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					                                                  “Co-originating
                                                        inter-
                                                 relationship– who
                                                    sees this, sees
                                                       reality.”




“The whole secret of existence is to have no fear. Never fear what
                                  no
  will become of you, depend on “ one. Only the moment you
                 reject all help are you freed.”
GENERAL TIMELINE
   Trad. 563 BCE: Siddhārtha Gautama, the Buddha-to-be, is
    born in Lumbini, Ancient India.

   Trad. 534 BCE: Gautama leaves his inheritance and becomes
    an ascetic.

   Trad. 528 BCE: Gautama attains Enlightenment, becomes
    the Buddha, and begins his ministry.

   Abt. 500 BCE: Classical Sanskrit replaces Vedic. It is the
    beginning of India’s axial age….

   Abt. 483 BCE: Sakyamuni Buddha died at Kusinara (now
    called Kushinagar), India.
    DEFINITIONS OF “BUDDHISM”
   “budh” – “to know,” to
    “be awake” and “-ism” =
    the practice of or belief in
    something. This is a
    “western” term.
   Buddha called his
    movement
    “dharmavinaya” or “the
    doctrine/reality and the
    Discipline”.
BUDDHIST LITERATURE
   Complete life of
    Buddha literature
    composed four
    hundred years after
    death
   Contained in collection
    of discourses (sutras)
    and the book of
    discipline (Vinaya)
   Image of the Buddha
    comes from the
    Samgha – the monastic
    community – who
    wrote about him.
BORN IN LUMBINI
NEPAL,
THE TERAI…
BUDDHA AS KSHATRIYA WARRIOR

   The idea is that
    Buddha was just as
    super cool as Rama
    etc., but just chose
    the path of peace
    from his convictions.




Statue, Buddha Park, Vientiane, Laos
HIS FATHER TRIED TO HIDE IT FROM HIM….

                  …but as a prince, he came
                   finally to see old age,
                   sickness, death and an
                   ascetic….
FROM THE EXTREME OF OPULENCE TO THE
EXTREME OF ASCETICISM…BUDDHA GOES
“JAIN”




            Greek image, from Sikri, Pakistan
BUDDHA’S GOLDEN RULE….
   Hatred does not cease
    by hatred, but only by
    love; this is the eternal
    rule.
    Buddha
   He who experiences
    the unity of life sees
    his own Self in all
    beings, and all beings
    in his own Self, and
    looks on everything
    with an impartial eye.
    Buddha
BUDDHA LEFT HIS WIFE, BUT CAME BACK!
   "O Father, please give me my
    inheritance." Thrice he had to ask
    before The Lord, turning to his beloved
    disciple Ananda, said, "Give the boy
    the ochre (gerrua) cloth."
   Ananda, aware of the silent but
    searching and expectant eyes of
    Yashodhara, asked the Lord, "And Sir,
    are we not to take ladies into our
    fold?" The large hearted Buddha
    replied, "Why, Ananda, since when has
    sex (gender) come into the arena of
    Truth? She is most welcome." Thus
    joined the wife, the mother, and the
    son in the sangha of Tathagata,
    melting the heart of a true Jnani.
BUDDHA’S TEMPTATION




Mara or “Death: daughters discontent, delight and craving
 overcome
SIX SUPER KNOWLEDGES
1.   psychic powers
2.   psychic hearing
3.   mind-reading
4.   memory of former lives
5.   psychic vision (visions of hell realms, etc.)
6.   cessation of sensual desire, views and ignorance
BUDDHA’S GOALS
   Disenchantment with things of the world
    (fame, wealth, power and lust)
   Dispassion, cessation of greed, hatred and
    ignorance, tranquility, higher awareness and
    awakening and finally, the “snuffing out”
    literally, of the self, that is called nirvana.
   The Buddha was more a scientist of the mind
    and his goal was principally the pacification of
    mental turbulence.
   In opposition to Upanishadic seers – Buddha
    sought not the identification of the soul and
    the world spirit – brahman; not an asceticism
    propounded by Vardhamana Mahavira,
    founder of the Jain tradition.

   That is why he called it, “the Middle Way”
BUDDHA’S REALIZATION:
THE WORLD IS BUT MIND-ALONE….
   "We are what we think.
    All that we are arises
    with our thoughts. With
    our thoughts, we make
    the world."
   “In the sky, there is no
    distinction of east and
    west; people create
    distinctions out of their
    own minds and then
    believe them to be
    true.”
FIRST, LOVE YOURSELF…NOT GOD OR HUMANS….

    "You can search
     throughout the entire
     universe for someone who
     is more deserving of your
     love and affection than you
     are yourself, and that
     person is not to be found
     anywhere. You yourself, as
     much as anybody in the
     entire universe deserve
     your love and affection" -
      Buddha
    ALL EXPERIENCE DEATH…ACCEPTANCE IS
    BUDDHA’S ANSWER…PARABLE OF THE
    MUSTARD SEED….
   Now the bereaved mother realized the import of the words 'where no death has
    ever occurred'. She could see the inevitability and definiteness of death as
    necessary part of life. She could see that suffering and sorrow were inevitable;
    no one could escape this fact. No one ever can be free from unhappiness and
    tragedies. She became calm, and wise too. Her grief for the loss of her son
    turned into wisdom of realization of Truth. Bending low at the holy feet of Lord
    Buddha, now the lady prayed, "O Wise One, please take me in your fold; allow me
    to join the Sangha."
A PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACH ELISABETH KÜBLER-ROSS’ GRIEF
CYCLE – BUDDHA GOT HER TO THE END OF THE CYCLE…NO
RESURRECTION THOUGH




                        1926 - 2004




                                                                       1924-2004
                                  http://changingminds.org/disciplines/change_management/kubler_ross/kubler_ross.htm
SOME FAMOUS QUOTES….
                  A dog is not considered a
                   good dog because he is a
                   good barker. A man is not
                   considered a good man
                   because he is a good talker.
                  It is a man's own mind, not
                   his enemy or foe, that lures
                   him to evil ways.
                  In a controversy the instant
                   we feel anger we have
                   already ceased striving for
                   the truth, and have begun
                   striving for ourselves.
WOMEN AND WEALTH


 The story of Prajapati, the
  Buddha’s step-mother,
 Wealthy laywomen appear
  often as bestowers of funds
  for the samgha’s benefit.
 The increase in wealth of
  the Samgha:
BUDDHA’S CLAIM TO FAME: THE WORLD’S FIRST SCIENTIST OF THE CONSCIOUSNESS:
THE KALAMA SUTRA: TRUSTING IN ONE’S OWN EXPERIENCE IS APPEALING TO THE
VENTURESOME CONSCIOUSNESS…SOME WANT TO MAKE UP THEIR OWN MINDS….


                            Do not go upon what has been acquired by
                             repeated hearing ;
                            nor upon tradition
                            nor upon rumor ;
                            nor upon what is in a scripture ;
                            nor upon surmise;
                            nor upon an axiom;
                            nor upon specious reasoning;
                            nor upon a bias towards a notion that has been
                             pondered over;
                            nor upon another's seeming ability;
                            nor upon the consideration, "The monk is our
                             teacher."
                            Kalamas, when you yourselves know: "These
                             things are good; these things are not blamable;
                             these things are praised by the wise; undertaken
                             and observed, these things lead to benefit and
                             happiness," enter on and abide in them.'
SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE TO AVOID…
WITHOUT VERIFICATION….
   Oral history
   Traditional
   News sources
   Scriptures or other official texts
   Logical reasoning
   Philosophical reasoning
   Common sense
   One's own opinions
   Authorities or experts
   One's own teacher
      Buddha’s core discoveries….
Pratitya Samutpada: his theory of inter-
                relativity
           No self in all that
    The Four Aryan (Noble) Truths
  The Aryan (Noble) Eightfold Path




                                           22
        PRATITYA SAMUTPADA
   The 12 linked chain of causation discerned in the last
    watch of the night


                                                “All things appear
                                                and disappear
                                                because of the
                                                concurrence of
                                                causes and
                                                conditions. Nothing
                                                ever exists entirely
                                                alone; everything is in
                                                relation to everything
                                                else. ”
THE BUDDHIST “PERSON:”
A FEEDBACK LOOP
 …Form -Sensation-Conception-Volition-Form –Sensation….
            “Consciousness” is thus four-fold.
THE “THREE SEALS” OF BUDDHISM
   Duh-kha – The world is “unsatisfactory” – for Buddhist
    tradition, a self-evident fact.
   An-aa-tman = Un + “beyond” + body or “thread” of
    existence. There is no soul existing apart from the body.
   A-nitya or “impermanence” necessitates anatman – “no
    self” and this fact of eventual decay leads to
    unsatisfactoriness or duhkha
THE FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS

1. Duhkha-
   Unsatisfactoriness,
   Suffering
2. Samudaya-Arising,
   origin (of Duhkha =
   desire)
3. Nirodha- Cessation,
   Eradication (of Desire)
4. Marga-Path (to
   Cessation)
DESIRE




  Only forms of desire that lead one further on the Wheel of
        Becoming are objects of desire to be eliminated.
 The desire for nirvana remains until nirvana is achieved and
   then even this desire is abandoned. The arising of suffering
              is gone, then #3 Cessation is realized.
THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH
    THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD
    PATH
 Divided into three
 categories
 The first category is
 Wisdom
1. The Proper View:
     Awareness of no-self, impermanence
     and the Four Noble Truths
2. The Proper Intention:
     The intention of renunciation
     The intention of non-aversion or loving kindness.
     The intention of non-injury or compassion.
THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH CONT.
   The second category is Morality
   3. Proper Speech:
       Abstinence from false speech, that is, from lying - instead making an
        effort to speak truthfully.
       Abstinence from slanderous speech, statements intended to divide or
        create enmity between people. Instead the follower of the path should
        always speak words which promote friendship and harmony between
        people.
       Abstinence from harsh speech, from speech which is angry and bitter,
        which cuts into the hearts of others. Instead one's speech should always
        be soft, gentle and affectionate.
       Abstinence from idle chatter, from gossip. Instead one should speak
        words which are meaningful, significant and purposeful.
THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH CONT. (MORALITY)

   4. Proper Action:
       Abstinence from destruction of life, that is, abstaining from
        killing of other living beings, which includes animals and all
        other sentient beings, to abstain from hunting, fishing etc.
       Abstinence from taking what is not given, that is, from
        stealing, cheating, exploiting others, gaining wealth by
        dishonest and illegal ways etc.
       Abstinence from sexual misconduct, that is from illicit types
        of sexual relations such as adultery, seduction, rape, etc.
        and for those who are ordained as monks, the observance
        of celibacy.
THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH CONT.
(MORALITY)
                    5. Proper Livelihood:
                          Dealing in flesh,
                           example: as a butcher.
                          Dealing in poisons.
                          Dealing in weapons and
                           arms.
                          Dealing in slave trade
                           and prostitution.
                          Dealing in intoxicants or
                           liquors and drugs.
THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH CONT. (CONCENTRATION)
                          The third and final category
                           is Concentration.
                        6. Proper effort, diligence:
                               The effort to prevent un-
                                arisen unwholesome states
                                from arising.
                               The effort to abandon the
                                arisen unwholesome states.
                               Develop the undeveloped
                                wholesome states
                               Strengthen and cultivate the
                                existing wholesome states
                           "The Buddha's point out the
                            path, you yourselves must
                            make the effort"
THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH CONT. (CONCENTRATION)

7. Proper mindfulness:
   Being mindful of body.
   Being mindful of feeling.
   Being mindful of mental states.
   Being mindful of mental contents.

8. Proper concentration:
   Samatha   - stopping thoughts, calming the mind
   Vipasyana - insight into the four noble truths, no-
    self, impermanence
THE “THREE BASKETS” OR TRIPITAKA

1.   Sutrapitaka-Basket of Discourses
2.   Vinayapitaka-Basket of Discipline
3.   Abhidharmapitaka- Basket of Higher Doctrine
MEDITATION OR “COGNITIVE
RESTRUCTURING.”
                Bhāvanā [2 types]
                   Śamathā - Pacifying the mind
                     and quieting the mental
                     confusion, strife.
                    Vipaśyana - Developing clear
                     understanding of Buddhist
                     tenets, the four noble truths
                     impermanence selfless or
                     cultivating direct perception of
                     the true nature of reality (the
                     dharma eye).
PRESCRIPTIVE ASPECT
   A teacher of meditation or guru will often prescribe the specific
    type of meditation that suits the needs of the individual.
      An angry person may be prescribed a meditation that
       cultivates feelings of love, or patience. Love and compassion
       are incompatible with anger, and so the more one cultivates
       these two, anger dissipates.
      A person strongly arrogant may be instructed to meditate on
       impermanence and no-self. No amount of money or fame
       can forestall death, hence meditation on bones, on the world
       as filled with skeletons walking around
MEDITATION AND SEXUAL DESIRE

  A person strongly attached to sexual desire may be
  instructed to meditate on the hideous features of a dancing
  girl: concentrating on her snot, poop, pee sweat, bile. A
  Buddhist seeks a proper state of detachment from this life.
VIPAŚYANA AND ŚAMATHĀ
    Vipaśyana: “analytical insight,” The latter is an analytical
     task in which one considers the emptiness or lack of self of
     the meditative object. This involves philosophical
     introspection.

    The combination of Śamathā or “Calming” the mind is a
     necessary prerequisite for attainment of analytical insight or
     Vipaśyana. The two are combined like two wings of one
     bird, enable the meditator to achieve high, subtle levels of
     consciousness.
THREE WORLDS

 1. The Desire Realm (where you are now)
 2. The Form Realms – dhyānas meditative
  states but “real” “places” for existence
 3. The Formless Realms – Higher states with
  no imagery or conception
FOUR FORMLESS ABSORPTIONS
1.   Absorption of limitless space
2.   Absorption of limitless consciousness
3.   Absorption of nothingness
4.   Peak of cyclic existence
THE PERFECTION OF WISDOM
EXCERPTS FROM THE HEART SUTRA
AVALOKITA, THE HOLY LORD AND BODHISATTVA, WAS MOVING IN THE DEEP COURSE OF
THE WISDOM WHICH HAS GONE BEYOND.
HE LOOKED DOWN FROM ON HIGH, HE BEHELD BUT FIVE HEAPS, AND HE SAW THAT IN
THEIR OWN-BEING THEY WERE EMPTY.
FORM IS EMPTINESS AND THE VERY EMPTINESS IS FORM ;
EMPTINESS DOES NOT DIFFER FROM FORM, FORM DOES NOT DIFFER FROM EMPTINESS,
WHATEVER IS EMPTINESS, THAT IS FORM,
ALL DHARMAS ARE MARKED WITH EMPTINESS ;
THEY ARE NOT PRODUCED OR STOPPED, NOT DEFILED OR IMMACULATE, NOT DEFICIENT OR
COMPLETE.
NO EYE, EAR, NOSE, TONGUE, BODY, MIND ; NO FORMS, SOUNDS, SMELLS, TASTES,
TOUCHABLES OR OBJECTS OF MIND ; NO SIGHT-ORGAN ELEMENT, AND SO FORTH, UNTIL WE
COME TO :
NO MIND-CONSCIOUSNESS ELEMENT ; THERE IS NO IGNORANCE, NO EXTINCTION OF
IGNORANCE, AND SO FORTH, UNTIL WE COME TO : THERE IS NO DECAY AND DEATH, NO
EXTINCTION OF DECAY AND DEATH. THERE IS NO SUFFERING, NO ORIGINATION, NO
STOPPING, NO PATH.
THERE IS NO COGNITION, NO ATTAINMENT AND NO NON-ATTAINMENT.

OM GATE GATE PARAGATE PARASAMGATE BODHI SVAHA
THE MAHAYANA THREE CYCLES OF
DOCTRINE

1.   The Hinayana – the          The doctrine of no
     “Inferior Vehicle” in       individual self.
     Mahayana conception.
2.   The Madhyamaka – the        The doctrine of no self for
     “Middle Way School.”        external phenomena, no
                                 self-existence for
                                 subject/object or
                                 consciousness.
3.   The Yogacara/Cittamatra
     – the “Yoga-praxis”/Mind-   The doctrine of the
     only school                 ultimate nature of
                                 consciousness .
THE TWO TRUTHS
IN MADHYAMAKA TRADITION
FIRE/FUEL ANALYSIS: Samvrti (Concealing
                       Truth )
MIND/BODY AND
                    The world of linguistic
NIRVANA/SAMSARA        or verbal
                            expression, images,
                            sounds and….
                         Paramartha (Ultimate
                            Truth )
                         The inconceivable truth
                            known by Buddhas
                            and Aryan
                            bodhisattvas in
                            meditative
                            equipoise
THE EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES OF
YOGACARA TRADITION
1- 5. The Five Sense consciousnesses

6.   The Mental consciousness -
     Manovijnana

7.   The Ego consciousness - Manas

8.   The Repository or Basal foundation
     consciousness - Alayavijnana
     Buddhism in China




Master Lao           Master K’ung
      The Ko’i Period: Exchange and
               transmission

   How to translate Buddhist terms? Start with
    Taoist ones – a patterned repeated in the West
   Tao = bodhi,yoga, Dharma marga (cf. “Law” as
    early Western translation)
   Fifth Century standardization
   “Religion of Images”
         Transformation of China
   Buddhism not deemed more refined “civilizing”
    influence as it had been seen by the
    “barbarians” to the west and north
   Emperor Ming-ti – 58-75 CE – dreamt of
    Buddhism; more likely, Central Asian traders
                          The Sangha

   Still a haven for the dispossessed – often a home
    for orphans
   Bhiksunisangha 317 – Chu ching-chien – first
    ordained bhiksuni and founded a convent in
    Ch’ang-an – she was the first – but Theravadin
    bhiksunis in 434 CE established the formal order
   Again, as in India, the first time women can acquire
    literacy and attain to great scholarship
                Chinese travelers
                    to India
   Fa-xian/ Fa-hsien – ca.
    400 CE
   Xuanzang/Hsuan-tsang
    and
   I-ching / I-tsing




                               Master Hsuan-tsang
          Buddhism “goes native”
   Hsuan-tsang (Xuanzang) – 596-664 CE
       New, authoritative translation and Yogacara
        doctrine systematized
   Empress Wu – ca. 625-706 CE
       – the mirrored hall of Fazang
       - First (and really only) woman ruler of China
       Consolidates power under Buddhist auspices
 The Many Schools of
  Chinese Buddhism
              1. The Vinaya School (Lu-tsung)
              2. The Realistic School (Chu-she)
          3. The Three Treatises School (San-lun)
              4.The Idealist School (Fa-hsiang)
  5. The Mantra or Tantric School (Mi-tsung or Chen-yen)
6. The Avatamsaka or Flower Adornment School (Hua-yen)
      7. The T'ien-t'ai or White Lotus School (Fa-hua)
            8. The Pure Land School (Ching t'u)
                9. The Dhyana School (Ch'an)
                 The Pure Land School
                      (Ching-te):
   The “Easy Way” or “Peasants’ Way”
   Never a formal school but a broad movement
   T’an-luan 476-542: vision of heavenly gate – turned
    to Taoism – Indian Bhiksu Bodhiruci turned him to a
    better method of immortality!
   Nien-fo – dharani – a recitation of the Buddha’s name
    Sanskrit: Namo ‘mitabha Buddha
       Concentration, meditation 2. length of
       Recitation of Amitabha’s name evil deed doers can enter
        the Western paradise if they desire it
            Revilers of the Dharma are excluded
             The Pure Land School
                  (Ching-te):
   T’a-li and Tzu-li – “other” power versus “self
    power”
       Faith becomes the prime directive towards nirvana
        – reliance on the vow of Dharmakara
       Latter days of Buddhism had arrived – sixth century
        view Degenerate Dharma
       So diffused broadly, survived the T’ang persecution
        along with Ch’an sect
       Viewed as vulgar peasant belief by Confucian elites
                      The Dhyana School (Ch'an):

   Bodhidharma ca. 520 AD
   Peak of Buddho-Taoism - rejected book learning as the basis
    of enlightenment, set aside all notions and theories of
    suffering and salvation, and relied upon day to day events,
    simple thinking and ordinary living as the means to
    enlightenment.
       free themselves from opinionated intellectuality and scholarly
        affectations to emerge into a world of notionless observations.
   Wu-hsin: the development of an unfettered and detached
    mind, that would not cling to anything and would not rest
    anywhere and would flow. [ video ]
                    The Dhyana School (Ch'an):


   Increasing use of paradox as teaching method
       The “public case” or koan
            One-hand clapping
            If you see the Buddha, kill him!
            Buddha is a shit-cleaning stick
            Does a dog have Buddha nature? Woof!
            Beatings with a stick (scarred hand Son school)
            Provincial, northern school lineage –avoiding the capital – survived
             the persecution
            Became known as “a special transmission outside the scriptures”
Japan: Kamakura Period (1185-1333)
             Dogen
   Triumph of the warriors and the bakufu system
    (shogunate)
   Capital moved to Kamakura
   Eisai (1141-1215): Brought Ch’an from Lin-chi
    tradition to Japan
   Dogen Kigen (1200-1253): travels to China lead to
    “dropping away of body and mind.”
       “Think No-thinking” – founds Soto School
       Shikantaza – questioning thought, not just seeking flow
       Demolishes disputes about transmission inside or outside
        the scriptures; quotes from “Hinayana” texts
                Neo-Confucianism
   Merger of Buddhist thought with Confucian
    ethics
       Public clinics became part of Confucian concern for
        society
       Buddhism lost the battle doctrinally
       Ming dynasty 1368-1644 – combination of Ch’an
        kung-an and Pure Land nien-fo practices combined
        in a synthesis for the masses
              The Figure of Kuan-yin
   “Mother Goddess” of China
   “She who hears the cries of
    the world”
       Exile due to desire to join
        bhiksunisangha
       Loss of arms for father
       Male to Female
        metamorphosis during Sung
        dynasty 970-1279
       Avalokitesvara – male in
        Tibet, female in China, neutral
        in Japan
        Japan: Post-war period (1945- )

   Sokagakkai
       shakubuku
   Samurai turn to business
       Mitsubishi
       Matsushita
   Aum Shinri-kyo
   Nishitani
Origins of Buddhism in
         Tibet
 Vajrayana and the Triumph of this
           Third Vehicle
   Three Practices / Three Mysteries

Mantra             Voice/Speech



Mandala            Consciousness/Mind



Mudra              Body
   Pivotal Events of the “Old”
    or “Early Translation” Period
    : The Three Principal
    Religious Buddhist Kings of
    Tibet

   Song-tsen gampo (Srong-
    brtsan sgam-po) (ca. 650 CE)

   Principal Establisher of Tibetan
    Empire
       Two symbolic
        wives: Bhrikuti (Nepal) and
        Wen Cheng (China)
   Introducer of Buddhism into
    Tibet formally
        The “Holy Three” of Tibet

   King Thrisong Detsen – Establisher of Formal Samgha,
    Monastery and Peak of Tibetan Empire

   Padmasambhava – Tantrin invited by Thrisong Detsen to
    subdue native shamanic spirits

   Shantaraksita – scholar/pandit invited from India to oversee
    construction of Monastery (and teach and translate); sent
    Kamalasila to debate the Chinese monk
              Nying ma
   (peak period: 8th – 11th century)

The “Holy Three”
 Trisong Detsen


     Samye monastery
 Shantaraksita


 Padmasambhava




                       Yeshe Tsogyal: Consort of Padmasambhava
Yab-Yum,
Father/Mother

Padmasambhava in
Union with Yeshe
Tsogyal
            The Sarma or “New Period”
   Shift from Yogacara to
    Madhyamaka emphases
   Atisha (982-1054 AD) and
    the Kadam: the great
    Indian reformer and writer
    of first Lam Rim or "Path
    Stages" text
       High Lama and King Yeshe
        Od and the search for “true
        dharma”
       Clean it up chums!
       Three scopes
Mongolian Empire at its peak
        (ca. 1294)
                  Gelukpa
      (peak period: 14th – 20th century)
Tsong kha pa (1357-1419):
   Sunyata and the conventional world
     all Buddhist systems mutually
   reinforcing
Vaibhasika, Sautrantika, Yogacara,
   Madhyamaka (Svatantrika and
   Prasangika)
   The dangers of “overnegation!”
Education of the Geshe
   Abhisamayalankara,
   Madhymakavatara, Abhidharmakosa,
   Vinaya
 - Pramanavartikka                      Ganden Monastery founded 1409
                                            And the “Three Seats”
                 Gelukpa
     (peak period: 14th – 20th century)
   Karma Paksi (1204-1283) – the first tulku
   First Dalai Lama: Gendun Drup (Tsong kha pa's close
    disciple)
   Third Dalai Lama (actually the First) Sonam Gyatso (1543-
    1588), received the name Dalai from his Mongolian patron
    and follower Altan Khan in 1578
   Panchen Lama - In the 17th century, the Fifth Dalai Lama
    declared his tutor, the abbot of the Tashilhunpo monastery,
    Panchen Lama or the "Great Scholar" Lama. This abbot, by
    retroactively applying the title to the three abbots preceding
    him, thereby became the Fourth Panchen Lama
Manchu Empire at its peak
      (ca. 1800)
            Other Dalai Lamas
   The “Great Fifth” and the importance of the regent
   The Sixth Dalai Lama - preferred going to brothels
    and writing love poetry than ruling the nation -
    where is Avalokitesvara?



                                        The current and
                                        14th Dalai Lama
    The Buddhist Holocaust
   Tibet and the Loss of a Nation
   Padmasambhava’s prophecy”
       "When the iron bird flies, and horses run
        on wheels, The Tibetan people will be
        scattered like ants across the World, And
        the Dharma will come to the land of the
        Red Man."
       13th: prophesied disaster

   14th Dalai Lama
       British, Russian, Chinese and
        Americans:
            Playing the “Great Game”

				
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posted:8/31/2012
language:English
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