AQA BACCALAUREATE

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					                                    AQA BACCALAUREATE
The AQA Baccalaureate (Bacc for short) is an academic qualification which builds on a
student’s core A level subjects, adding value through wider learning and enrichment
activities. It is available nationally from Autumn 2008 for first awards in 2010 and will be
offered to Post 16 students at Chipping Campden Sixth Form from September 2008.

The achievement of an AQA Bacc is a demonstration that a student has gained a fuller,
more rounded education with greatly enhanced personal qualities and skills.

‘Enrichment’ means students have extended their education and personal growth
beyond their A-level studies. It demonstrates that they have developed their skills and
individual potential to take their places as successful members of society.

Employers and Higher Education centres are increasingly looking for students who can
demonstrate that they are resourceful, imaginative and can use their own initiative,
working both independently and with others.

 The AQA Bacc is an innovative qualification that recognises the all round achievement
of students with GCE A Levels at the heart of the qualification.




                  skills
                  AS General
                  Studies fulfils
                  the criteria.




The AQA Baccalaureate is an opportunity for students to significantly improve their
further learning, education and employment prospects. www.aqa.org.uk/bacc

The AQA Baccalaureate Grading Scheme

3 A Levels    Extended Project         Enrichment      Breadth (AS)       Award
E             E                        √               √                  Bacc
C             C                        √               √                  Bacc with Merit
A             A                        √               √                  Bacc with
                                                                          Distinction
       BTEC FIRST DIPLOMA TRAVEL & TOURISM (1 year)
Course Aims:
 to gain a broad understanding of travel and tourism and study selected areas in more
  depth
 to develop skills, knowledge and understanding in travel and tourism
 to have an opportunity to apply learning in a practical and realistic way
 to follow a programme of study that enables progression to further education and
  employment in travel and tourism
 to develop key skills that are highly valued by employers
 to gain confidence by developing independent learning skills

Course Content:
The course is made up of six units (three compulsory and three specialist).

Core units:
 The UK Travel and Tourism Industry
 Exploring Customer Service in Travel and Tourism
 UK Travel and Tourism Destinations

Specialist units:
 Exploring Marketing in Travel and Tourism
 European Holiday Destinations
 Developing Employability Skills for Travel and Tourism

Learning Methods:
Students are encouraged to investigate and research much of the programme material
for themselves, both on an individual basis and as part of a group. The course is a
mixture of formal lessons and practical work, with an emphasis on learning and
practising skills relevant to the travel and tourism industry. As part of the course students
visit relevant travel and tourism organisations and all students undertake a weekly work
experience programme with a local travel/tourism business.

Assessment:
All of the units are internally assessed through assignments that are set and marked by
teaching staff. All students will develop Key Skills in Communication, Application of
Number, Information Technology, Problem Solving, Working with Others, Improving
Own Learning and Performance.

Entry Requirements:
Students should achieve a minimum of four grade D passes at GCSE to start the
course. They should be well motivated and have an interest in a career in travel and
tourism.

Career Opportunities:
The qualification helps students to progress on to higher level qualifications, such as
Vocational ‘A’ Levels, or even straight into work. It can prepare students for a range of
jobs in the public, private or voluntary sectors, in organisations such as travel agents,
sports centres, arts centres, hotels, theme parks, heritage sites and fitness centres.
Staff Contact: Mr Slattery
                 ART – FINE ART: A-LEVEL COURSE 2008:
Course Aims:
This exciting, creatively diverse and intellectually challenging course aims, over one or two
years, to enable students to…
 Express their ideas and creative individuality in an imaginative and thoughtful way.
 Analyse their own work and that of other artists, evaluating this critically using appropriate
subject terminology.
 Develop ideas using a variety of media; experimenting and investigating.
 Realise these ideas as informed, sustained artwork(s), through a personal, clear and
relevant creative journey.
 Foster an interest in, enthusiasm for, and enjoyment of art, craft and design.
Course Content And Assessment Weighting:
                                                                           ASSESSMENT WEIGHTING
UNIT               TITLE                 LEVEL        DURATION
                                                                              AS          A2
    1       Coursework Portfolio          AS                -                60%         30%
                                                 5 hours examined, plus
    2      Controlled Assignment          AS                                 40%           20%
                                                     preparation time
    3      Personal Investigation         A2                -                              30%
                                                 15 hours examined, plus
    4      Controlled Assignment          A2                                               20%
                                                     preparation time
COURSEWORK (Units 1 & 3):
                              Students produce a portfolio of work from selected starting points,
1       Coursework Portfolio  focussing on creative exploration, research and the acquisition of
                                    AS
                              techniques and skills.
                              Students develop one major, in depth body of work that has a
3   Personal Investigation A2 personal significance and relevance. This body of work must include
                              a related, written study of between 1000 and 3000 words.
CONTROLLED ASSIGNMENT (Units 2 & 4):
                              The starting points for this are set by the exam board. Students select
                              a theme from a range of ideas provided and have 3-6 weeks of
2   Controlled Assignment  AS preparation time to develop ideas and experiment. They then
                              produce a piece of work in 5 hours, which is relevant to their
                              development and to the selected theme.
                              As above, but students have 15 hours in which to create work(s)
4   Controlled Assignment  A2
                              relevant to their planning and development.
Learning Methods:
Lessons are supplemented by printed materials, I-board presentations, discussion and
the student’s individual work. One to one mentoring and tuition form a regular part of the
routine. Regular use of a sketchbook is vital as an extension of the creative and learning
process. Great importance is placed on each student developing their own individual
style, helping to nurture their confidence in a range of working methods and media.
Outside visits are also made when possible.
Exhibitions:
Public exhibitions are held each year. These are highly regarded within the local
community and help evidence the subject’s high success rate, especially at the highest
grade levels!
Entry Requirements:
Whilst a C grade or higher at GCSE is not vital, it is expected that potential students will
have a good level of art-based skill and a keen interest, evidenced through personal
work produced outside school. A willingness to work methodically and productively in
class and an ability to make sensible use of time outside timetabled lessons is also very
important.
Career Possibilities:
Entry into Art foundation, Degree and Diploma courses to access a wide range of art,
design and media professions. Fashion, illustration, animation, advertising, graphic
design, animation, photography, TV / film / theatre industry, Museum / gallery work,
architecture, hairdressing.
Staff Contacts: Mr R. Grover, Mrs S. Chandler or Ms N Crew.
                                     BIOLOGY
Course Aims:
   Develop a knowledge and understanding of the concepts of Biology including
     anatomy, physiology, botany, ecology, microbiology, biochemistry and
     biotechnology.
   Develop empathy with our environment.
   Recognise the value and responsible use of Biology in society
   Sustain and develop an interest and enjoyment of Biology.
   Develop skills in experimental technique including design, observation, handling
     and evaluating skills, logical thinking and written and oral expression
Course Content:
  AS Level:
  Three modules are covered
   Biology and Disease
   Variety of Living Organisms
   Practical and Investigative Skills.
  A2 Level:
  Three further modules
   Populations and Environment
   Control in cells and in organisms
   Practical and Investigative Skills

The new AS course will consist of many aspects of anatomy, physiology and
microbiology. A great deal of human biology is covered in addition to studying aspects of
ecology and plant biology.
A secure understanding of chemistry is important to complement this part of the course.
A good mathematical knowledge is also important for the course as skills are necessary
as there is a mathematical element to examination questions.The practical element of
the course involves a range of different biological techniques such as microscopy,
biochemical testing, chromatography and other laboratory skills.
Learning Methods:
A variety of teaching methods are used when possible these include note taking,
practical tasks, comprehension, powerpoint presentation, starter activities e.g.
whiteboards, statement builders, practice questions, research tasks, group work and
independent tasks. Practical experiments include dissection, amino acid
chromatography, enzyme investigation and osmosis and plasmolysis experiments.
In the past, outside speakers on Forensic Science, Neuroscience and Conservation
have spoken to Biology students. There have also been visits to Kew Gardens, the Eden
Project, Bristol Zoo, Natural History Museum and various revision conferences.
Obviously, trip and visits depend upon student uptake and funding and therefore we
cannot guarantee that they will take place.
Assessment: Examinations (January and June) and Coursework
Entry Requirements: Science GCSE at least grade BB and a good ability in Maths.
Applied Science students will need to be considered individually due to differences in the
course.
Career Opportunities: Animal nutritionist, Brewing technologist, Conservation Officer,
Environmental Management, Forensic Scientist, Toxicologist, Botanist, Pharmaceutical
Development, Agricultural Engineering, Veterinary Science, Geneticist, Medicine,
Speech Therapy, Dietician, Archaeologist

Staff Contact: Mrs L Millikin.
                              APPLIED BUSINESS
Course Aims :
 to gain a broad understanding of the world of business and study selected areas in
   more depth
 to develop skills, knowledge and understanding in business studies
 to have an opportunity to apply learning in a practical and realistic way
 to follow a programme of study that enables progression to both higher education
   and employment within business
 to develop key skills that are highly valued by employers and universities
 to gain confidence by developing independent learning skills
Course Content :
AS Units
Unit 1 Investigating People at Work              Unit 2 Investigating Business
Unit 3 Investigating Marketing                   Unit 4 Investigating Electronic Business
Unit 5 Investigating Customer Service            Unit 6 Investigating Promotion
Unit 7 Investigating Enterprise
A2 Units
Unit 8 Business Development                      Unit 9 Managing & Developing People
Unit 10 Marketing Decisions                      Unit 11 Impact of Finance on Business
Unit 12 International Dimensions of Business Unit 13 Organising an Event
Unit 14 External Influences on Business
The qualification has an AS/A2 structure. It can take the form of:
 A Single Award AS GCE. Units 1 – 3
 A Double Award AS GCE. Units 1 – 3, plus two from 4, 5 or 7
 A Single Award Advanced GCE. Units 1 – 3, 8, plus two from 9 – 14
 A Double Award Advanced GCE. Units 1 – 3, 6, plus two from 4, 5 or 7, plus 8, 10,
   plus four from 9, 11 – 14

Learning Methods :
Students are encouraged to investigate and research much of the programme material
for themselves, both on an individual basis and as part of a group. The course is a
mixture of formal lessons and practical work, with an emphasis on learning and
practising skills relevant to the business industry.

Assessment :
Two thirds of the units are internally assessed through assignments that are set and
marked by teaching staff. One third of the units are externally assessed through tests,
set assignments, projects or case study work.

Entry Requirements :
Students should achieve a minimum of 5 GCSE passes at grade C or above to start the
course. They should be well motivated and have an interest in a career in business.

Career Opportunities :
The qualification helps students to progress on to higher qualifications, such as an HND
or degree at university, or even straight into work. Because Applied Business students
develop the transferable skills and the key skills that employers are looking for, they can
lead to a very wide range of employment opportunities. This can further training in such
areas such as Banking, Insurance, Management and Retailing.

Staff Contacts : Mr R Steeds, Mr P May, Mr J Slattery
                            APPLIED SCIENCE
Course Aims:
 to gain a broad understanding of Science and study selected areas in depth,
 to develop skills, knowledge and understanding of Science,
 to have an opportunity to apply learning in a practical and realistic way,
 to follow a programme of study that allows for progression to both higher
   education and employment,
 to develop key skills that are highly valued by employers and universities,
 to gain confidence by developing independent learning skills.

Course Content:
In Year 12, three units are studied. One of these, Science at Work involves the study
of organisations and jobs where science is applied on a daily basis to provide a
product or service. This is an internally assessed unit where coursework makes up a
portfolio of evidence. Of the other two units, one is assessed internally by portfolio and
the other by examination in June. These consist of a balance between the three
science disciplines and focus on the human body, energy and analytical chemistry.
In Year 13, a further three units are studied which build on and extend work covered in
year 12. Two of these are assessed internally by portfolio and currently include sports
science and an extended personal investigation, which may reflect a particular area of
science in which a student has a special interest. One unit is assessed by examination.
(Currently, ‘The Healthy Body’).

Learning Methods:
During the course you will carry out a series of tasks and activities. These tasks are
grouped into assignments through which you will learn about science and its
application as well as produce evidence for assessment. We will discuss the standard
of your work as you build your portfolio.

Learning will take place through a variety of activities including visits, outside speakers,
individual and group projects, practical sessions, presentations and classroom work

Assessment:
Two thirds of the units in both Years 12 and 13 are internally assessed through
assignments that are set and marked by teaching staff. One third of the units are
externally assessed through exams. (One in June of Year 12 and the other in Year 13).

Entry Requirements:
To begin this course, students should have 5 GCSEs at grade C or above including 2
Bs in Science (or 2Cs with discussion with Mrs. Jeal and your Year 11 science
teachers) and a minimum grade C in Maths.

Career Opportunities:
Applied Science A-level is the same as any other A-level and is therefore acceptable
as a qualification for university entrance. It also allows students to develop the
transferable skills that are needed in the world of work, so they are valuable to a wide
range of employers. These include Campden and Chorleywood Food Research
Association, hospitals and banks as well as the Armed Forces and Civil Service.

Staff Contact: Mrs C Jeal
                             BUSINESS STUDIES
Course Aims:
This course takes a close look at business and the way it works, providing you with a
relevant knowledge and understanding of finance, marketing and production.

Course Content:
This course takes as its theme the processes of decision-making in business
organisations. Starting from a consideration of the stages involved in this process the
syllabus expands to include:
 The types of business organisation
 Communication within the organisation
 The finance of business
 Marketing the firm's goods and services
 Production of the firm's goods
 Human relationships involved in management and leadership; Trade Unions and
    industrial relations
 Relevant quantitative and statistical techniques


Learning Methods:
A wide variety of learning styles are used including case studies, problem-solving,
presentations and group work.

Assessment:
This course can either be studied for one year to obtain an AS level or continued for two
years to receive the full A-level qualification. The students take two AS modules in Year
12 and two A2 modules in Year 13.

Four Units of Assessment

   AS Units                                        A2 Units
   An Introduction to Business                     Marketing
   Business Functions                              Strategic Management

Entry Qualifications:
It is not necessary to have any previous experience in Business Studies. The skills
required are nevertheless wide ranging, including statistical analysis and evaluative
writing. A grade C in GCSE Maths and English is required.

Career Opportunities:
Many students go on to degrees in Management Science, Business Administration and
other related subjects, or use their A-level pass as an entry requirement for many other
degree courses.

Alternatively, a student may wish to go straight into a career. Business Studies is
particularly relevant to accountancy, banking, building societies, the Civil Service,
insurance, management and management consultancy and retailing.

Staff Contacts: Mr R Steeds, Mr P May, Mr J Slattery
                                    CHEMISTRY
Course Aims:
This course aims to stimulate and sustain an interest in and enjoyment of Chemistry. It is
hoped that students will develop an awareness of Chemistry in today’s society; thus
encompassing the social, economic, environmental and technological implications of
Chemistry.
This qualification is suitable for students who:
- have an interest in Chemistry
- enjoy carrying out investigations by the application of imaginative, logical and critical
   thinking
- want to use Chemistry to support other qualifications or progress onto further studies.

Advanced Subsidiary
This is the first half of the course and consists of two units. The first unit acts as a
general introduction to some core principles of Chemistry, the second unit covers
application of the core principles with topics such as Redox chemistry, The Periodic
table and some Organic Chemistry.

Advanced Level (A2)
This full A level qualification is made up of the three AS units above and three more
units which are studied at a higher level:
Unit 4 – Rates of reaction/ Equilibria and further Organic Chemistry
Unit 5 – Transition metals and Organic Nitrogen Chemistry
Unit 6 – Chemistry lab. skills

Assessment:
There are three AS assessment units for year one followed by three A2 units for year
two. Unit tests will be available in January and June of each year. Practical assessment
accounts for 20% of the AS course and 20% of the A2 course.

 Entry Requirements:
It is expected that students will have a knowledge and understanding of Chemistry at
grade B in a GCSE examination in Science (Double Award) or Chemistry. In addition it
is advisable for students to have a grade C in GCSE Maths.

Career Opportunities:
What could you do at the end of the course?
- Chemistry is required for degrees in medicine, veterinary science, dentistry and
   related areas.
- Follow a degree course in Chemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine, and
   Pharmacy. These are a small selection of courses with direct links. UCAS handbooks
   will provide further guidance.
- Employment in Biotechnology, Engineering, Pharmacy or Advertising as possible
   examples.
- Follow a Higher National Programme in Chemical Science, Sports Studies, Beauty
   Therapy, Applied Biology, Engineering, Animal or Equine Management,
   Environmental Science, Countryside Management or Horticulture.

Staff Contacts: Ms D E Moore (Head of Chemistry), Dr J Cannadine
                    DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY: FOOD
Course Aims:
Food Technology offers candidates an opportunity to gain personal satisfaction and a
positive experience from working with food as a material. At both AS and A level,
candidates are encouraged to:
 develop their own creativity and design and technology capability, to produce high
   quality products;
 develop an understanding of the historical influences on current processes and
   product design;
 apply essential knowledge of understanding and skills to practical work in relation to
   industrial practices;
 use information and communication technology (ICT) to enhance their design and
   technological capability;
 recognise the social, moral and cultural values inherent in design activities.
The distinguishing feature of the Food Technology course is its practical nature.
Knowledge and understanding is not therefore to be acquired purely for its own sake,
but in order to apply it to the solution of practical problems which arise in everyday life
and in industry.

Course Content: Underpinning all learning are the designing and making skills which
make use of knowledge and understanding in order to produce outcomes which satisfy a
design brief. The content of the course is delivered through the following three sections:
Materials and Components / Design and Market Influences/ Process and Manufacture

Learning Methods: Students will have nine 60 minute lessons per fortnight. In year 12,
this time will be directed towards design and practical work. In year 13, lessons will be
used to concentrate on an integrated coursework project.

Assessment: There will be four units of assessment. Students taking the AS option will
study the first two only.

UNIT                ASSESSMENT           TIME                PERCENTAGE
1                   Written Exam         2 hrs               50% AS
2                   Coursework           Approx. 50hrs       50% AS
3                   Written Exam         2 hrs               25% A2
4                   Coursework           Approx. 60hrs       25% A2

Entry Requirements: Grade C or above in Food Technology is desired.

Career Options: Biology, P.E. and Food Technology is a common combination. The
following courses also combine well with Food Technology; Applied Science, Health and
Social Care and Leisure Studies. Students with A-Level Food are welcomed by a
number of universities and colleges. This could lead onto vocational or academic
courses in many fields.

Staff Contacts: Mrs Carter and Mrs Simper




                                             9
            DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY – PRODUCT DESIGN
Introduction
It is intended that this syllabus should provide an interesting and stimulating subject for study in
the Sixth Form. The skills gained on this course are likely to be of great benefit to both
candidates planning on going onto higher education or those seeking employment after leaving
school. The syllabus has been designed to provide considerable flexibility in course design,
allowing pupils to focus on specific material areas.
Course Aims:
 To develop awareness in all aspects of design activity including sensitivity to aesthetic
     factors and accuracy in the choice and use of materials.
 To encourage candidates to apply their knowledge and understanding of design and
     technology to familiar and unfamiliar situations and problems.
 To develop numeric and communication skills and scientific knowledge appropriate to Design
     and Technology.
 To provide an opportunity for candidates to exercise initiative, imagination and
     resourcefulness in the solution of design problems.
This syllabus encourages an awareness and understanding of economic, political, social,
aesthetic, cultural, health and environmental factors relevant to this subject area and others, in
addition to specific skills and knowledge associated with Design and Technology.

Course Content: The D & T Department can provide a document with full details of the course
structure on request.
Learning Methods: Students will have nine 60 minute lessons per fortnight. In year 12, four of
these will be directed towards completing design and practical work including the case study,
whilst the other period presents a more formal teaching situation when the theory work will be
addressed. In year 13 lessons will be used to concentrate on project work. It is also important
that students allocate some of their study periods to work in this area, especially with regards to
the design folders.

Assessment:
There will be four units of assessment. Students taking an AS option will study the first two only.
AS Units
Unit 1 – Innovation challenge - The Advanced Innovation Challenge requires candidates to
design and model in a design workshop or examination room and complete a workbook and
question paper.
Unit 2 - Product study - The Product Study consists of product analysis and product
development, prototype modelling and testing.
A2 units
Unit 3 – Design, make and evaluate - Candidates are required to produce a coursework
portfolio and product which fully demonstrates their designing, making and evaluation skills,
using creativity, flair and innovation.
Unit 4 - Product Design - The subject content of this unit is focused towards products and
applications and their analysis in respect of:
• materials, components and their uses
• manufacturing processes
• industrial and commercial practices.
Entry Requirements: Usually grade C or above in any one of the Design and Technology
options - Graphics, Electronics and Resistant Materials.
Career Opportunities: Product Design is welcomed by universities and college admissions
tutors due to the variety of skills that are developed. It is recognised by the Design Council and
the engineering industry as a qualification for higher education. Similarly, the number of students
gaining direct entry to Design courses is a testament to the quality of portfolios that students
develop during their A-level course. In this context, whilst Maths, Physics and Design is a
common combination for Engineering course entry, Design and Art is a common combination for
Design course entry. AS Product Design is increasingly being chosen in combination with a
varied range of other AS courses.

Staff Contact:   Mr L Evans
                                                10
                DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY: TEXTILES
Course Aims:
 Develop a critical understanding of the influences on the processes and products of
  design and technological activity from a historical perspective and in current practice.
 Develop and sustain their own innovation, creativity and design and technology
  capability, to recognise constraints and to produce high quality products.
 Apply essential knowledge of understanding and skills of design production
  processes to a range of technological activities and develop an understanding of
  industrial practices.
 Use information and communications technology (ICT) to enhance their design and
  technological capability.

Candidates will have the opportunity to work and study a variety of textile materials so
that they understand the working characteristics, physical properties, cost and
availability, which influence the choice of materials in design situations. Knowledge will
be required of a wide range of components used in the making of textile products.

This syllabus encourages development of critical evaluation skills in technical, aesthetic,
economic, environmental, social and cultural contexts.

Course Content:
Available from D & T Department.

Assessment:
AS Unit 1 Written paper 50% AS             A2 Unit 3      Written paper 25% A level
           2 hours      25% A level                       2 hours
     Unit 2 Coursework 50% AS                    Unit   4 Coursework 25% A Level
     Approx. 50 hrs     25% A Level                        Approx. 60 hrs

Learning Methods:
Pupils will have nine lessons per fortnight. These will be directed toward design and
practical work and some time will be spent on formal theory work.

Entry Requirements:
Usually Grade C or above in Textiles.

Career Opportunities:
Students with A-level Design are welcomed by increasing numbers of colleges and
universities, combining Design and Technology Textiles with Art, English, Media
Studies, Business Studies, ICT and Science. Candidates are now also being
encouraged to include an AS or A level that may have a different subject emphasis to
broaden their perspective. Possible careers include fashion and textiles buyers, fashion
PR, art, interior design, costume design, product development, education and
management.

Staff Contacts: Mrs S Carter and Miss S Streeter




                                            11
                       DRAMA AND THEATRE STUDIES
Course Aims
      Students will be encouraged to :
      Develop their interest and enjoyment in drama and theatre, both as participants and as
         informed, critical members of an audience.
      Develop understanding of the significance of social, cultural and historical influences of
         the development of drama and theatre
      Experience a range of opportunities to develop a variety of dramatic and theatrical skills.
 Course Content & Assessment
Unit 1 – Exploration of Drama and Theatre                      AS      60 marks
This internally assessed unit requires students to explore two contrasting play texts, chosen by
the centre in a practical and active way. At least one of the plays must be explored in the light of
a recognised theatre practitioner.
A set of Exploration Notes based on individual research and response to the practical work to a
maximum of 3000 words must also be submitted. Students are also required to experience a live
theatre performance and submit an evaluation to a maximum of 1000 words. The live theatre
experience may be a performance of one of the chosen play texts or a different play.
Unit 2 – Theatre Text in Performance                           AS      80 marks
This externally assessed unit contains two elements. It requires students to contribute to a
performance of a professionally published play by a known writer. Group sizes should not be
fewer than three or more than nine students and performance time should not be less than 15
minutes or more than 60 minutes. Additionally, students must offer either a monologue or
duologue from a different play to that offered in the first section. Students may offer either acting
or a design form.
Unit 3 – Exploration of Dramatic Performance                   A2      60 marks
This internally assessed unit requires students to create an original and unique piece of theatre.
Their starting point may be stimulus material, themes, ideas and issues or a professionally
published play by a known writer. Students will be assessed on the research and development
of their work as well as the final performance in front of an identified audience. They are also
required to complete an evaluation on both the process and performance of their work.
Unit 4 – Theatre Text in Context                               A2      80 marks
This externally assessed unit takes the form of a two and a half hour written paper. There are
three sections to the paper. In Section A and B one play should be studied and explored from
the point of view of a director from a choice of three set texts. It will be expected that students
will explore the play in both an academic and practical way.
Learning Methods
The course demands practical, creative and communication skills in almost equal measure. You
will extend your ability to create drama and theatre, either in a performing or production role. You
will also be required to write about drama and to develop your powers of analysis to become an
informed critic. The course will involve taking part in drama productions, as well as studying
plays and playwrights.
Entry Requirements
It is useful to have taken Drama at GCSE level but not essential. It is important that you are
interested in gaining a greater understanding of how theatre and plays work, and that you are
keen to be involved with performances. You will need English GCSE grade C or above.
You need to be curious about issues and ideas and have a creative instinct for communicating
your views through drama. You may be keen on acting, writing or on the visual and technical
side of theatre and wish to develop your skills in some or all of these areas. Equally you will be
interested in going to the theatre and see plays performed by different theatre companies.
Career Opportunities
This AS and Advanced GCE can lead to further study in Drama, Theatre Studies and Performing
Arts in Higher Education at degree or HND level. It can be used as part of your course to
broaden your studies and may lead to a career in the performing arts industries. Drama and
Theatre Studies AS and Advanced GCE complements a range of subjects and is useful in
building confidence and improving presentation skills in a range of careers.

Staff Contact: Mrs Caithness
                                                 12
               ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

This is a well established, successful and popular subject.

Course content
This is a combined course in which you will study a wide range of Literature and also
have the opportunity to produce your own original work. It builds on the skills you have
developed in your GCSE course but you will have to adopt a more linguistic approach to
your reading and analyse your own language in much more detail. There is plenty of
variety as spoken texts, as well as non-literary texts are part of the course. The course
has an underlying theme, currently the spoken monologue, which is developed in each
modular unit.

If you are in Year Eleven and are considering taking the course you should be a keen
reader prepared to tackle some difficult texts from different periods. You must enjoy
writing both creative and analytical texts; you must want to develop your own skills
through studying your own and others’ work; and you must enjoy analysing the effects
that texts have on readers and listeners.

Learning Methods
Teaching styles in the course are varied, but at the core is active, close reading and
discussion in whole class or smaller groups. Active participation is always encouraged
and is the best way for you to develop your understanding and knowledge. There will be
a range of writing, including note-taking, analytical essays and creative responses to
what you read. Preparation for lessons is often reading, either independently or with a
partner or group. In coursework units there will be some freedom for you to follow your
own reading and writing interests, with guidance on drafting from your teachers.

Assessment:
There is one examination and one coursework unit in each year. You will take
examinations in the Summer Terms of Year 12 and Year 13. The four modules are:

AS Level (Year 12)                      A Level (Year 13)

1. Speaking Voices:                     4. Dramatic Voices:
Introduction to ways of studying        Students study two drama texts
Language, comparing natural speech      focussing on power relationships
with speech in written texts.

3. Changing Texts (Coursework           5. Connections across Texts
                                        (coursework):
Students write “multi-modal” creative   Students produce coursework about
pieces and commentaries.                an issue in literary, non-literary and
                                        spoken texts and produce a creative
                                        piece.

Entry requirements:
If you want to take the course you will need to gain grade C or above in both English and
English Literature at GCSE.
Staff Contact: You can obtain further details from your English teacher or Mr. Sawyer,
Head of English.

                                            13
                            ENGLISH LITERATURE

This is a well established, successful and popular subject.

Course content
You will study a wide range of Literature from different genres and periods, including
poetry, drama and prose. You will build on the critical skills you have developed in your
GCSE course but you will have to adopt a wider range of literary approaches to what
you read and be prepared to analyse in much more detail. There is plenty of variety in
the texts you will study and you will be required to develop your knowledge of their
social, historical and literary backgrounds. There will be opportunities for students to
follow their own interests within the rules of the specification.

If you are in Year Eleven and are considering taking the course you should be a keen
reader, prepared to tackle some substantial, challenging texts from different periods.
You must also enjoy writing and want to develop your own skills through studying and
analysing the effects that literary texts have on their readers. You must be prepared to
read independently outside the set texts.

Learning Methods
Teaching styles in the course are varied, but at the core is active, close reading and
discussion in whole class or smaller groups. Active participation is always encouraged
and is the best way for you to develop your understanding and critical techniques. There
will be a range of writing, including note-taking, analytical and creative responses to
what you read. Preparation for lessons is often reading, either independently or with a
partner or group. In coursework units there will be some freedom for you to follow your
own reading and creative writing interests, with guidance on drafting from your teachers.

Assessment:
There is one examination and one coursework unit in each year. You will take
examinations in the Summer Term of Year 12 and Year 13.The four modules are:

AS Level (Year 12)                       A Level (Year 13)
1. Poetry and Prose 1800-1945            3. Drama and Poetry Pre 1800
A wide range of poetry and prose         Shakespeare, comparing writers from
from Jane Austen to James Joyce,         1300 to 1800.
Keats to Eliot
2. Literature Post 1945                  4. Texts in Time (Coursework)
(Coursework)
Comparison of texts, one of which        Extended study of literary texts from
must have been published 1990.           different genres.

The texts above are possible texts in Year 12 and 13. These are not necessarily
the ones you will study but are for example purposes. Teachers choose the texts
from within the OCR set text list which changes every few years.

Entry requirements:
If you want to take the course you will need to gain grade C or above in both English and
English Literature at GCSE.

Staff Contact: Further Details can be obtained from your English teacher or Mr.
Sawyer, Head of English.
                                            14
                               GENERAL STUDIES

General studies AS level is an enrichment subject taken by all year 12 Advanced level
students. It is a compulsory requirement for the AQA Baccalaureate.

Course Aims:

The General Studies course aims to encourage students to develop a greater
awareness of human knowledge, understanding and behaviour, to appreciate that there
are various ways of interpreting different types of information and be able to assess the
relative merits of evidence in order to understand concepts like objectivity, neutrality and
bias.

Students will learn transferable skills to support their progress in their Advanced level
studies.

Course Content: The course is based on an investigation into the three key areas of
the contemporary world: culture, science and society. These three areas are integrated
into two units, with overlapping themes. The themes are presented as questions and
issues to explore through debate and research.

Learning Methods:

A team of staff will prepare groups for the externally assessed written papers on a
carousel basis of taught lessons. There is an emphasis placed upon utilising a variety of
learning styles, lively debate and research methods.

Assessment:

Unit 1: Challenges for Society: scientific, technological, moral. 50% of the total marks at
AS
Unit 2: The Individual and Society: influences, values, communication, media. 50% of
the total marks at AS.

Entry Requirement

All students have met the requirements to follow Advanced level programmes and will
qualify for General Studies.

Learning Opportunities:

Students can integrate knowledge from a range of disciplines. Skills of interpretation,
logical thinking and critical awareness are developed.
This qualification is excellent preparation for both employment and higher education,
where a range of problems and conflicting perspectives have to be considered and
reconciled. Through this process students will develop highly-valued study and
communication skills. It offers students the chance to gain a broader picture of the world,
and to connect ideas and information from different disciplines.


Staff Contact:        Mrs J King
                                             15
                                  GEOGRAPHY
Course aims: The course provides an opportunity for Sixth Formers to develop a much
better appreciation and understanding of the world in which we live. It is designed to
promote a balanced view of modern geography which is concerned with examining
patterns in the landscape and the recurrent processes contributing to them. It will
examine current global issues such as Energy Resources. The course will complement
many other subject areas and would be an ideal choice as a fourth subject to be studied
for AS level for many students.

Course Content: A variety of physical and human topics will be studied in depth on a
modular basis. Core topics include rivers, floods and management and population
change. In addition, optional topics covered will include Coasts and Energy issues.

Fieldwork: Participation in fieldwork forms an essential role within the course. A three
day field visit will be organised to Slapton Sands in South Devon. Coursework does not
need to be submitted for assessing: but a fieldwork exam paper (Unit 4) will be
completed concerning the work done at Slapton.

Learning Methods: The course is designed to stimulate interest and enjoyment and
help to contribute to the development of a thinking, responsible individual. Extensive
opportunities are given to the student to develop his/her descriptive, interpretative and
analytical skills whilst an emphasis is also placed on developing essay style and
technique. In addition, discussion, problem solving exercises, frequent use of visual
materials and fieldwork all stimulate the learning process. This course is for people who
are energetic and willing to work and it should be noted that this course does involve a
substantial amount of note-taking and the student is expected to undertake extensive
reading.

Modules:

Yr12/AS
Unit 1       Physical and Human Geography             2 hrs (35%) June
Unit 2       Geographical Skills                      1 hr (15%) Jan

Yr13/A2
Unit 3       Contemporary Geographical Issues         2½hrs (30%) June
Unit 4       Geography Fieldwork Investigation        1½hrs (20%) Jan

Entry Requirements: Grade B in Geography GCSE is required.

Career Opportunities: The following is a list of some careers available to students with
geography qualifications though, as an academic qualification, Geography will allow
entry into a variety of other occupations, for example, cartography, telecommunications,
surveying, planning, environmental and ecological work, meteorology, oceanography,
teaching, transport, travel and tourism, landscape architecture, journalism, television,
computing and recreational management.

Staff Contact: Miss R Thompson.




                                           16
                          HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE

Course Aims:
 to gain a broad understanding of health, social care and early years working
   environment
 develop skills, knowledge and understanding in health, social care and early years
 have an opportunity to apply learning in a practical and realistic way
 follow a programme of study that enables progression to both higher education and
   employment in health, social care and early years
 develop key skills that are highly valued by employers and universities
 gain confidence by developing independent learning skills

Course Content:
AS Units
Unit 1 Human Growth & Development (externally assessed) - Single Award
Unit 2 Communication & Values (internally assessed)            - Single Award
Unit 3 Positive Care Environments (internally assessed)        - Single Award
Unit 4 Social Aspects & Lifestyle Choices (externally assessed)
Unit 5 Activities for Health & Wellbeing (internally assessed)
Unit 6 Public Health (internally assessed)

A2 Units
Unit 7 Meeting Individual Needs (externally assessed)       - Single Award
Unit 8 Promoting Health & Wellbeing (internally assessed) - Single Award
Unit 9 Investigating Disease (internally assessed)          - Single Award
Unit 10 Using & Understanding Research (internally assessed)
Unit 11 Social Issues & Welfare Needs (internally assessed)
Unit 12 Understanding Human Behaviour (externally assessed)
Double Award students complete all Units of work.

Learning Methods:
Students are encouraged to investigate and research much of the programme material
for themselves, both on an individual basis and as part of a group. The course is a
mixture of formal lessons and practical work, related to Health and Social Care.

Assessment:
External assessment will be through written examinations.

Entry Requirements:
Students should achieve a minimum of 5 GCSE passes at grade C or above.

Career Opportunities:
This can include further training in such areas as Social Work, Education and the Health
Service.

Staff Contacts: Mrs H Greenall/Mrs H Gregory




                                            17
                                           HISTORY
Course Aims: To develop student’s powers of observation, analysis and argument through
studying elements of 19th and 20th Century History; to make them aware of the nature of
change, continuity, similarity and difference; to promote an understanding of the present through
the past and to encourage research techniques which will help students in their pursuit of post 18
education.
Course Content: We follow the Edexcel Board specifications for AS (8HI01) and A2 (9HI01).
This provides for a sound structure enabling students to gain both an overview of the whole of the
period, and an understanding in depth. Check out www.edexcel.org.uk for more details.
AS (These courses will be examined in Year 12)
Unit 1 – Historical Themes in Breadth – China 1900-1976
Students study two linked topics on China. The first concentrates on the overthrow of the old
regime, revolution, civil war and the victory of Communism 1900-49. The second looks at the
development of the People’s Republic of China under Mao and its impact on people’s lives
between 1949 and Mao’s death in 1976.
50% of AS
1 hour and 20 minute exam consisting of two essay questions.
Unit 2 – British History Depth Studies –Britain 1830-85: Representation and Reform
Students will study the way in which people in Britain campaigned to gain their political rights
through protest and organised pressure groups and the impact that this had on their everyday
lives. They will also look at how this led to the modern political parties that we have today in
Britain.
50% of AS
1 hour and 20 minute exam consisting of two source based questions.
A2 (These courses will be examined in Year 13)
Unit 3 – Depth Studies and Associated Controversies – The United States, 1917-54: Boom,
Bust and Recovery.
This unit encourages students to look at issues that have provoked disagreement and controversy
amongst historians. The topic explores the roaring economy of America after the First World War,
its demise in the Depression of the 1930s and the impact these changes had on the government
and people, e.g. the development of organised crime (gangsters) and the Red (communist) Scare.
There will also be an opportunity to look at key social tensions such as immigration, racism and
the Ku Klux Klan.
60% of A Level (30% combined)
2 hour exam consisting of one source based and one essay question.
Unit 4 –Historical Enquiry – The Making of Modern Italy c. 1800- c. 1900
In this unit students will look at the process by which Italy became a united country. They will
explore the long and short term causes and consequences of change and compare the
significance of different factors e.g. the role of individuals such as Garibaldi, Mazzini or Napoleon
III and the intervention of foreign countries such as France or Austria. Students will be taught a
basic overview of events and then produce an independent enquiry supervised by their teacher.
40% of A Level (20% combined)
COURSEWORK consisting of one source based and one essay question.
Learning Methods: There is great opportunity for debate, with students being encouraged to
research and prepare presentations on a variety of topics. This course helps to explain the social,
political and economic structure of Modern Europe. The willingness to read widely, search the
Internet and other resources, form and discuss opinions and develop ideas in writing is important.
A desire to learn about, value and question the ideas and actions of those in the past is essential.
Entry Requirements: A GCSE Grade B in History and/or a GCSE Grade B in English is
preferred. It is not essential to have studied GCSE History, but the student should possess an
interest and enthusiasm for History.
Career Opportunities: History is recognised as requiring a range of important skills, useful in
both the workplace and Higher Education. Areas might include Law, Journalism, Education,
Politics, Management, Social Policy, Media, in fact, any area in which the ability to analyse and
interpret information is held in regard.

Staff Contacts: Mrs E Kingswood, Mr M Hobby.

                                                  18
     INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

Course Aims:

To equip students with the knowledge needed to work in today’s technology dependant
environment.

Course Content:

 There are 2 AS and 2 A2 modules:

Learning Methods:

Students are encouraged to work independently, in pairs and in groups during the
course.

Assessment:

Assessment is through practical work and by terminal examinations at the end of Year
12 and Year 13.

Career Opportunities:

The career opportunities for ICT professionals include: web designer,
analysts/programmer, network manager, software engineer and multimedia production
assistant.


In today’s society our dependence on technology means that knowledge of Information
Technology is essential. The ‘A’ level course covers the current use of IT in industry to
facilitate business processes as well as predicting how new technologies will change our
lives in the future, both in the domestic and professional context.

The qualification covers an element of assessment practical work encompassing topics
including spreadsheets, data bases, desktop publishing and web design. This is done in
the context of developing a software solution for a client.

Both AS and A2 qualification have a theory comprehension assessment by terminal
examinations. Theory covers the knowledge needed to be an effective ICT programmer
in today’s fast and changing business environment.


Staff Contacts:    Mr T Read, Mr T Nelmes, Mr A Williams




                                           19
                             LEISURE STUDIES
Course Aims:
1. To gain a broad understanding of leisure and recreation and study selected areas in
   more depth.
2. To develop skills, knowledge and understanding in leisure and recreation.
3. To have an opportunity to apply learning in a practical and realistic way.
4. To follow a programme of study that enables progression to both higher education
   and employment within business.
5. To develop key skills that are highly valued by employers and universities.
6. To gain confidence by developing independent learning skills.
Course Structure:
Single Award AS GCE (3 units)
Single Award A2 GCE (6 units)
AS Units:
Unit 1 – The Leisure Industry
Unit 2 – Working Practices in Leisure
Unit 3 – The Leisure Customer
A2 Units:
Unit 4 – Leisure in Action
Unit 5 – Employment in Leisure
Unit 6 – Current Issues in Leisure

Learning Methods:
Students are encouraged to investigate and research much of the programme material
for themselves, both on an individual basis and as part of a group. The course is a
mixture of formal lessons and practical work, with an emphasis on learning and
practising skills relevant to the leisure industry. As part of the course, students visit
relevant leisure organisations during the course.

Assessment:
Two thirds of the units are internally assessed through assignments that are set and
marked by teaching staff. The other third is externally assessed through tests, set
assignments, projects or case study work.
All students will develop Key Skills in Communication, Application of Number,
Information Technology, Problem Solving, Working with Others, Improving Own
Learning and Performance.

Entry Requirements:
Students should achieve a minimum of 5 GCSE passes at grade C or above, or a First
Diploma or equivalent at merit or distinction level to start the course. They should be well
motivated and have an interest in a career in the leisure industry.

Career Opportunities:
The qualification helps students to progress on to higher qualifications, such as an HND
or a degree at university, or even straight into work. Because Leisure Studies ‘A’ Level
students develop the transferable skills and the key skills that employers are looking for,
there is a wide range of employment opportunities available. This can include further
training in such areas as Recreational Management, Leisure Activities, Travel and
Tourism, Armed Forces and Civil Services.

Staff Contacts: Mr. May, Mr. Slattery
                                             20
                               MATHEMATICS
Course Aims:
Students will be expected to develop their understanding of the process of mathematical
modelling through the study of mathematical methods and to use these skills to:
     abstract from a real situation
     solve problems
     interpret and communicate results

Course Content: Mathematics A level contains two main areas of study. All students
study Core Mathematics (two-thirds of course) and Applied Mathematics (one third of
course). Applied courses can include Mechanics, Statistics, and Decision Mathematics.

Core Mathematics extends GCSE Algebra and Trigonometry and covers new areas of
algebra to include Calculus and Co-ordinate Geometry.

Mechanics extends work previously met in GCSE Physics and includes Newton's Laws
of Motion, Collisions, Forces with and without friction.

Statistics extends GCSE probability and data handling and introduces new topics such
as Normal, Poisson and Binomial Distributions, Correlation and Hypothesis Testing.
Emphasis is placed on applying mathematics to real-world situations.

Decision Mathematics is a study of algorithms and their application.

Some universities require additional mathematics beyond A level to undertake an
undergraduate course in maths. To facilitate this, we provide additional modules in one
option block and students would be required to do both statistics and mechanics in year
12 and either statistics or mechanics, Decision Mathematics and Further Pure in Year
13 to obtain an AS in Further Mathematics.

Learning Methods: Core Mathematics is taught by one teacher, each area of Applied
Mathematics by another and course content is taught by topic according to syllabus
modules. Questions are set on a regular basis to be completed individually and follow
up lessons are often in the form of a tutorial. Students are encouraged to discuss
problem solving strategies with teachers and fellow students.

Assessment: Assessment is by a written examination paper for each of 6 modules.
All papers are of one and a half hours duration and carry 72 marks.
Module examinations are taken throughout the course (in January and June in Years 12
and 13). It is possible to re-take modules in the Further Maths option. Four modules are
taken in Year 12, the best three modules are used for an A/S Level qualification,
completed in Year 12.

Entry Requirements: It is important that students have at least a very high grade B in
Mathematics GCSE as a minimum qualification and to have studied the GCSE Higher
Level syllabus. In addition to this, it will require a great deal of work and time over the 2
year course to succeed. An aptitude for algebra is vital at this level.

Career Opportunities: Accountancy, banking, engineering, teaching, computer science,
financial consultant, actuary, marketing consultant.
 Staff Contacts: Miss M Pratley, Mr A Williams, Mr P Martin
                                             21
                                MEDIA STUDIES
Course Aims: To foster an understanding of media products, the practices which lead
to their production, the institutions in which they are produced and the audiences who
consume them. Candidates will be given the opportunity to work with media
technologies in imaginative and inventive ways.

Course Content: In AS Unit 1: Investigating the Media, candidates will investigate the
media in order to reach an understanding of how meanings and responses are created.
The contemporary media landscape and its changing contexts will be studied in terms
of texts, platforms and technologies. This unit is assessed by examination (90 mins) in
June.
 In Unit 2: Creating Media, students will produce coursework of two linked media
artefacts taken from two of the media platforms studied in Unit 1 with a single,
accompanying evaluation and pre-production folder.

At A2, in Unit 3: Critical Perspectives, Candidates are encouraged to examine the
media in a less formulaic way and develop their understanding of the media and its
influential role in society, as well as debating major contemporary media issues. This
unit is assessed by examination (90 mins) in June.
Unit 4: Research and Production (coursework) involves in-depth research of a media
theme/text and leads to a production piece which reflects the candidate’s findings.
At both AS and A2, Examinations account for 50% of the assessment, and Coursework
for 50%. AS modules each count for 25% of the total A2 grade.

Learning Methods: Media texts will be analysed both in class and independently.
Students will be expected to take an active part in discussion, and to make detailed
notes, which will contribute to regular essays and projects. Students will be introduced
to the use of media equipment.

Entry Requirements: Prospective candidates should have acquired the skills and
knowledge associated with study at GCSE level and attained a C grade in English. Prior
study of the media is helpful but not essential. Clearly, an interest in the mass media will
be important, but creative flair, good I.T. skills and experience in the Creative Arts
(Music, Drama, Art) would be a definite advantage.

Career Opportunities: Knowledge of the media is increasingly valued and is becoming
an important aspect of work in most institutions in our ‘information society’. AS/A2
Media Studies should therefore be of value to candidates entering employment across a
wide range of industries and professions, particularly journalism, marketing, advertising,
television, film, radio and theatre.

Staff Contact: Mr J Beynon




                                            22
 MODERN LANGUAGES – FRENCH, GERMAN and SPANISH
Course Aims: Most of the teaching will take place in the Target Language with the aim
of developing in students a range of practical skills which will enable them to
communicate in spoken and written German, French or Spanish for a variety of
purposes in daily life, society and the working world. Students are also encouraged to
increase their awareness of current events and cultural matters in the target country and
to extend them to include other German, French and Spanish speaking countries. It also
aims to train students in the study skills which will allow them to study the Language at a
higher level or to learn other Languages.

Course Content

ADVANCED SUBSIDIARY
The Advanced Subsidiary is assessed at a standard appropriate for candidates who
have completed the first year of a two year A-Level Course and is therefore between
GCSE and A-Level. It forms the first half of the A-Level in terms of teaching time and
content and is worth 50% towards the final A-Level. It may be taken as a stand-alone
qualification or can be combined with the second half of the course. In the present
climate, where a Modern Language qualification is a real asset in professional life, this
course provides the ideal opportunity for students who are able linguists but who do not
wish to study for the full A-Level.

Topics covered in Year 12 will include:
 Media: television, advertising, communication technology
 Popular Culture: cinema, music, fashion/trends
 Healthy Living/Lifestyle: sport/exercise, health & well being, holidays
 Family/Relationships: relationships within the family. friendships,
   marriage/partnerships

Assessment:
Units are tested in June and take the following form:
                                                                     % of A.S
Unit 1 - Listening, Reading & Writing (2 hours)                      70%
Unit 2 - Speaking (35 mins including 20 mins preparation time)       30%


ADVANCED LEVEL
Students wishing to enter for the full A-Level will continue in Year 13 and will study the
following topics:

             The Environment: pollution, energy, protecting the planet
             The Multicultural Society: immigration, integration, racism
             Contemporary Social issues: wealth & poverty, law & order, impact of
             scientific & technological progress

Two cultural topics from a choice of:
             A target language-speaking region/community
             A period of 20th century history from a target language-speaking country
             A novelist from a target language-speaking country
             A dramatist/poet
             A director, architect, musician, painter
                                            23
Assessment:
                                                               % of total A level marks
Unit 3 – Listening, Reading & Writing     (2½ hours)                          35%


Unit 4 – Speaking    (35 mins including 20 mins preparation time)            15%


Learning Methods: Topics are taught and discussed almost entirely in the target
language, the informal approach and small group-size encouraging a large degree of
oral work. In addition, emphasis is placed on the acquisition of a sound knowledge of
grammar and the ability to produce accurate and idiomatic written work. Reading and
listening skills are also trained, the latter by frequent use of the multi-media room, where
students will be able to improve their aural and oral skills. Students also have weekly
sessions with a Foreign Language Assistant. We also develop self-supported study
skills, encouraging students to pursue a topic independently.

It is considered most important for students wherever possible to spend a period of time
in a German French or Spanish speaking country during their A-Level course. The
School and the County offer opportunities for visits and of course students may plan
their own. Several students have chosen to do their year 12-work experience abroad. At
this level languages cannot be studied in a vacuum and students are expected to be
aware of developments in Great Britain and Europe, against which the study of A-Level
topics achieves real relevance. This course is for keen students with a real interest in
Languages and the countries where it is spoken.

Entry Requirements: The course is for motivated students with B or above at GCSE in
Languages.

Career Opportunities: A wide range of career opportunities, particularly when linked to
another area such as Management Studies, Accountancy, Law, IT or Engineering.
Students who do not wish to pursue their studies to degree level will find that an A-Level
qualification will prove extremely useful in a large number of jobs.

Staff Contacts: Mrs D Wateridge, Mr D Rushworth, Mrs Millar




                                             24
                                       MUSIC
Course Content

The new AS and A level are now linked more closely to what has been studied at GCSE.
It allows students to perform, compose, listen and study in detail many different styles
and forms of music.

The course is broken up into Units and is an extension of the main study areas
encountered at GCSE. Some new skills are required and the depth of study is
increased. The course is made up of a mixture of coursework and exam papers. Some
are assessed internally and then sent off to examiners.

Learning Methods:

Teaching groups are small so extensive individual assistance and tuition is available.

Assessment
Below are listed the areas of study.

The % weighting shows what the marks are if you study the Unit as an AS level and then
what it would be if you go on to complete the full A level in the second year.

Unit   Level      Name                                Duration           Weighting
                                                                        AS       A
1      AS         Performing: Solo &/or Ensemble      5 – 6 min. total 30%    15%
                  performance programme               time
2      AS         Composing: 1 composition            Coursework       30%    15%
                  responding to 1 of 4 briefs.
3      AS         Developing Musical                  2 hour exam       40%     20%
                  Understanding Listening Exam
4      A2         Extending Performance: Solo         12 – 15 min.      30%     15%
                  &/or Ensemble programme             total time
5      A2         Composition & Technical Study       Coursework        30%     15%

6      A2         Further Musical Understanding       2 hour exam       40%     20%
                  Unit 3 & 6 includes set works

Entry Qualifications:

Grade A* - C at GCSE level or other proof of musical ability, Grade 5 – 8 on an
instrument as an example.

Career Opportunities

With 8% of GDP being connected to the UK’s music industry, career opportunities are
endless. There are many different kinds of Music degree courses now on offer. Some
focus on performance skills whilst others focus on composing, music technology or
music business. Music is also highly regarded as a good 3rd or 4th A Level if you intend to
study another subject at university.

Staff Contact: Mr L James
                                           25
                          PHYSICAL EDUCATION
 Course Aims:
     (a) provide a knowledge and understanding of the conceptual basis, structure
     and function of a selection of physical education activities;
     (b) develop understanding and problem solving skills;
     (c) develop planning and practical skills for effective performance;
     (d) foster an ability to relate practice to theory and theory to practice;
     (e) develop an understanding of the scientific, socio-cultural and
     environmental factors, which influence physical education;
     (f) provide an experience, which is valuable, both as a means of personal
     development and as a foundation for employment or more advanced study.

Course Content:
The course is composed of four modules.
The students in year 12 follow modules 1 and 2, and the students in year 13 follow
modules 3 and 4.

Module 1. (G451) An Introduction to Physical Education.
       This module has three sections.
(a) Anatomy and Physiology. The structure and function of the human body of the
       human body and how it influences physical performance.
(b) Acquiring Movement Skills. The process of how and why performers develop
       physical skills.
(c) Socio-Cultural Studies in Relation to Participation in Physical Activity. The
       history, development and current issues which have shaped sport and
       physical education.
       Practical.

Module 2. (G452) Acquiring, Developing and Evaluating Practical Skills in PE.
     Students are assessed in two activities. The assessment reflects their ability
     to demonstrate specific skills in a conditioned competitive environment. The
     students are also assessed in their proficiency at evaluating the performance
     of others – this element of the course is assessed orally.

 Module 3. (G453) Principles and Concepts Across Different Areas of PE.
       This module also has three sections.
(a) Historical Studies in Physical Education and Sport. Detailed analysis of how
       physical education and sport have developed from pre-industrial Britain to the
       present day.
(b) Psychology of Sport. How a performer’s mental processes and personality
       influence physical performance.
(c) Exercise Physiology. How the human body performs and responses to physical
       activity.

Module 4 (G454) Practical Skills
     This module is similar to module 2 as students are again assessed in two
     activities. However the assessment in this module reflects how effective they
     themselves are in a full competitive situation. Their perception of
     performance through observation and analysis is again examined orally.


                                             26
Learning Methods:
      Practical work in appropriate settings and theory work involving personal
      research, discussion, investigation and lectures with the possibility of external
      visits in support of theory.

Assessment:
     Modular. Modules are normally assessed in June with an opportunity to
     retake in January of the following year. The exception to this is modules 2
     and 4. These constitute the coursework element of the course and
     assessment is internal (with external moderation) and ongoing.

Entry Requirements:
      High level of motivation, is required, the course is only 40% practical as
      opposed to 60% at GCSE! Under normal circumstances, Grade CC in
      science. A GCSE in physical education is preferable but not essential.

Career Opportunities:
     Access to higher education, physical education, sports coaching, the health
     and fitness industry, sports science, recreation management, and the leisure
     industry (a boom area!). Very useful for anyone wishing to enter the services.

IMPORTANT: A level physical education is academically comparable to ANY other
     A level and is now treated as such by employers or institutes of higher
     education.

Staff Contact:      Mr D Graham.




                                              27
                                        PHYSICS
Course aims:
The course aims to provide a stimulating and worthwhile programme of study which will
broaden your understanding of the physical world around you. It develops your logical
thought processes and problem solving skills. The course is based on applications of
physics in the everyday world and beyond. The Specification is Edexcel Physics and full
details are available on the Edexcel website, www.edexcel.org.uk
Course Content:
AS
Unit 1: Physics on the go
You will learn about motion, forces, energy, power, flow of liquids, viscosity and properties
of materials. Applications that use these concepts include sports, theme parks, the
production of sweets and biscuits and spare-part surgery.
Unit 2: Physics at work
You will learn about electricity, waves, refraction, polarisation, diffraction and the nature of
light. The content of this unit is related to applications that include medical physics, music
and solar cells.
Unit 3: Exploring physics coursework
Visits to a theme park and a food production plant are followed up with a practical
assessment in the school laboratories.
A2
Unit 4: Physics on the move
This unit is related to applications that include transport, communications and display
techniques. It also covers the physics behind the particle physics experiments at CERN.
Unit 5: Physics from creation to collapse
You will learn about the physics behind building in earthquake zones and astrophysics and
cosmology.
Unit 6: Experimental physics coursework
A practical assessment carried out in school.
Learning Methods:
The course involves practical experiments, data-logging and ICT activities, group work, visits
and talks from outside speakers.
The text book comes with an interactive CD to support learning.
Assessment Y12:
 Units 1 & 2 are assessed by written papers (80 minutes). The papers will contain objective,
short and longer questions.
Unit 3 consists of a visit report followed by a practical write up.
Assessment Y13:
Units 4 & 5 are assessed in 95 minute written papers. The papers will contain objective,
short and longer questions.
Unit 6 involves a practical assessment and experiment report.
Entry requirements:
Students must have a BB in Science (double award). The course requires students to have
good maths skills and, therefore, students should have grade B ability in GCSE
Mathematics.
Career Opportunities:
Physics A-level allows you to follow a wide variety of University and career paths
(mathematics may be required for some of these options).
These include: Communications, Engineering, Meteorology, Medical imaging and
radiography, Astrophysics and cosmology, Nuclear science, Materials science
Visit http://learningphysics.iop.org/beyond_school/careers/index.html for further information
on careers in physics.



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Staff contacts: Mrs J Flaherty, Mr D Watson
                                     PSYCHOLOGY
      Course Aims:
      This course will enable students to:
           Understand psychological theories and methods used to collect data.
           Explore topics which reflect contemporary issues.
           Explore different areas of psychology, including cognitive, social and
              physiological psychology.
           Replicate key studies/ experiments in psychology. Interpret data and evaluate
              the findings.
           Gain awareness of the ethical issues in psychology, particularly in the field of
              research.
           Enhance their critical thinking.
      The course will appeal to students who:
           Enjoy exploring issues dealing with how and why people behave in certain
              ways.
           Want to find out more about the link between people’s behaviour, their
              environment and physiology.
           Want a course that will complement other AS and A levels such as English,
              Business Studies, Sociology, Biology and Sports Studies.
      Course Content: THE SPECIFICATION FOLLOWED IS AQA
      The AS is the first half of the full A level course and consists of two examined units:
      The AS specification has 2 units:
      Assessment:
      Unit 1: Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology and Research
           Cognitive psychology, including memory and eyewitness testimony.
           Developmental psychology, including early social development, attachment
              and the effects of day care.
           Research methods.
      Unit 2: Biological Psychology, Social Psychology and Individual Differences
           Biological psychology, including stress, factors affecting stress and managing
              stress.
           Social psychology, including majority and minority influence, obedience and
              independent behaviour.
           Individual differences, including definitions of abnormality, approaches and
              therapies.
      The A2 specification has 2 units:
      Unit 3: Topics in Psychology e.g.
      Biological rhythms and sleep, Relationships, Aggression, Eating behaviour or
      Gender.
      Unit 4: Psychopathology, Psychology in Action and Research Methods
      Biological approach, behaviourism, social learning theory, cognitive, psychodynamic
      and humanistic approaches
      Comparison of approaches and debates in psychology.
      Methods in psychology, inferential statistics, issues in research.
      Entry Requirements:
      Students will need sound literacy and numeracy skills. Grade C is required in both
      Maths and English. Enjoying debates would be an advantage as examinations
      require considering a range of explanations for behaviour and using research to
      evidence an answer.
      Students will need to be highly motivated to tackle a new and challenging subject.
      Career Opportunities



                                                29
Psychology is very widely accepted as a useful and valued A level in its own right.
If you wish to pursue Psychology you could: follow a degree course in Psychology,
Social Science, Medicine, Nursing, Business Management……. These are a small
selection of courses with direct links to psychology.

Staff Contact: Miss G Daniels




                                         30
      RELIGIOUS STUDIES (AS Ethics & A2 Philosophy)

ETHICS

Course Aims: Ethics is about moral choices, the values that lie behind them, the reasons
people give for them and the language they use to describe them. The aim of the course is
to develop a questioning attitude, and to raise awareness of the role of ethics in modern
society. The applied ethics component will complement other subjects studied at A level,
both in arts and sciences.

Course Content: A study of ethical language: the different meanings which scholars
have given to terms such as “good”, “bad”, “right” and “wrong”. What is conscience? Are
we really free? Students will study in detail: Moral Relativism, Natural Law, Categorical
Imperativism and Utilitarianism. Applied ethics includes topics on abortion, euthanasia,
sexuality, genetic engineering, environmental ethics and war.

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Course Aims: As with the ethics course, the aim is to develop within students an
enquiring mind, open to debate on a range of related topics.

Course Content:
Philosophy of Religion focuses on two areas; the traditional arguments for the existence of
God, and challenge to religious belief (examining the issue of evil, faith, the function of
religious belief within society, and the challenge facing religion today).

Learning Methods:
 Mostly through discussion (students will be expected to prepare for this in advance). They
will need to be up to date with current affairs and issues raised by the media. Students will
find that they can also draw on ideas from literature and drama as well as topics covered in
science, history or business studies. It is important that they enjoy reading and are
prepared to use private study for independent research. Students will benefit from the
emphasis placed on developing essay style and technique.

Assessment:
    AS Philosophy of Religion
    Candidates are required to answer two two-part essay questions from a choice of
    four in a 90 minute written paper
    AS Religious Ethics
    Candidates are required to answer two two-part essay questions from a choice of
    four in a 90 minute written paper
    A2 Philosophy of Religion
    Candidates are required to answer two open essay style questions from a choice of
    four in a 90 minute written paper
    A2 Religious Ethics Candidates are required to answer two open essay style
    questions from a choice of four.

Entry Requirements:
GCSE grade B or above in English is preferred.

Career Opportunities: This course will be useful for anyone wanting to pursue a career in
law, medicine, journalism, management, research, nursing, teaching and social services.




                                                31
Staff Contacts: Mrs A Carr, Mr J Sanderson




                                             32
                            SOCIOLOGY

Course Aims:
This course will enable students to:
 Understand sociological theories, research studies and the methods used
   to collect data.
 Explore topics which reflect contemporary issues.
 Gain an understanding of society’s influence on the individual.
 Gain an understanding of their role in society.
 Develop analytical skills.

The course will appeal to students who:
 Want to find out more about the society in which we live.
 Enjoy discussing sociological issues, such as inequality, wealth and
   poverty, socialisation, culture and identity.
 Want a course that will complement other AS and A levels such as
   English, Psychology, History, Ethics and Business Studies.

Course Content:
THE SPECIFICATION FOLLOWED IS AQA
The AS specification has 2 units.
Unit 1: Culture and Identity; Families and Households; Wealth, Poverty and
Welfare.
Unit 2: Education; Health; Sociological Methods.

Assessment:
These topics will also be assessed by examination.
The A2 half of the course leading to the full A-level will consist of studying
‘Beliefs’ or the mass media, their functions for society and the individual. In
addition, Crime and Deviance forms a major area for review.

Entry Requirements:
Students will need sound literacy and numeracy skills – a grade B or above in
English Language is preferred. Sociology involves being able to analyse
society and express ideas clearly and accurately, therefore an interest in
current affairs would be beneficial.

Career Opportunities
Sociology is a popular A-level and degree subject. It is accepted for
admission to a wide range of university degree courses in the Social Sciences
(including Social Policy, Social Work and Education.), the Arts, Humanities
and Business Studies. It is also accepted for training courses in Health and
Social Care, Personnel Management, Leisure and Tourism, Journalism, the
Police, the Legal profession and similar careers.

Staff Contact: Miss G Daniels




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