Strategic Plan Narrative Responses by vlfpl2

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 45

									                 3-5 Year Strategic Plan
                 This document includes Narrative Responses to specific questions
                 that grantees of the Community Development Block Grant, HOME
                 Investment Partnership, Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS
and Emergency Shelter Grants Programs must respond to in order to be compliant
with the Consolidated Planning Regulations.



GENERAL

Executive Summary

The Executive Summary is required. Include the objectives and outcomes identified
in the plan and an evaluation of past performance.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Executive Summary:

The City of Biddeford has worked diligently to develop a Consolidated Plan that
meets the requirements for submission to the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development, while at the same time is aimed at addressing the community
development needs of the City's low and moderate income population.

Particular attention has been given to formulating a program that provides needed
public services and improvements to public facilities and infrastructure in the City's
oldest downtown neighborhoods.

Special efforts have also been made to develop a Consolidated Plan that is
comprehensible and workable for the community at large.

While the City has formulated a multi-dimensional action plan aimed at addressing a
variety of important needs, a principal focus of CDBG funds is on upgrading public
facilities serving LMI neighborhoods (e.g. streets, sidewalks, park improvements,
etc.). The need for such improvements is well documented and due to budget
constraints and competing demands, such needs are not likely to be addressed for
years and decades to come.

Biddeford's Consolidated Plan is comprised of a housing and community development
analysis, a three-year strategic plan from 2005 to 2008, and a one-year action plan.
The City will submit an annual action plan, a new plan in the third year, and annual
Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Reports to chart progress and ensure
activities are on target. The plan may be amended at any time and the process for
amendments, as well as citizen participation is stated in the Citizen Participation Plan
that was adopted in March 2005 by the City Council.

The Citizens Advisory Committee and the citizens of Biddeford have through public
hearings, meetings with city staff, social services, housing authorities, drive by
surveys and the media, determined that the highest priority is public
infrastructure/facilities, followed equally by social services, housing and economic
development. This multi-faceted approach along with job creation for LMI persons is
a pervading theme throughout the other three categories. The CAC felt that



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    1                        Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


infrastructure and public facilities, social services, housing projects and economic
development over the next three years should create economic opportunities
whenever possible for LMI persons, in order to provide a transition to a sustainable
improved quality of life. Examples are social service programs that are educational in
nature, and housing and infrastructure improvements that create a better
environment for health, safety and the ability to access businesses, jobs and services
in the downtown core.

While the City addresses its housing issues during the first year of the Plan,
infrastructure and public facility improvements, and beautification projects in LMI
neighborhoods will address not only access and safety issues, but will enhance the
sense of "wholeness" in the community. In addition, an adult education retraining
program, senior advocate, and childcare and dental clinic will target a wide variety of
needs for all age groups of the community over the next three years. Also, the
purchase of a van for LMI youth and seniors to enable access to services and
programs will also provide the possible spin-off of additional mentoring and mixed
age related activities.

During the second and third years of the plan, a downtown facade program will begin
to address blighted buildings by enabling present and potential businesses
opportunities that until now have been unaffordable. Revitalization and business
attraction efforts are beginning through the partnership of the City and "Heart of
Biddeford", a downtown attraction and revitalization non-profit corporation.
Attracting and retaining long term businesses to the downtown, as well as growing
the local entrepreneurial sector is a focus of the partnership to enable job creation.

In conjunction with the downtown projects is the formulation of a conceptual
redevelopment plan for Biddeford's mill complex. As in many cities across the U.S.,
the redevelopment of old mill structures is a major challenge. Located in the
downtown, these mills are an integral piece in the revitalization strategy of
Biddeford.

A flexible community in the midst of change, Biddeford's various agencies and
organizations continue to seek solutions by sharing resources, searching for
innovative funding sources and project/program collaboration, to enable the
Consolidated Plan to be a viable tool kit for the next three years and beyond.

Strategic Plan

Due every three, four, or five years (length of period is at the grantee’s discretion)
no less than 45 days prior to the start of the grantee’s program year start date.
HUD does not accept plans between August 15 and November 15.

Mission:

"To create a Strategic Plan that enhances the community and economic development
of the City of Biddeford through targeted public facility and infrastructure
improvements, social services, housing, economic development projects and
activities that benefit residents, including low to moderate income persons and
special population groups."




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    2                        Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


CITY OF BIDDEFORD
CONSOLIDATED PLAN

PRIORITIES, OBJECTIVES AND ACTIONS


Priorities are listed in the order in which they rank (highest Priority #1, etc.) Each is
addressed within the Consolidated Plan and Year 1 Action Plan and are part of the
multifaceted approach to addressing the City’s issues.

Priority 1 - To eliminate slum and blight in the downtown area through infrastructure
and public facilities improvements that benefit LMI neighborhoods.

Objective 1 - Increase access and provide public facilities that provide for the health
and safety of LMI neighborhoods.

         Actions:    1. Implement sidewalk, street paving and beautification projects in
                      LMI neighborhoods for safe and adequate access to services and
                      facilities.

                      2. Implement park and vacant lot developments in LMI
                       neighborhoods for safe and adequate recreation needs.

                      3. Provide transportation for LMI citizens to services and
                       community programs.

Objective 2 - Increase business attraction and the elimination of slum and blight
through the implementation of downtown improvements.

         Actions:     1. Provide loan/grant assitance to commercial property owners in
                       the downtown core along with design assistance for a Downtown
                       Program.

                      2. Develop a plan for redevelopment of the mills and adjacent
                       downtown area.


Priority 2 - To provide a strategy to meet the increasing need for transitional to
affordable and supportive housing.

Objective 1 - Increase the supply of affordable housing for low to moderate-income
persons.

          Actions:     1. Consider making the City's "surplus" and/or tax acquired real
                       estate available for the development of affordable housing.

                      2. Consider revisions to the City's zoning and land use standards
                       which would provide incentives, e.g. density bonuses for the
                       development of affordable housing.

                      3. In partnership with other public/private parties, explore the
                       adaptive re-use and redevelopment of non-residential properties,
                       e.g. mills, into affordable housing.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                       3                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



Objective 2 - Increase opportunities for homeownership for low and moderate
income persons.

          Actions: 1. Consider a partnership with other public/private organizations
                    to pool resources to help finance home ownership, e.g. down
                    payments, loan assistance, mortgage interest rate write-downs,
                    and other financing mechanisms.

Objective 3 - Preserve and upgrade the City's housing stock serving low to moderate
income persons.

          Actions: 1. Consider establishment of low interest loan programs to help
                    finance the rehabilitation of the City's downtown housing stock.

                      2. Undertake a systematic and concentrated program of code
                       enforcement to ensure life - safety standards are met and to
                       prevent blighting influences on neighbohoods.

                      3. Provide funding to low to moderate income homeowners for
                       improvements aimed at energy conservation.


Priority 3 - Implement strategies to aid the elderly and special needs populations in
access to information and services to increase health and safety and reduce reliance
of the City's overburdened Health and Welfare Department that can only provide
minimal assistance.

Objective 1: Improve the health and safety of the elderly.

          Actions: 1. Provide for an outreach elderly advocate through the City's
                    Health and Welfare Department to assist the elderly in accessing
                    programs and services such as Medicare D.


Priority 4 - Provide educational and work opportunities for homeless persons, LMI
and special needs populations that provide avenues to obtain jobs and/or better
paying jobs.

Objective 1 - Increase the economic prosperity of low to moderate income persons
and their ability to afford housing and health and safety amenities.

          Actions: 1. Provide opportunities for low to moderate income persons to
                    attend training and educational programs that can lead to higher
                    wages.

                      2. Provide child care programs that increase the opportunity for
                       low to moderate income persons to attend educational and
                       training programs.

                      3. Link local programs to institutions that would be the "next step"
                       for low to moderate income persons.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                       4                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



Priority 5 - To reinforce and strengthen the emergency shelter and transitional
housing system that is already in place which includes housing, counseling,
education and a wide variety of homeless, special needs and LMI assistance.

Objective 1 - Assist and work with the City's Health and Welfare Department,
volunteer organizations and agencies to seek collaborative efforts to assist homeless,
LMI and special needs populations in Biddeford.

          Actions:    1. Encourage network meetings of area resources and services.


* The following falls under all priority listings and pertains to special needs
populations thus giving it a stand alone Objective and Action.

Objective 1 - Provide for a seamless network of social services and assistance for
special needs populations.

          Actions:    1. Conduct a study to gather all social service information and
                       examine gaps in existing systems for all special needs population
                       groups (includes diagnostic, rehabilitative, educational, housing
                       and work opportunities).


General Questions

1. Describe the geographic areas of the jurisdiction (including areas of low income
   families and/or racial/minority concentration) in which assistance will be directed.

2. Describe the basis for allocating investments geographically within the
   jurisdiction (or within the EMSA for HOPWA) (91.215(a)(1)) and the basis for
   assigning the priority (including the relative priority, where required) given to
   each category of priority needs (91.215(a)(2)). Where appropriate, the
   jurisdiction should estimate the percentage of funds the jurisdiction plans to
   dedicate to target areas.

3. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs (91.215(a)(3)).

3-5 Year Strategic Plan General Questions response:

1. Geographic Area

Biddeford is bordered by the towns of Saco, Dayton, Arundel and Kennebunkport. It
is comprised of 30 square miles with a population of approximately 21,000 people.
Although benefits will be citywide, the concentration of this Plan's efforts will be in
the 30 block downtown area comprised of the following Block Groups: Tract 252_01
Block Group 4, Tract 252_01 Block Group 1, Tract 252_02 Block Group 1, Tract
252_02 Block Group 9, Tract 252_01 Block Group 3, Tract 252_01 Block Group 2,
Tract 252_02 Block Group 6, Tract 252_02 block Group 7, and Tract 252_02 block
Group 8 (see map attached). A majority of the Census Block Groups are comprised
of at least 51% low to moderate income households, with Tract 252_02 Block Group
1 at 77.9% LMI households and Tract 252_01 Block Group 1 at 85.9%. Only Tract
252_02 Block Group 8, Tract 252_02 Block Group 6 and Tract 252-01 Block Group 3


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                      5                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


are under the 51% LMI household requirement. However, it is believed that through
an income survey, if needed, these census blocks could qualify as over the 51%
requirement. Projects in the Plan are targeted to benefit LMI persons or are located
in LMI neighborhoods determined to have the greatest need and/or highest
percentage of LMI persons.

2. Basis for Assigning Priority

The City and Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) determined that after review of the
various projects/programs coming forward for funding that a three-year plan would
be the best course of action.

The CAC then tasked itself with reviewing the types of programs/projects being
developed on Community Development Project Worksheets available to any entity
through the Community Development Coordinator's Office. The CAC also reviewed
information gathered on "need" from City Departments, U.S. Census, the
Department of Health and Human Services, Housing Authorities, social service
organizations, and public hearings and comment.

Following this, the CAC made its recommendations and the City unanimously agreed
to fund Administration and Planning at 13% and social services at 9.8% the first
year. The remainder of the first year allocation would be divided amongst public
infrastructure/facility and community improvement projects.

The CAC felt that it would need a year to develop a comprehensive approach to
effectively examine and begin to address all the various housing issues and provide
economic development opportunities involving large-scale collaboration in years 2
and 3. It was also felt by the CAC that the visible results of public
infrastructure/facilities needed in the downtown core, such as sidewalks, pocket
parks, etc., would encourage greater participation and enthusiasm from citizens
during the first year.

The basis for allocating investments geographically in the downtown core area was
determined after the City and CAC examined the City's Capital Improvements
Program and maps of Census Blocks comprising the area. Highest priority was given
to infrastructure improvements including sidewalk construction and street paving
over the next three years on streets in LMI neighborhoods that are not covered
under the Capital Improvements Plan due to budget constraints. An additional
priority was given to LMI neighborhoods with public housing and senior complexes,
as well as those that have a high rate of foot traffic and no sidewalks. Park
improvements were also given highest priority in LMI neighborhoods where access to
a park is an important component of recreation.

In Social Services, the priority was a multifaceted approach involving programs
designed to assist all age groups, their families and the City. The first year this
included; an advocate to assist seniors to access programs and services, and a new
worker retraining program for adults through Adult Education to provide an avenue
to better paying jobs. The second year, an expanded childcare program and new
dental clinic is planned to enable parents the ability to participate in educational and
employment opportunities. These programs will be available to LMI persons
citywide.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                     6                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


3. Obstacles In Meeting Underserved Needs

The greatest obstacle to meeting underserved needs will be the restrictions due to
available staff and funding. The Community Development Coordinator currently is
tasked with the entire administration of the program. In addition, the demand for
social services is high in Biddeford and smaller organizations seeking support for
projects/programs may not be able to handle the strains of extra staff and costs
incurred to offer an expanded or new service. Also, the reality that only 15% of the
total allocation may be spent in the social services sector limits the amount of
activities that can be implemented. The Community Development Coordinator will
develop a system to gather the needs of these smaller organizations and encourage
collaborations and the seeking of other funds to supplement the stated needs.

Another obstacle is the spiraling increase in rental housing costs and lack of
affordability for persons of low to moderate income. Housing strategies such as the
possible conversion of vacant mill buildings into affordable housing will need to be
explored over the second year.

In addition, the City's Health and Welfare Department is overwhelmed in addressing
the basic shelter and food provisions of the homeless and families in desperate need.
A coalition of resource agencies is meeting regularly to initiate dialogue and assess
what services are available. Coordination of these services including educational
resources and programs to remove barriers that prevent persons from acquiring
services and employment will need to be developed, as well as coordination of
advocacy for these populations.


Managing the Process (91.200 (b))

1. Lead Agency. Identify the lead agency or entity for overseeing the development
   of the plan and the major public and private agencies responsible for
   administering programs covered by the consolidated plan.

2. Identify the significant aspects of the process by which the plan was developed,
   and the agencies, groups, organizations, and others who participated in the
   process.

3. Describe the jurisdiction's consultations with housing, social service agencies, and
   other entities, including those focusing on services to children, elderly persons,
   persons with disabilities, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families, and homeless
   persons.

    *Note: HOPWA grantees must consult broadly to develop a metropolitan-wide strategy and other
    jurisdictions must assist in the preparation of the HOPWA submission.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Managing the Process response:

l. Lead Agency

The Economic Development Department comprised of the Director and Community
Development Coordinator of the City of Biddeford will serve as the lead agent for the
Consolidated Plan planning process and implementation. The Economic Development
Department collaborated with City Departments, statistical bureaus, various



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                          7                           Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


organizations and citizens during the planning phase and will continue this process
throughout the Entitlement Program.

The Department will be responsible for all required documentation, training and
compliance issues with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and
will work with the CAC with full support from the City of Biddeford.

2. Process for Plan Development

On July 20th, 2004, the City Council of Biddeford voted unanimously to accept a
CDBG Entitlement Grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development. A Community Development Coordinator was hired to administer and
serve as the contact for the planning and implementation of the Consolidated Plan.
An educational effort was launched in February to provide information about the
program to the general public. A Citizens Participation Plan was drafted and a public
hearing was held on February 24th regarding the process by which citizens would
participate in the planning process. The City Council adopted the plan on March 15 th.
During this time, the Director of Economic Development and Community
Development Coordinator met with City staff, Public Works, Health and Welfare, the
Heart of Biddeford, a downtown revitalization program, Parks and Recreation, the
YMCA, Adult Education and Community Center staff to receive input regarding the
social and economic needs of the people. The Community Development Coordinator
did one on one information sharing in the downtown when the opportunity presented
itself regarding the program and public hearings. A driveby assessment of sidewalks
was conducted in LMI neighborhoods in February. A call for proposed projects was
implemented and entities were given a workable project worksheet to fill out and
submit.

Projects began to pour into the Department by early March and the CAC met to
review the initial flood of requests and gain a sense of need in the community. A
public hearing was held on March 10th to solicit citizens input for projects and
determine if any collaborations could be built between enitities. Meantime, the U.S.
Census Bureau and Maine State Housing Authority gave technical assistance to the
City for statisitcal analysis of the housing and homeless situation.

The CAC continued to work through March to assess and priortize the various
projects/programs suggested for inclusion in the Consolidated Plan. A folder was
started for projects not qualifying for CDBG funding in event resources could at some
point be found for the project/program. A draft plan was developed including the
itemized projects for the first year prioritized by the Project Review Criteria included
in this Plan. A public hearing was held on March 31st to receive input and comments
on the plan. This was followed by a 30-day comment period in which any comments
and input were taken into consideration. On April 5th the Biddeford Economic
Development Department gave a presentation to the City Council regarding the
proposed Consolidated Plan and First Year Annual Action Plan to receive input. The
final draft of the Plan was adopted by the City Council on May 3rd. The CAC met
March 15th to review Project/Program Review Criteria and review projects. They
then met on March 23rd to discuss the draft Consolidated Plan and review additional
submitted projects. They met again on April 20th to review any public comments and
review any changes or additions to the Plan. They also added additional criteria to
the Project/Program Review Criteria.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    8                        Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


One of the most significant aspects of the process was the grassroots participation
by citizens and those agencies participating in the CDBG process for the first time. A
significant moment came during a public hearing when one participant stated in an
emotional testimony how the child care an agency provided enabled her to attend
school.

3. Consultations

A survey was conducted as part of Biddeford's 1999 Comprehensive Plan. It queried
citizens to comment on many aspects of the community including public housing,
youth activities, elderly needs, etc. This survey was used as a baseline reference in
the development of the Consolidated Plan.

The City of Biddeford sponsored a meeting with area resource providers to meet and
share information about their programs and services they provide. The Community
Development Coordinator attended the meeting and received valuable information
regarding the pressing social service needs in the City including homelessness, the
elderly, and special needs groups.

The City's Health and Welfare Department met with the Economic Development
Department and provided comprehensive homeless data for the entire year. In
consultation with the York County Homeless Shelter, data was obtained on the
various shelter and transitional housing available. Various City departments such as
Recreation and the Public Works and Parks Director provided information on LMI
neighborhoods, needs, and current facilities, infrastructure and programs. The
Southern Maine Agency on Aging provided information on recent developments in
the Medicare system and the issues seniors and the elderly are facing. The Northern
York County YMCA and Catholic Charities of Maine provided information on child care
programs and who uses them. The YMCA had a great deal of information regarding
children and teen programs, including a bike mentoring program.

The Community Development Coordinator met in consultation with the "Heart of
Biddeford" Executive Director to receive input regarding the downtown. The Heart of
Biddeford is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation overseen by an active working board.
Four standing committees focus on Organization, Economic Restructuring,
Promotion, and Design to target downtown efforts with businesses and social service
agencies. The Heart of Biddeford anticipates becoming part of the National Main
Street Program. Information in the consultation ranged from availability of
employment opportunities for LMI persons, the presence of the creative economy
and entrepreneurial sector in Biddeford, and the existence of blighted conditions in
the downtown core. In addition, information was received regarding the mill
complex and what businesses are currently housed at various locations in the
complex.

On a broader scope, the Maine State Housing Authority provided assistance and
information regarding housing issues and assisted in the interpretation of data.
Regarding lead based paint issues, the Department of Human Services was contacted
and a report requested from the Childhood Lead Based Paint Prevention Program.
The Department provided data regarding lead based paint issues facing Maine and
Biddeford households and the interpretation of the data provided by HUD.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   9                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Citizen Participation (91.200 (b))

1. Provide a summary of the citizen participation process.

2. Provide a summary of citizen comments or views on the plan.

3. Provide a summary of efforts made to broaden public participation in the
   development of the consolidated plan, including outreach to minorities and non-
   English speaking persons, as well as persons with disabilities.

4. Provide a written explanation of comments not accepted and the reasons why
   these comments were not accepted.

*Please note that Citizen Comments and Responses may be included as additional files within the CPMP
Tool.
3-5 Year Strategic Plan Citizen Participation response:

1. Summary

The City of Biddeford continues to seek active citizen participation in the
development and implementation of the Consolidated Plan. Through prior CDBG
activities over the last 20 years, the City has developed long standing relationships
with housing authorities, non profit organizations, social service agencies and others
that provide services to low to moderate income persons, including special needs
populations. These entities also provide valuable information regarding needs and
current gaps in the delivery system that can affect economic prosperity and quality
of life for these population groups. The City will continue to seek the consultation of
these various entities and encourage their participation, as well as that of their
clients, at public hearings and meetings regarding the Consolidated Plan.

On February 24th a Public Hearing was held to solicit input on the Citizen's
Participation Plan (CP Plan). Prior to the hearing, copies of the CP Plan were taken to
the local library and were also available at City Hall. The notice was posted in "The
Journal Tribune" and "Courier". On March 10th, another Public Hearing was held to
solicit input for projects and programs for the Consolidated Plan. This hearing was
also posted in the local/regional papers. Another Public Hearing was held on March
31st, to solicit comments and input regarding the Consolidated Plan. Copies were
available at the library and City Hall. All public hearings were posted for 15 days
prior to being held and notices and agendas were posted at the main entrance to
City Hall, in the Clerk's Office, the library and at the Community Center. A thirty-day
comment period followed the hearing to receive input, comment and additional
information for the Plan.

Three citizens were also asked to be on the Citizens Advisory Committee. Amongst
these three volunteer citizens are representation encompassing LMI persons,
disabled, seniors, business, downtown residents and non-profit services.

2. Summary of Citizen Comments

See Appendices.

3. Efforts to Broaden Public Participation




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                           10                           Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Since July, 2004, the City has undertaken efforts to educate the public about the
Consolidated Plan and the process through a published summary of Biddeford's
CDBG history, how the Entitlement Program is different, the benefits, eligible
projects, and other major components for understanding "how it works". The first
step in citizen participation was to assist the City Council, Mayor and City Manager in
understanding the program and requirements. This process has been ongoing since
Entitlement status was received. The next step was to educate the citizens and
solicit their involvement in the planning process. Once a Community Development
Coordinator was hired in January, a Citizen Participation Plan was drafted and made
available to the public in February 2005. A Public Hearing was advertised to receive
comments on the plan of how citizens would participate and the notice stated where
copies could be obtained for review.

The Community Development Coordinator also met businesses in the downtown and
passed the information about the Entitlement Program in one-on-one introductions
whenever possible. An article appeared in the "Journal Tribune" on February 22 nd to
solicit interest. The Public Hearing on February 24th to receive input regarding the
Citizens Participation Plan was sparsely attended. Those that came wanted to talk
about projects. They were told that another Public Hearing would be held on March
10th for project proposal. The City encouraged those present to "get the word out"
and attend. It was felt that since the results of the citizen survey developed for the
current Comprehensive Plan were assessed, citizens have worked to move towards
the goals that evolved from the survey. These include youth activities, social
services, housing needs, economic development, public facilities and infrastructure
improvements, etc. Presently, citizens feel they are ready to move on to additional
projects that will immediately benefit and elevate the housing, social needs, public
infrastructure/facilities, and health and safety of residents. This no nonsense
approach to planning and project proposal is an important component and the
driving force behind the development of the Consolidated Plan. The Citizens
Participation Plan was adopted by the Town Council after a 15-day comment period
on March 15th.

The media had attended the hearing on February 24th and stated that they would
help get the word out by publishing an article about the program and a call for
projects. The article appeared in the "Courier" on March 3rd, encouraging citizens to
participate.

On March 10th, 2005, the City of Biddeford held a Public Hearing to receive projects
for the proposed funding. Fourteen people attended, more than the previous hearing.
Attendees were informed about the restrictions and requirements of the CDBG funds
and the process the CAC would use to evaluate and prioritize proposed projects and
programs. Attendees were encouraged to seek partnerships and collaborate
wherever possible. A total of five major projects and programs were received.
Another article appeared on March 28th in "The Journal" to keep the participation
growing.

Every citizen has and is encouraged to attend any public hearing. Organizations are
encouraged to inform clients about the program and encourage their attendance.
The meetings are handicap accessible and special accommodations are available
upon request for interpretive and other services.

After the March 15th Public Hearing, the CAC then met and prioritized the qualifying
projects based on a set of Project/Program Evaluation Criteria. However, no project


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   11                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


or activity proposed was deleted and all projects will be kept on file for future
consideration and searches for other funding will be conducted by the Community
Development Coordinator and the City's part time grant writer as time allows within
budget constraints. Citizens are continually encouraged to contact the Community
Development Coordinator with any projects they may wish to propose.

The Consolidated Plan was then drafted and made available 15 days before the
Public Hearing on March 31st. Drafts were available to citizens at the library and City
Hall. An Executive Summary was published in the paper and sent to neighboring
communities and the Biddeford Housing Authority. A 30-day comment period
ensued with presentation to the City Council on April 5th. The plan was adopted by
the City Council on May 3rd, followed by submission to HUD on May 5th. The Citizens
Participation Plan is included in Appendices and includes the processes by which
citizens can access and receive timely information regarding their Consolidated Plan,
the CAPER, Annual Action Plan and Complaint Process.

4. Comments Not Incorporated into the Plan

See Appendices.


Institutional Structure (91.215 (i))

1. Explain the institutional structure through which the jurisdiction will carry out its
   consolidated plan, including private industry, non-profit organizations, and public
   institutions.

2. Assess the strengths and gaps in the delivery system.

3. Assess the strengths and gaps in the delivery system for public housing, including
   a description of the organizational relationship between the jurisdiction and the
   public housing agency, including the appointing authority for the commissioners
   or board of housing agency, relationship regarding hiring, contracting and
   procurement; provision of services funded by the jurisdiction; review by the
   jurisdiction of proposed capital improvements as well as proposed development,
   demolition or disposition of public housing developments.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Institutional Structure response:

1. Institutional Structure

The City of Biddeford will be the lead and the coordinating institution responsible for
the implementation of the Consolidated Plan. The City Council will make decisions
on the allocation of CDBG funds. The City will work diligently to strengthen existing
partnerships and establish new networks with public and private entities to ensure
every available resource is used to leverage CDBG resources.

2. Strengths and Gaps - Delivery System

The delivery system the City will implement will be smooth and seamless between
municipal government, departments, public and private entities and citizens. Any
gaps will result from the need to keep citizens, especially those affected by CDBG
funding, engaged actively in the process. Keeping the reporting process to the


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    12                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Economic Development Department on track and educating various entities on "how
the program works" will be one of the goals to ensure organizations can then
educate their program clients. A major strength of the Consolidated Plan will be the
increased collaboration that the City plans to build upon its existing networks.
However, it will take work to ensure that the collaborations remain ongoing.

The City is confident that these new challenges will provide an opportunity to
capacity build its own economic and community development network and build
upon its knowledge from participation in CDBG programs over the last 25 years.


3. Strengths and Gaps - Public Housing

The strength’s in the delivery system for subsidized housing is the effective working
relationship between the Biddeford Housing Authority (BHA) and the City. Biddeford
Housing Authority administers the Section 8 Voucher program. There are currently
approximately 300 Section Vouchers being utilized in Biddeford at this time. The
BHA has 118 of those Vouchers in its own allocation through HUD, while the
remainder of the vouchers is being administered by BHA for other Housing Agencies.
The Authority is a political subdivision of the State, organized under 30 MSRSA. It is
governed by a board of six Commissioners who are appointed by the Mayor with
consent of the City Council. The Authority is an independent entity and accomplishes
its own hiring, procurement and contracting under policies established by its Board of
Commissioners. The Section 8 Voucher program is federally funded and is expected
to be consistent with the City’s Consolidated Plan. The BHA prepares its own five-
year Agency Plan with Annual Plan Updates.


Monitoring (91.230)

1. Describe the standards and procedures the jurisdiction will use to monitor its
   housing and community development projects and ensure long-term compliance
   with program requirements and comprehensive planning requirements.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Monitoring response:

The Community Development Coordinator will monitor each project for program
requirements and to ensure project completion. Training will be implemented for
subrecipients and close monitoring during the project implementation phase.
Subrecipient contracts, reporting materials and training materials have already been
received from the City of Portland for the City's use. Throughout all phases of the
Consolidated Plan, the City of Biddeford Planner will review projects and programs to
ensure that they are in compliance with the Comprehensive Plan. In addition, the
CAC will meet monthly to review current programs and any proposed changes in the
Consolidated Plan. The City Manager, Mayor and City Council will receive a monthly
report on the Plan's progress.

The City of Biddeford will submit a Comprehensive Annual Performance and
Evaluation Report (CAPER) to HUD as required annually. The report is a review of
how funding was used and projects/programs implemented during the previous
program year. The report will be submitted ninety days after the close of the City's
program year as required. The CAC will review the CAPER.



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                  13                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


The CAPER will be made available for 15 days for public review and comment. A
public notice advertised in "The Courier" and "Journal Tribune" will state where the
report can be viewed. After the 15-day comment period the report will be submitted
to HUD.

In addition, Performance Measurements will be developed during the first six months
of implementation of the Consolidated Plan and implemented to measure project
compliance and success at the end of the first year.


Priority Needs Analysis and Strategies (91.215 (a))

1. Describe the basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority
   needs.

2. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Priority Needs Analysis and Strategies response:

1. Basis for Assigning Priority

The City of Biddeford and the CAC as priviously described in the section General
Questions, number 2., prioritzed the categories of public infrastructure/facilities,
social services, housing and economic development. Public infrastructure/facilities
was the top priority followed by social services, housing and economic development
equally. Since projects in these categories were already being taken in by the
Community Development Coordinator the CAC developed seven Project/Program
Evaluation Criteria by which projects/programs were prioritized. After reviewing
several projects according to these criteria, the CAC felt that the criteria could be
applied to the categories of need, along with the consultations with various groups
and individuals, to avoid the necessity for another set of criteria. All the criteria are
considered of equal weight. They are as follows:



PROJECT/PROGRAM EVALUATION CRITERIA

1.     The degree to which the project/program qualifies under HUD required
objectives.

2.     The degree to which the project/program has a positive impact on the health
and safety of the project/program participants and City’s residents.

3.      The degree to which the project/program improves the quality of life in an
effort to provide decent and affordable housing, a suitable living environment, and
expand economic opportunities for all citizens.

4.   The degree to which committed economic activities provide for the greatest
number of jobs created for low to moderate income individuals.

5.     The degree that optimum leverage of CDBG funds is ensured through
partnerships with private and public sector resources (inkind and monetary) in the
project.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                     14                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



6.     The degree to which the project/program is ready to be implemented and
organization staff available.

7.    The degree to which the project/program benefits significant numbers of LMI
persons.

As the projects were submitted then catagorized and prioritized, and consultations
reviewed, the CAC and City began to see a pattern. The public
infrastructure/facilities appeared to benefit the largest number of people, improve
health and safety, provide leveraged funds and/or labor, and were ready to
implement. Social services,housing and economic development rated second
equally, with a number of good ideas in the social service category, but most were
not ready to implement at this time. The three projects/programs selected were the
only ones completely ready to be implemented and some submitted projects did not
qualify under HUD regulations.

Because of this the CAC determined at a meeting on April 20th that it would be best
to add one requirement in addition to the seven project/program evaluation criteria.
This requirement is as follows:

"Non profit organizations must provide proof of non profit status, submit a list of the
organizations Board of Directors including addresses and phone numbers, and
provide a copy of the most recent annual report, preferebly two years annual
reports."

All proposals not meeting this requirement will still be accepted, but the organization
will be advised of the requirement and directed for assistance regarding this status.

Regarding solutions to housing issues, while definitely encompassing many different
types of needs, these will need time to be developed. And, under economic
development, a downtown facade program and mill redevelopment plan will be large
projects that will need to take place the second program year.

2. Identify Obstacles In Meeting Underserved Needs

Obstacles to meeting underserved needs could occur in the social services category,
since small non profits have very limited saff to implement large scale programs and
meet documentation requirements. The City will do everything it can to assist in the
development of collaborations and networking to enable smaller services to
participate.

Another obstacle to meeting underserved needs will be the need to develop a
housing strategy. Since the City does not own any public housing, other housing
alternative strategies will need to be developed. Rising housing costs are continuing
to make affordable housing scarcer and scarcer.



Lead-based Paint (91.215 (g))

1. Estimate the number of housing units that contain lead-based paint hazards, as
   defined in section 1004 of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   15                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


    of 1992, and are occupied by extremely low-income, low-income, and
    moderate-income families.

2. Outline actions proposed or being taken to evaluate and reduce lead-based paint
   hazards and describe how lead based paint hazards will be integrated into
   housing policies and programs, and how the plan for the reduction of lead-based
   hazards is related to the extent of lead poisoning and hazards.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Lead-based Paint response:

1. Lead Based Paint

In Biddeford, according to the U.S. Census 2000, 41.9% of the total number of
households (8,636), are estimated to contain lead-based paint. This is a total of
3,616 households of owner and rental housing built before 1978 and which pose lead
based paint issues. According to City records this figure is extremely high. Although
the City understands that efforts are needed in the future to remedy this issue, since
1975, approximately 1,000 homes in neighborhoods with LMI households have been
renovated and lead issues addressed. This would lower the number of households at
risk to 2,616 or 30.2%. The concentaration of older homes in the downtown core
area appears to contain the oldest housing comprised of LMI households. It is
suspected that these homes may contain the greatest lead based paint issues.
Children are at the greatest health risk for lead based paint exposure. Children with
an Elevated Blood Level (EBLL) of 10ug/di or higher are considered at risk from lead
based paint exposure.

2. Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction Actions

The City of Biddeford currently works with several private housing agencies that
have lead based paint programs to ensure the safety of their program clients. The
York County Community Action Program also has a housing program serving
Biddeford citizens and has a lead based paint education and testing program in
place. Since the City has not implemented a housing rehabilitation program for
approximately 10 years, it uses the CDBG Lead Reduction and Education Guidelines
it implemented in previous programs. The Biddeford Housing Authority also
monitors lead based paint issues for its tenants and provides information on the
dangers of lead paint to all participating tenants.

Over the next three years the City will actively seek guidance from the Advisory
Council for the Maine Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program coordinated
through the Department of Health and Human Services. The City will consider
implementing the Elimination Plan that was developed through the Strategic Planning
process with this council comprised of Maine communities. The plan is a template for
Maine communities to implement a lead awareness outreach plan to asist in the
elimination of childhood lead poisoning in the State of Maine by 2010. The City will
also consider the inclusion of lead hazards in the next update of the City's
Comprehensive Plan. A third strategy will include working with Community Concepts
to access funding from the Lead Hazard Control Grants Program for testing and other
lead reduction activities.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                  16                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


HOUSING

Housing Needs (91.205)
*Please also refer to the Housing Needs Table in the Needs.xls workbook

1. Describe the estimated housing needs projected for the next five year period for
   the following categories of persons: extremely low-income, low-income,
   moderate-income, and middle-income families, renters and owners, elderly
   persons, persons with disabilities, including persons with HIV/AIDS and their
   families, single persons, large families, public housing residents, victims of
   domestic violence, families on the public housing and section 8 tenant-based
   waiting list, and discuss specific housing problems, including: cost-burden, severe
   cost- burden, substandard housing, and overcrowding (especially large families).

2. To the extent that any racial or ethnic group has a disproportionately greater
   need for any income category in comparison to the needs of that category as a
   whole, the jurisdiction must complete an assessment of that specific need. For
   this purpose, disproportionately greater need exists when the percentage of
   persons in a category of need who are members of a particular racial or ethnic
   group is at least ten percentage points higher than the percentage of persons in
   the category as a whole.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Housing Needs response:

1. Housing Needs

Biddeford’s year round housing stock totals 10,379 dwelling units comprised almost
evenly of (5,219) single family units and (5,160) rental units.

Since 1995, housing growth in the City proceeded at a relatively modest annual rate
of 1.3% or 705 units. Of this number, 545 were single family units representing a
12% increase in the City’s single family housing stock over a nine year period.
During the same period, 160 new rental units were built representing a growth of 3%
in the City’s rental housing stock. Despite the modest overall growth, it’s significant
to note that 102 of the 160 new rental units were “assisted” units in projects
targeted for low-moderate income persons, disabled, or families. These projects
were: St. Andre’s School (32 units – elderly/disabled), 5 Graham St. (35 units –
elderly/disabled), and Riverbend (35 units – family).

Availability

Since 1996, Biddeford’s housing vacancy rate has averaged 1% for single family
units and between 1-2% for rental units. Housing demand for all income levels and
household types has been driven by several factors such as a 9% increase in the
number of Biddeford households since 1990 as well as the growth of the local
economy and institutions such as the University of New England. Additional
pressures on the local market have resulted from those seeking to relocate from
higher priced housing markets such as Portland to more affordable housing.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                           17                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Affordability

Biddeford’s housing market has reflected the trend of the past decade in southern
Maine as housing costs for both rental and single family housing has risen
dramatically. According to the study using U.S. Census data, "Bringing Families
Home Again: Affordable Housing Issues in York County, Maine" by Mary Ann
Gleason, M.S., "the federal government's standard for housing affordability is not
spending more than 30% of your income on housing costs. In Biddeford, greater
than one in five owner households, and greater than 40% of renter households are
living in housing that is unaffordable, which limits their ability to meet other family
obligations - including daycare, utilities, transportation, food, and health care for
those under- or uninsured." It should be noted that often when a family buys a lower
priced home, the home requires such extensive rehabilitation just to obtain HUD
Section 8 Standards that the repairs become a substantial burden on the owner.


Monthly Housing Costs for Owners and Renters As Percent of Household Income
2000


Percent of Total Income Spent on Housing Costs                Owners           Renters

Less than 20%                                                 50.6%            31.6%
20 to 29%                                                     27.5%            23.3%
30 to 34%                                                      6.7%             8.5%
35% or more                                                   14.6%            32.4%

According to the Gleason study, which is based on U.S. Census 2000 figures, "almost
one in every four Biddeford family households has an annual income of less than
$25,000. Fify-five percent of Biddeford family households have incomes of less than
$50,000 a year. The median family income is $44,109. Affordability for some
families is due in large part to the significant difference between the annual median
income for families in Biddeford,which is $44,109 versus $36,674 for the overall
population of Biddeford."

The report futher states that "Census 2000 showed Biddeford to have the highest
poverty rate in York County at 13.8%, vesus an overall poverty rate in the county of
8.15%, and in the state of 10.9%."

In addition the report stated, "Biddeford also has the largest number of rental units
among their housing stock - 51%, would potentially make rental housing affordable.
However their average rents (including utilities) have increased significantly over the
last several years, according to the Maine State Housing Authority."


Bedrooms           Percent Increase in Average Rents 1999- 2002

    0                              65.4%
    1                              34.2%
    2                              23.4%
    3                              28.5%




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    18                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


These increases can be especially difficult on the elderly and disabled who are on
fixed incomes. The needs regarding housing include finding solutions to affordable
housing for all age groups and types of households. During the first year of
implementation of the Consolidated Plan no housing activities are planned or being
implemented. However, the housing situation will begin to be reviewed and possible
strategies will begin to be developed with the City, CAC, Biddeford Housing Authority
and other organizations. Housing costs are expected to continually rise and the
elderly population to increase.


2. Disproportionate Housing Needs of Racial or Ethnic Groups

Biddeford welcomes diversity in its population and it has not been determined to
date that there is a disproportionately greater need with housing issues within any
racial or ethnic group. The data in the needs table did not reveal a ten percentage
point higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. However,
the City of Biddeford and Biddeford Housing Authority and its programs will continue
to monitor any changes in these numbers. The mill redevelopment study proposed
for Year 3 is expected to assess the potential for converting mill space into affordable
housing.


Priority Housing Needs (91.215 (b))

1. Identify the priority housing needs and activities in accordance with the
   categories specified in the Housing Needs Table (formerly Table 2A). These
   categories correspond with special tabulations of U.S. census data provided by
   HUD for the preparation of the Consolidated Plan.

2. Provide an analysis of how the characteristics of the housing market and the
   severity of housing problems and needs of each category of residents provided
   the basis for determining the relative priority of each priority housing need
   category.
Note: Family and income types may be grouped in the case of closely related categories of residents
where the analysis would apply to more than one family or income type.

3. Describe the basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority
   needs.

4. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Priority Housing Needs response:

1. Priority Housing Needs

According to the Housing Needs Table with information supplied by HUD, elderly
households who have an income of less than 30% of the median family income who
rent and have a housing cost burden greater than 30% of the household income,
number 55.4% of the 370 households in this category. Those with cost burdens
greater than 50% number 33.8%. Of these 55.4% have housing problems.

Of elderly households who own their homes with the same criteria, there are 75.2%
of the 459 households who have a housing cost burden of greater than 30% and



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                           19                            Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


24.8% over a cost burden of 50% of the household income. Of these, 75.2% have
housing problems.

Elderly households whose income is between 30% and 50% of the median family
income and who rent equal 65.8% of households with a cost burden of greater that
30%, and 19.8% have a cost burden of 50%. Of these households 65.8% have
housing problems. Of the households who own their homes, 42.2% have cost
burdens of greater than 30% of their household income and 10.1% have a cost
burden of greater than 50%. There are housing problems in 42.2 percent of the
households.

The numbers tend to decrease in the renting elderly households with 50% to 80% of
median household income with cost burdens at 24.5%, and 24.5% with housing
problems. In the cost burden category of greater than 50% of household income
there are 0% elderly households.

In elderly households who own their homes the numbers for cost burden also
decrease in the 50% to 80% of median household income.

In the households that rent that are comprised of 2-4 and 5 or more persons, the
cost burden figures revealed the same trends as the elderly, highest in the less than
30% of median household income category. Percentage of housing with problems
was also highest in this income category. It was determined that this trend held true
for the owners category also, except where the amount of households altered the
statistics.

In the category marked "all other households" the renter category revealed the same
trend as the renter categories for the elderly and 2-4 and 5 or more person families.

In this same category marked "all other households" the owner category reveals that
even though as the percent of medium household income increases, the cost burden
and housing problems increase respectively.

It is evident that the age of Biddeford's population, rising housing costs and utilities,
and cost burden of renters and owners have a direct effect on the health and safety
of households. This is especially the case for seniors and the disabled, who must try
to afford medications, heat and food on a fixed income budget. The number of
housing problems is evidence that housing repairs that could include life safety and
health issues are often going unresolved.


2. Analysis for Determination of Relative Priority Housing Needs

The Housing Needs Table provided comprehensive data for the housing needs of
renters and owners of various categories. In considering local and consultation data,
as well as U.S. Census figures, the elderly were considered the top priority due to
the projected increase in numbers that will occur in future years and the
complications brought on by rising housing costs on fixed incomes. All other
households followed in equal standing due to the Plan's focus on bridging the gap
between assisted housing, increased income and home ownership.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    20                        Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


3. Basis for Assigning Category Priority

The three top priority categories: Elderly/Disabled, persons in assisted housing and
on Section 8 tenant-based waiting lists, and low to moderate income families were
targeted due to the result of meetings with housing authorities, Southern Maine
Agency of Aging, daycare providers, Biddeford Adult Education and the City of
Biddeford's Health and Welfare Department. In addition, the results of the homeless
strategic plan and the review of those near homeless brought to light new findings
on Biddeford's housing stituation. It should be noted that according to the Biddeford
Housing Authority there are approximately 100 households on the waiting list for
public housing which is a four year wait. The CAC pioritized housing needs
categories based on what projects within the next year might begin to address the
housing needs for that particular subpopulation.

All others in the low to moderate income housing groups (renters and owners)
followed in priority. Although a priority listing is requested, the City and CAC felt
that each case is almost unique and can cross over to several of the needs categories
and income guidelines.

4. Since the City of Biddeford does not have any Public Housing and relies on a
network of housing agencies, it will need to strengthen this network to ensure
communication to enable housing for LMI persons most in need.


Housing Market Analysis (91.210)
*Please also refer to the Housing Market Analysis Table in the Needs.xls workbook

1. Based on information available to the jurisdiction, describe the significant
   characteristics of the housing market in terms of supply, demand, condition, and
   the cost of housing; the housing stock available to serve persons with disabilities;
   and to serve persons with HIV/AIDS and their families. Data on the housing
   market should include, to the extent information is available, an estimate of the
   number of vacant or abandoned buildings and whether units in these buildings
   are suitable for rehabilitation.

2. Describe the number and targeting (income level and type of household served)
   of units currently assisted by local, state, or federally funded programs, and an
   assessment of whether any such units are expected to be lost from the assisted
   housing inventory for any reason, (i.e. expiration of Section 8 contracts).

3. Indicate how the characteristics of the housing market will influence the use of
   funds made available for rental assistance, production of new units, rehabilitation
   of old units, or acquisition of existing units. Please note, the goal of affordable
   housing is not met by beds in nursing homes.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Housing Market Analysis responses:

1. Housing Market Analysis

See Appendices.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                            21                           Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Specific Housing Objectives (91.215 (b))

1. Describe the priorities and specific objectives the jurisdiction hopes to achieve
   over a specified time period.

2. Describe how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that
   are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs
   for the period covered by the strategic plan.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Specific Housing Objectives response:

1. Housing Priorities and Specific Objectives

Since the City of Biddeford owns no public housing it will implement the following
actions to enhance the affordability of permanent housing while at the same time
working with the Biddeford Housing Authority and other agencies to find solutions to
affordable housing and home ownership. Priority #5 begins to address the City of
Biddeford's Homeless Strategy and is contained in the Homeless Needs Section of
this Plan that follows the Housing Section. This priority deals with strengthening the
network for emergency shelter and services strategies.

Affordable housing actions are listed under Objective 1 of Priority #2 on page 36 on
this plan. The following actions under Priority 2 go one step further to increase
affordable opportunities for home ownership:

Priority 2 - To provide a strategy to meet the increasing need for transitional to
affordable and supportive housing.

Objective 2 - Increase opportunities for homeownership for low and moderate-
income persons.

      Actions: 1. Consider a partnership with other public/private organizations to
               pool resources to help finance home ownership, e.g. down payments,
               loan assistance, mortgage interest rate write-downs, and other
               financing mechanisms.

Objective 3 - Preserve and upgrade the City's housing stock serving low to
moderate-income persons.

       Actions: 1. Consider establishment of low interest loan programs to help
                finance the rehabilitation of the City's downtown housing stock.

                   2. Undertake a systematic and concentrated program of code
                   enforcement to ensure life - safety standards are met and to prevent
                   blighting influences on neighborhoods.

                   3. Provide funding to low to moderate-income homeowners for
                   improvements aimed at energy conservation.

Priority 4 - Provide educational and work opportunities for homeless persons, LMI
and special needs populations that provide avenues to obtain jobs and/or better
paying jobs.



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                     22                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Objective 1 - Increase the economic prosperity of low to moderate-income persons
and their ability to afford housing and health and safety amenities.

        Actions: 1. Provide opportunities for low to moderate-income persons to
                 attend training and educational programs that can lead to higher
                 wages.

                    2. Provide child care programs that increase the opportunity for low
                    to moderate-income persons to attend educational and training
                    programs.

                    3. Link local programs to institutions that would be the "next step"
                    for low to moderate-income persons.

2. Resources

The City will continue to coordinate with affordable housing developers, organizations
and agencies, and will continue to seek and fund partnerships that expand the supply
of decent, safe, and affordable housing. The City and CAC will be developing
strategies that could include a housing loan program combined with HOME funds
from HUD.


Needs of Public Housing (91.210 (b))

In cooperation with the public housing agency or agencies located within its
boundaries, describe the needs of public housing, including the number of public
housing units in the jurisdiction, the physical condition of such units, the restoration
and revitalization needs of public housing projects within the jurisdiction, and other
factors, including the number of families on public housing and tenant-based waiting
lists and results from the Section 504 needs assessment of public housing projects
located within its boundaries (i.e. assessment of needs of tenants and applicants on
waiting list for accessible units as required by 24 CFR 8.25). The public housing
agency and jurisdiction can use the optional Priority Public Housing Needs Table
(formerly Table 4) of the Consolidated Plan to identify priority public housing needs
to assist in this process.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Needs of Public Housing response:

Public Housing Needs

The City of Biddeford has a total of 498 units of "project based" rental housing and
340 units of vouchers that provide rental assistance to low to moderate-income
households. In addition to the project based assisted housing, the Biddeford
Housing Authority administers 340 units of HUD "vouchers" whereby low to
moderate income persons receive rental assistance in apartments scattered
throughout the community. Unlike the project-based subsidies, the voucher program
allows tenants to move and still retain their subsidy. Approximately 66% of the 340
households using the voucher program are elderly/disabled.

A survey was conducted in 1995 and updated in 2005 to evaluate the overall
condition of the City's housing stock. Nearly 42% (4,395 units) of the City's housing
stock was built prior to 1939, including over half of the City's rental housing stock.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                      23                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


The recent survey indicated that there are approximately 100 residential structures
that appear to be in need of substantial rehabilitation. These properties are
predominately multifamily rental structures located in the City's oldest downtown
neighborhoods.

The Biddeford Housing Authority informed the City that there are currently 148
applicants on their housing waiting list. Of those 148 households, 24 have a head of
household that is over 60 years old, 37 are families with children and 62 are disabled
households.

Of the 148 waiting households, 24 households had an annual income of less the
$4,999, 63 households had an income of between $5,000 and $9,000, 41 households
had an income between $10,000 and $14,000, and 20 families had an annual income
over $15,000. The main source of income for 43 families is wages, 20 have TANF as
their main source of income, 105 list SS and SSI as their main source, and 43 had
other or no income.

The Biddeford Housing Authority is currently not taking applications for the waiting
list. Due to the 2005 change in budgeting and budget cuts, they do not anticipate
housing more than a few, if any, households who are presently on the waiting list.
The wait for housing for those already on the list is approximately three to four
years, and perhaps even longer, due to anticipated budget cuts in the coming years.
The Biddeford Housing Authority receives approximately 15 to 20 calls weekly
inquiring about housing availability.


Public Housing Strategy (91.210)

1. Describe the public housing agency's strategy to serve the needs of extremely
   low-income, low-income, and moderate-income families residing in the
   jurisdiction served by the public housing agency (including families on the public
   housing and section 8 tenant-based waiting list), the public housing agency’s
   strategy for addressing the revitalization and restoration needs of public housing
   projects within the jurisdiction and improving the management and operation of
   such public housing, and the public housing agency’s strategy for improving the
   living environment of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate families
   residing in public housing.

2. Describe the manner in which the plan of the jurisdiction will help address the
   needs of public housing and activities it will undertake to encourage public
   housing residents to become more involved in management and participate in
   homeownership. (NAHA Sec. 105 (b)(11) and (91.215 (k))

3. If the public housing agency is designated as "troubled" by HUD or otherwise is
   performing poorly, the jurisdiction shall describe the manner in which it will
   provide financial or other assistance in improving its operations to remove such
   designation. (NAHA Sec. 105 (g))

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Public Housing Strategy response:




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                  24                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


1. Public Housing Authority's Strategy

According to the Biddeford Housing Authority there are potential looming cuts in the
amount of 3% to the Section 8 Voucher Program anticipated for next year.
Currently, they are continuing to work diligently to find housing for their Section 8
clients. The City has developed a Plan that will begin to address the increasing need
for affordable housing beginning in the first year by exploring potential affordable
housing alternatives, educational and training programs, and advocacy for seniors.

2. Plan Benefits and Participation by Public Housing Residents

The Biddeford Housing Authority encourages public housing clients to be involved in
the management of their housing needs, including referrals to a HUD Loan program
for home ownership. The City will work with the Biddeford Housing Authority to
encourage assisted housing clients to become more involved in the Consolidated Plan
process through encouragement to participate in public hearings. Priority #2 and
Priority #4 provide opportunities that will begin to meet the possible additional need
for more assisted and affordable housing. The Plan encourages assisted housing
clients to take part in the following actions contained in the Plan.

Priority 2 - To provide a strategy to meet the increasing need for transitional to
affordable and supportive housing.

Objective 1: Increase the supply of affordable housing for low to moderate-income
persons.

      Actions: 1. Consider making the City's "surplus" and/or tax acquired real
               estate available for the development of affordable housing.

                  2. Consider revisions to the City's zoning and land use standards
                  which would provide incentives, e.g. density bonuses for the
                  development of affordable housing.

                  3. In partnership with other public/private parties, explore the
                  adaptive reuse and redevelopment of non-residential properties, e.g.
                  mills, into affordable housing.

Priority 4 - Provide educational and work for homeless persons, LMI and special
needs populations that provide avenues to obtain jobs and/or better paying jobs.

Objective 1 - Increase economic prosperity of low to moderate-income persons and
their ability to afford housing and health and safety amenities.

      Actions:     1. Provide opportunities for low to moderate-income persons to
                   attend training and educational programs that can lead to higher
                   wages.

                   2. Provide childcare programs that increase the opportunity for low
                    to moderate-income persons to attend educational and training
                    programs.

                   3. Link local programs to institutions that would be the "next step"
                    for low to moderate-income persons.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                      25                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


3. Performance

The Biddeford Housing Authority has been designated a "High Performer" by HUD for
   several years under the Section 8 Management Assessment System (SEMAP).
   The agency is most emphatically NOT troubled or otherwise performing poorly.


Barriers to Affordable Housing (91.210 (e) and 91.215 (f))

1. Explain whether the cost of housing or the incentives to develop, maintain, or
   improve affordable housing are affected by public policies, particularly those of
   the local jurisdiction. Such policies include tax policy affecting land and other
   property, land use controls, zoning ordinances, building codes, fees and charges,
   growth limits, and policies that affect the return on residential investment.

2. Describe the strategy to remove or ameliorate negative effects of public policies
   that serve as barriers to affordable housing, except that, if a State requires a unit
   of general local government to submit a regulatory barrier assessment that is
   substantially equivalent to the information required under this part, as
   determined by HUD, the unit of general local government may submit that
   assessment to HUD and it shall be considered to have complied with this
   requirement.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Barriers to Affordable Housing response:

The City of Biddeford does not have any regulations, land use controls, zoning
ordinances, code enforcement, development or growth limitations that would deter
affordable housing projects. The Biddeford Housing Authority and other coordinating
agencies involved in providing technical assistance remain committed in achieving
and encouraging affordable housing for all the citizens of Biddeford.



HOMELESS

Homeless Needs (91.205 (b) and 91.215 (c))
*Please also refer to the Homeless Needs Table in the Needs.xls workbook

Homeless Needs— The jurisdiction must provide a concise summary of the nature
and extent of homelessness in the jurisdiction, (including rural homelessness and
chronic homelessness where applicable), addressing separately the need for facilities
and services for homeless persons and homeless families with children, both
sheltered and unsheltered, and homeless subpopulations, in accordance with Table
1A. The summary must include the characteristics and needs of low-income
individuals and children, (especially extremely low-income) who are currently housed
but are at imminent risk of either residing in shelters or becoming unsheltered. In
addition, to the extent information is available, the plan must include a description of
the nature and extent of homelessness by racial and ethnic group. A quantitative
analysis is not required. If a jurisdiction provides estimates of the at-risk
population(s), it should also include a description of the operational definition of the
at-risk group and the methodology used to generate the estimates.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                           26                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan Homeless Needs response:

Summary of Nature and Extent of Homelessness

The nature of homelessness and the near homeless has been a complex issue best
understood at the local level and by the City's history. The City was a center for
textile manufacturing with its former Pepperell textile mills that once employed
approximately 9,000 people. Over the years the mills ceased operations and
WestPoint Stevens is now the only manufacturer with a workforce of about 300
workers. The limited availability of affordable housing, as well as housing costs,
have contributed to the incidence of homelessness, as has an increasing transient
population.

Although there are no homeless shelters in Biddeford, individuals or families seeking
shelter seek assistance through the City's Health and Welfare Office. The Continuum
of Care that requires an annual one night survey revealed that there were four
homeless individuals and one family seeking shelter on January 24th, 2005.

However, the City of Biddeford's Health and Welfare Department has developed the
following chart that provides information regarding the homeless seeking shelter in
Biddeford in any given month in 1994.

CITY OF BIDDEFORD HOMELESS REPORT 2004

Month        Total # of        Total #      Total # of
            Households         Persons      Children

January     18            29        4
February    26            47       11
March       25            44        8
April       18            44       19
May         25            52       14
June        24            44       14
July        15            44       18
August      15            30        5
September   15            24        6
October     17            37       17
November    25            37        9
December    24            44       11
______________________________________
Total 2004 247           476      136

According to the Case Worker in the Health and Welfare Department and staff at the
York County Homeless Shelter, the largest populations seeking shelter are people
with dual diagnosis, or individuals with mental disabilities and addiction issues. It is
believed that one factor contributing to this larger population of homeless persons is
due to the closing of the Augusta Mental Health Institute in Augusta, forcing patients
out onto the street to "fend for themselves".

Another population group on the rise are victims of domestic abuse. The perpetrator
in a domestic violence case must leave the home. Most often this individual is the
wage earner in the family and thus the family loses its income and then the home.
The result is a mother or father seeking shelter with children.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    27                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



Other homeless cases are famililes with children. Both parents are low income wage
earners and unable to find affordable housing. All of the assisted housing available
in Biddeford has a long waiting list.

Excacerbating the problem is the oveflow of homeless from the City of Portland that
the surrounding communities receive, including Biddeford. During the past year,
Portland experienced extreme strain on their services resulting in an overflow of
needing persons to surrounding communties, including Biddeford. Along with this
overflow has been the increasing number of persons from out-of-state, who have
either maxed out their benefits in their resident state, or have relatives in Maine, or
were from Maine originally. The City's Health and Welfare Department is now
tracking these individuals. Lastly, there is also an increase in individuals on
probation seeking transitional housing and other services. Biddeford's postion along
the transportation route and its inventory of relatively affordable apartments acts as
an attraction for persons starting a new life, but who are not prepared for the steady
increases in rents that are occuring presently.

Near Homeless

The near homeless individual or family is an almost hidden segment of the
population of Biddeford. These are individuals or families who are barely able to
meet their housing needs or are in danger of losing their housing. In Biddeford,
extremely low, very low and low income households who own their homes number
1,084 or 26 percent of the total owner households (4,193). Of this 26 percent of
extremely low to low income households, 604 are elderly or 56 percent of this
population. The increasing costs of prescription medications, fuel costs, rising
property taxes, and fixed incomes, combined with Biddeford's increasing elderly
population in Biddeford, is an issue that will need to be addressed to keep this
population segment from potential homelessness. Since 15.5 percent of Biddeford's
population is over the age of 65 this issue will only continue to escalate as the
population ages and elderly homeowners need more and more services on a fixed
income. Of the 1,084 owner households in this category, 444 or 41% are all other
households that are extremely low, very low and low income.

EXTREMELY LOW, VERY LOW AND LOW OWNER HOUSEHOLDS

Household Income             Elderly           All Others       Total
   % of MFI                 Households         Households

Extremely low (0 - 30%)  137            47         184
Very Low (31%- 50%)      199            74         273
Low (51% - 80%)          304           323         627
_______________________________________________________
TOTAL                   604            444       1,084


Of Biddeford's 4,443 renter households, a total of 2,896 or 65 percent are extremely
low, very low or low income renter households. Of the 2,896 renter households in
this category, 832 are elderly households or 29 percent. Of these households, 71.2
percent are all other households. It has been estimated that this higher figure of alll
other households comprises a majority of the subsidized housing available.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   28                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



EXTEMELY LOW, VERY LOW AND LOW RENTER HOUSEHOLDS

Household Income                  Elderly          All Others      Total
   % of MFI                      Households        Households

Extremely low (0 - 30%)  370            669       1,039
Very Low (31%- 50%)      278            580        858
Low (51% - 80%)          184            815        999
_______________________________________________________
TOTAL                    832           2,064      2,896


Affordability

Biddeford’s housing market has reflected the trend of the past decade in southern
Maine as housing costs for both rental and single family housing has risen
dramatically.


A comparison of monthly rental housing costs (including utilities) follows:

                           Bedroom Size        1995         2004           % increase
                                 1             $373         $615           +65%
                                 2             $453         $750           +66%
                                 3             $549         $875           +60%
                                 4             $550         $950           +73%

This spiraling increase in rental housing costs has increased the lack of affordability
for persons of low to moderate income. According to a 2004 report conducted by the
Maine State Housing Authority, 58.2% of Biddeford’s rental households could not
afford the average two bedroom rent in the City. Reflecting the lack of affordable
rental housing throughout the region and the state, Biddeford’s rate closely
approximated the rate of 60.8% for York County and the state-wide rate of 61.2%.

The cost of new and existing homes in Biddeford continues its sharp upward increase
over the past eight – ten years. According to the MSHA, in 2004 the median sale
price of a single family home in Biddeford reached $189,950. The MSHA report
noted further that 81% of Biddeford’s households cannot afford the median price of
$189,950. This percentage is significantly higher than both the York County rate of
75% and the state-wide rate of 66%.

Biddeford is known as a friendly town where neighbor helps neigbor. At a recent
local social service networking meeting, several soup kitchens and other homeless
services stated that "they would never refuse anyone" and that if someone needed
shelter "they would find something" at all costs. This is verified by the local churches
who go out of their way to link homeless with services and shelter. The meeting was
held in a local church.

Biddeford people want to continue in their generousity and willingness to welcome
and assist people seeking shelter as well as those looking for a new beginning.
However, strategies need to be in place to offset rising rents and housing prices,




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                       29                     Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


develop more affordable housing, as well as the need to keep the elderly in their
homes.


Priority Homeless Needs

1. Using the results of the Continuum of Care planning process, identify the
   jurisdiction's homeless and homeless prevention priorities specified in Table 1A,
   the Homeless and Special Needs Populations Chart. The description of the
   jurisdiction's choice of priority needs and allocation priorities must be based on
   reliable data meeting HUD standards and should reflect the required consultation
   with homeless assistance providers, homeless persons, and other concerned
   citizens regarding the needs of homeless families with children and individuals.
   The jurisdiction must provide an analysis of how the needs of each category of
   residents provided the basis for determining the relative priority of each priority
   homeless need category. A separate brief narrative should be directed to
   addressing gaps in services and housing for the sheltered and unsheltered
   chronic homeless.

2. A community should give a high priority to chronically homeless persons, where
   the jurisdiction identifies sheltered and unsheltered chronic homeless persons in
   its Homeless Needs Table - Homeless Populations and Subpopulations.


3-5 Year Strategic Plan Priority Homeless Needs response:

1. Homeless Prevention Priorities

While there are no homeless shelters in Biddeford, individuals or families seeking
shelter through the City’s Welfare Office are assisted in any of several ways. This
may include providing transportation to the area’s regional shelter, the York County
Shelter in Alfred, arranging for a room at a local lodging establishment, or making
arrangements for the household to stay with friends or family. Once shelter has
been provided, there are numerous service organizations available to assist the
individual(s) to establish themselves in the community if they choose to do so.

Prevention Priorities

It was determined by the City in coordination with the CAC and through several
public hearings to receive input on the Consolidated Plan, that homeless prevention
priorities should be focused on several priority needs spanning all age groups. In
addition, after speaking with the City's Health and Welfare Department, the Southern
Maine Agency on Aging, Catholic Charities of Maine, Biddeford's Parks and Recreation
Department, the Northern York County YMCA, Maine State Housing Authority, Maine
Department of Health and Human Services and Biddeford Adult Education, and
various social service organizations at a regional meeting, it was determined that the
following would be a good prioritization of the issues surrounding homelessness and
near homelessness in Biddeford. These priorities also act in response to housing
issues to begin to enable LMI persons the avenues to be able to afford safe and
adequate housing and integrate into the community.

- The first priority is to keep reinforcing and strengthening the emergency shelter
and transitional housing system that is already in place which includes housing,


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   30                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


counseling, education and a wide variety of homeless, LMI and special needs
population assistance.

- The second priority is to provide a strategy to meet the increasing need for
transitional to affordable and supportive housing.

- The third priority is to implement strategies to aid the elderly and special needs
population in access to information and services to increase health and safety and
reduce reliance on the City's overburdened Health and Welfare Department that can
only provide minimal assistance.

- The fourth priority is to provide educational and work opportunity programs for
homeless persons, LMI and special needs populations. These same opportunities
would be offered to those identified as near homeless so as to mitigate the
downward spiral that often occurs to homelessness. These educational and work
opportunities would provide the avenue to obtain jobs and/or better than minimum
wage jobs. The Objective and Actions to be taken state that they will target low to
moderate income persons, however, homeless and special needs populations may be
included as ready and are addressed in their respective sections of the Consolidated
Plan.

- The fifth priority is to eliminate slum and blight in the downtown area through
infrastructure and public facilities improvements that benefit LMI neighborhoods.

The fifth priority was included to address health and safety issues in LMI
neighborhoods and create a more pleasant and community atmosphere. In addition,
improvement of LMI neighborhoods and downtown areas can attract businesses with
training and work opportunities.

It was determined by the City and CAC that after Priority#1, Priorities #2, #3, #4
and #5 be given equal weight and implemented simultaneously.

Gaps In Services and Housing

The gaps currently in services and housing include the need to strengthen the social
service organizations network to better use existing services. Regional meetings
have just been implemented where these organizations serving various populations
in need can network and share resources. Another gap was identified while speaking
with the Biddeford Housing Authority. There is a shortage of transitional housing
and a long waiting list for assisted housing for individuals and families while they are
accessing needed services.

2. Chronically Homeless

The City of Biddeford gives a high priority to chronically homelss persons. However,
to date there are according to the City's Health and Welfare Deartment only two
chronically homeless persons in Biddeford. Often shelter is offered but can be
refused by a homeless person.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   31                        Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Homeless Inventory (91.210 (c))

The jurisdiction shall provide a concise summary of the existing facilities and services
(including a brief inventory) that assist homeless persons and families with children
and subpopulations identified in Table 1A. These include outreach and assessment,
emergency shelters and services, transitional housing, permanent supportive
housing, access to permanent housing, and activities to prevent low-income
individuals and families with children (especially extremely low-income) from
becoming homeless. The jurisdiction can use the optional Continuum of Care
Housing Activity Chart and Service Activity Chart to meet this requirement.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Homeless Inventory response:

Biddeford has a total of 498 units of "project based" rental housing and 340 units of
vouchers which provide rental assistance to low to moderate income households. In
addition, there is project based assisted housing and the Biddeford Housing Authority
administers 340 units of HUD "vouchers" whereby low to moderate income persons
receive rental assistance in apartments scattered throughout the community. Unlike
the project-based subsidies, the voucher program allows tenants to move and still
retain their subsidy. Approximately 66% of the 340 households using the voucher
program are elderly and/or disabled. The following is a summary listing of housing
and program services in Biddeford, as well as those offered through cooperative
regional agencies.

City of Biddeford Health and Welfare Department

The department offers assitance to find shelter and provide access to programs and
services for homeless and near homeless individuals and familites.


Homeless Shelters

York County Shelter Programs, Inc. - Alfred, Maine
   63 - bed facility serving both individuals and families
   This program provides immediate basic and emergency services.

    Emergency Extended Shelter

While individuals are awaiting placement in an appropriate transitional or
independent living program, counseling, case management and other self-help
services are available. During their stay clients have access to housing, independent
living skills, remedial education, vocational training, intensive case management,
medical and other necessary services.

    Transitional/Permanent Housing

   York County Shelter operates 11 housing programs with Case Management
support to help clients maintain independence:

    -   Charles Street Apartments - Transitional housing for 2 families
    -   Cottage Street Apartments - Residence for 6 single adults in recovery
    -   High Street - Residence for 4 single adults in recovery
    -   Within - Offers transitional housing to 16 family members


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                     32                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


    -   The Smith Apartments - Transitional housing for 10 single adults
    -   Janis Apartments - Housing for 4 families
    -   the Ponroy Family Center - Housing for 3 families
    -   Thornton Avewnue - Housing for 3 single adults
    -   Lebanon Street - Housing for 2 families
    -   Manson Avenue - Housing for 4 individuals
    -   Rogers Road - Housing for 4 individuals
    -   McDermott SRO - Permanent housing for 5 elderly or special needs individuals
    -   Joseph Raymond Angers Farm - Permanent housing for 8 male individuals
    -   Creative Housing Alternatives for Maine People - Three low-cost housing
        projects


Subsidized Rental Housing Projects

    Elderly/Disabled Housing

    -   Prospect Manor - 50 units
    -   Ledgewood Apts. - 60 units
    -   5 Gaham Street - 35 units
    -   Presidential Apts. - 45 units
    -   York Manor - 45 units
    -   Summer Street Block - 20 units
    -   St. Andre's - 35 units

    Family Housing

    -   Summer Street Block - 12 units
    -   Berry Park - 36 units
    -   Forrest Green - 40 units
    -   Hill St. Terrace - 12 units
    -   Avignon Apts. - 8
    -   Scattered Sites - 68 units
    -   Riverbend - 32 units

There are several facilities in Biddeford which provide transitional/supportive housing
for persons with special needs, i.e. those suffering from mental illness and/or
substance abuse. These facilities are owned and/or managed by area non-profit
agencies which assist persons with special needs, e.g. Counseling Services, Inc.,
Community Living Options, Shalom House and Maineway, Inc.

These and other agencies operate 9 such facilities in the City encompassing 85
units/beds. The facilities are a combination of single and multifamily residential
properties which are situated in neighborhoods throughout the City.

In addition, there are several other facilities in nearby communities such as Saco and
Old Orchard Beach which also provide housing and services to special needs
populations, e.g. The Milestone Foundation in Old Orchard Beach operates a 20 bed
facility which provides services and shelter to persons with substance abuse
problems.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                    33                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


Within Biddeford are approximately seven soup kitchens and pantries, and a variety
of clinics, churches, child care services, furniture and clothing banks, as well as
several satellite outreach services.


Homeless Strategic Plan (91.215 (c))

1. Homelessness— Describe the jurisdiction's strategy for developing a system to
   address homelessness and the priority needs of homeless persons and families
   (including the subpopulations identified in the needs section). The jurisdiction's
   strategy must consider the housing and supportive services needed in each stage
   of the process which includes preventing homelessness, outreach/assessment,
   emergency shelters and services, transitional housing, and helping homeless
   persons (especially any persons that are chronically homeless) make the
   transition to permanent housing and independent living. The jurisdiction must
   also describe its strategy for helping extremely low- and low-income individuals
   and families who are at imminent risk of becoming homeless.

2. Chronic homelessness—Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy for eliminating chronic
   homelessness by 2012. This should include the strategy for helping homeless
   persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. This
   strategy should, to the maximum extent feasible, be coordinated with the
   strategy presented Exhibit 1 of the Continuum of Care (CoC) application and any
   other strategy or plan to eliminate chronic homelessness. Also describe, in a
   narrative, relationships and efforts to coordinate the Conplan, CoC, and any other
   strategy or plan to address chronic homelessness.

3. Homelessness Prevention—Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy to help prevent
   homelessness for individuals and families with children who are at imminent risk
   of becoming homeless.

4. Institutional Structure—Briefly describe the institutional structure, including
   private industry, non-profit organizations, and public institutions, through which
   the jurisdiction will carry out its homelessness strategy.

5. Discharge Coordination Policy—Every jurisdiction receiving McKinney-Vento
   Homeless Assistance Act Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG), Supportive Housing,
   Shelter Plus Care, or Section 8 SRO Program funds must develop and implement
   a Discharge Coordination Policy, to the maximum extent practicable. Such a
   policy should include “policies and protocols for the discharge of persons from
   publicly funded institutions or systems of care (such as health care facilities,
   foster care or other youth facilities, or correction programs and institutions) in
   order to prevent such discharge from immediately resulting in homelessness for
   such persons.” The jurisdiction should describe its planned activities to
   implement a cohesive, community-wide Discharge Coordination Policy, and how
   the community will move toward such a policy.

3-5 Year Homeless Strategic Plan response:

1. Homeless Strategy

The City of Biddeford will continue through its Health and Welfare Department to
implement and strengthen its current emergency shelter strategy for the immediate


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   34                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


needs of homeless individuals and families, as stated in Priority #5 of the Prevention
Priority section. However, as the subsequent priorities state, the real need is to
enable homeless clients to "make the leap" to permanent housing. The following
actions address priorities in the Prevention Priorities section to begin to implement
homeless and housing solutions.

Priority 5 - To reinforce and strengthen the emergency shelter and transitional
housing system that is already in place which includes housing, counseling,
education and a wide variety of homeless, special needs and LMI assistance.

Objective 1 - Assist and work with the City's Health and Welfare Department,
volunteer organizations and agencies to seek collaborative efforts to assist homeless,
LMI and special needs populations in Biddeford.

        Actions:    1. Encourage network meetings of area resources and services.


Priority 2 - To provide a strategy to meet the increasing need for transitional to
affordable and supportive housing.

Objective 1 - Increase the supply of affordable housing for low to moderate-income
persons.

      Actions: 1. Consider making the City's "surplus" and/or tax acquired real
               estate available for the development of affordable housing.

                   2. Consider revisions to the City's zoning and land use standards
                   which would provide incentives, e.g. density bonuses for the
                   development of affordable housing.

                   3. In partnership with other public/private parties, explore the
                   adaptive re-use and redevelopment of non-residential properties, e.g.
                   mills, into affordable housing.

Priority 3 - Implement strategies to aid the elderly and special needs populations in
access to information and services to increase health and safety and reduce reliance
on the City's overburdened Health and Welfare Department that can only provide
minimal assistance.

Objective 1: Improve the health and safety of the elderly.

      Actions: 1. Provide for an outreach elderly advocate through the City's Health
               and Welfare Department to assist the elderly in accessing programs
               and services such as Medicare D.

Priority 4 - Provide educational and work opportunities for homeless persons, LMI
and special needs populations that provide avenues to obtain jobs and/or better
paying jobs.

Objective 1 - Increase the economic prosperity of low to moderate-income persons
and their ability to afford housing and health and safety amenities.

      Actions: 1. Provide opportunities for low to moderate-income persons to


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                      35                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


                  attend training and educational programs that can lead to higher
                  wages.

                  2. Provide childcare programs that increase the opportunity for low
                   to moderate-income persons to attend educational and training
                   programs.

                  3. Link local programs to institutions that would be the "next step"
                  for low to moderate-income persons.


2. Chronic Homelessness

The City will continue to address chronic homelessness by its current system, while
monitoring for any increases. Emergency services are currently in place, but the real
issue is what to do once a person is in transitional or temporary housing. Often, the
individual in transitional housing does not have the skill set to obtain a job or
families do not have the means or access to childcare in order to work or obtain an
education. Current services are full to capacity. The above strategies begin to
address the situation for homeless persons at this critical point before they become
chronically homeless.

3. Homelessness Prevention

It will take the full three years of this Consolidated Plan to effectively begin to close
the gap in preventing homelessness for individuals and families with children. The
City's three-pronged approach aimed at a multi-generational strategy combined with
educational opportunities with expanded day care services and affordable housing
goals will begin to decrease the number of individuals and families with children who
are at the greatest risk of becoming homeless, as evidenced by the Continuum of
Care survey. One, Assisting seniors to access services that they are entitled to will
decrease their economic liability and improve the welfare of their care giving
families. Two, implementing strategies for more affordable housing will enable low
to moderate income persons the ability to "make the leap" to permanent housing.
Three, educational and work opportunities aimed at better paying jobs combined
with day care options will enable families to elevate themselves from low paying jobs
and the potential to be able to afford permanent housing.

4. Institutional Structure

The City of Biddeford will keep its current institutional structure and seek to
strengthen existing networks in order to bridge the gap between homelessness and
near homelessness, to transitional and assisted housing, to permanent housing. The
Citizens Advisory Committee will continue to seek new and innovative projects to
bridge this gap. The City will work with organizations and agencies which are
affiliated with providing homeless services and will collaborate whenever possible to
proactively address its needs of homeless and near homeless persons.
In addition, an outreach senior advocate will be hired and guided by the City's Health
and Welfare Director to assist seniors with information and access to services.
Monitoring will be conducted by the Community Development Coordinator with
reports generated by the senior advocate. Special efforts will be given to providing
services to seniors threatened by homelessness and poor living conditions.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                     36                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


The City will also work closely with the Adult Education Department in order to begin
the implementation of educational programs for low to moderate-income persons.
Monitoring will be completed by the Community Development Coordinator with
reports required from the Adult Education Department. An expanded childcare and
new dental clinic will provide more working and training opportunities for LMI parents

5. Discharge Coordination Policy

The City will continue to work with the various agencies and organizations and their
discharge policies. The City will support collaborations that encourage a uniform and
fair evaluation of a client's situation before discharge, and that have provided all the
existing and new programs proposed for low to moderate income persons in this
strategic plan.


Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG)

(States only) Describe the process for awarding grants to State recipients, and a
description of how the allocation will be made available to units of local government.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan ESG response:

(The City does not receive Emergency Shelter Grants)

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Community Development (91.215 (e))
*Please also refer to the Community Development Table in the Needs.xls workbook

1. Identify the jurisdiction's priority non-housing community development needs
   eligible for assistance by CDBG eligibility category specified in the Community
   Development Needs Table (formerly Table 2B),  i.e., public facilities, public
   improvements, public services and economic development.

2. Describe the basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority
   needs.

3. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

4. Identify specific long-term and short-term community development objectives
   (including economic development activities that create jobs), developed in
   accordance with the statutory goals described in section 24 CFR 91.1 and the
   primary objective of the CDBG program to provide decent housing and a suitable
   living environment and expand economic opportunities, principally for low- and
   moderate-income persons.

    NOTE: Each specific objective developed to address a priority need, must be identified by number
    and contain proposed accomplishments, the time period (i.e., one, two, three, or more years), and
    annual program year numeric goals the jurisdiction hopes to achieve in quantitative terms, or in other
    measurable terms as identified and defined by the jurisdiction.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Community Development response:



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                            37                            Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



1. Priority Non Housing Community Development Needs

The priority non housing community development needs were identified in meetings
between the Director of Economic Development and Community Development
Coordinator with City staff, Public Works, Health and Welfare, the Heart of Biddeford,
Parks and Recreation, the YMCA, Adult Education and Community Center staff to
receive input regarding community development needs. In addition, public hearings
were held to receive projects and receive input regarding community needs other
than housing. Projects were also solicited from various social service organizations.
A set of seven criteria were used by the CAC to determine the projects. The needs
identified are to be located in LMI Census blocks or benefit LMI persons. They are as
follows: Public Improvements/Infrastructure (sidewalk improvements, street paving,
beautification); Public Services (worker retraining, senior services advocate, child
care services and LMI transportation); Parks and Recreation (park and vacant lot
improvements, transportation); and Economic Development (downtown facade
program, mill redevelopment plan).

2. Basis for Assigning Priority

The City and CAC developed Priority #1, Objective #1, Actions: 1. and 2. and
Objective #2, Actions: 1. and 2. as the top priorities in the Consolidated Plan with
objectives and actions to begin to meet the community development needs. It was
felt that all the community development needs included under this priority were of
equal weight in priority and that the visible results from their implementation would
also heighten awareness of the Plan and stir greater citizen participation especially
those targeted in the Year 1 Action Plan. (See Year 1 Action Plan for specific costs,
timeline and numeric goals).

Priority 1 - To eliminate slum and blight in the downtown area through infrastructure
and public facilities improvements that benefit LMI neighborhoods.

   Objective 1: Increase access and provide public facilities that provide for the
   health and safety of LMI neighborhoods.

          Actions: 1. Implement sidewalk, street paving and beautification projects in
                   LMI neighborhoods for safe and adequate access to services and
                   facilities.

                      2. Implement park and vacant lot developments in LMI
                      neighborhoods for safe and adequate recreation needs.

                      3. Provide transportation for LMI citizens to services and
                      community programs.

   Objective 2: Increase business attraction and the elimination of slum and blight
   through the implementation of downtown improvements.

          Actions:    1. Provide loan/grant assistance to commercial property owners
                      in the downtown core along with design assistance for a
                      Downtown Program.

                      2. Develop a plan for redevelopment of the mills and adjacent


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                      38                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


                      downtown area.

Two additional Public Service programs, a worker retraining program and a senior
advocate program are included under Priorities #3 and #4 respectfully. This was
done because of their very close relationship to homelessness and near
homelessness.

The City and CAC developed community development activities after receiving input
from the Public Works/Parks Department, Recreation Director, and Heart of
Biddeford Director. Sidewalks and street reconstruction in LMI neighborhoods
coordinated with landscaping improvements were a top priority, Public Services
second, then park development, transportation and a downtown facade program and
mill redevelopment plan. The sidewalks and street reconstruction are targeted for
LMI neighborhoods where Capital Improvement Plan funding is not available due to
funding limitations. These are older neighborhoods with a variety of assisted and
private housing encompassing families with children, the elderly and disabled. A
windshield survey confirmed the blighted condition of the sidewalks and streets. It
has been stated that several of these targeted sidewalks are very difficult to traverse
in a wheelchair or with a cane or walker. One targeted area has no sidewalks and
children use this street to access the downtown YMCA and other programs. These
areas were given a high priority due to the large number of LMI persons who live in
these neighborhoods; they are a health and safety issue and will probably never be
able to be funded by any other means.

Another priority identified was the lack of available green space for families to access
in LMI neighborhoods. The lots targeted for development are mostly small empty
public owned lots that citizens would like to use as parks. One lot is located behind a
neighborhood youth center. Staff of the youth center stated that they would like to
grow a community garden as part of the park development. Beautification efforts
grew during the development of this plan and more citizens have joined the efforts
to ensure CDBG funding extends as far as possible in LMI downtown areas. If
funding permits, citizens would like to extend the beautification efforts from Main
Street to the Saco town line. These projects were given a high priority listing due to
the large amount of citizen participation, including the Heart of Biddeford and Project
Canopy (a volunteer landscaping group), and the number of LMI persons who will be
able to access the parks.

Transportation from LMI neighborhoods and to services and programs is also a
targeted priority for LMI persons. Since Objective 1. of Priority #1 deals with access
and would be implemented by the Recreation Department, what is actually a Pubic
Service project falls here. Seniors and children have a difficult time in the City's LMI
neighborhoods accessing services and programs in the downtown or across town,
including park activities. Often it is too far to walk, especially for seniors and young
children. A mini bus would provide this needed transportation and provide
interaction between seniors and children. This project was given a high priority since
not only would it serve a large number of LMI persons, but would offer the
opportunity for seniors and children to meet. In addition, this project has been on
the Recreation Department's list of targeted needs for several years and also has a
self-sustaining maintenance and operational plan.

Third, a loan/grant program to assist commercial property owners in the downtown
with facade improvements, including design assistance, would eliminate a substantial
amount of the slum and blighted conditions seen in the downtown core. These


3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   39                        Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


improvements would encourage new business development and encourage citizens
and visitors to access the downtown. This was given a priority due to the fact that
several owners of recently acquired properties in the downtown have asked if there
could be help with improvements. At one of the Public Hearings citizens voiced the
need to remove slum and blighted conditions in the downtown.

Fourth, a mill redevelopment plan to encourage growth of present businesses housed
in this complex and business attraction for entities looking for space was a high
priority over the next three years. This would be in conjunction with planning for the
adjacent downtown core. This was given priority because the mills have great
potential for business occupation, affordable housing and other uses. A study by the
Southern Maine Regional Planning Commission was conducted in January 2004 to
Inventory and Survey what space was available and what entities were occupying
the complex to date. A report was published. A plan would be the next step.


3. Obstacles to Meeting Underserved Needs

The City will work diligently to see that all clients and neighborhoods being targeted
for CDBG community development projects are aware of the projects in their
neighborhoods. The City will be responsible for keeping citizens informed and
encouraging for them to participate in projects or spin-off projects whenever
possible.


4. Long and Short Term Community Development Objectives

The City of Biddeford will continue to target business attraction through its Pine Tree
Zones, HUD Entitlement funding, and other avenues, to create permanent jobs and
training opportunities in the City. The community and economic development needs
of the City are circular in nature. Permanent jobs, training opportunities and
affordable housing, whether through redevelopment of the mill complex or
downtown, would begin to solve the issues of better health, safety and economic
conditions for Biddeford's LMI population.


Antipoverty Strategy (91.215 (h))

1. Describe the jurisdiction's goals, programs, and policies for reducing the number
   of poverty level families (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget and
   revised annually). In consultation with other appropriate public and private
   agencies, (i.e. TANF agency) state how the jurisdiction's goals, programs, and
   policies for producing and preserving affordable housing set forth in the housing
   component of the consolidated plan will be coordinated with other programs and
   services for which the jurisdiction is responsible.

2. Identify the extent to which this strategy will reduce (or assist in reducing) the
   number of poverty level families, taking into consideration factors over which the
   jurisdiction has control.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan Antipoverty Strategy response:




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   40                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


The City of Biddeford will continue to work with a variety of agencies and
organizations to implement the Consolidated Plan to reach and enhance the health
and welfare of as many citizens; especially low to moderate-income persons and
special needs populations. Since the City owns no public housing or does not have a
shelter, it will address the issue from an economic and community development
perspective. This will be accomplished by implementing programs that give training
and job opportunities to persons in poverty, while working with various organizations
and agencies through the City's Health and Welfare Department to provide safe and
adequate shelter, food and other services necessary to enable the transition from
poverty and homelessness.

The City is now at a crossroads in facing new challenges and first year
implementation of the Consolidated Plan will be the first step in Biddeford's strategy
to decrease poverty. Under Public Services, the Worker Re-Training and Senior
Advocate programs will assist all ages with opportunities to access training and/or
services. The Worker Re-Training Program will provide training opportunities for jobs
that pay more than minimum wage and that can link to community college
programs. The Senior Advocate Program will assist seniors to understand and access
services and medical programs that will lighten the responsibility now on their
families both economically and emotionally. Enabling seniors to access services and
prescription programs that they may presently be paying for, and giving LMI
caregivers the freedom to access training and employment opportunities will raise
the economic level especially for LMI families.


Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) Coordination (91.315
(k))

1. (States only) Describe the strategy to coordinate the Low-income Housing Tax
   Credit (LIHTC) with the development of housing that is affordable to low- and
   moderate-income families.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan LIHTC Coordination response:

1. The City will explore ways in which it could potentially coordinate the Low-Income
Housing Tax Credit with developers and others for use to fund needed housing in the
community.

NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS

Specific Special Needs Objectives (91.215)

1. Describe the priorities and specific objectives the jurisdiction hopes to achieve
   over a specified time period.

2. Describe how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that
   are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs
   for the period covered by the strategic plan.

3-5 Year Non-homeless Special Needs Analysis response:




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   41                       Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


1. Priorities and Specific Objecives

The City of Biddeford's Health and Welfare Department refers clients with all types of
special needs to the various agencies and organizations that directly assist this
population with services and programs. Many of these services are fairly low key in
visibility due to the sensitive nature of their services and clients. Many of these
services did not come forward in the "call for proposals". This was determined to be
caused in some part by the work intense nature of their services.

According to a 2004 report, "The Government Performance Project - A Case of
Neglect" by the National Association of State and Mental Health Program Directors
Research Institute, Maine ranked 10th highest in per capita spending in mental health
agencies with 30.1% on inpatient services and 65.1% on community services.

Maine's economic climate, per capita income and long winter season contribute to
mental health issues amongst its citizens. Efforts to address these issues place
Maine high on expenditures for social services. However, with increasing economic
pressures combined with the closure of the Augusta Mental Health Institute, more
and more individuals are either living on the streets or trying to make it with minimal
income and assistance. Although entities such as Sweetser, Counseling Services
Inc., and the Department of Health and Human Services provide services for
homeless and nonhomeless special needs persons, there are a myriad of other social
service organizations who also offer vital services. Since the landscape of social
services is broad and complex the City and CAC felt that over the next three years
the following "stand alone" actions would assist in understanding and developing
strategies to assist the special needs population to ensure a better quality of life.

Priority 1 through 5

Objective 1 - Provide for a seamless network of social services and assistance for
special needs populations.

         Actions: 1. Conduct a study to gather all social service information and
         examine gaps in existing systems for all special needs population groups
         (includes diagnostic, rehabilitative, educational, housing and work
          opportunities).


Non-homeless Special Needs (91.205 (d) and 91.210 (d))
Analysis (including HOPWA)
*Please also refer to the Non-homeless Special Needs Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. Estimate, to the extent practicable, the number of persons in various
   subpopulations that are not homeless but may require housing or supportive
   services, including the elderly, frail elderly, persons with disabilities (mental,
   physical, developmental, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families), persons with
   alcohol or other drug addiction, victims of domestic violence, and any other
   categories the jurisdiction may specify and describe their supportive housing
   needs. The jurisdiction can use the Non-Homeless Special Needs Table (formerly
   Table 1B) of their Consolidated Plan to help identify these needs.
    *Note: HOPWA recipients must identify the size and characteristics of the population with HIV/AIDS
    and their families that will be served in the metropolitan area.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                           42                            Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



2. Identify the priority housing and supportive service needs of persons who are not
   homeless but may or may not require supportive housing, i.e., elderly, frail
   elderly, persons with disabilities (mental, physical, developmental, persons with
   HIV/AIDS and their families), persons with alcohol or other drug addiction by
   using the Non-homeless Special Needs Table.

3. Describe the basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority
   needs.

4. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

5. To the extent information is available, describe the facilities and services that
   assist persons who are not homeless but require supportive housing, and
   programs for ensuring that persons returning from mental and physical health
   institutions receive appropriate supportive housing.

6. If the jurisdiction plans to use HOME or other tenant based rental assistance to
   assist one or more of these subpopulations, it must justify the need for such
   assistance in the plan.

3-5 Year Non-homeless Special Needs Analysis response:

See narrative above for Non-Homeless Special Needs Analysis. The City of Biddeford
does not receive HOME or HOPWA funds.


Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA)
*Please also refer to the HOPWA Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. The Plan includes a description of the activities to be undertaken with its HOPWA
   Program funds to address priority unmet housing needs for the eligible
   population. Activities will assist persons who are not homeless but require
   supportive housing, such as efforts to prevent low-income individuals and
   families from becoming homeless and may address the housing needs of persons
   who are homeless in order to help homeless persons make the transition to
   permanent housing and independent living. The plan would identify any
   obstacles to meeting underserved needs and summarize the priorities and
   specific objectives, describing how funds made available will be used to address
   identified needs.

2. The Plan must establish annual HOPWA output goals for the planned number of
   households to be assisted during the year in: (1) short-term rent, mortgage and
   utility payments to avoid homelessness; (2) rental assistance programs; and (3)
   in housing facilities, such as community residences and SRO dwellings, where
   funds are used to develop and/or operate these facilities. The plan can also
   describe the special features or needs being addressed, such as support for
   persons who are homeless or chronically homeless. These outputs are to be
   used in connection with an assessment of client outcomes for achieving housing
   stability, reduced risks of homelessness and improved access to care.

3. For housing facility projects being developed, a target date for the completion of



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                           43               Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.


    each development activity must be included and information on the continued
    use of these units for the eligible population based on their stewardship
    requirements (e.g. within the ten-year use periods for projects involving
    acquisition, new construction or substantial rehabilitation).

4. The Plan includes an explanation of how the funds will be allocated including a
   description of the geographic area in which assistance will be directed and the
   rationale for these geographic allocations and priorities. Include the name of
   each project sponsor, the zip code for the primary area(s) of planned activities,
   amounts committed to that sponsor, and whether the sponsor is a faith-based
   and/or grassroots organization.

5. The Plan describes the role of the lead jurisdiction in the eligible metropolitan
   statistical area (EMSA), involving (a) consultation to develop a metropolitan-wide
   strategy for addressing the needs of persons with HIV/AIDS and their families
   living throughout the EMSA with the other jurisdictions within the EMSA; (b) the
   standards and procedures to be used to monitor HOPWA Program activities in
   order to ensure compliance by project sponsors of the requirements of the
   program.

6. The Plan includes the certifications relevant to the HOPWA Program.

3-5 Year Strategic Plan HOPWA response:

See narrative above for Non-Homeless Special Needs Analysis. The City of Biddeford
does not receive HOPWA funds.


Specific HOPWA Objectives

1. Describe how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that
   are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs
   for the period covered by the strategic plan.

3-5 Year Specific HOPWA Objectives response:

See narrative above for Non-Homeless Special Needs Analysis. The City of Biddeford
does not receive HOPWA funds.



OTHER NARRATIVE

Include any Strategic Plan information that was not covered by a narrative in any
other section.

The City of Biddeford developed its Consolidated Plan through a local grassroots
process and internal data analysis. Although participation in the plan is slowly
gaining numbers, those participating are "getting the word out" to others. The
Community Development Coordinator hears talk on the street referring to "changing
the negative attitude we have about our city" and "solving the problems that are
before us". The City will continue its efforts to stir citizen involvement and keep
citizens talking.



3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   44                      Error! Not a valid link.
Error! Not a valid link.



Also, some local data is not available at this time for the Plan. It is hoped as the
Plan is implemented that more groups comprised of special needs populations will
come forward with data that may be included.

Lastly, although many of the projects listed have timelines and targeted inputs and
outcomes, priority need and objective timelines and outcomes will be more
definitively defined in the Performance Measurement Guidelines to be established
within the next six months.




3-5 Year Strategic Plan                   45                       Error! Not a valid link.

								
To top