Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOCULTURAL THEORY NATION, STATE IDENTITY by Civet

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 4

									Anth 510­01                                                           Fall 2009 
 
INTRODUCTION  TO SOCIO­CULTURAL THEORY: NATION, STATE & IDENTITY 
 
Instructor: Elana Chipman, PhD 
Class Hours: Tuesday 1:10‐4:10, Science I, 141B 
Office Hours: Thursdays (or by appointment) 10:30 am – 12:30 pm, Science I, room 137.  
Email: echipman@binghamton.edu                               
Phone: 777‐2737 
 
 
Course Description and Goals 
In this theory seminar we will engage with both foundational texts and more recent anthropological 
treatments pertaining to the nation‐state, nationalism & identity. Related issues that will be 
touched upon include ethnicity, power, colonialism and globalization. Through close reading and 
discussion we will approach each theoretical text on several levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or 
explanatory power for understanding the social world (2) the specific historical and social contexts 
in which it was produced (3) its contribution to the development of social theory and ongoing 
debates. Thus, the goal of this course is to help students develop skills in reading theory critically 
and in applying analytical perspectives in their own work. It will be particularly useful to students 
interested in political‐economy, but also to students interested more generally in social theory. 
Students must read the assigned texts and prepare for class discussion (including occasionally 
presenting a text). Class assignments are brief weekly précis/response papers and three short 
essays in response to a question.   
 
Course Reading Material: 
    1. Articles and book sections will be posted on Blackboard. 
    2. Required books:  
       • Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities, 2nd edition (Verso, 1991) 
       • Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism, 2nd edition (Blackwell, 2006) 
       • Clifford Geertz, The Interpretation of Cultures (Basic Books, 1973) 
       • Jim Segal, Naming the Witch (Stanford U Press, 2006) 
       • Lila Abu‐Lughod, Dramas of Nationhood (U Chicago Press, 2005) 
       • John and Jean Comaroff – Ethnicity, Inc (U Chicago Press, 2009) 
 
Course Requirements & Grading Policy: 
    1. Attendance, engagement & participation (15%). Students may miss up to two classes with 
       no penalty (with exceptions for H1N1 related illness), but are responsible for catching up on 
       class material. 
    2. Students must turn in a minimum of 10 out of 13 précis/assessment papers of the week’s 
       readings (50%). These papers are aimed at helping each student prepare for class 
       discussions and facilitate conversations.  Papers will be 2‐3 pages in length, double spaced 
       (and proof‐read!). 
    3. Three 5‐7 page essays in response to questions that I will provide (35%). In these papers, 
       students will be asked to synthesize a body of theory discussed in class. 
 
 
Other Policies, Procedures and Information 
   •   In order to create a constructive learning atmosphere, all cell phones and other electronic 
       devices must be turned off during class.  
   •   Similarly, in order to contribute to a good class environment, please treat your class‐mates 
       with respect and patience. I encourage debate and arguments, but they must take place in 
       an atmosphere of tolerance and good faith.  
   •   The class schedule will most probably change somewhat throughout the semester, but the 
       dates set for papers will remain.  
   •   Coursework submission deadlines are firm. Papers may be handed in late only after 
       consultation and agreement with me, and due to extreme circumstances. I reserve the right 
       to refuse to accept late submissions or to penalize students in their grades. 
   •   I encourage you to meet with me and/or contact me by email if you have questions or 
       concerns, but please do not expect an immediate reply to email and do not leave it until the 
       last moment. I will do my best to get back within a few hours.  
   •   If you have a documented learning disability and are authorized to have special 
       arrangements for tests, quizzes or class, please inform me at the beginning of the course. I 
       will do all that I can to accommodate your needs in conjunction with Services for Students 
       with Disabilities (777‐2686, bjfairba@binghamton.edu)  but I must be made aware as soon 
       as possible. 
      
Academic (Dis)Honesty 
Academic dishonesty is a form of misconduct that is subject to disciplinary action under the Student 
Code of Conduct and includes the following: plagiarism, fabrication, cheating, facilitating academic 
dishonesty and falsification of data. When you registered for classes, you signed a statement 
agreeing to abide by the Student Code and other university rules. They all apply to this class. 
Students caught cheating or plagiarizing the works of others (students or published authors) in any 
work submitted for this course will be penalized and may fail the course.  
Please consult the Rules of Student Conduct and view the resources provided by the Writing Center 
& Library for further information on plagiarism and the correct use of sources.  
 
COURSE SCHEDULE  (Subject to changes) 
 
Week 1 – introductions 
 
Week 2 ­ History, culture, memory and the nation 
Pierre Nora – “Between Memory and History” (BB) 
Etienne Balibar, “The nation Form” (BB) 
El‐Haj, Abu. "Translating truths: Nationalism, the practice of archaeology, and the remaking 
of past and present in contemporary Jerusalem." American Ethnologist 25, no. 2 (1998): 
166‐188.(BB) 
 
Week 3 ­ Marx on ethnicity and the nation 
Karl Marx, “On the Jewish Question” (BB) 
Karl Marx, “The 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte”  (BB) 
 
Week 4 ­ The rise of the modern nation­state 
Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities 
Hobsbawn & Ranger, “Introduction” in The invention of tradition (BB) 
 
Week 5­  The modern nation­state cont. 
Ernest Gellner, Nations and nationalism 
 
Week 6­ Power, authority  and the state 
Weber – on political authority – selections from Social and Economic organization 
Foucault – selection TBA 
Althusser, “Ideology and ideological state apparatus” (BB)   
M Herzfeld‐ selections from Cultural Intimacy: Social Poetics in the Nation­State (BB) 
Paper 1 due in class. 
 
Week 7­ The Nation and the sacred 
Edward Shils, “Primordial, Personal, Sacred and Civil Ties: Some Particular Observations on the 
Relationships of Sociological Research and Theory”  The British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 8, No. 2 
(Jun., 1957), pp. 130‐145. 
Geertz – The interpretation of Cultures, ch. 1, 4, 8, 9, 10 
Diana Mines – “Hindu nationalism, Untouchable reform, and the ritual production of a South 
Indian village” (BB) 
 
Week 8­ The nation and Magic 
Jim Segal, Naming the Witch 
 
Week 9­ Capitalism and the world order 
Eric Wolf, “introduction” in Europe and the people without History (BB). 
Jonathan Friedman, “Being in the world: globalization and localization” in Theory Culture 
Society.1990; 7: 311‐328 
Wallerstein – world systems analysis – selection TBA 
 
Week 10­ Colonialism, nationalism, and post­colonialism 
Edward Said – “Introduction” in Orientalism (recommended, part 1) (BB) 
Dipesh Chakrabarty, “Introduction” in Provincializing Europe (recommended, part 1). 
Michael Taussig – “The golden army” in Mimesis and alterity (1993) (BB) 
Paper 2 due in class 
 
Week 11­ Colonialism etc. cont 
Lila Abu‐Lughod, Dramas of Nationhood 
 
Week 12 ­ Ethnicity and the State – foundational theoretical texts 
Primeordialism‐  selections from Geertz, Shils, Weber 
Situationalism  ‐ selections from Leach, Barth 
John Comaroff “Of Totemism and Ethnicity: Consciousness, Practice and Signs of 
Inequality” Ethnos 1984: 301‐323 
Kathryn Verdery (1994), “Ethnicity, Nationalism and The state” 
 
Week 13 – ethnicity, nation and neo­liberalism 
Simon Harrison, “Identity as a Scarce Resource” (BB) 
John and Jean Comaroff – Ethnicity, Inc. 
 
Week 14 ­ Transnationalism, globalism & citizenship 
Aihwa Ong, “introduction” in Flexible citizenship 
Appadurai, “Patriotism and its futures” in Modernity at Large. 
Coronil and Skurski, “Dismembering and Remembering the nation”, CSSH (1991):288‐337. 
Verdery, Katherine. "Transnationalism, nationalism, citizenship, and property: Eastern 
Europe since 1989." American Ethnologist 25, no. 2 (1998): 291‐306. 
Paper 3 due in class 

								
To top