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•   The balance of good health
•   One portion of fresh fruit
•   Vegetables
•   Juices and Smoothes




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Contents
       One portion of fresh fruit
Small-sized fruit
  One portion is two or more small fruit, for example two
  plums, two Satsuma's, two kiwi fruit, three apricots, six
  lynches, seven strawberries or 14 cherries.
Medium-sized fruit
  One portion is one piece of fruit, such as one apple,
  banana, pear, orange, nectarine or Sharon fruit.
Large fruit
  One portion is half a grapefruit, one slice of papaya, one
  slice of melon (5cm slice), one large slice of pineapple or
  two slices of mango (5cm slices).



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                       Vegetables
Green vegetables
   Two broccoli spears or four heaped tablespoons of kale, spinach,
   spring greens or green beans.
Cooked vegetables
   Three heaped tablespoons of cooked vegetables, such as carrots,
   peas or sweet corn, or eight cauliflower florets.
Salad vegetables
   Three sticks of celery, a 5cm piece of cucumber, one medium
   tomato or seven cherry tomatoes.
Potatoes
   Potatoes don't count towards your 5 A DAY. They are classified
   nutritionally as a starchy food, because when eaten as part of a
   meal they are usually used in place of other sources of starch such
   as bread, rice or pasta. Although they don't count towards your 5 A
   DAY, potatoes do play an important role in your diet as a starchy
   food.


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        Juices and Smoothes
• One 150ml glass of unsweetened 100% fruit or
  vegetable juice can count as a portion. But only
  one glass counts, further glasses of juice don’t
  count toward your total 5 A DAY portions
• Smoothes count as a maximum of two of your 5
  A DAY, however much you drink.
• Sugars are released from fruit when it's juiced or
  blended, and these sugars can cause damage
  to teeth. Whole fruits are less likely to cause
  tooth decay because the sugars are contained
  within the structure of the fruit.

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posted:9/2/2012
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