Civics Standards1 by JAW3HH

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									                            Lincoln Public Schools
                                   Civics
         Standards, Objectives, and Indicators
                            Pacing Guide

                             The Role of the Citizen in a
Standard CIV 1                Democratic Government
                                                                  3 Weeks

                             The U.S. Constitution and
Standard CIV 2                 Federal Government
                                                                  5 Weeks

                                History and Politics of
Standard CIV 3                 State, Tribal, and Local
                                                                  5 Weeks
                                    Governments

                                       Total Time:            15 Weeks
The standards, objectives, and indicators are designed to be completed in fifteen
weeks. The remaining time, either at the end of the semester, or at the end of each
unit, should be spent on classroom performance projects and assessments such as:
We the People hearings, Project Citizen or other community service, mock trial,
student vote, or character education. This will also accommodate modified
schedules for assemblies and school activities.

We the People: - Middle School – Congressional hearings
http://www.civiced.org/wethepeople.php

We the People: Project Citizen
http://www.civiced.org/project_citizen.php

Nebraska High School Mock Trial Project
http://www.nebarfnd.org/education.htm#Mock%20Trial

Character Counts!
http://www.charactercounts.org/


Civics                                  2004 - 2005                      Page 1 of 5
Lincoln Public Schools
                                   Civics
                     Overview of Standards

CIV1 The Role of the Citizen in a Democratic Government

         After concluding CIVICS 1, students will understand the foundations
         of democracy in the United States, and the relationship of the citizen
         to a participatory government.

CIV2. The United States Constitution and Federal Government

         After concluding CIVICS 2, students will understand the U.S.
         Constitution and federal government.


CIV3. History and Politics of State, Tribal, and Local Governments

         After concluding CIVICS 3, students will understand the political and
         historical development of Nebraska, as well as Nebraska’s state,
         tribal, county, and capital city governments.

                     ***CRT administered during finals week




Civics                               2004 - 2005                        Page 2 of 5
                                 Lincoln Public Schools
                                         Civics
         Standards, Objectives, and Indicators
After concluding Civics, students will understand:

CIV1 The Role of the Citizen in a Democratic Government.
         Students are able to:

1.1 Describe government.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Defining government.
     Defining sovereignty/popular sovereignty.
     Explaining the purpose of government, rule of law (constitution), and state of nature
       (anarchy).
     Explaining the concept of higher law, limited and unlimited government.
     Identifying these forms of government: totalitarian; oligarchy; absolute and constitutional
       monarchy; dictatorship; representative and direct democracy.

1.2 Describe the nature and role of the citizen
       Students may indicate this by:
     Defining civics.
     Describe who are U.S. citizens and the process of becoming a citizen.
     Describing the importance of personal responsibilities, e.g., accepting consequences,
       adhering to moral principles, etc.
     Describing the importance of civic responsibilities, e.g., election process, legal process,
       etc.
     Demonstrating rules of order, e.g., calling class meetings, mock congress, etc.
     Demonstrating the relationship between informed citizens and community issues, e.g.,
       community service, social/political action, etc.

1.3 Explain the importance of information awareness to the role of the citizen.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Identifying local, state, national, and international current events relevant to being an
       informed citizen.
     Analyzing information sources, e.g., local newspaper, Internet, the British Broadcast
       Corporation, etc.
     Explaining the impact of personal perspectives of reporting current events, e.g., analyze
       the same news story from a variety of sources.




Civics                                      2004 - 2005                                 Page 3 of 5
CIV2 The U.S. Constitution and Federal Government.
       Students are able to:
2.1 Describe the development and framework of the U.S. Constitution.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Listing events that led to the development of the U.S. government as a representative
       democracy.
     Describing the rationale for separation of powers and checks and balances and how these
       systems prevent abuse of power.
     Describing the concept of federalism.
     Identifying the six purposes of the U.S. in the Preamble.
     Identifying the seven articles of the U.S. Constitution.
     Identifying the purpose for the Bill of Rights (amendments 1-10) and additional
       amendments.

2.2 Describe the structure, membership, and constitutional powers given to the legislative
branch.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Describing the two-lawmaking bodies of Congress, e.g., qualifications for membership,
       length of term, etc.
     Identifying powers of Congress, e.g., delegated, implied, etc.
     Describing the organization of Congress, e.g., leadership, committees, two party
       structure, etc.
     Defining legislative vocabulary, e.g., lobbyist, cloture, etc.
     Outlining how a bill becomes a law.
     Describing how governments raise money to pay for its operations and services at all 3
       levels, e.g., national, state and local.

2.3 Describe the structure, membership, and constitutional powers given to the executive
branch.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Identifying the qualifications, length of term, and pay and benefits for the president and
       vice-president.
     Describing the powers, and roles of the president.
     Listing the order of presidential succession.
     Describing executive bureaucracy, e.g., the cabinet, independent agencies, etc.

2.4 Describe the structure, membership, and constitutional powers given to the judicial
branch.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Identifying the constitutional and legislative basis for the U.S. judicial system.
     Defining types of laws and jurisdictions, e.g., civil law, appellate, etc.
     Describing the establishment of judicial review by Marbury v. Madison.
     Identifying the organization and specialized purpose of the federal courts and the
       selection of judges.
     Defining judicial vocabulary, e.g., precedents, dissenting opinions, etc.




Civics                                     2004 - 2005                                 Page 4 of 5
CIV3 History and Politics of State, Tribal, and Local Governments.
        Students are able to:
3.1 Identify major historical and political events prior to Nebraska statehood.
        Students may indicate this by:
     Identifying early inhabitants of present-day Nebraska.
     Listing motivations for competition among European nations for control of land in
        present-day Nebraska.
     Describing how the United States acquired and managed land that is now Nebraska, e.g.,
        territory of Indiana, Louisiana Purchase, etc.
     Describing how treaties diminished the power of Nebraska’s tribal nations.
     Describing events that led to Nebraska’s status as a territory and a state, e.g., the Kansas-
        Nebraska Act, location of the state capital, etc.

3.2 Describe Nebraska’s state government.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Describing the history, purpose and structure of Nebraska’s State Constitution.
     Describing the history, organization, membership and constitutional powers of
       Nebraska’s unicameral legislature.
     Describing how a bill becomes law through Nebraska’s unicameral.
     Describing the organization, membership and constitutional powers of Nebraska’s
       executive branch of government.
     Describing the organization, membership and constitutional powers of Nebraska’s
       judicial branch of government.
     Describing how Nebraska’s citizens can directly influence government, e.g., initiative,
       referendum, and recall.

3.3 Describe tribal governments in Nebraska.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Identifying Nebraska’s four federally recognized sovereign Native American nations.
     Describing the political structure of Nebraska’s Native American nations.
     Listing the powers of Nebraska’s tribal court systems.
     Explaining the relationship between Nebraska’s sovereign Native American nations and
       the U.S. government.

3.4 Describe local governments in Lancaster County.
       Students may indicate this by:
     Defining local government vocabulary, e.g., municipalities, special district, etc.
     Identifying other forms of local governments, e.g., commission, council – manager, etc.
     Describing the structure, elected, and appointed officials and powers of government in
       Lancaster County, e.g., municipalities, counties, etc.
     Identifying the purpose of Lincoln, Nebraska’s charter – home rule.
     Describing the structure, elected, and appointed officials, and powers of Lincoln,
       Nebraska’s city government.
     Describing the process of passing an ordinance in Lincoln’s City Council.




Civics                                      2004 - 2005                                  Page 5 of 5

								
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