing board.

       The Reaffirmation Committee was accorded courteous and professional cooperation

by members of the Board of Visitors, administration, faculty, staff, and student body before

and during the visit. We appreciated the high levels of consideration and cooperation we

received and wish to express our best wishes and sincere gratitude to the entire University

family for the hospitality and good working environment we enjoyed during our visit.

       While this was not a joint visit, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

also conducted a site visit to ODU during the same dates as our SACS/COC team was on

campus. All findings of the NCAA visit are reported in a separate report and through NCAA

processes. Representatives of the two teams did meet to share information.
                                                                                          2


       The following report reflects the collective opinion of the SACS/COC Visiting

Committee based on the full range of peer review activities engaged in before and during the

campus visit. We sincerely hope that the recommendations, suggestions, and commentary

contained in the report will further strengthen Old Dominion University in its teaching,

research, and service programs and activities.
                                                                                            3



          SECTION I:
 PRINCIPLES AND PHILOSOPHY OF
        ACCREDITATION
Evaluation of the Institution’s Self-Study

       Old Dominion University has conducted a self-study in accordance with the

requirements of the Commission on Colleges. The Self-Study took place during a period of

approximately two years and involved a significantly representative group of faculty, staff,

students, administrators, and community leaders. Overall internal participation of campus

constituents seemed to be very high. The study was comprehensive and broad based and

resulted in findings to ensure compliance with the Criteria for Accreditation. In general, the

Committee was pleased with the sum total of the self-study process engaged in by the

personnel of the University as well as with the products of the process that were made

available to the Visiting Committee.

       The Committee recognizes the following attributes as strengths of the self-study

process:

       1.      The self-study team of the institution provided excellent leadership.

       2.      Exhibits were cataloged, organized, and displayed in a commendable fashion.

       3.      Outstanding communications within the University community during the
               self-study was evident.


       The Visiting Committee believes that the self-study and its resulting reports will

continue to be a valuable resource for ODU as it looks forward to the development and

implementation of the next five-year plan.
                                                                                            4


1.1     Institutional Commitment and Responsibilities in the Accreditation
        Process

        As a part of the peer review process, Old Dominion University made appropriate and

satisfactory arrangements that assisted the Visiting Committee in carrying out its duties and

responsibilities in an effective way. From all indications, the leadership of the institution

will use the accreditation process as a tool in the further development of the University. A

spirit of collegiality existed between the Committee and the representatives of the

University. Information on the institution was provided in a timely manner before and during

the visit. Every indication was that the leadership adhered to the principles and practices of

the Commission on Colleges. Also, ODU appears to comply with the rules and requirements

of Title IV of the federal higher education act. No evidence was found to the contrary.

1.2     Application of the Criteria

        Major changes made at the institution since the last reaffirmation visit have been

appropriately reported to the Commission on Colleges. The institution has procedures for

addressing student complaints.

1.3     Separately Accredited Units

        Old Dominion University has no separately accredited units.

1.4     Conditions of Eligibility

        The Visiting Committee makes no recommendations in the section on Conditions of

Eligibility.
                                                                                     5


1.5    Initial Membership

       Old Dominion University continues to be accredited by the Commission on Colleges

of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

1.6    Representation of Status

       ODU reports its status with the Commission on Colleges consistent with required

language.
                                                                                            6



                 SECTION II:
           INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE
       Old Dominion University has an expansive, highly comprehensive mission statement

that is complemented by both an historical statement and a statement of institutional goals.

The Mission of the University statement provides a broad perspective and a comprehensive

description of the University’s purpose.

       The history, mission, and major goals statements have been published in the Old

Dominion University Catalog (2000-2002), the ODU Faculty Handbook (1999-2001), the

ODU Strategic Plan 2000 - 2005, and on the Old Dominion University web site in the Board

of Visitors section. Although the mission and goal statements are included in PDF format on

the University’s web site within the Board of Visitor’s Policies and Procedures section, it is

unlikely that prospective students or others seeking information about the University’s

purpose would find it easy to access this web-location because there is no direct linkage on

the Home Page to University Mission, Goals, or Purpose. Establishing a direct link on the

home page to access the University Mission and Goals would facilitate access to the

information by prospective students and other users. When searching for university mission

on the home page search component, however, the search does provide direct links to

numerous mission statements for many of the University’s academic and support service

units. These direct, easy access linkages concerning the primary purpose of the various units

would be helpful to prospective students or others interested in learning about the

University’s programs and services. Suggestion (1): The Committee suggests that a direct

internet link to the Mission of the University and the Major Goals of the University

statements on the Old Dominion University Home Page be added to provide user-friendly
                                     7


internet access to the statements.
                                                                                           8



           SECTION III:
  INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
3.1    Planning and Evaluation: Educational Programs

       The Assessment of Academic Achievement program (Assessment Program) was

created in support of the University’s planning and decision making procedures and intended

to improve student learning and provide an enhanced educational experience for ODU

students. The Assessment Program is currently staffed with one full-time research associate,

two part-time graduate assistants, and an externally contracted director.         Given the

Assessment Program’s ever increasing workload since its 1986 inception; growing local,

regional, and national demand for assessment data; increased visibility of assessment

activities over the past decade and in the foreseeable future; and emphasis on quality

enhancement and institutional effectiveness by the Southern Association (SACS/COC) and

the State of Virginia, the Assessment Program’s staffing requirements need reevaluation. In

light of these factors, a review conducted to determine the appropriate level of staffing to

support its current and future responsibilities would be most desirable. Further, the

functional relationship and probable overlap of assigned responsibilities between the

Assessment Program and University Planning and Institutional Research Office is in need of

examination as well. It appears that these two important university units have much in

common and that there would be utility in considering ways and means to better integrate

their assigned planning, assessment, and evaluation duties as well as to provide an effective

staffing pattern designed to enhance accomplishment of the institution’s planning,

assessment, and evaluation needs.
                                                                                             9


       Currently, the University appears to have no centrally located archive for the

maintenance of institutional planning, research, and assessment materials. To facilitate

institutional planning and evaluation processes and procedures in a systematic and broad-

based manner, as outlined by the Quality Enhancement Process, there would be great utility

in the establishment of a university assessment archive designed to collect, assemble, and

make accessible important planning, research, and assessment documents. Suggestion (2):

The Committee suggests that a systematic study of the current assigned responsibilities of

the Assessment Program in conjunction with a review of the adequacy of current staff to

carry out those responsibilities in a timely fashion be initiated. Suggestion (3): The

Committee suggests that the University examine the feasibility of combining (a) the

Assessment Program and (b) the University Planning and Institutional Research office into a

single office.   Suggestion (4): The Committee suggests that primary academic and

administrative units designate an individual to be responsible for coordinating unit

assessment initiatives and function as the unit’s liaison to appropriate institutional planning

and assessment bodies and initiatives. Suggestion (5): The Committee suggests that the

University establish, maintain, and keep current with newly generated data a central archive

of relevant assessment and evaluation documents concerning the University’s strategic

planning and institutional effectiveness processes.

3.2    Planning and Evaluation: Administrative and Educational Support
       Services

       The Old Dominion University Strategic Plan 2000 - 2005 is a comprehensive

planning document that identifies five key areas of emphasis that the University plans to

focus on during the five year period from 2000 to 2005. The five key areas, (1) Distinctive

Academic and Research Programs, (2) Quality of University Life, (3) Strategic Partnerships
                                                                                            10


and Collaboration, (4) Community Involvement and Commitment, and (5) Enhanced

Institutional Reputation, are organized into ten strategic initiatives and some 54 objectives,

each of which stipulates specific action(s) to be taken during this quintennial period. The

Strategic Plan calls for a minimum of 40 different institutional administrative units,

programs, and services to be responsible for one or more of the plan’s objectives. In a

parallel approach, virtually all administrative units have established and published written

mission and purpose statements, most of which can be found on the University’s web site.

The administrative units collect evaluative data on a continuing basis and use that data to

guide planned change over time. Evidence of this can be found for the various units in the

38-page report entitled Assessment and Change: Continuous Improvement at Old Dominion

University (December 2001) compiled by the Director of Assessment. This compilation was

based on graduate and undergraduate program directors’ Assessment Plan Reports

containing (a) links to the University Mission and Strategic Plan, (b) targeted goals, and (c)

assessment methods used. This compilation report is most comprehensive and provides

descriptions of how 48 academic college and administrative support units have used

assessment data to implement programmatic changes.

3.3    Institutional Research

       Institutional research at Old Dominion University is carried out largely via two

agencies. The primary agency is the Office of University Planning and Institutional

Research (UPIR), which functions primarily as the analytical arm of the central

administration.   This office coordinates institutional reports on enrollment, student

characteristics, and other data required for state, federal, and private agencies. In addition,

the office provides the University president, provost, vice-presidents, deans and other
                                                                                           11


officials assistance in analytical and technical matters when called upon. The second agency,

the Assessment of Academic Achievement program (Assessment Program), was described in

some detail under Section 3.1, Planning and Evaluation: Educational Programs. Although

these two agencies were conceived as separate academic and administrative support

programs for planning, assessment, evaluation, and research purposes, there is considerable

overlap of functions and assigned responsibilities. These functional and responsibility

overlaps have led to concern on the part of some and a suggestion that a systematic review

be initiated to determine the utility of merging the two entities to increase both functional

and cost effectiveness (see Suggestion 3).

    There is minimal documentation that a systematic process for judging the effectiveness

of the University Planning and Institutional Research Office beyond conversations between

the director and the provost in annual budgetary conferences.           Although numerous

institutional administrative units access UPIR services, evaluation data collected from those

users is neither systematically collected nor available. There is need to explore avenues for

obtaining user feedback regarding quality of and satisfaction with services rendered by the

office. In addition, the demands upon the resources of the UPIR have expanded considerably

in recent years as the University requires increased amounts and types of data and analyses in

support of its operational effectiveness. Compounding the problem of managing increased

demand is the fact that staffing for UPIR has been decreased over the past decade. There is

little doubt that these factors have combined to diminish the effectiveness of institutional

research productivity over time. Consequently, it appears clear that a well conceived review

of organizational structure, reporting and supervisory procedures, functional expectations,

and available human, technical, and fiscal resources is essential in the near term.
                                                                                          12


Recommendation (1): The Committee recommends that a formal procedure for collecting

input on satisfaction of customers with University Planning and Institutional Research be

developed and used to guide the department’s planning and evaluation process. Suggestion

(6): The Committee suggests that a review of the University Planning and Institutional

Research office’s workload be conducted to determine the staffing skills necessary to satisfy

demands for data collection and analysis and additional qualified staff be provided as

needed.
                                                                                           13



                   SECTION IV:
              EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Introduction

       The focus of Old Dominion University, as articulated in its Mission Statement and in

the stated goals of the University, is the education of its students which it provides through

six colleges: Arts and Letters, Business and Public Administration, Education, Engineering

and Technology, Health Sciences, and Sciences. The University also provides extensive

distance education by use of TELETECHNET. Academic areas reviewed included Allied

Health Programs; Business; Criminal Justice; Education; Engineering; General Education;

Humanities;    Mathematics/Computer        Science;   Natural    Physical    Sciences;    and

Social/Behavioral Sciences.

       All aspects of the program at Old Dominion are related to the articulated purpose of

promoting knowledge and the pursuit of truth. Undergraduate education, which is the largest

segment of the University, emphasizes intellectual skills and intercultural understanding.

Graduate and certificate programs are in appropriate areas of either faculty strength or have

other unique characteristics such as geographic advantages. In like manner, the principles of

institutional effectiveness pertain to, and are used by, all academic programs and units. The

use of programs such as the TELETECHNET allows greater access to the resources of the

University.

       Except as noted, all policies and procedures are in writing; have been appropriately

approved; have been published; and are being implemented and enforced.
                                                                                            14


4.1    General Requirements of the Educational Program

       The Mission Statement of Old Dominion University, as articulated in several

documents including the Self-Study at page two, is to "promote[s] the advancement of

knowledge and the pursuit of truth. It develops in students a respect for the dignity and

worth of the individual, a capacity for critical reasoning, and a genuine desire for learning."

The mission statement is further developed by the articulation of eleven defined goals

dealing with students; faculty; academic programs (undergraduate programs, graduate

programs, and special emphasis areas); teaching; research, scholarship, and creativity;

distance learning; life long learning; community service; student life, alumni; and quality as

a continual process.

       All aspects of the educational program are related to the stated mission and goals of

the University. Again, with the exceptions as noted, there is a competent faculty, adequate

library and learning resources are provided, and there are appropriate computer resources,

instructional materials and equipment. The physical facilities are appropriate. The student

enrollment and financial resources, though challenged at the present time, are sufficient to

support an effective education program. The number of applicants and the quality of

entering statistics has increased. Finally, appropriate levels of student achievement and

quality of program are met. The use of TELETECHNET and other methods of delivery

services distinguish Old Dominion University.

4.2    Undergraduate Program

       4.2.1   Undergraduate Admission

       The Board of Visitors (BOV) establishes general admission policies. Changes in

admission policies are approved by the Faculty Senate, the Provost and VPAA and President
                                                                                           15


and sent to the Academic Advancement Committee of the BOV, which makes its

recommendation to the entire BOV.

       There appears to be three distinct offices involved in undergraduate admissions: the

Office of Admissions, the Office of International Admissions, and TELETECHNET. The

Office of Admissions is responsible for administering the BOV policy for permanent

residents; the Office of International Admissions handles admissions of non-immigrant

applicants. TELETECHNET handles its own admissions; all TELETECHNET students are

considered transfer students. It is not clear what, if any, coordination occurs between these

admissions offices.

       Some programs (Honors College; Engineering; Guaranteed Entry Programs in

physical therapy, nursing, dental hygiene, B.S./M.D., Engineering/M.D., B.S.

Engineering/Law, Engineering’s B.S./M.S. and B.S./Ph.D.; early childhood and special

education, speech pathology; B.A./M.B.A.; and B.A./M.A.) have specific admissions

policies. Specific program requirements are delineated in the appropriate program section of

the catalog. The Self-Study Report states that, “Admission policies and procedures for

specific degree programs are coordinated with the University’s Colleges and the Office of

Academic Affairs.” The Follow-Up Action Plan notes that policies for the different

admissions areas will be published in the next catalog. The role of the Office of Academic

Affairs in these admissions decisions is unclear, as is the degree of coordination between the

admission offices and the programs with special requirements. Suggestion (7): The

Committee suggests that Old Dominion University evaluate the level of coordination

between the admission offices.
                                                                                          16


       Admission policies are consistent with the educational purposes of the institution.

Requirements for admission as stated in the catalog include official high school transcripts

and standardized test scores. Qualitative assessments are not required, although the student

may submit letters of recommendation from current instructors, evidence of leadership in

extracurricular activities, or an autobiographical essay.

       Admission policies must include qualitative and quantitative requirements that

identify students who demonstrate reasonable potential for success at the institution.

Recommendation (2): The Committee recommends that Old Dominion University require

qualitative assessment of its applicants.

       Appropriate developmental courses are offered. The appropriate administrators

evaluate admission policies. Matriculants possess the high school diploma or GED.

Admission procedures are followed for all students. Matriculants have interests and

capabilities consistent with admission policies.

       Admission criteria for transfer students are defined and published.

       Credit awarded for advanced placement or other examinations, training and

experiential learning fulfill the conditions governing the award of such credit.

       Transfer students are properly notified of the amount of credit awarded. Transfer

courses are equivalent collegiate coursework. Policies regarding dismissal, suspension and

readmission are defined and consistent with the academic policies of the institution.

       4.2.2   Undergraduate Completion Requirements

       All degree programs at Old Dominion University (ODU) have an appropriate

sequence of courses leading to the degree. The 2000-2002 ODU catalog (available on the

University’s Web Site and free of charge in the bookstore) publishes all requirements leading
                                                                                          17


to degrees including the total credits, the number and distribution of general education

credits, the number of credits to be earned in the major or area of concentration, the number

of electives, the standards for satisfactory progress, and other degree requirements.

       General education courses for the undergraduate program include 32-54 credit hours

of lower division courses, depending on the major, along with 6-12 hours of upper division

courses. The lower division requirements include 6 hours of written communication, 3 hours

of oral communication, 3 hours of mathematics, 0-6 hours of foreign language, 3 hours of

computer skills, 3 hours of fine and performing arts, 3-6 hours of history, 3 hours of

literature, 3 hours of philosophy, 11-12 hours of natural science and technology, and 3-6

hours of social science. Passing grades in required general education courses in each of

these areas demonstrate competency. Also the University demonstrates competency in

writing through the University’s Exit Examination of Writing Proficiency.

       The ODU catalog (2000-2002) clearly defines majors and minors while outlining the

number of credits required for these. At least 25% of semester credit hours must be earned

through instruction at ODU. The Academic Skills Program at ODU offers developmental

courses to students who need supplemental work in preparation for subsequent courses,

however these remedial courses are not offered for degree credit.

       4.2.3   Undergraduate Curriculum

       Each of the University’s six colleges is actively engaged in undergraduate education

with curricula appropriate to the mission and goals of the institution. Undergraduates may

choose from an array of programs in the liberal arts and sciences and specific professional

programs in business, education, engineering, and health sciences.
                                                                                          18


         For each degree program ODU assigns an academically qualified program

coordinator. The process for this assignment varies from college to college and, in some

cases, the University Catalog (2000-2002) does not make it clear when a program

coordinator is also the department/school chair. The catalog currently being created will

specifically state who the designated program coordinators are. Also, the remuneration

and/or release time for program coordinators varies from college to college.

         The institution has a systematic and campus-wide process for establishing, reviewing

and evaluating curricula. Each department has a standing committee whose faculty

representatives write, revise, review, and evaluate the undergraduate curriculum. These

recommendations are reviewed by the department or program coordinator who sends the

proposals to the college curriculum committee, which is composed of representatives from

each department and program. This committee carefully analyzes curricula proposals to

avoid duplication of courses. The Provost has initiated a university practice, which requires

that faculty who propose a new course must also propose to discontinue an existing course.

The recommendations of college curriculum committee are reviewed by the appropriate dean

and then are sent to Committee A (undergraduate curriculum and programs) of the Faculty

Senate for further review. Committee A sends the proposal to the floor of the entire Senate

for debate and approval. The Senate’s recommendation is forwarded to the Provost and Vice

President for Academic Affairs, who makes the final decision. The University’s Board of

Visitors approves new degrees and programs but not individual courses or curricular

changes. In addition to this process, Academic Program Reviews are conducted every five

years.
                                                                                            19


        The institution has strong articulation agreements with Tidewater Community

College and all community colleges in the Virginia Community College System. These and

other transfer agreements are clearly stated in the University Transfer Guide and other

university publications. Transfer agreements also exist between ODU and international

institutions.

        4.2.4   Undergraduate Instruction

        The University’s commitment to teaching and instruction and the preparation of well-

educated undergraduate students is reflected in its academic programs and instructional

techniques. All ODU programs strive to meet national standards of excellence.

        Instruction is evaluated regularly and the results are used to ensure continued quality

instruction. Two instruments are used for these evaluations. The Student Course Evaluation

is a form which students use each fall, spring, and summer semesters in each course to rate

teaching performance and overall course effectiveness. Students also have an open-ended

form on which they can cite particular strengths and weaknesses of instruction for each

course and faculty member. Faculty members who teach through the TELETECHNET

distance-learning classes also use a form to assess the effectiveness of distance learning

delivery.

        Instruction is also assessed through annual administrative evaluations of faculty.

Faculty members develop instructional portfolios, which are reviewed regularly according to

faculty status. Additionally, the University has a well-developed assessment program

consisting of student exit interviews and assessments as well as follow up studies of

graduates.
                                                                                              20


        The University ensures that methods of instruction are appropriate to the goals of the

courses and the capabilities of the students. Regular university-wide workshops, courses,

seminars, and innovator grants provide faculty with opportunities for professional

development and improvement of instruction.

        ODU also strongly encourages innovative instruction and experimentation with

methods to improve instruction. Recent growth in delivery of instruction through various

vehicles of instructional technology demonstrates the institution’s commitment to innovation

with instructional quality. Regular and systematic evaluations of these forms of instruction

are being conducted and the results are being used for continued growth and improvement.

        4.2.5   Academic Advising of Undergraduate Students

        ODU provides a program of systematic and effective undergraduate academic

advising. Advisors receive regular training in the advisement process. Students report a

great deal of satisfaction with the advisement process as well as their ability to receive career

and academic advising from a variety of faculty in the discipline as appropriate. The number

of advisees assigned to faculty is reasonable. An orientation program is available for all full-

time and part-time undergraduate students. Academic advising and orientation programs are

regularly evaluated and used to enhance assistance to students. For example, in the College

of Business and Public Administration the assessment of advising identified concerns with

the accessibility of faculty advisors. As a process improvement, an increased focus on

identifying and posting advising hours is underway. In addition, a directory of advisor e-

mail addresses and phone numbers will be provided to advisees.
                                                                                           21


4.3    Graduate Program

       4.3.1    Initiation, Operation and Expansion of Graduate Programs

       The procedure for the initiation of new degree programs at Old Dominion University

is set forth in the Curriculum Development and Change Policies and Procedures Manual.

Support also is provided in the Faculty Handbook and the Faculty Senate Handbook and

Constitution.

       Ideas for new graduate programs generally start with a faculty member or faculty

members in a department (although, the administration may suggest an idea to a department

or faculty member). The program idea is then discussed with the Chair of the department or

school as well as the College Dean to determine if there is interest and support for the idea.

If there is such support, it is then submitted to the Associate Vice President for Research &

Graduate Studies and the Assistant Vice President for Research & Graduate Studies who will

review the concept and make a recommendation to the Provost. The program developer(s)

remain involved in the process. The Director of University Planning and Institutional

Research often prepares data on the enrollment and degree productivity of similar programs

at other institutions in Virginia and often some preliminary enrollment projection data. The

department may conduct a survey as well for a needs assessment (e.g., with the proposed

Doctor of Physical Therapy a survey of local therapists was conducted by the department).

The Provost then determines if the idea is viable considering other curriculum items and

resource implications. The Provost may consult with the college dean and President as well

as seek some informal consultation with the staff at State Council of Higher Education for

Virginia (SCHEV).
                                                                                           22


         If the idea is viable, there is a formal internal review. The proposal is reviewed by

the faculty of the originating department or school then a recommendation is made to the

Chair.      Proposals for interdisciplinary programs must be reviewed by all

departments/schools, and colleges involved. The Chair of the department or school makes a

recommendation to the Dean. The Dean will submit the proposal to the appropriate college

faculty governance structure.

         The college Dean then reviews the proposal taking into consideration the

recommendations of the department/school faculty, the Chair, and the college committee and

makes a recommendation to the Provost.           The Dean will assure that the resource

requirements for the new program are identified and justified in the department/school

proposal (e.g., development funds were used to support a needed course in the new E-

Commerce proposal).

         The Provost then submits the program to the Chair of the Faculty Senate for review.

In the Faculty Senate, graduate programs are reviewed by the Senate’s Committee on

Graduate Studies. That Committee and the Faculty Senate then vote on the recommendation.

Changes may be suggested.

         The Faculty Senate then makes it recommendation to the Provost who will review it

and will involve as well the Council of Senior Academic Deans and Senior Academic Affairs

Staff. A positive recommendation may then be made to the President. If the President

approves, the Board of Visitors will then consider the proposal. If the Board approves, it

will be submitted to SCHEV.
                                                                                          23


       SCHEV will then review the program proposal. SCHEV will consider all aspects of

the proposal including resource allocation and possible duplication of programs in the state.

If SCHEV approves the program, the President notifies SACS/COC about the new program

at least three months prior to its planned implementation.

       This process does involve the faculty and the administration. A new program will

not be approved without a review of the resources available for it. Thus, it will have the

curricula and resources substantially beyond those provided for an undergraduate program.

Research, scholarly activity and/or advanced professional training are provided. A review of

the proposed program includes a review to ascertain that the faculty will be competent; the

library adequate; computer and laboratory facilities will be provided; and that there is an

appropriate administrative organization. The Executive Director of the Commission is

informed. There also are reviews of various graduate programs at appropriate intervals to

ensure their continued validity and viability (e.g., the Ph.D. in Urban Services, involving

three colleges, is currently being reviewed, and applications for the new master’s in E-

Commerce have been suspended at the current time).

       Recent proposals are illustrative of how the process works.

       In January 2001, the University notified the Southern Association of Colleges and

Schools regarding two new degree programs: a B.S. and a M.S. in E-Commerce Systems,

which programs became effective in the spring of 2001. These programs have been

approved by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia at its June 20, 2000 meeting.

Such approval came after the in-house review by the host departments and colleges, Old

Dominion’s Faculty Senate on March 23, 2000, and the University’s Board of Visitors on

April 13, 2000. As noted in its proposal, these programs address the mission and goals
                                                                                           24


statement regarding commerce, economic development and science and technology by

addressing the need for well trained and multi disciplinary-based persons for entry and mid-

level management positions in the rapidly expanding cyber-business sector.

       The University also sought approval for a master’s degree program in Criminal

Justice. Again, the in-house procedures were followed. The State Council of Higher

Education, however, determined in 2001 not to approve this degree at this institution at the

present time.

       Finally, the University has begun the process to seek approval for a Doctor in

Physical Therapy degree. The internal process has been completed and a proposal has been

submitted to SCHEV.

       4.3.2    Graduate Admission

       Three offices receive applications for graduate admission: the Office of Admission,

the Office of International Admissions and the M.B.A. program office. Requirements for

University Graduate Admission are an application form, official transcripts, an earned

bachelor’s degree from an accredited university and an undergraduate GPA of 2.50.

       Some master’s programs require a higher undergraduate GPA for admission.

Masters’ degrees in History, International Studies, Business Administration, Secondary

Education and all Engineering degrees require a 3.0 GPA. All other programs require

between a 2.5-2.80 GPA. The minimum University requirements for master’s degrees and

doctoral degrees are stated in the catalog. Admission requirements for each program are

delineated in that program’s section of the catalog. In that section, the requirements for the

master’s degree and the doctoral degree are listed separately. The Self-Study states that all

programs, except the M.A./M.F.A. in Visual Studies (which requires a portfolio), require
                                                                                             25


standardized test scores. According to the Self-Study, not all programs require letters of

recommendation and/or essay and/or scholarly writing sample. No qualitative materials are

required for the M.S./Ed. in Secondary School – General Major for Licensed Teachers or for

the M.S. in Occupational and Technical Studies.

        An institution is required to establish qualitative and quantitative requirements which

result in the admission of students whose educational preparation indicates the potential for a

high level of performance. Recommendation (3): The Committee recommends that Old

Dominion University require qualitative assessments of all graduate applicants.

        The catalog states that no graduate credit is awarded by examination or

correspondence. However, the Experiential Learning Credit Options lists knowledge-based

examinations and external examinations as two of the four ways to earn Experiential

Learning Credit; the other two mechanisms are credit for training, such as professional or

military training, and portfolio development. A maximum of six semester hours of graduate

credit can be obtained through Experiential Learning Credit, and are listed as “Pass” and

designated “XP” on the transcript.

        The chair and/or dean must approve experiential Learning Credit by portfolio

development before the student can develop the portfolio. Beginning in fall 2002, the

appropriate Graduate Program Directors will approve portfolio development for credit.

Portfolios are submitted to the Director of Experiential Learning and assessed by the

department and/or college. It is not clear in the catalog if the student is allowed to develop a

portfolio for experiential learning that occurred prior to matriculation at ODU. However,

according to the Self-Study, ODU does allow graduate credit for portfolio experiential

learning prior to matriculation. The Follow-Up Plan states that the SACS criteria pertaining
                                                                                             26


to experiential learning are contradictory, so no action was taken. Suggestion (8): The

Committee suggests that data pertaining to experiential learning credit by portfolio be more

cohesively organized and collated according to academic year to be more accessible for

review.

          The doctoral degree requires two letters of recommendation from previous professors

and a recommendation from a departmental, school or college committee. Doctoral

programs in Business and Public Administration, Computer Sciences, Ecological Sciences,

Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Oceanography and Physics require a 2.50 GPA. All

other programs require a 3.0 - 3.50 GPA. According to the Follow-Up Report, the Faculty

Senate has recommended that GPA for master’s admission be 2.80 and for doctoral

admission a 3.0; these changes should appear in the next catalog. Suggestion (9): The

Committee suggests that Old Dominion University follow through with their plans to publish

in appropriate documents the different admission criteria for master’s and doctoral graduate

work.

          ODU offers regular, provisional and non-degree admission status. It is not clear if

these categories apply to doctoral students as well as master’s students. The Self-Study

reports that submission of official transcripts for non-degree students is not enforced. The

Follow-Up Report notes that transcripts are required, but that formal mechanisms are not in

place to assure that the transcripts are submitted. The action plan describes a mechanism of

putting a hold on the student’s registration to ensure submission of transcripts upon

registration for the sixth hour of graduate courses. In addition, better procedures for tracking

non-degree students will be implemented. Suggestion (10): The Committee suggests that

Old Dominion University implement a procedure for ensuring submission of official
                                                                                             27


transcripts and tracking non-degree students.

       4.3.3   Graduate Completion Requirements

       The graduate completion requirements are published in the University Catalog and

online. However, there is some confusion in finding information related to time limitations

for the master’s and doctoral degrees for the various departmental programs.               The

information on time limitations is only listed once at the beginning of the catalog. Time

limitation for the Master’s degree is six years and for the doctoral degree eight years. Time

limitation on program completion in a department are important and need to be readily

accessible to a student who is planning to study for a graduate degree. It would be less

confusing to the reader of the catalog to list the time limitations requirements in each section

where a departmental program is described or provide a reference where that information can

be found in the catalog.

       There are no clear policies in the catalog for graduate students who are placed on

academic probation and suspension. According to University officials, these policies will be

listed in the new University Catalog for the 2002-03 academic year. A copy of the proposed

information for the 2002-03 catalog has been provided.

       4.3.4   Graduate Curriculum

       The University offers a breadth and depth of graduate studies. Graduate programs

are generally at a sufficient level of complexity and comprehensiveness in their respective

fields to allow graduates to practice in and contribute to their disciplines. There is a

significant differentiation between programs leading to a master’s or specialist degree and

programs leading to a doctoral degree. Courses go through a rigorous approval process,

working through department and college level review to review by the Office of Academic
                                                                                            28


Affairs. The review by Academic Affairs insures that coordination among courses and

programs is maintained across departments and colleges.

       Curriculum is established through a clearly articulated process beginning with faculty

and progressing through a college and the University to the Board of Visitors. Doctoral,

specialist, and master’s level programs are of appropriate length and number of credit hours.

Curricular offerings are clearly described in published materials.

       Graduate programs are evaluated regularly and thoroughly. Master’s level curricula

are evaluated at the college level. Though the specifics of the curriculum evaluation process

vary according to college, the evaluation does include review by evaluators external to the

degree program under evaluation. Doctoral curricula go through a formal review process on

a five-year cycle and includes self-report and review by evaluators external to the University.

These external evaluators are chosen by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies.

       The University permits combined instruction of graduate and undergraduate students.

The University has policies in place that govern the maintenance of a substantial difference

between undergraduate and graduate instruction. While most faculty seem to adhere to this

requirement, in some cases in 400/500 level cross-listed courses, faculty are unaware of the

necessity that this difference be maintained and documented. In particular, review of syllabi

and interviews with faculty in Chemistry, Physics, and to a lesser extent Biological Sciences

and Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences reveal that some faculty are not making a

distinction between graduates and undergraduates in cross-listed courses. Recommendation

(4): The Committee recommends that in all courses in which combined instruction of

undergraduates and graduates is permitted, a substantial difference in instruction of the two

be maintained.
                                                                                           29


       4.3.5   Graduate Instruction

       Scholarly interaction occurs formally as well as informally at ODU. Graduate

students have the opportunity to engage in applied research projects, make research

presentations, and generate publications with ODU faculty members. Some graduate areas

bring in nationally recognized speakers as a means for students to hear from and interact

with professionals in related fields. Graduate students are encouraged to participate in

professional organizations.

       The institution uses a variety of means to evaluate student performance. Graduate

programs at ODU use standard grading policies for tests, research papers, presentations, field

experiences, and various performance based assessments. Combinations of oral and written

comprehensive examinations are used as well as capstone research projects, papers, and

theses. Provisions are in place to assign advisors to students, appoint graduate committees,

and monitor the student’s academic progress.

       Regular and systematic evaluation is conducted with graduate instruction, and

programmatic revisions are made as necessary. Follow up data on graduate students and

their employers are used to test the long-range effectiveness of graduate instruction.

       4.3.6   Academic Advising of Graduate Students

       A review of institutional documents (i.e., Faculty Handbook and University Catalog),

along with interviews of selected graduate program directors and graduate students, indicates

that the institution has clearly defined policies and procedures to govern the advisement of

graduate students. In each graduate program area, the graduate program director or

designated graduate faculty members have primary responsibility for advising degree-

seeking graduate students. As graduate students move through their respective program of
                                                                                            30


study, and depending on the program level and degree requirements, they may have a Thesis

Advisory Committee, Guidance Committee, or a Dissertation Committee. Each of these

committees is composed of certified graduate faculty members.

       The institution has policies and procedures to ensure that the number of advisees

assigned to faculty is reasonable. The number of advisees assigned to a faculty member is

included in the calculation of the faculty member’s teaching load.

       Although some graduate programs provide an orientation for full-and part-time

graduate students, the institution does not have a program to ensure an effective orientation

for all full- and part-time graduate students.       Recommendation (5) The Committee

recommends that the institution make available an effective orientation program to all full-

and part-time graduate students.

       The institution did not present any evidence to demonstrate that the orientation and

advisement programs for graduate students are regularly evaluated. Efforts are underway to

develop a graduate student satisfaction survey for implementation during the 2002 fall

semester. This survey will include items that will allow for the evaluation of effectiveness of

orientation and advisement of graduate students. Nevertheless, orientation and advisement

programs have not been regularly evaluated.         Recommendation (6): The Committee

recommends that the institution take steps to ensure that orientation and advisement

programs are regularly evaluated and that the evaluation results be used to enhance effective

assistance to students.
                                                                                            31


4.4    Publications

       The principles of good educational practice are evidenced in the content, design,

accuracy, and consistency of institutional publications. Current catalogs and other official

publications are readily available to students and the public. The institution also maintains a

web page allowing for access to similar information.

4.5    Distance Learning Programs

       The Committee found documentation of clear and explicit goals for distance learning

programs and the demonstration of them being consistent with Old Dominion University’s

stated institutional purpose. Documentation was found in the University’s Strategic Plan

2000-2005 and other documents listed in the 2000-2002 Self-Study Report to support this

finding. Through the self-study materials, interviews with staff, faculty, and students, and

review of evaluation document reports, the Committee found evidence that Old Dominion

University demonstrated that it achieves its goals and that its distance learning programs are

effective and comply with all applicable criteria.

       The Committee was extremely impressed with the exceptional quality of the

TELETECHNET program and found that the University has allocated significant resources

to ensure the quality of the courses. The TELETECHNET model was designed to have site

directors for immediate availability to students in providing advisement services, assistance

in processing applications, assistance in obtaining financial aid, and general assistance for

formal and informal university processes. The TELETECHNET administrative staff has

designated specific staff members to handle services that are offered on the Old Dominion

University campus to expedite and to reduce problems in accessing these services. Programs

planned for TELETECHNET reflect requirements for courses and degrees identified by site
                                                                                           32


directors, surveys, and majors. There are ongoing assessment and evaluation procedures for

faculty, students, site directors, courses, programs, and services. The staff has demonstrated

that assessment and evaluation results are used to improve the quality and effectiveness of

the TELETECHNET program. The Committee found the TELETECHNET program to be

an outstanding model of an effective distance learning initiative.

       The Committee commends the University’s TELETECHNET program for its

exemplary support services, coordination of programs and dedication to providing a quality

experience for distance learning students.

4.6    Continuing Education, Outreach and Service Programs

       Continuing Education and Public Service activities are in a state of transition. The

programs have been decentralized for the last couple of decades, being administered

individually from each college or school and coordinated through the provost’s office. In

2001, a decision was made to centralize Continuing Education and a director was hired. The

program is currently operating with the continuing education units embedded in colleges but

with programming and budgeting being handled from Continuing Education/ Public Service.

This approach allows the program to cover units who may have a budgetary shortfall while

providing resources for expansion where desired. The centralization appears to be resulting

in an improved attitude, greater cooperation and potentially greater synergy among

programs.

       Evaluation of continuing education programs is carried out at the course and college

level and tends to focus on the number of people served, the solvency of the program and the

program’s use of faculty from within the respective college. These evaluations vary in scope

and content depending on the unit conducting the evaluation. Suggestion (11): The
                                                                                           33


Committee suggests that program evaluation occur in a more centralized fashion and come

under the auspices of the Assistant Vice President for Higher Education Centers and

Continuing Education. Common evaluation procedures should be in place for all programs.

       The institution awards academic credit for non-credit activities through the

experiential learning program. This program offers four assessment options to determine

whether program credit should be awarded.             These options provide appropriate

documentation that the non-credit coursework is equivalent to a designated credit experience.

       The Continuing Education program does not currently offer any degree programs or

programs for academic credit. It develops programs based on community needs coupled

with the interests of the faculty and the mission of the University. Programs have typically

been developed as either public admission programs or on a more contractual basis. The

College of Engineering and Technology has developed a master’s degree program in

Systems Engineering. In addition to being offered on campus and via distance learning, it

will be offered at corporate sites. One such potential corporate site is in Northern Virginia.

The contractual agreement between the University and the corporate partner will be

implemented and administered through Continuing Education. The academic aspects of the

program will be administered through the Department of Engineering Management. While it

should prove beneficial to the continuing education program and then University to offer

programs for credit, it is necessary that the Commission on Colleges be notified prior to any

such implementation as per the Commission document “Substantive Change Policy for

Accredited Institutions.” Recommendation (7): The Committee recommends that the

institution inform the Executive Director of the Commission on Colleges in advance of any

degree program implemented through continuing education.
                                                                                            34


4.7    Student Records

       The University implemented the Banner student record system approximately three

years ago. Despite initial difficulty in integrating the system with existing operations, the

implementation was generally successful and the Banner system has now been fully

integrated. The University maintains adequate student records. The Office of the Registrar

has primary responsibility for academic records, while other types of student records are

maintained at numerous places around the campus. Records are maintained in secure

locations and policies are in place to ensure the privacy of and access to student records.

Records are backed up regularly and electronic backups are stored in areas outside the

records office. Policies are in place to ensure proper retention and disposal of records.

4.8    Faculty

       Old Dominion University enjoys a strong faculty who are well prepared and

committed to the mission of the University. The selection process is generally conducted in

a fair and professional manner. The faculty and administration of this University collaborate

in the process to assure that appropriate faculty are employed. The credentials of the faculty

are appropriate and documented in each College and secured in a faculty personnel file.

       4.8.1   Selection of Faculty

       The Faculty Handbook clearly describes the policies and procedures for the selection

of the faculty. Discussions with faculty and university officials indicate that these policies

and procedures are always followed in the selection of faculty.

       4.8.2   Academic and Professional Preparation

       The faculty of Old Dominion University have academic and professional preparation

for baccalaureate and graduate instruction.
                                                                                              35


                4.8.2.1 Associate

        Not Applicable.

                4.8.2.2 Baccalaureate

        All Colleges keep accurate and current records on all full-time and part-time faculty

documenting their academic and professional preparation. Full-time and part-time faculty at

Old Dominion University who teach baccalaureate students are generally prepared at the

doctoral level. Some faculty, who are trained at the master’s level, are generally prepared in

the discipline and have at least 18 graduate semester hours in the discipline. They

appropriately contribute to baccalaureate instruction. In those cases when outstanding

professional experience and contributions to the discipline are accepted in lieu of formal

academic preparation, it is thoroughly justified and documented on a case-by-case basis.

        Each academic major provides at least 25% of the hours by qualified faculty.

                4.8.2.3 Graduate

        Faculty teaching graduate students at the Old Dominion University demonstrate a

high level of faculty competence in teaching and research. The faculty handbook adequately

defines the qualifications for instruction of graduate students. The credentials of the faculty

of the University are documented in a faculty file kept in each Dean’s Office. These files are

standardized in terms of content and contain appropriate faculty credentials, i.e., CV,

transcripts, certification for graduate instruction, etc. All full-time and part-time faculty who

teach at the graduate level, generally hold the appropriate doctoral degree or designated

terminal degree. When an exception is required, each faculty file contains the rationale and

justification for the exception.
                                                                                             36


        The SACS criteria state that:

        … in some instances, the master’s degree, such as the M.F.A., the M.S.W.,
        and the M.L.S., in others, a master’s degree in the discipline coupled with a
        doctoral degree in a related discipline. It is the responsibility of the
        institution to justify the master’s degree, or master’s in the teaching discipline
        coupled with a related doctorate as the terminal degree for faculty members. )
                                              ***
        when an institution presents evidence of competence or academic credentials
        other than the doctorate in the discipline for its graduate faculty, it must
        justify the employment of such faculty.


        The College of Health Sciences has promulgated a document entitled Certification of

Faculty for Graduate Instruction for the College of Health Sciences. Certified faculty for

instruction in graduate education are deemed to “hold an earned terminal degree in the

discipline or hold an advanced degree in an appropriate field.” It is not entirely clear in this

document, the Self-Study, and the Faculty Handbook what the terminal degree is for various

disciplines in the College of Health Sciences. Suggestion (12): The Committee suggests

that the College of Health Sciences determine the various appropriate terminal degrees for

faculty of the College and incorporate that list into the document entitled Certification of

Faculty for Graduate Instruction for the College of Health Sciences. Suggestion (13): The

Committee further suggests that any faculty that are not doctoral-trained in the discipline or

considered to hold the appropriate terminal degree should be considered as an exception and

should be individually justified and documented in the faculty file.

                4.8.2.4 Distance Learning Programs/Activities

        The Committee reviewed the records of the faculty who teach via TELETECHNET,

the primary distance learning program at the University. The faculty met all criteria related

to faculty for both undergraduate and graduate courses. The Committee found that the

instructional design and management of the TELETECHNET courses provided numerous
                                                                                          37


ways of structured access to faculty and planned interaction with faculty members by all

distance learning students at the University.

       4.8.3   Part-time Faculty

       As reported in the institution’s 2000-2002 Self-Study Report, there were 157.78

adjunct (part-time) faculty FTEs for the 1999-2000 academic year. Part-time faculty

generated 31% of the student credit hours in lower division courses, 22% of student credit

hours in upper division courses, and 27% of student credit hours in graduate courses during

the Fall 1999 Semester. Although there has been a consistent increase in the number of part-

time faculty and the number of credit hours generated by part-time faculty during the past

several years, the institution has generally maintained an adequate number of full-time

faculty to provide effective teaching, advising, and scholarly or creative activity, and to

engage in curriculum development, policy making, institutional planning and governance.

Suggestion (14): The Committee suggests that the institution examine the current use of

part-time faculty across all academic units and establish guidelines and standards for

ensuring that the number of part-time faculty be properly limited.

       The institution has policies to ensure that part-time faculty members teaching courses

for credit meet the same requirements for professional, experiential, and scholarly

preparation of their full-time counterparts teaching in the same disciplines. These policies

are published in the Faculty Handbook and in a document entitled “Initial Appointment of

Teaching and Research Faculty, Board of Visitors Policy #1401.”

       The institution provides appropriate orientation, supervision, and evaluation of part-

time faculty. New part-time faculty members are provided with an orientation along with

new full-time faculty and administrators prior to the start of fall semester classes. Each
                                                                                            38


college has prepared a handbook for part-time faculty that includes academic policies,

procedures, and expectations of part-time faculty.        Department chairs have primary

responsibility for the supervision and evaluation of part-time faculty. Like full-time faculty,

part-time faculty members are required to be accessible to students by maintaining office

hours and e-mail transmissions.

       4.8.4   Graduate Teaching Assistants

       Graduate teaching assistants are appointed in several departments at Old Dominion

University. They are primarily used for instructional support of laboratories, tutorials,

recitation or discussion classes, and grading. Only a few of the graduate teaching assistants

have full responsibility for teaching of lecture courses.        These lectures courses are

overwhelmingly lower division general studies courses such as English Composition, Pre-

calculus Mathematics, and Introduction to Psychology.

       The University has a published set of guidelines for institution-wide graduate

assistantship administration, including the appointment criteria, remuneration, rights and

responsibilities, evaluation and reappointment. These guidelines can be found in the

University Catalog and in the Instruction Resource Booklet for Graduate Teaching Assistants

prepared by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies.

       The institution employs several graduate teaching assistants, particularly in

departments with a large service function. The evidence indicates that all graduate teaching

assistants with primary responsibility for teaching a course for credit and/or for assigning

final grades for such a course have earned at least 18 graduate semester hours in their

teaching discipline.
                                                                                             39


       Prior to appointment, graduate teaching assistants for whom English is the second

language must demonstrate proficiency in oral and written communication. A good

command of written English must be demonstrated by acceptable TOEFL scores and

required entrance essays. Oral proficiency is measured by successful performance on the

SPEAK test administered by the English Language Center. Additionally, students who are

to be appointed as graduate teaching assistants must attend and satisfactorily complete the

Graduate Teaching Assistant Institute. The institute consists of three days of instruction and

training on class administration policies and procedures and instructional methodologies.

Institute participants must prepare and present a mini lecture.

       The Office of Research and Graduate Studies has responsibility for the administration

of the Graduate Teaching Assistant Program. This office publishes guidelines for the

University’s graduate student assistant administration. Also, the office organizes the twice a

year Graduate Teaching Assistant Institute.

       4.8.5   Compensation

       The institution’s faculty handbook delineates procedures and guidelines for faculty

salary increases. All faculty salary increases are based on merit and take into account the

performance of faculty members in teaching, research, and service. Specific criteria for

merit increases have been developed at the college or department level. Upon completion of

the annual evaluation of faculty members, department chairs make recommendations of

merit increases to the dean based on a pool of funds allocated to the department for merit

increments. The recommendations of the chairs are reviewed by the dean, who makes the

final determination of the salary for each faculty member in the college. If dissatisfied with a

salary increment decision made by the dean, a faculty member may request a review of the
                                                                                         40


salary decision by the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. The decision of this

official is final. If a faculty member believes that a salary decision is discriminatory,

university policy allows the faculty member to appeal to the Director of Equal Opportunity

and Affirmative Action for the administration of a faculty equity study.

       The institution appears to have adequate salaries and fringe benefits to attract and

retain able faculty members. The retirement package is attractive in that eligible faculty

members may participate in the Virginia Retirement System or may select one of six optional

retirement plans. Included among these optional retirement plans are TIAA/CREF, Fidelity

Investments, and Valic.

       4.8.6   Academic Freedom and Professional Security

       At Old Dominion University, policies regarding faculty employment, including

policies designed to safeguard academic freedom, have been adopted by the Board of

Visitors, published in the Faculty Handbook, and distributed to those affected by those

policies. Those interviewed during the site visit, both faculty members and administrators,

unanimously attest that these policies governing academic freedom and professional security

are well known and consistently applied. Review of the Faculty Handbook reveals a wide

array of policies regarding employment, and no one interviewed suggested that unwritten or

unpublished policies affect the faculty’s professional security.

       Since 1994, the Board of Visitors has subscribed to the 1940 statement on academic

freedom by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). This statement of

the principles of academic freedom in teaching, research, and publication appears in the

Faculty Handbook, which is distributed to all members of the faculty. In 1994, the Board

also adopted AAUP’s 1987 statement of professional ethics for college faculty members, a
                                                                                            41


statement that goes a considerable way toward specifying the features of academic duty that

must accompany academic freedom. This statement also appears in the Faculty Handbook.

Further, the Handbook sets forth in detail those general policies and procedures that govern

appointment to the faculty, annual review of faculty members (including post-tenure review),

promotion, tenure, non-renewal of probationary appointment, and termination of

appointment, including terminations for cause. In particular, termination and non-renewal

procedures are clearly set forth and appear to safeguard the academic freedom of the

community and its members.

       Annually, Old Dominion University extends to each continuing faculty member an

employment agreement that outlines the terms and conditions of their employment for the

coming academic year. No faculty member interviewed expressed confusion about or

frustration with these annual agreements.

       Perhaps inherently, the publication of a policy or the provision of a contract is easier

to substantiate than is the lived practice of academic freedom. Apart from the existence of a

policy statement, the Self-Study does not offer empirical or testimonial support for the claim

that the faculty and students of Old Dominion University are free to exercise academic

freedom as defined by the Criteria. Certainly, however, abundant indirect evidence for this

exercise of freedom is available in the research activities of the faculty, in the range and

variety of topics and methodologies evident in their class syllabi, and in the academic

accomplishments of their students.

       4.8.7   Professional Growth

               Old Dominion University affords to its faculty a number of formal

opportunities for continued professional development.          A notable feature of these
                                                                                         42


opportunities is their variety. For example, in cooperation with the Provost and Vice

President for Academic Affairs, the Faculty Status Committee of the Faculty Senate

administers awards focused on development of advanced skills in teaching ($30,000

annually, matched by department chairs and deans). This program has been in existence for

more than a decade. Over $65,000 in summer research fellowships is made available

through the office of the Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies. These

awards focus almost exclusively on the professional growth of probationary faculty

members, especially those who may soon attract outside funding. To assist the continued

development of tenured faculty members, a limited number of semester- or year-long

research or development assignments are made available. These assignments, like the

summer research fellowships, are made after review by the investigator’s department chair

and dean but are administered through the office of the Provost. Because departments must

cover the teaching duties of those who win research awards and maintain acceptable faculty-

student ratios, some faculty members who work in departments with large teaching

responsibilities appear to feel at a disadvantage in the competition for these development

opportunities. Likewise disadvantaged may be faculty in departments where it is difficult to

find short-term substitutes for absent faculty members. Nevertheless, for the faculty as a

whole these research grants represent an important growth opportunity.

       In addition to these formal, funded programs, with their follow-up reporting

requirements, informal development opportunities are often available, for example,

workshops on teaching with technology, on grant applications, and on writing-across-the-

disciplines.
                                                                                              43


        Evidence that career-long professional development actually occurs is naturally more

dispersed and thus difficult to trace, much less to attribute confidently to University-

sponsored programs. The annual performance review process appears to provide faculty

members some assistance in reviewing and setting goals for their professional growth. A

recently revised procedure for extraordinary post-tenure review may help at-risk faculty

members to set ascertainable professional goals. This process, however, appears designed to

serve as a rarely-used supplement to annual review procedures, not as a stimulus to general

faculty growth. As suggested by faculty members interviewed during the site visit, perhaps

the best evidence for long-term professional development at Old Dominion University is to

be found in the scholarly presentations and teaching portfolios of its faculty. Certainly it is

here where one finds best exemplified the faculty’s embrace of its own professional

responsibilities.

        Still, the University devotes substantial resources to formal methods of faculty

development. While these methods are common in academia, there appears to have been

little broad-based effort to study their effectiveness in the University’s particular setting and

moment or to review other methods that might turn about to be locally more effective.

Planning for the career-long professional development of its most important human resource,

the faculty, belongs among the University’s other important planning and evaluation

functions. Suggestion (15): The Committee suggests that the institution evaluate the

effectiveness of its formal programs designed to support the faculty’s professional

development.
                                                                                              44


        4.8.8   The Role of the Faculty and Its Committees

        When asked during the site visit to identify who is responsible for the quality and

integrity of Old Dominion University’s academic program, representative faculty members

responded with a single voice: “We are.” (The University’s administrators quickly echoed

this assertion.) The evidence available in the self-study and other documents only confirms

this important role for the faculty.

        The standing committees of the Faculty Senate evidently meet regularly, conduct

their business with a sense of its value to the institution, and even discharge functions, such

as allocating grants and other funds that elsewhere might be reserved for distribution by the

central administration. Matters pertaining to curriculum, instruction and standards, general

academic policies, and promotion, tenure, and faculty growth are plainly the concerns of

these committees. Those interviewed during the site visit expressed confidence that the

faculty’s voice could also have important bearing on other matters, such as enrollment

management, that are not directly academic, but that may bear strongly on the academic

character of the institution. While the University’s formal policies appropriately place broad

and final authority in the hands of the President and Board of Visitors, there is a sense of

easy and mutually respectful interaction among all parties. Even in areas where central

leadership may be most commonly urged, such as strategic planning of program

prioritization, those faculty interviewed during the site visit expressed unfeigned confidence

that their views are not only heard but actively solicited. It is hard to tell whether this

confidence is wholly the long-developing product of the University’s academic culture or

partly a result of recent administrative priorities, such as formal use of focus groups to advise

the incoming President. In either case, the confident and respectful participation of the
                                                                                              45


faculty in the governance of the University is a quality worth continued cultivation.

        4.8.9   Faculty Loads

        The University is expected to provide a faculty of adequate size to support its

purpose. It is also expected to have procedures for the equitable and reasonable assignment

of faculty responsibilities—including classroom instruction, academic advising, committee

membership, guidance of student organizations, and research and service to the public.

        The procedure for determining faculty load is published in the Faculty Handbook,

and the procedure has been approved by the President of the University and revised with in

the past five years. It states that a full load for faculty is 24 Load-Hours per Academic Year.

A load-hour is defined in terms of credit hour and/or contact hour. Some examples of

equivalent assignments to load-hour are given, and special cases are determined by the

administrative head of the academic unit of the faculty member.

        The number of preparations and class size are part of the “equivalency-equation.”

However, the Visiting Committee had some concern about the larger class sizes, especially

about some of the ones delivered via TELETECHNET. Even though release-time and

additional resources and compensations are given to the professor of record for each such

class, the size is still considered to be quite challenging for the professor to conduct and get

“quality results.” Suggestion (16): The Committee suggests that the University re-examine

its faculty-load policy with respect to large classes of a writing-intensive nature delivered via

TELETECHNET.

        4.8.10 Criteria and Procedures for Evaluation

        The procedures for the regular performance evaluation and Post-Tenure Review

(PTR) of faculty are published in the Faculty Handbook, and they have been approved by the
                                                                                             46


President and Board of Visitors of the University and revised within the past five years. It

defines the regularity and time intervals for the procedures; it defines the persons responsible

for implementing the procedures.

       Interviews with certain faculty members and the Chair of the Faculty Senate

confirmed the procedures to be consistent with the purpose and goals of the University and

widely disseminated by the administration of the University. These interviews also

confirmed that, in most cases, the results from the evaluations are used for continuous

improvement of the faculty and academic programs. The faculty member is subjected to a

Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) when warranted by the regular annual review and/or

the Post-Tenure Review processes. In both cases the effect is to improve the quality of

faculty performance and delivery of instruction in the academic program.

4.9    Consortial Relationships and Contractual Agreements

       The University has sufficient control of consortial relationships and contract

agreements, and these external arrangements are evaluated on a regular basis. The

University is also consistent in its reporting policies and procedures related to substantive

changes.

       4.9.1   Consortial Relationships

       The University participates in consortia degree and certificate programs with

regionally accredited institutions offering degrees or certificates at the same level. The

University further maintains the quality of its courses/programs offered through consortial

arrangements. These relationships are related to the teaching purposes of the institution.
                                                                                       47


       4.9.2   Contractual Agreements

       The University’s educational services and programs offered through contractual

agreement with other institutions or organizations support the educational purposes of the

institution. As evidenced by dual-degree programs with Radford University, Salisbury State

University, and student exchange programs with Acadamia Sinica Institute of Oceanography

and Hefei University of Technology, the University maintains the quality of its

programs/courses offered through contracts.
ACADEMIC AREA REPORTS
                                                                                          49


                                  Arts and Humanities

       The Humanities and Fine Arts occupy a proud place at Old Dominion University.

The departments of English, Foreign Languages, History, and Philosophy, with those of Art,

Communication and Theatre Arts, and Music, located in the College of Arts and Letters, are

staffed by over 90 full-time, tenure-track faculty members and represent with distinction the

scope and life of their disciplines. They, together with approximately 150 non-tenure-track

faculty members, serve several thousand students each semester and educate over 1,600

majors. Courses of study are offered leading to the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Fine

Arts, the Bachelor of Music, the Master of Arts, and the Master of Fine Arts. Through these

degrees, the University’s students prepare for advanced study, for achievement in the

workplace, and for considered and well-shaped lives.

       On the organizational chart, the human and artistic disciplines are housed in the

departments already mentioned and in a group of powerfully focused interdisciplinary units

such as Women’s Studies, Humanities, the Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity,

Interdisciplinary Studies (the largest single undergraduate program on campus), and the

Filipino-American Center. One has to look beyond the organizational chart; however, to

assess the health of the Humanities and Fine Arts as they are manifest at and through Old

Dominion University. The University is known for being networked in the newest senses of

that term. The computer revolution has also touched the Humanities and Fine Arts, but they

are also networked, in an older sense of the word, by being connected to other sectors of the

University and to the Hampton Roads community, which, indeed, they help to sustain.

These departments offer theatrical and musical performances and consultation on others’

performances. They supply composition workshops for local teachers and writing tutorials
                                                                                            50


for over 3,000 students each semester. They mount celebrations of film, video, and creative

writing and form mutually supportive relationships with community groups. A notable

example is the Friends of Women’s Studies, a community group that pays for library

subscriptions to otherwise unavailable journals in the field. To a notable degree, these are

engaged disciplines.

       Faculty and students interviewed during the site visit testify to the same strengths and

weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges. Faculty members praise the diversity and variety

of the University’s students; students praise the faculty’s openness and availability. Both

groups recognize that the student population has strengths of independence and maturity and,

perhaps as a byproduct of this independence, also a regrettable distance from campus life.

One student complained gently about meeting the same ten students in honor society after

honor society. That said, however, there is a good fit here between faculty and students.

       The Humanities and Fine Arts faculty of the University are also fully engaged with

their disciplines. Considering the teaching loads they carry, these faculty members are

consistently active in scholarship and creative work. For these activities they would like

better support, but the record is already good. (A need for improved library holdings and

technical support and maintenance for mediated instruction are also commonly noted.) They

have adapted well to University initiatives that they might not themselves have selected for

special emphasis, such as TELETECHNET, and those that align more clearly with their

disciplines, such as international programs.

       Among the weaknesses noted by both faculty and student groups is the large number

of adjunct faculty currently being employed by these departments. In too many departments

the percentage of student credit-hours generated by part-time faculty members now exceeds
                                                                                             51


40%, raising questions about whether the number of part-time faculty members is properly

limited, as required by the Criteria. Under these staffing conditions, the fewer than needed

full-time faculty members justly complain about the extent of their participation in

curriculum development and review, in planning and evaluation, in program administration,

in institutional service, and in governance. The work itself appears to interest them, but there

are not enough colleagues to carry out these responsibilities. In their own way, the full-time

faculty members keep running into each other, just like those ten honor-society students.

There is probably room for principled dispute over what constitutes proper limitation of the

number of part-time faculty members. In these disciplines, however, there would probably

be consensus that at Old Dominion University that number should be reduced, not increased.

                     College of Business and Public Administration

       The College of Business Administration offers the degrees of Bachelor of Science in

Business Administration, Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Master of Business

Administration, Master of Public Administration, Master of Science in Accounting, Master

of Science in Economics, Master of Urban Studies, and Doctor of Philosophy in Business

Administration. Enrollment has been suspended into the Master of Science in E-Commerce

and Master of Taxation. In addition, the College of Business and Public Administration

jointly offers a Computer Information System concentration for the Master of Science in

Computer Science and a Management Concentration for the Doctor of Philosophy in Urban

Services. The business degrees are accredited by AACSB – International Association for

Management Education. The Master of Public Administration program is certified as

meeting the standards of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and

Administration (NASPAA). The College enrolls approximately 3,000 undergraduate
                                                                                           52


students, and 650 graduate students including about 30 in the Ph.D. program. The college

currently has 69 tenure track faculty and 18 instructors.

       In its undergraduate program, the College provides majors for the Bachelor of

Science in Business Administration in Accounting, Decision Sciences, Economics, Finance,

International Business, Information Systems and Technology, Management, and Marketing.

These majors require two years of general education and a core of common business

knowledge. Minors are also offered in these areas. The College also offers a separate

honors program for undergraduate Business Administration majors. The undergraduate

degree programs are well conceived and properly build upon the University’s general

education component.

       Each of the master’s programs integrates practical experience into the curriculum and

contains an ethics component. Graduate students in the Ph.D. program develop research

skills and have the opportunity to present their research at professional meetings. The

curriculum in all programs is traditional and appears appropriate for the degree objectives.

The systematic evaluation of instruction includes requiring teaching portfolios of all faculty

who are teaching a new course or a course for the first time in over two years.

       The resources appear to meet the purposes of the College within the stated mission.

With the scheduled 2002 opening of a new building for the College of Business and Public

Administration the facilities, and support materials for the programs being offered by the

College appear adequate.

                         College of Engineering and Technology

       The general mission of the College of Engineering and Technology is to instill into

its graduates that engineering is the profession in which knowledge of mathematics and
                                                                                      53


natural science is applied with judgment to develop ways to economically utilize the

materials and forces of nature for the benefit of mankind. The College offers Bachelor of

Science degree programs in Civil Engineering (CE), Computer Engineering (CpE), Electrical

Engineering (EE), Environmental Engineering (EnvE), Mechanical Engineering (ME), Civil

Engineering Technology (CET), Electrical Engineering Technology (EET), General

Engineering Technology (GET), and Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET). All but

two are accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET); the

two not approved are EnvE and GET. Plans are made for seeking accreditation of EnvE by

the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET. No immediate plans are made

for approval of GET by the Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of ABET.

Options and/or concentrations are offered in Computer Engineering Technology (EET),

Nuclear Engineering Technology (MET), and Surveying (CET). ABET is the accreditation

body for Engineering and Engineering Technology, and CE, CpE, EE, and ME received

excellent evaluations during the last accreditation visits in 1997. The EnvE programs

follows the CE programs quite closely, and no problem is expected during the next ABET

accreditation visit in 2003.

       ODU offers the Master of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering (AE), Civil

Engineering (CE), Computer Engineering (CpE), Design & Manufacturing Engineering

(D&MfgE), Electrical Engineering (EE), Engineering Management (EnMa), Engineering

Mechanics (EMME), Environmental Engineering (EnvE), Experimental Methods

Engineering (MEXME), Material Science and Engineering (MSE), Mechanical Engineering

(ME), Modeling & Simulation Engineering (MSIME), and Operations Research/Systems

Engineering (OR/SE).
                                                                                            54


       ODU offers the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Aerospace Engineering (AE), Civil

Engineering (CE), Electrical Engineering (EE), Engineering Management (EnMa),

Engineering Mechanics (EMME), Environmental Engineering (EnvE), Mechanical

Engineering (ME), and Modeling & Simulation Engineering (MSIME).

       The curricula in the College are structured to graduate quality students that are

capable of taking their places in the mainstream of the engineering and technology

profession. Students are being prepared to satisfy the manpower needs of industry and to

tackle the complex engineering challenges facing a technology-based society. It also

prepares its students to think critically, interpret knowledge, pursue lifelong learning, and

function effectively and productively as members of a global society and as engineering

professionals in the workforce.

       The curriculum for each bachelor degree program in Engineering is 125 semester

credit hours. The curricula for the engineering programs are essentially the same for the first

two years ( i.e., through the sophomore year). The curriculum for each bachelor degree

program in Engineering Technology is 127 semester credit hours. The curricula for the

engineering technology programs are essentially the same for the first year (i.e., through the

freshman year).

       Student enrollment in the College is slightly greater than 2000, and approximately

1700 are undergraduate students. Some of these students were interviewed (approximately

20) by the SACS Committee, and they were welled trained and had well-defined career

goals. They seem to have benefited from the advanced technology and professional

development exposure afforded by the College, University, and Industrial Partners.
                                                                                          55


       The faculty is excellent for all programs in the College, and more than fifteen were

interviewed by the SACS Committee. The faculty and administrators in the College were

from a broad spectrum of outstanding Engineering and Engineering Technology institutions,

and all had a terminal degree in his/her assigned academic area. The faculty research and

grant funding totaled approximately $11,254,197 per year. This was approximately 45% of

the University’s total external funding effort. The collaborative research and teaching

partnerships that the College’s faculty has with industrial, governmental, and other academic

institutions are quite outstanding, too. They include the following partners: (1) Eastern

Virginia Medical School; (2) Dominion Energy (Dominion Virginia Power); (3) Dean’s

Corporate Circle (Clark-Nexsen: Architects and Engineers/ John Deere Vehicle Group, Inc./

Modern Machine and Tool Co., Inc./ Pressure Systems/ Hensel Phelps Construction

Company/ Landmark Design Group/ WR Systems/ MMM Design Group/ Siemens/ Bauer

Compressors/ Pace Collaborative); (4) Naval Postgraduate School; (5) Australian Defense

Forces; (6) International Modeling and Simulation Week in Hampton Roads; (7) Army War

College; (8) Virginia Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation Center; (9) United States Navy;

(10) Virginia Micro-Electronics Consortium; (11) Supreme Allied Commander, NATO

Atlantic Forces (SACLANT); (12) United States Army Training Support Center; (13) NASA

Langley Research Center (LARC); Eastern Virginia Medical School and Regent University;

and the United States Army Officers/Post-Graduate Training in Modeling and Simulation.

                                College of Health Sciences

       The College of Health Sciences at Old Dominion University is one of six Colleges.

The College contains five schools: Community and Environmental Health, Dental Hygiene,

Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, Nursing, and Physical Therapy. These Schools
                                                                                          56


are the units responsible for various academic programs at the Bachelor of Science degree,

the Master of Science degree, and the Ph.D. degree levels. The following bachelor of

science degrees are granted by the College:            Cytotechnology, Dental Hygiene,

Environmental Health, Health Sciences, Medical Technology (entry level and degree-

completion weekend program), Nuclear Medicine Technology, Nursing (regular and

accelerated), Nursing RN to BSN (on campus and distance) and Ophthalmic Technology.

The following master’s degrees are granted by the College:             Community Health,

Environmental Health, Dental Hygiene, Nursing, Physical Therapy, and Public Health. A

Ph.D. in Urban Services Health Services Concentration is also granted by the College.

       All of these programs allow the College to successfully meet its mission to provide

leadership in health care by offering excellent educational experiences in a quality learning

environment to facilitate the development of competent, caring health professionals; by

generating knowledge through inquiry and discovery; and by engaging in lifelong learning

and professional and community service.

       In the domain of Learning, the College has a national reputation for excellence in

instruction both at the campus in Norfolk and the Distance Learning settings. In fact the

College was the first academic unit to become successfully involved in the now extensive

distance learning initiative. The enrollment of the College has increased by 100% on

campus and 300% in off-campus offerings. The College has a reputation for innovation

e.g., the DL degree, and the Dental Clinic. The College does an exceptional job of preparing

its graduates for various licensure, registry, and certification examinations, enjoying pass

rates ranges from 93%-100%!
                                                                                            57


       The College plans new degree initiatives, e.g., the DPT degree in Physical Therapy,

an MS degree in Community Health on TELETECHNET, an MSN in Women’s Health.

       In the domain of Discovery, the College is seeking to expand its nascent research

program and grow a culture of academic inquiry and research. It has identified the following

areas for development of the research agenda: Childhood Obesity, Aging, Family Violence,

Distance Learning, Product Testing, Physical Activity and Health, and Diabetes Prevention.

The College has already established a unique Dental Hygiene Research Center and seeks to

expand its activity in modeling and simulation in Nursing and Physical Therapy.

       In the domain of Engagement, the College seeks to expand its interaction and

relationships with the larger community.

       In summary, the College of Health Sciences seeks to grow through new degree

programs, student scholarship, and support for international opportunities. It plans to build a

new facility, obtain increased extramural funds, and address a more beneficial faculty

workload. It seeks support for community outreach at places like Lambert’s Point, Eastern

Shore, and Park Place Dental Clinic and Health Center.

       The strengths of this College are its collegial environment and excellent teaching

reputation. It has a faculty that has continued to take on new initiatives even in the face of

budget cuts and/or no new funding. The college has good advising systems and excellent

clinical sites. They truly provide graduates in some programs offered only by ODU for the

region and the state and make a wonderful contribution to the health care industry. They do

this in an environment that is somewhat under-funded and relies too much on non-tenure

track faculty.
                                                                                             58


       The faculty recognized these limitations and have a strategic plan to challenge them.

Recruitment of Ph.D. faculty is a major objective, but it faces the barriers of inadequate

funding and heavy teaching loads. A new resource base will provide the opportunity to

recruit new faculty and spread the teaching responsibility out so that current faculty can pay

more attention to developing their research. Replacing the non tenure-track faculty with

tenure-track faculty with reduced teaching loads will also provide more faculty time to

participate in research and contribute to a change in the culture. The projected new building

with up to date equipment in teaching and research laboratories will be a major step in

providing the infrastructure which is also necessary to shift the culture to include research

along with continued attention to an excellent teaching program.

       In essence, this College stands poised to lead this collection of professional schools in

the health sciences into true partnership with the rest of the academy by developing a

doctoral-trained faculty who engage their students in the search for knowledge and the

research agenda of the College. Old Dominion University should be rightfully proud of the

quality and the potential of its College of Health Sciences. The Committee commends the

College of Health Sciences for its strong instructional programs as measured by high

national ranking and the high passing rates on licensure, registry, and certification

examinations of its graduates.

                Computer Science Undergraduate/Graduate Program

       Admission policies and procedures for the Department of Computer Science, in the

College of Sciences, are consistent with those of the University. The chief academic advisor

evaluates transcripts of students admitted to the department to make sure that they have a

strong mathematics background. Admission policies and procedures are published in the
                                                                                          59


University’s catalog and online for each student and are followed by the computer science

department.

       The assistant chair evaluates student work done elsewhere for credit to make sure the

content of those courses being transferred are consistent with those offered in the

department. There is a first level review of work for transfer credit at the university level

before it comes to the department. Students are then informed of the amount of credit that

will transfer. A large number of the students admitted to the department are graduates who

transfer to the University from community colleges in the state of Virginia.

       The degree requirements for the bachelor’s degree in computer science are published

in the University Catalog and online. Students are required to have 120 credit hours to

receive the bachelor’s degree. A minimum of 30 hours in general education is required. The

department exposes the students to three main areas in computer science-digital library, high

performance grid generation, and mobile networking for the degree.

       The associate chair certifies all students for the bachelor’s degree with the chair’s

approval.

       The department’s curriculum goals and mission are consistent with that of the

University.

       The departmental undergraduate curriculum committee coordinates the curriculum

requirements for the major. They structure the curriculum to follow the guidelines suggested

by the ACM, their professional organization. One of the primary goals of the curriculum is

to prepare the students to be attractive to industry after graduation.

       An annual general survey of the curriculum administered to the students in the

department provides feedback to the curriculum committee about their concerns.
                                                                                            60


        The department is in the process of forming a recruitment committee of faculty to

assist in the recruitment of students. Faculty recruit majors through their individual

initiatives.

        Instruction utilizes a variety of methods to assess student learning. All students must

pass a writing intensive course in computer science. Students are required to pass a

University-required exit writing examination before graduation. They have multiple tries at

this examination until it is passed. It is a requirement that students will have mastered basic

skills in reading, writing, communications, and basic mathematics before graduation. To

ensure content mastery in the computer science, students are administered an exit

examination which they must pass.          A capstone course given in conjunction with

representatives from industry also provides students with experience in applying their

knowledge to an industrial setting. Technology is integrated into the teaching process.

Undergraduate students are satisfied with the instruction they receive. An average of nine

undergraduate courses are offered in computer science each semester.

        The department offers graduate study in computer science leading to the master’s and

doctoral degrees. Currently, there are no graduate courses offered through distant learning.

Students in graduate programs are supported financially through teaching assistantships and

from money acquired by external support. Graduate policies and programs are well defined

and published in the University Catalog and online. The graduate departmental coordinator

certifies students for graduation after receiving the approval of the faculty and the chair.

Graduate students are able to concentrate in three main areas – digital library, high

performance grid generation and mobile networking. Graduate students are required to

participate in the department’s colloquium.
                                                                                          61


       The official teaching load for tenured and tenure-track faculty is four courses per

academic term. Research faculty teach two or three courses per semester, and not more than

five annually.

       All tenured and tenure-track faculty teach both graduate and undergraduate courses.

       Instructors teach seven courses per academic year. Instructors can only teach specific

graduate courses.

       Even though the requirements for graduation are published in the catalog and online,

it would be less confusing to the reader to explain the time limits for matriculation to the

master’s and doctoral degrees with other requirements in the computer science section.

       Faculty are concerned about securing more financial support for graduate students,

since large numbers of them are part-time and need financial assistance.

                                     Criminal Justice

       Criminal Justice is a major which is available in the Department of Sociology and

Criminal Justice in the College of Arts and Letters. In the undergraduate school, a student

who majors in Criminal Justice may receive either a Bachelor of Arts or, as most do, a

Bachelor of Sciences. There are approximately 400 majors in the Department of which 350

are majors or intended majors in Criminal Justice (an individual cannot declare a major until

he or she has completed English 111). A minor also is possible in Criminal Justice.

       A student in Criminal Justice has an individual faculty advisor and there is also a

Chief Departmental Advisor available.        The Departmental Advisor verifies that all

requirements are met for the major before graduation. A student may take a practicum, and

honor courses are available. A capstone course is required for graduation. Course grading in

the department is appropriate. Some courses are offered by TELETECHNET and several
                                                                                              62


classes are taught in mediated classrooms. Each course has a syllabus. Students evaluate

each course and these evaluations are reviewed by the faculty member and the Chair of the

Department. There is a senior exit survey, the results of which have been used by the

Department. Every faculty member is evaluated by the Chair each year. Tenure and

promotion requirements include teaching (approximately 40%); scholarship (approximately

40%) and service (approximately 20%). A strength noted by many (including a student) is

the collegiality and ability of the faculty. Adjunct or part time use is consistent with the rest

of the University. Faculty work loads are appropriate. Faculty development monies have

been available, although the current financial status may affect this in the future. Graduates

may take positions in public or private security, in probation or parole work, or they may

attend graduate or law schools.

        The pre-law advisor is a senior lecturer in the Department of Political Science. She

advises current students, potential students, and alumni concerning law studies.

        A Master of Arts in Applied Sociology degree is available with a Criminal Justice

Track (there is also a Sociology Track and a Women’s Studies Track). This is a joint degree

with Norfolk State University. Admission requirements are stated in the Catalogue and

include a bachelor’s degree with at least a 2.75 average (on a 4.00 scale); a minimum of 12

hours of undergraduate work in sociology or criminal justice (including courses in theory,

research methods, and statistics); and the Graduate Record Examination. If one or more or

the foregoing are not met, a student may be provisionally admitted. The Admissions

Committee is composed of faculty members from both institutions. There is a designated

Graduate Program Director. There is a graduate student handbook for the M.A. in Applied

Sociology.
                                                                                                63


        The master’s program requires 36 hours and includes a thesis requirement. The

thesis is supervised by faculty from both universities. A student can complete the program in

two years. Currently there are approximately 20 students in the program, most of who are

provisionally admitted. Increased recruitment efforts are planned. Courses may be taken at

Old Dominion or Norfolk State. Graduates may use the degree in their current jobs or may

continue their education.

        The proposed Master in Criminal Justice will not be offered at this time.

                                Darden College of Education

        The Darden College of Education is comprised of the following departments: Early

Childhood, Speech-Language Pathology and Special Education, Educational Curriculum and

Instruction, Educational Leadership and Counseling, Exercise Science, Physical Education

and Recreation, and Occupational and Technical Studies. The Darden College of Education

is committed to excellence in teaching, scholarly activities, and service. With approximately

85 faculty members and over 2,800 students, the college strives to meet the needs of the

community while maintaining national and international prominence and is dedicated to

preparing distinguished professionals who are leaders in their fields. The college fulfills its

mission through its undergraduate and graduate programs in the fields of education,

counseling and human services, exercise science, sports management, recreation, training,

fashion, speech-language disorders, and instructional and occupational technology as well as

its continuing education activities.

        Old Dominion University’s major purpose in its teacher education programs is to

prepare teachers and educational leaders who have adequate knowledge of their teaching

disciplines, abilities to practice state-of-the-art instruction to students of various cultural and
                                                                                           64


socioeconomic backgrounds, and attitudes which reflect commitment to teaching and

learning as well as lifelong professional growth and development.

       Educational programs in the College of Education are accredited by the National

Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the American Speech and

Hearing Association (ASHA), the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related

Educational Programs (CACREP), National Recreation and Park Association, American

Association for Leisure and Recreation Accreditation Council, and the National Athletic

Trainers Association. Teacher licensure programs are also approved by the Department of

Education of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The graduate programs provide the Eastern

Virginia region and mid-Atlantic South with nine broad majors for the Master of Science in

Education and one Master of Science in Occupational and Technical Studies. Two majors

are offered for the Educational Specialist, and one Doctor of Philosophy is offered in Urban

Services. Within these graduate majors are over forty related interest areas designed to

address the professional needs of students and the communities that they serve. The primary

objective of graduate programs is to improve the professional skills and attitudes of students

to enable them to influence the quality of education (teaching, leadership, counseling,

research, and community services) at the state, regional, national, and international levels.

       From the students to the faculty, there are numerous points of pride in the College of

Education at Old Dominion University. The students’ minimal overall grade point of 2.75

overall is the highest for undergraduate teacher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

In 2001 pre-service education students also achieved between 85-100% passage rates on the

Praxis Test for teachers in various academic content areas. Faculty in the College of

Education are continuously engaged in exemplary teaching and service as well as scholarly
                                                                                        65


activities. ODU faculty members in the College of Education published 18 books, 14

chapters in books, and 55 refereed journal articles in 2000. Dr. Dwight Allen, faculty

member in the College of Education, was named a State Council of Higher Education for

Virginia (SCHEV) Professor in 2000. His book, American Schools: The Billion Dollar

Challenge, co-authored with Bill Cosby, was among the top three of 345 books nominated

for the e-book award of 2001, an international ceremony held in Frankfurt.

       Other areas of accomplishment include special programs and ODU alumni. Special

programs such as the partnerships with Professional Development Schools, the Darden

College Academy, the International Network of Principals’ Centers, the Institute for the

Advanced Study of Education, and the Tidewater Writing Project all focus on best practices

in the field of education and provide pre-service and in-service educational professionals

with continuing growth opportunities. At least 40% of the Teachers of the Year in area

schools are graduates of the College of Education at ODU. The institution may also boast of

Principals of the Year, several area superintendents and other administrative positions in

Virginia schools and across the nation. The current President of Tidewater Community

College is a graduate of the College of Education at ODU.

       The Darden College of Education at Old Dominion University is committed to

excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service through best practices and innovative

instruction. Clearly, this college demonstrates exemplary performance as it prepares

distinguished professionals and educational leaders through its comprehensive

undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs.
                                                                                           66


                               General Education Program

       The General Education Program’s goals and mission are consistent with those of the

University. The program requirements are clearly defined for students. Each department has

integrated the requirement into the undergraduate curriculum for their degree programs.

         Mathematics and Statistics Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

       The admission policies of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics in the

College of Sciences are the same as those for the University. The chief departmental advisor

is responsible for making sure that all students admitted to the department meet institution–

wide admission policies and procedures. An excellent mathematics tutorial program is in

place to assist students who have potential for studying mathematics but need tutorial

support to strengthen areas of weaknesses. The tutorial program is run by senior-level

undergraduates and graduate students. Diagnostic testing is utilized for newly admitted

students’ placement into first-year classes. Admission policies and procedures are published

in the University Catalog and online for each student, and are being adhered to by the

mathematics and statistics department.

       Transfer credit for student work done elsewhere is evaluated at the university-level

first, and then the chief departmental advisor reviews the transfer credits to make sure they

are consistent with the departmental courses for which they will substitute. Students are then

informed of the amount of credit that will transfer.

       The degree requirements for the bachelor’s degree in mathematics are published in

the University Catalog and online. Students are required to have 120 credit hours to receive

the bachelor’s degree. A minimum of 30 semester hours in general education is needed.

Students have three degree options – statistics/biostatistics, applied mathematics or
                                                                                         67


mathematics education. A majority of the students in the department are currently pursuing

the bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics. The chief departmental advisor in the

department certifies all degree completions with the chair’s approval.

        The departmental goals and mission are consistent with that of the University. The

departmental curriculum committee functions as the primary source for curriculum

development. It also coordinates mathematical department needs of other departments for

appropriateness and levels of complexity. The department offers an average of one

undergraduate course through distant learning per semester. Students complete an annual

curriculum survey questionnaire that is used by the curriculum committee in updating and

developing new curricula.

        Indirectly faculty are involved in recruiting mathematics majors individually. The

department sponsors an annual scholarship weekend to recruit undergraduate mathematics

majors. Faculty play a major role in recruiting majors at this event.

        Instruction utilizes a variety of methods in assessing student learning. Among those

are: cooperative group projects, math laboratory experiences, homework assignments, tests,

undergraduate research initiatives, and others. Hard and software technology are integrated

into the teaching of math content. Undergraduate students feel the resources and instruction

are satisfactory.

        The department offers graduate study in computational and applied mathematics and

statistics leading to either the master’s or doctoral degrees. The graduate departmental

director coordinates the graduate program for the department. The department graduates on

an average two or three doctoral students per academic year. There is a need in the

department to find more money to support graduate students. Graduate policies and
                                                                                          68


programs are well defined and published in the University Catalog and online. Graduate

students feel the resources in the department are more than adequate for graduate study.

       The graduate departmental coordinator certifies the students for graduation with the

chair and faculty’s approval. Currently there are no graduate courses offered through distant

learning.

       Faculty who are on a tenure-track and those who are tenured teach an average of

seven to nine semester hours per semester. Instructors teach twelve hours per semester.

       Instructors do not teach graduate level courses. Graduate teaching assistants teach an

undergraduate mathematics laboratory of about twenty students. Teaching assistants do not

teach any of the courses in the mathematics curriculum other than the laboratory course.

       General Observations: The department may need more scholarship support for its

graduate students. There also seems to be a need for resolving the weights used to evaluate

and assess faculty performance in the areas of teaching, research and service.

                             Natural and Physical Sciences

       The College of Sciences is composed of the Departments of Biological Sciences;

Chemistry and Biochemistry; Computer Science; Mathematics and Statistics; Ocean, Earth

and Atmospheric Sciences; Physics; and Psychology. This report does not include Computer

Science, Mathematics and Statistics, or Psychology.

       The Department of Biology offers bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. The

doctoral degree in Biomedical Sciences, which has five tracks, is offered in conjunction with

Eastern Virginia Medical Center.

       The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department offers bachelor’s degrees in

biochemistry and chemistry, and a master’s degree in chemistry; the master’s degree has
                                                                                                       69


seven tracks, as well as a master’s degree in chemistry education offered in conjunction with

the College of Education.

          The Geology Department has recently merged with the Department of Oceanograhy

to form the Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; this department offers a

bachelor’s degree only in geology. The department offers master’s degrees in geology and

oceanography, and the doctorate in Oceanography.

          The Department of Physics offers the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees.

          The following tables delineate the requirements, assessments and tracks of all the

degrees offered.      Each of the disciplines offers a minor; the semester credit hour

requirements for the minor are listed in the first table. The master’s programs offer both the

thesis and non-thesis options; the requirements for each option are listed in the second table.

B.S. degrees:
Discipline    SCH     GPA    Assessments                     Tracks                    SCH     Other
              Major                                                                    Minor
Biology       120     2.00   Exit Examination of Writing     Pre-professional/          20     Honors program
                             Proficiency                     Prehealth/SecEd.
                             Senior Assessment
                             Departmental exit exam          Cell/Molecular/Biomed
                             alternates with ETS Major
                             Field Test                      Ecology/Evolution/
                             Final seminar/project           Marine/Terrestrial
                                                             professional curriculum
Biochem       120     2.00   Exit Examination of Writing                                26     BS/MS 5 yr
                             Proficiency
                             Senior Assessment
Geology       125     2.75   Exit Examination of Writing     Geology                    28     Honors
                             Proficiency                     Gen Geology                       Practicum req.
                             Senior Assessment               Environ Sci                       Minor in Ocean
                             Final seminar/project in some   Earth Sci Ed                      Postgrad Remote
                             tracks                                                            Sensing
                             Alumni Survey                                                     Certification
Physics       120     2.00   Exit Examination of Writing     Research                   20     Senior thesis
                             Proficiency                     Professional                      Honors
                             Senior Assessment               Education
Chem          120     2.00   ACS Exam in General Chem        Teaching Licensure         23     ACS certified
                             and Physical Chemistry          Pre-professional                  BS/MS 5 yr with
                             Exit Examination of Writing     curriculum                        2 tracks
                             Proficiency                                                       Honors
                             Senior Assessment
                             ETS Major Field Test
                             Final seminar/project
                                                                                            70


M.S. Degrees:
Discipline       Stand    UG GPA      Qual. assess     SCH Thesis    SCH Nonthesis    Other
                 Scores   Maj/cum
Biology          GRE +    3.00/2.70   2 letters of              31            37      Tracts:
                 Biol                 recommendation                                  General Biol
                 MCAT                 Essay                                           Wetlands Biol
                                      Advisor                                         Biotech
                                      acceptance                                      Ed-Biol
Chem             GRE      3.00/2.50   2 letters of              31            34      7 tracks
                                      recommendation                                  Also MS
                                                                                      Chem Ed with
                                                                                      COE
Geology          GRE      3.00        2 letters of              31            31      Options:
                                      recommendation                                  Envir Sc
                                                                                      Special
Oceanogr         GRE      3.00/2.70   3 letters of              30            30      10 days
                                      recommendation                                  shipboard
                                                                                      exp. required
Physics          GRE      ~3.00       3 letters of              30            33
                                      recommendation



Ph.D. degrees:
Discipline       Stand    GPA         Qualitative      SCH beyond    Tracks           Other
                 Score    Maj/cum     assessment       MS/BS
Biomed Sci       GRE      3.00        3 letters        48 /79        Biol Chem        Offered with
                                      Personal                       Clin Chem        EVM
                                      goals/acad                     Biomed Sc
                                      objectives                     Cell biol/mol
                                                                     pathogenesis
                                                                     Systems
                                                                     biol/biophsics
Biol/Ecol Sci    GRE      ~3.00       Letters          48/70                          Foreign lang
                                      Prof goals                                      or computer
                                                                                      skills
PhD Ecol Sci +                                                                        Dual degree
MS Comp &
Appl. Math
Oceanogr         GRE      3.00        3 letters of     48 /60
                                      recomm
Physics          GRE      ~3.00       3 letters of     48/85                          Ap. Phys
                                      recomm                                          endorsem.


           The departments appear to be well staffed with faculty, most of whom are tenured.

The following table delineates the faculty of each department, as published in the 2000-2002

catalog, which was published before the Department of Geology merged with the

Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The Department of Chemistry and

Biochemistry has since hired four new assistant professors.
                                                                                            71


       Department Faculty Sorted by Rank (2000-2002 catalog):

 Department       Professor       Associate       Assistant        Lecturer      Res. Asst Prof
Biology              11              15               1               1                0
Chem/Bioch            3               5               1               1                0
Geology               4               1               0               0                0
Ocean               20*               4               3               0                2
Physics               7               9               3               0                1
* Of these 20 professors, 5 have dual appointment

       The faculty of these departments are committed to teaching and research. They have

instituted several assessment procedures for their programs leading to the undergraduate

degree. The Department of Chemistry is certified by the American Chemical Society and

has an NSF grant for Research Experiences in Biogeochemistry for Undergraduates.

International students are encouraged to enter graduate programs in the Department of

Physics through partnerships between the department and European universities. The

Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric

Sciences, and Physics apparently generate the largest amount of funding from external grants

in the College of Sciences.

       The faculty of natural and physical sciences appear to be satisfied with their roles and

duties at ODU. A recurring area of concern was the lack of adequate funding for laboratory

courses; some faculty members mentioned the necessity of using some of their research

funding for educational expenses. Another area of concern is the allocation to the Research

Foundation of indirect costs from externally funded grants. Several faculty mentioned the

need for more research laboratory space, as well as the desire for more mediated classrooms.

                         Social Science and Behavioral Sciences

       Old Dominion University offers several degree-granting programs in the social and

behavioral sciences. These programs are offered in the Department of Political Science and
                                                                                         72


Geography, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, and the Department of

Psychology. The former two departments are located in the College of Arts and Letters and

the latter in the College of Sciences.

       The Department of Political Science and Geography offers the B.A. and B.S. degrees

in political science and the B.A. and B.S. degrees in geography. The primary factor that

differentiates the B.A. and B.S. degrees in both disciplines is the foreign language

requirement. The requirement is more extensive for students seeking the B.A. degree.

       The Political Science Program seeks to provide students with a core of basic

knowledge and analytical skills along with an opportunity to specialize in one of two

emphasis areas: American politics and public law or international relations and comparative

politics. The program has seven full-time faculty members and typically employs six adjunct

faculty members each semester.

       The Geography Program aims to provide students with a broad base of geographical

training and knowledge of human environment interrelationships. Also, students get an

opportunity to specialize in one of four emphasis areas: urban planning and

emergency/hazards management, environment and resources, geographical information

systems (B.S. only), and teaching. The program has 28 majors, five full-time faculty

members, and typically employs four adjunct faculty members each semester.

       The Department of Political Science and Geography has an adequate faculty and

instructional support resources to deliver high quality degree programs in political science

and geography. The Pre-law, Model UN, and internship programs are special features of the

department. The department is also fortunate to have an endowment, the Burke Fund, which

provides $50,000 to $60,000 annually for library development.
                                                                                            73


       The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice offers the B.A. and B.S. degree

programs in sociology and in criminal justice. Students majoring in sociology may choose

one of three emphasis areas: general sociology, social welfare, or anthropology. The majority

of the department’s 400 undergraduate majors are pursuing the B.A. or B.S. degree in

criminal justice. In collaboration with Norfolk State University, the department also offers

the M.A. degree in Applied Sociology. Students in this program may pursue one of three

curriculum tracks: sociology, criminal justice, or women’s studies. Currently, there are

forty-six full-time and part-time master’s level students. The department has twenty full-time

faculty members and typically employs sixteen adjunct faculty members each semester. The

faculty, curricula, instructional support resources, and facilities of the department appear to

be adequate for achieving the expected educational outcomes of its degree programs.

       The Department of Psychology offers the B.S. degree in psychology, the M.S. degree

in Psychology, and the Ph.D. degree in industrial/organization psychology. The latter

program is an APA approved program. In a joint venture with the Departments of

Psychology at the College of William and Mary and Norfolk University, and the Department

of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Eastern Virginia Medical School, the department

offers the Psy.D. in clinical psychology.

       At the undergraduate level, the department offers students the opportunity to

participate in the Psychology Honors Program. Students in the master’s program may earn

certificates of concentration in psychopathology and assessment, quantitative and

assessment, and applied cognitive psychology. The specialty areas in the doctoral level

Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program are personnel psychology, organizational

psychology, and human factors psychology.
                                                                                     74


       Currently, the Department of Psychology has twenty-five full-time and six adjunct

faculty members serving 500 baccalaureate majors, 30 master’s level students, and 45

doctoral level students. The department has nine graduate teaching assistants. Active

scholars, the psychology faculty has generated $631,000 in competitive research and

training funds during the 2000-2001 academic year.
                                                                                            75



                  SECTION V:
             EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT
                   SERVICES
       The educational programs of Old Dominion University are complemented by well-

rounded support structures that encourage the total growth and development of students.

Faculty and students have access to library and learning resources that not only support the

educational programs and related research activities, but also provide broad exposure to

numerous disciplines, cultures, and ways of understanding. Through its many on-campus

resources and on-line systems and services, the institution supports its entire range of

academic courses and programs wherever and however they are delivered.

       An effective program of student development services, available to both on-campus

and distance learning students, is integrated into the overall educational experience. All

educational support services are systematically evaluated for effectiveness, and the

evaluation results are used to make appropriate modifications in resources, programs and

services.

       Policies and procedures relevant to the provisions in Section V are in writing,

approved through specified institutional processes, and enforced by the institution. Many of

the policies and procedures are available on-line through the web sites of the library, student

development services, and the Office of Computing and Communications Services.
                                                                                             76


5.1     Library and Other Learning Resources

        5.1.1   Purpose and Scope

        Old Dominion University (ODU) has made provision for access to a broad range of

library and learning resources by all faculty and students enrolled in academic programs on

and off campus. A mission statement guides library efforts in its support of instructional,

research, and public service goals of the institution.

        Results of periodic user surveys show broad satisfaction with library services and the

adequacy of resources to support the needs of users. Assessments of library collections

identify strengths and areas that need development. Input by faculty, departments, and

student users is used to establish priorities for acquiring materials and establishing services.

Departmental library liaisons and the Faculty Senate Library Committee perform an

oversight function to assure that the needs of library users are met.

        5.1.2   Services

        Through its various library facilities and services, the institution ensures that all

students and faculty have access to a broad range of resources at both primary and distance

learning sites. The Library Instruction Program, which includes tours, course-related classes,

web tutorials, workshops, a print newsletter, and other printed materials, provides

appropriate user orientation and instruction on how to access bibliographic information and

other learning resources. Librarians collaborate with faculty and other entities on campus to

ensure the effective use by students of print and electronic library and information resources.

        A large collection of print and non-print resources is accessible in the campus library

facilities. The newly renovated and expanded Perry Library seats 2,000 students and houses

the bulk of the 2.8 million item collection which is cataloged according to the Library of
                                                                                            77


Congress Classification System. The main library is open one hundred hours per week with

full services offered by qualified personnel.       An open computer lab and computer

workstations throughout the building, consisting of modern and well-maintained equipment,

provide user access to the large number of local holdings and to numerous electronic

resources available through direct subscriptions and consortia arrangements.

       5.1.3   Library Collections

       Through its library facilities and off-campus resources, the institution provides access

to essential reference and specialized program resources for each instructional location. The

Library’s web site serves as a complete guide to resources and a gateway to the numerous

resources located both on and off campus. The library is a consortium member of Virginia’s

Virtual Library (VIVA), an on-line service that gives all faculty and students access to

several thousand full-text journals, 200 index/abstract services and numerous additional

reference sources not available in the campus facilities. These resources are available to all

users both on and off campus.

       Collection development policy statements are available for each discipline, and

materials are selected through a collaboration of departmental faculty and the bibliographer

for that discipline. Provision is made for the acquisition of library resources substantially

beyond those required for baccalaureate programs. The shared development of collections

by librarians, faculty and researchers is governed by policy through the Faculty Senate

Library Committee. Policies and procedures are established to manage the replacement or

removal of materials that are deteriorating or no longer appropriate to the collections.
                                                                                          78


       5.1.4   Information Technology

       The ODU Libraries have incorporated a wide variety of contemporary technologies

for user access to learning resource materials. The Library’s web site serves as the entry

point to the on-line public access catalog, a local periodicals database, e-reserves, remote

electronic resources, etc. Students off campus may access all the library and learning

resources available to students on campus, and all students have access to the numerous

holdings available via Virginia’s Virtual Library, a statewide consortium.

       The opening of the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center and the availability of

the Information Technologies Instruction Center offer further evidence that access to the

library’s collections and services is fundamentally technology based. Library personnel in

support of technology include the head of systems development, systems librarian for

Internet technologies, digital services coordinator, electronic resources cataloger, computer

operations technician, installation and repair technician, and systems development assistant.

       5.1.5   Cooperative Agreements

       Cooperative agreements with other libraries and agencies include the Virginia

Tidewater Consortium for Higher Education, organized in 1975-76, and the Virtual Library

of Virginia (VIVA), established in the 1994-96 biennium. The former includes a council of

library directors and committees of functional experts; the latter is a technology-based

consortium for access to a broad range of electronic resources.

       The ODU Library is also an active participant in the Center for Research Libraries

which collects and loans less used research materials in various formats. The library holds

associate membership in the organization. All cooperative agreements are formalized and

regularly evaluated for effectiveness.
                                                                                            79


       5.1.6   Staff

       The Old Dominion University Libraries are staffed by twenty-four professional

librarians, all of whom hold at least a graduate degree in library science. Some librarians

hold additional graduate degrees including one with a doctorate. All support staff, forty-

eight in number, meet the qualifications for classified staff positions as defined by the

Commonwealth of Virginia. With additional professional and support staff positions added

in FY 1998-99, the libraries are adequately staffed for the services offered and the hours of

operation as posted.

       The University’s Faculty Handbook clearly defines librarian status, salary,

contractual security, etc. Required qualifications for librarian positions are also recorded.

       5.1.7   Library/Learning Resources for Distance Learning Activities

       The ODU Libraries support distance learning through the availability of on-campus

resources and services, access to electronic databases and other resources purchased or

subscribed to by the libraries, and a broad range of electronic resources available through the

Virtual Library of Virginia. The library’s web site provides on-line access to the entire

holdings of the library, and on-line access services permit users to request materials from

other libraries as well. On-line access to resources by all users is available in the library

facilities, in computer labs across campus, at distance learning sites, in work places, and at

home. Delivery of materials to off-campus users is accomplished by courier, UPS, electronic

delivery by Ariel, fax, and other means as appropriate.

       Responsibility for the provision of library and learning resources and services is

assigned to the Associate University Librarian and the Distance Learning Committee which

includes representatives from across the library system. Memoranda of Understanding
                                                                                             80


ensure the provision of library resources and services in support of the institution’s distance

learning programs.

5.2     Instructional Support

       A variety of facilities and instructional support services are provided at the university

level and in each of the six colleges. The Office of Computing and Communications

Services (OCCS) provides support and maintenance for general computing and

communications technology across campus. The University Libraries offer instructional

support for both print and electronic resources. Networked printing capabilities, photo-

duplication services and other support services are available in the libraries.

      Through the Division of Student Services, program support is offered for students with

disabilities and students who need assistance or training in writing, mathematic skills, and

other academic skills. Instructional support for learning technologies, media services,

learning assessment, multimedia duplication, and telecourse production is offered by various

entities on campus, including the Center for Learning Technologies which directly supports

faculty who teach in the Distance Learning programs. These services and those offered by

each of the colleges are adequate to allow fulfillment of the institutional purpose and

contribute to the effectiveness of learning.

5.3     Information Technology Resources and Systems

       Through the Office of Computing and Communications Services, Academic

Technology Services, the University Libraries’ computer laboratories and on-line system, the

TELETECHNET program, the Virginia Virtual Library, the six colleges of Old Dominion

University, and other programs and services, the institution capably demonstrates that it is

incorporating technological advances into its operations. The campus networking and server
                                                                                             81


infrastructure, plus library and college support of additional servers, provide reliable support

for both the planning and educational program components of the institution. All technology

offices and service locations are staffed by well trained personnel, and recommendations

regarding campus-wide applications of technology resources plus the development of a

university information technology plan are the responsibility of the University Advisory

Committee on Technology.

      A reliable data network, accessible in the libraries, colleges, in computer laboratories

across campus, at distance learning sites, and at home, provides the access and resources

students need in support of their programs. The prevalence of computer technology on

campus, the use of computer technology for the delivery of degree programs, and the

requirement of computer usage in many academic programs across the curriculum ensure

that students acquire basic competencies in the use of computers and related information

technology resources.

      There are many opportunities for faculty and staff to become skillful users of

appropriate application software. The Office of Computing and Communications Services

(OCCS), the Center for Learning Technologies, the library, and the colleges are among the

entities that offer technology training for faculty and staff. Training is offered both by the

institution and through contractual agreements. However, it is a finding of the institution’s

Self-Study that there is not a central point or system for notification of training sessions and

technology workshops available to the general faculty and staff across campus. The

implication is that some faculty and staff miss opportunities for computer and software

training due to a lack of knowledge of the specific opportunities available to them.

Suggestion (17): The Committee suggests that the institution develop a central point or
                                                                                           82


system of required posting of technology training sessions and workshops so that faculty

and staff who are qualified to participate in a particular training session may do so and make

timely and skillful use of appropriate application software.

      Policies for the use of information technology resources, consistent with the

institution’s purpose and goals, have been formulated by OCCS, the University Advisory

Committee on Technology in its coordinating capacity for the Network Advisory Committee,

the Instructional Advisory Committee, and the college technology planning groups. These

policies are available in print and are posted on the OCCS web site. The offices and

committees responsible for the policies evaluate them regularly to ensure that academic and

administrative needs are adequately addressed.

      The institution employs a full-time Data Security Administrator who leads the

University Security Team composed of representatives from each technical area on campus

plus the University Auditor. All users are required to obtain individual accounts for access

to library resources and other centrally managed computer resources. Access codes and

identification records of users who have left the University are deleted from the system in a

timely manner. Vendor-supplied security and firewalls also provide protection for the

confidentiality and integrity of academic and administrative systems and the University

network.

5.4     Student Development Services

        5.4.1   Scope and Accountability

        Through its Division of Student Services, the University provides those essential

student development services to ascertain the achievement of the educational goals of the

institution and to contribute to the cultural, social, moral, intellectual, and physical
                                                                                          83


development of its students.

       By offering an array of services, programs, and activities in accord with the mission

for Student Services, goals are articulated to align delivery with the purpose of the

institution. The Division is continually striving to enhance the delivery of appropriate

student development services for distance learning programs.

       To plan and implement student development services, the institution maintains a

Division of Student Services which engages its established policies and procedures for

student development programs and services. Additionally, the Division of Student Services

works cooperatively and collaboratively with other Divisions within the University in

accomplishing its mission. The administrative organizational chart of the institution reveals

that the Vice President for Student Services and Dean of Students holds status commensurate

with other major areas within the institution. The academic preparation and experience of

the staff in Student Services meet or exceed current guidelines; an exceptional number of

staff hold a terminal degree. There is evidence to demonstrate that staff in the Division

engage both quantitative as well as qualitative measures on a regular basis to evaluate and

plan student development services and programs.

       The planning process is an integral aspect of the administration of the Division of

Student Services.    Designed within the Division, the process is clearly articulated,

recognized throughout the Division, and includes functional guidelines and procedures.

These guidelines and procedures encourage each unit in the Division to engage its mission

statement, goals, and objectives to evaluate student learning and outcomes. There is

evidence that planning and evaluation are systematic, broad based, interrelated, and

appropriate to the Division. The Division is especially effective at gathering and analyzing
                                                                                             84


both quantitative and qualitative data ensuring effectiveness.

       Two distinctive initiatives relative to planning and assessment were identified. The

Division’s staff has designed and successfully integrated a most functional database

organized around the student learning objectives including measures of outcomes and how

the assessment is used as related to developing goals and strategic planning. Designed by

Division staff, the Freshman Survey assesses characteristics of incoming ODU freshmen and

is subsequently used to identify at-risk students and to plan appropriate interventions.

Therefore, the Committee commends Old Dominion University for its efforts to ensure

institutional effectiveness by using exemplary practices and its engagement of the planning

process and assessment in the Division of Student Services.

       5.4.2   Resources

       Adequate allocation of human, physical, financial, and equipment resources is

provided for student development services to support the goals of the institution. Budgetary

data are presented in a tabular format to reveal a progressive increase in budgetary

allocations for personnel expenditures as well as other division priorities.

       Human resources available to accomplish the goals related to student development

services are adequate with the unit including an associate vice president for student services,

ten directors, and one coordinator reporting directly to the vice president for student services

or associate vice president.

       Two major expansion/renovation projects in Webb Center have occurred in the past

thirteen years and a high priority request under consideration for improvements to athletic

facilities indicate that the institution is committed to providing adequate physical facilities

for student development services to support the goals of the institution
                                                                                           85


       Student activity fees, health services fees, gifts, operating budgetary allocations and

federal and state grant funds provide adequate financial resources for the accomplishment of

goals related to the delivery of student development services and programs.

       With access to adequate equipment, and particularly an enhanced computer and

information technology infrastructure, the student services division is enabled to provide

student development services and programs more effectively and efficiently.

       Staff development in student affairs is planned and coordinated by a division

professional development committee appointed by the division vice president. Staff

participate in programs, activities, and conferences designed to enhance staff competence

and awareness of current theory and practice.

       5.4.3   Programs and Services

               5.4.3.1 Counseling and Career Services

       The Office of Counseling and Academic Advising provides personal counseling and

academic advising services for undecided majors and at-risk students. The goals of the

office are addressed under the supervision of a doctorally-prepared supervising director who

implements the services and programs with a director of counseling, director of academic

advising, an orientation coordinator, six counselors, and clerical assistance. Though

operating in the Division of Academic Affairs, a unique array of career services is provided

in the Career Management Center operating under the direction of a director and nine

counselors.    The institution has clearly specified policies regarding the use of career

development services by students, alumni, and employers.
                                                                                            86


               5.4.3.2 The Student Government, Student Activities and Student
                       Publications

       The student’s role and participation in institutional decision-making is noted in the

stated purpose for the Student Government Association in its constitution. Students are

afforded opportunities to participate at various levels. Students in elected positions

representing other students as well as student appointees serving on campus committees or

advisory groups reflect a philosophy of shared governance.

       University staff is available to advise students in developing appropriate student

activities. Funding for student activities is provided by student activity fees. Students are

given opportunities to participate in over 192 organizations ranging from departmental and

professional organizations, honor societies, social fraternities and sororities to religious

organizations. Campus organizations are advised by faculty or staff.

       The institution hosts a radio station WODU, yearbook, the Laureate, and a student

newspaper, the Crown and Mace, which are advised by staff in the Division of Student

Services.   The institution maintains a clearly written statement of the institution’s

responsibilities in regard to these media. The institution’s responsibilities regarding student

publications are clearly stated.

               5.4.3.3 Student Behavior

       The institution has a Student Handbook which includes the Student Code of Conduct

and a statement of students’ rights and responsibilities. The jurisdiction of judicial bodies

and student disciplinary policy and procedures are clearly defined.

               5.4.3.4 Residence Halls

       The residential life program provides a comprehensive, well-designed, secure

environment for residents. Adequate policies and procedures are in place to sustain a
                                                                                           87


positive learning environment. There appears to be ample support and programming

designed to respond to stated institutional objectives to create a safe, positive learning

environment within the residence halls. Educational preparation and experience for

residence hall staff is sufficient, with the director being doctorally-prepared. Satisfactory

collaboration between the residential life director and the housing director, administratively

assigned to the administration and finance division, was noted.

               5.4.3.5 Student Financial Aid

       With the Office of Student Financial Aid being a unit in the Division of

Administration and Finance, the institution provides an effective financial aid program that

meets the needs of the students and is consistent with the University’s purpose. In 2001-02

approximately 60% of the institution’s students received financial aid. The financial aid

office has a director who supervises 28 staff including an associate director for technical

operations, a scholarship coordinator, 12 financial aid counselors, and 14 other classified

staff. Office policy and procedures assure the institution-wide coordination of all financial

aid awards.    The institution has developed and revised policies and procedures for

administering Title IV programs that appear to be in compliance with state and federal

regulations. The institution operates with a default rate of under 5% which is recognized as

below the threshold of 25% required of institutions to avoid possible loss of funding for loan

programs.

               5.4.3.6 Student Health Services

       The institution provides an effective program of health services and wellness

education. Since 1986 the unit has been accredited by the Accreditation Association for

Ambulatory Health Care. Census data reported reveals the high frequency of use of health
                                                                                             88


services with 14,000 visits per year and 2,000 to 2,500 new patients per year. Annually,

preventative health education activities and workshops are sponsored in various settings.

Services are provided by staff with appropriate credentials. Funding for health services is

provided through a student assessed fee.

               5.4.3.7 Intramural Athletics

       The Recreational Sports Department operates under the supervision of the

Intercollegiate Athletics Department. Qualified staff operate the program and benefit from

the advisement of student input. Plans are under consideration for improvements and

expansion of current facilities for programming in the area of intramural sports.

5.5    Intercollegiate Athletics

       5.5.1   Purpose

       The institution maintains an intercollegiate athletic program as a Division I institution

of the NCAA and is a member of the Colonial Athletic Association. The program operates

in strict adherence to an appropriately developed and approved written statement of goals

and objectives. This statement addresses the developmental needs of student athletes and is

consistent with the purpose of the institution. Both qualitative and quantitative measures are

used in the evaluation of the intercollegiate athletics program and regular and systematic

evaluations are conducted.

       5.5.2   Administrative Oversight

       An athletic committee composed of faculty, staff and students and a student advisory

council made up of students recommends policies and procedures for governance of the

athletic program. The Athletic Director reports to the President of the University. The

President appoints a Faculty Athletic Representative (FAR) to the NCAA.                    The
                                                                                              89


responsibilities of the FAR include providing oversight and advice in the administration of

the athletic program and for certifying the eligibility of each student athlete. It appears that

the FAR is integrally involved in the intercollegiate athletics program.

        5.5.3   Financial Control

        The financial operation of the intercollegiate athletic program is under the control of

the institution’s administration. Approvals for budget implementation involve an Assistant

Athletic Director for Finance, the Director of Athletics, and ultimately, the President. When

alumni, friends, and others make donations or give gifts to any athletic program, designated

accounts are maintained by the Foundation Office in an account designated for the

Intercollegiate Foundation. Foundation records are audited annually by an independent

certified public accountant. Financial aid programs involving athletes are administered by the

office of financial aid. All income and expenditures related to the athletic program are part of

and subject to university policy and procedure and audits.

        5.5.4   Academic Program

        The institution monitors compliance with policies pertaining to the recruitment,

admission, financial aid, and continuing eligibility of student athletes. The Faculty Athletic

Representative certifies the eligibility of the student-athlete. All records are maintained in the

office of the registrar. The student athlete is held to the same standard as all students for

academic good standing and fulfillment of curricular requirements.
                                                                                          90



             SECTION VI:
      ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES
6.1    Organization and Administration

       The duties of the President and her administrative offices are clearly defined in the

faculty handbook. Organizationally, the President reports to the Board of Visitors and is

charged with the ultimate responsibility for bringing together the University’s resources and

accomplishing the Institution’s goals.

       The University has an administrative structure that brings together the vice

presidents, academic deans and directors, the faculty senate, the Association of University

Administrators, the Hourly and Classified Employees Association, and the Student Senate.

Through these efforts, communication among the various constituencies appears to be

enhanced and there appears to be a minimum of communication problems.

       6.1.1   Description Titles and Terms

       The University’s name is appropriate and congruent with its stated mission and

purpose, and the designation of the administrative and academic divisions of the University

and the terms used to describe the academic offerings and programs appear to be accurate,

descriptive and appropriate.

       6.1.2   Governing Board

       The Board of Visitors is the legal body responsible for the University and for policy

making. It was created by the state legislature and consists of 18 members, 17 of whom are

voting members and appointed by the Governor. The eighteenth member, a student and a

non-voting member, is appointed annually by the Governing Board. The voting members of
                                                                                               91


the Board hold office for staggered four years and are dismissed for cause (failure to perform

the duties of a board member for one year) by majority vote of the Board at its next meeting

after the end of such year. The Board holds annual and regular meetings and is clearly an

identifiable body which is responsible for policy making as defined in Section 23-49.14 of

the Code of Virginia and Section 3.02 (c) of the Board of Visitors By-Laws. The Board

establishes broad institutional policies, secures financial resources to support adequate

institutional goals, has in place proper procedures to ensure it is adequately informed about

the financial condition and stability of the institution, is not subject to undue pressure from

political, religious or other external bodies, and selects the chief executive officer. There is a

clear distinction between the policy-making functions of the governing board and the

responsibility of the administration and faculty to administer and implement policy.

        6.1.3   Advisory Committee

        Advisory committees are used by academic units and their roles and functions are

clearly defined.

        6.1.4   Official Policies

        There does not appear to be a problem with official documents containing the duties

and responsibilities of administrative officers, the pattern of institutional organization and

governance of faculty, statements governing tenure or employment security, statements

governing due process, and institutional policies and procedures that affect the faculty, the

administrative, and other personnel.
                                                                                            92


        6.1.5   Administrative Organization

        The administrative organization reflects the purpose and philosophy of the institution

and enables each functional unit to perform its particular responsibilities as defined by the

mission statement.

        Administrative responsibility and authority for all educational offerings and functions

are clearly identified, graphically illustrated, and published in the Organizational Charts for

the University as a whole.

        The duties of the President and of the administrative offices directly responsible to

the President are clearly defined and made known to faculty and staff. Administrative

officers possess appropriate credentials in their areas of responsibility, and, along with the

President, are evaluated periodically.

6.2     Institutional Advancement

        The University’s advancement program is directly related to the purpose of the

institution.

        6.2.1   Alumni Affairs

        The Office of Alumni Affairs encourages former students to continue to participate in

the development of the University and assist alumni in the evaluation of institutional

effectiveness, but there is a need to maintain up-to-date records on the location of former

students and to employ periodic surveys. Suggestion (18): The Committee suggests that the

institution maintain up-to-date records on the location of former students and employ

periodic surveys.
                                                                                            93


       6.2.2. Fundraising

       Fund raising efforts are related to the purpose of the University, are incorporated into

the planning process, and evaluated on a regular basis. Policies and procedures are

appropriately disseminated and followed.

6.3    Financial Resources

       6.3.1   Financial Resources

       Old Dominion University has two major sources of unrestricted financial support:

student tuition and fees and state appropriations. These sources provide sufficient financial

resources in relation to the institutional purpose, academic programs, and student enrollment.

       Through fiscal year 2000, the University has demonstrated financial stability. The

latest audited fiscal year (2000) reported an unrestricted fund balance of $19,417,449.

       Approximately 54% of education and general expenditures were allocated to

instruction and academic support. Unrestricted education and general expenditures per FTE

student for Fiscal Year 2000 were $10,051.

       The University is faced with a 3% mid-year budget reduction this fiscal year and

expects additional reductions in the next two years. These reductions, because of good

budget planning and institutional assessment, are not anticipated to adversely affect financial

stability. The University is using these reductions as an opportunity to more efficiently

allocate resources based on the strategic plan.

       6.3.2   Organization for the Administration of Financial Resources

       The chief business officer, the Vice President for Administration and Finance, reports

directly to the President and his responsibilities are organized by the major functions of

business and financial operations. The President makes quarterly reports to the Board of
                                                                                           94


Visitors on the institution's fiscal operations.

        The business office organization and staffing are consistent with the size and purpose

of the University.
                                                                                            95


        6.3.3   Budget Planning

        The annual operating budget is approved by the Board of Visitors. It conforms to the

accounting system to provide academic and administrative offices with enough detail to use

the document as a management tool. The vice presidents, after consulting with their budget

units, are responsible for developing the budget which is presented by the chief business

officer to the Board of Visitors for final approval consistent with appropriations allocated by

the state legislature.

        The University also submits a biennial operating budget plan and a six year capital

outlay budget to the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Planning and Budget.

        This budget process ensures that sound educational planning precedes the

development of the budget. The process is continually evaluated and revised at each level of

management, from departmental head to Board of Visitors.

        6.3.4   Budget Control

        There is adequate budget control to ensure that expenditures do not exceed revenue.

The chief business officer provides budget units with quarterly budget reports. Department

heads and other budget managers use these reports to reallocate non-personal services as

priorities change or additional funds become available. Personal services are reallocated at

the institutional level.

        6.3.5   The Relation of an Institution to External Budgetary Control

        There appears to be no undue influence exercised by external organizations upon the

expenditures of institutional funds once the budget is approved by the Board of Visitors.
                                                                                           96


       6.3.6   Accounting, Reporting and Auditing

       Old Dominion University follows the generally accepted principles of institutional

accounting as outlined by the National Association of College and University Business

Officers. Financial statements are audited by the Auditor of Public Accounts for the

Commonwealth of Virginia who issues an annual audit report.

       The report for Fiscal Year 2001, the latest year completed, was not available at the

time of the reaffirmation committee visit. The University expects to have the report shortly

after the visit. Recommendation (8): The Committee recommends an audited Fiscal Year

2001 financial report be submitted.

       An Internal Audit Department reports directly to the President and Board of Visitors

and performs financial, technology, and operational audits. A five year audit planning cycle

has been developed based on a university-wide risk assessment survey.

       6.3.7   Purchasing and Inventory Control

       The purchasing function is centralized under the chief business officer. All major

purchases require a purchase order. An encumbrance system is used to commit budgeted

funds when a purchase is initiated. Inventories are centrally controlled.

       6.3.8   Refund Policy

       There is a refund policy published in the University Catalog and refunds are based on

the date of official withdrawal from the University in keeping with generally accepted refund

practices.

       6.3.9   Cashiering

       The cashiering function is a major responsibility of the chief business officer and all

funds are receipted and deposited daily in authorized bank accounts. All appropriate
                                                                                           97


employees are bonded through commercial insurers.

          6.3.10 Investment Management

          State funds are held and managed by the Cash Management and Investments Division

of the Commonwealth of Virginia. University foundation funds have their own specific

investment policies and procedures approved by the Board of Visitors. Investment reports

are presented to the Board of Visitors on a regular basis and investment policies are reviewed

and evaluated regularly.

          6.3.11 Risk Management and Insurance

          The Office of Risk Management is responsible for safety, loss prevention, and

insurance programs. The University participates in the Commonwealth of Virginia self-

insurance programs for major coverage and contracts with private carriers for minor

coverage.

          6.3.12 Auxiliary Enterprises

          Old Dominion University either operates or contracts for the traditional auxiliary

enterprises including a bookstore, student housing, a cafeteria, and vending services. These

services are efficiently operated and generate surplus funds for the educational and general

budget.

6.4       Physical Resources

          Old Dominion University is located on a 167 acre campus in an urban neighborhood

setting. Additional land has been acquired for student housing and the University maintains

several off-campus facilities. The physical plant includes well maintained academic,

administrative, and service buildings. The campus is well equipped for instructional

technology and has sufficient space to develop the master plan.
                                                                                         98


       6.4.1   Space Management

       The physical plant provides adequate space for current student enrollment and

academic programs.

       6.4.2   Buildings, Grounds and Equipment Maintenance

       The physical plant function is adequately staffed and funded to maintain the

buildings, grounds, and equipment. There is a formal schedule of preventative maintenance.

       6.4.3   Safety and Security

       The University employs a well-trained and adequate staff of security officers

reporting to the associate vice president for administration and finance. The University

police share jurisdictional responsibility with the City of Norfolk Police Department to

provide additional safety for students residing in the immediate vicinity of the campus. The

Police Department recently was accredited by the Virginia Law Enforcement Professional

Standards Commission. A Campus Safety Committee meets regularly to assess safety

programs and to recommend safety policies.

       6.4.4   Facilities Master Plan

       A facilities master plan was approved by the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Art and

Architectural Review Board in 1996. The plan emphasizes academic facilities and is

updated and evaluated annually. Recent revisions include the University Village, a 75 acre

mixed-use redevelopment project and a specific master plan for traffic control and parking.

These revisions were included in the current six-year (2002-2008) capital budget request.
                                                                                          99


6.5    Externally Funded Grants and Contracts

       The Faculty Handbook specifies guidelines that facilitate the research endeavors of

the faculty while protecting the interest of both the faculty and the University. There is a

procedure in place to insure faculty grant and research activity is approved and monitored by

academic administrators and administered by the Research Foundation. Academic freedom

is a university policy as defined in the Faculty Handbook.

6.6    Related Corporate Entities

       There are five related corporate entities: The Educational Foundation, the

Intercollegiate Foundation, the Alumni Association, the Research Foundation, and the Real

Estate Foundation. These organizations engage in fund-raising and friend-raising activities

to support the University. Each organization has its own by-laws and is audited annually by

an independent auditor. A summary of these audits is included in the University’s financial

audit performed by the Auditor of Public Accounts for the Commonwealth of Virginia.
                                                                                              100



                     RECOMMENDATIONS

SECTION III INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

     3.3 Institutional Research

1.       The Committee recommends that a formal procedure for collecting input on satisfaction

         of customers with University Planning and Institutional Research be developed and used

         to guide the department’s planning and evaluation process.

SECTION IV: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM


4.2      Undergraduate Program

         4.2.1   Undergraduate Admission

2.       The Committee recommends that Old Dominion University require qualitative

         assessment of its applicants.

4.3      Graduate Program

                 4.3.2   Graduate Admission

3.       The Committee recommends that Old Dominion University require qualitative

         assessments of all graduate applicants.

         4.3.4   Graduate Curriculum

4.       The Committee recommends that in all courses in which combined instruction of

         undergraduates and graduates is permitted, a substantial difference in instruction of the

         two be maintained.
                                                                                         101


      4.3.6   Academic Advising of Graduate Students

5.    The Committee recommends that the institution make available an effective orientation

      program to all full-and part-time graduate students.

6.    The Committee recommends that the institution take steps to ensure that orientation and

      advisement programs are regularly evaluated and that the evaluation results be used to

      enhance effective assistance to students.

4.6   Continuing Education, Outreach and Service Programs

7.    The Committee recommends that the institution inform the Executive Director of the

      Commission on Colleges in advance of any degree program implemented through

      continuing education.

SECTION VI: ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES

6.3   Financial Resources

      6.3.6   Accounting, Reporting and Auditing

8.    The Committee recommends an audited Fiscal Year 2001 financial report be submitted.
                                                                                           102



                            SUGGESTIONS

SECTION II: INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE

1.    The Committee suggests that a direct internet link to the Mission of the University and

      the Major Goals of the University statements on the Old Dominion University Home

      Page be added to provide user-friendly internet access to the statements.

SECTION III: INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS


3.1   Planning and Evaluation: Educational Programs

2.    The Committee suggests that a systematic study of the current assigned responsibilities

      of the Assessment Program in conjunction with a review of the adequacy of current staff

      to carry out those responsibilities in a timely fashion be initiated.

3.    The Committee suggests that the University examine the feasibility of combining (a) the

      Assessment Program and (b) the University Planning and Institutional Research office be

      consolidated into a single office.

4.    The Committee suggests that primary academic and administrative units designate an

      individual to be responsible for coordinating unit assessment initiatives and function as

      the unit’s liaison to appropriate institutional planning and assessment bodies and

      initiatives.

5.    The Committee suggests that the University establish, maintain, and keep current with

      newly generated data a central archive of relevant assessment and evaluation documents

      concerning the University’s strategic planning and institutional effectiveness processes.
                                                                                          103


3.3   Institutional Research

6.    The Committee suggests that a review of the University Planning and Institutional

      Research office’s workload be conducted to determine the staffing skills necessary to

      satisfy demands for data collection and analysis and additional qualified staff be

      provided as needed.

SECTION IV: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM


4.4   Undergraduate Program

      4.4.1   Undergraduate Admission

7.    The Committee suggests that Old Dominion University evaluate the level of coordination

      between the admission offices.

4.5   Graduate Program

              4.3.2   Graduate Admission

8.    The Committee suggests that data pertaining to experiential learning credit by portfolio

      be more cohesively organized and collated according to academic year to be more

      accessible for review.

9.    The Committee suggests that Old Dominion University follow through with their plans

      to publish the different admission criteria for master’s and doctoral graduate work.

10.   The Committee suggests that Old Dominion University implement a procedure for

      ensuring submission of official transcripts and tracking non-degree students.
                                                                                            104


4.7   Continuing Education, Outreach and Service Programs

11.   The Committee suggests that program evaluation occur in a more centralized fashion and

      come under the auspices of the Assistant Vice President for Higher Education Centers

      and Continuing Education. Common evaluation procedures should be in place for all

      programs.

4.8   Faculty

              4.8.2.3   Graduate

12.   The Committee suggests that the College of Health Sciences determine the various

      appropriate terminal degrees for faculty of the College and incorporate that list into the

      document entitled Certification of Faculty for Graduate Instruction for the College of

      Health Sciences.

13.   The Committee further suggests that any faculty that are not doctoral-trained in the

      discipline or considered to hold the appropriate terminal degree should be considered as

      an exception and should be individually justified and documented in the faculty file.

      4.8.3    Part-time Faculty

14.   The Committee suggests that the institution examine the current use of part-time faculty

      across all academic units and establish guidelines and standards for ensuring that the

      number of part-time faculty be properly limited.

      4.8.7    Professional Growth

15.   The Committee suggests that the institution evaluate the effectiveness of its formal

      programs designed to support the faculty’s professional development.
                                                                                           105


      4.8.9   Faculty Loads

16.   The Committee suggests that the University re-examine its faculty-load policy with

      respect to large classes of a writing-intensive nature delivered via TELETECHNET.

SECTION V: EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES

5.3   Information Technology Resources and Systems

17.   The Committee suggests that the institution develop a central point or system of required

      posting of technology training sessions and workshops so that faculty and staff who are

      qualified to participate in a particular training session may do so and make timely and

      skillful use of appropriate application software.

SECTION VI: ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES

6.2   Institutional Advancement

      6.2.1   Alumni Affairs

18.   The Committee suggests that the institution maintain up-to-date records on the location

      of former students and employ periodic surveys.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:9/3/2012
language:English
pages:110