Washington Island Course Catalog by E89Eu8

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									Washington Island Course Catalog




                      District of Washington
                  2012-2013 Course Catalog
                     Washington Island Course Catalog
SUBJECTS                                                         CREDITS

English                                                          4

Social Studies                                                   2

-United States Government                                        1

Mathematics                                                      2

Science                                                          2

Technology Education                                             1

Physical Education                                               1½

Speech                                                           1

Health                                                           1 (Taken in 7th & 8th grade)

Electives                                                        8½

CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION                                  24
                                                         Washington Island School District Policy IKF



                                    GRADE POINT AVERAGE

To figure your GPA, use the grading scale below. Assign each of your semester grades a point value.
Add all of the points together and divide by the number of grades. Please note: Any student taking an out-
of-district, online or virtual class is subject to that district’s grading policy. The grade the student
receives will be observed by Washington Island High School.

A+       = 4.33                         Example:         B+      3.33
A        = 4.00                                          B-      2.67
A-       = 3.67                                          C       2.00
B+       = 3.33                                          A       4.00
B        = 3.00                                          C+      2.33
B-       = 2.67                                          A-      3.67
C+       = 2.33                                                   18 --- 6 = 3.0 g.p.a.
C        = 2.00
C-       = 1.67
D+       = 1.33
D        = 1.00
D-       = 0.67
F        = 0.00
                 SAMPLE of Traditional 4 Year Course Map




Freshman Year                              Sophomore Year

American Literature (1.0)                  American Literature (1.0)
American History (1.0)                     American History (1.0)
Algebra 1 (1.0)                            Algebra II/Geometry (1.0)
Physical Science/Biology (1.0)             Physical Science/Biology (1.0)
Speech (1.0)                               Foreign Language or Elective (1.0)
Foreign Language or Elective (1.0)         Technology/Art/Physical Education
Study Hall or Elective                     Study Hall or Elective




Junior Year                                Senior Year

World Literature (1.0)                     British Literature (1.0)
American Government (1.0)                  World History (1.0)
Algebra II/Geometry (1.0)                  Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (1.0)
Chemistry/Physics (1.0)                    Chemistry Physics (1.0)
Elective (Possible Transcripted Course)    Elective (Possible Transcripted Course)
Technology/Art/Physical Education          Technology/Art/Physical Education
Study Hall or Elective                     Study Hall or Elective
NAME:_____________________________________________________



                My 2012 Spring Semester Course List
                     Please fill in and give to Mrs. McClaren Cornell
   Course Number                 Course Name                        Mode of Teaching:
                                                                      ITV, Online,
                                                                       Traditional




NOTES/COMMENTS/QUESTIONS:
                                   Department of English

1054.1 American Literature I: Fall Semester Grades 9-10                            Credits .5

The student will read and analyze literature from 1800’s through 1950, i.e. Edgar Allen Poe,
Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, and Steinbeck. When studying, students are reading World War I
in history, they will be reading All Quiet on the Western Front, the 1920’s The Great Gatsby,
the 1930’s The Grapes of Wrath, (video) and 1941-1945 Night and Hiroshima.

Students will write poetry and essays, and continue to review grammar, punctuation and
vocabulary. Fridays, students will read contemporary novels and quiz on Accelerated Reading.

1054.1 American Literature II: Spring Semester Grades 9-10                                 .5

Students will study poetry by Frost and Dickinson; African-American pieces i.e. Native Son
(video), A Raisin In the Sun (video), “I Have A Dream”; and classics: To Kill A Mockingbird,
When The Legends Die, Old Man and The Sea as well as classic American poetry.

Students will write a research paper on the 1960’s, and review grammar, punctuation and
vocabulary. Fridays, students will read contemporary novels and quiz on Accelerated Reader.

1058.1 World Literature Grades 11-12                                                       1.0

Students will study ancient and modern literature from every continent in the world and discuss
how each piece reflects the culture, as well as what it’s message is for today’s reader. Students
are exposed to selections from the holy books of the five major religions of the world.

Students will write poems and essays, as well as review grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary.
The first three weeks of September students will study the history, architecture, geography and
famous art and artists as well as basic state government facts, and a Shakespeare play, for the
Chicago-Madison trip.

1056.1 British Literature Grades 11-12                                                     1.0

Students will study Beowulf of antiquity through Orwell’s contemporary Animal Farm. There is
an emphasis on Shakespeare and the Renaissance. Gulliver’s Travels, classic poetry, Agatha
Christie mysteries, and Arthur Conon Doyle detective stories end the year. Students will write a
research paper on a human rights issue, write poetry, write essays, and write a journal. Students
will read contemporary novels and quiz on Accelerated Reader.
                           Transcripted Course Offerings:
                          University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
                      and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College
         A transcripted course is a class that gives credit toward both Washington Island High
School and colleges and universities. This is a college-level course that provides dual credit. If
the class listed is using curriculum from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, then this course
would be credited to any university within the University of Wisconsin system. If the course
listed is offered through Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, then the credit earned is
applicable to any NWTC campus. These courses are also weighted as a 5.0 on Washington
Island High School’s 4.0 Grading Scale.




ENG COMP 100-College Writing                                                .5 WIHS/3.0 UWGB
New Fall 2012
       An introductory course in college writing, emphasizing writing as a process. Focuses on
generating and organizing ideas, conducting library research, developing paragraphs, improving
sentence structure. Reviews conventions of punctuation, grammar, spelling, and usage as needed.
Offered through University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

ENG COMP 105- Expository Writing                                            .5 WIHS/3.0 UWGB
New Spring 2013
       College-level writing skills and principles of logical reasoning, effective organization and
development of ideas. Emphasis on research skills and on academic reading and writing.
Offered through University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
                               Department of Social Studies
   4102.1 American History I: Fall Semester Grades 9-10                                     .5

First semester students will study the Cold War Conflicts, Civil Rights, Counter-Culture, Nixon
and Watergate, Conservative Tide, through the War on Terror. Second semester students will
study the First Americans through the Civil War. Every Friday, students will read and discuss a
current event as well as memorize a corresponding map. Local history will be incorporated into
this class.



  4103.1 American History II: Spring Semester Grades 9-10                                   .5

Students will study Reconstruction through World War II. A substantial time will be spent on
World War I and II, analyzing and learning maps and Primary Sources. A personal, researched
journal will be created. Current events will be read and discussed each Friday with
corresponding maps.

4051.1 World History Grades 11-12                                                           1.0

Students will study the geography, history, religion and culture of countries from all around the
world and discuss how these characteristics have affected the country. Students will also meet
the important people involved in the development of each country. After studying each country,
all students will participate in preparing an authentic dinner for the class, after which they will
watch a movie based on the country. One student will create a game for review of each country,
to be played the day before the test. Current events are discussed each Friday and corresponding
maps are memorized.

4151.1 United States Government Grades 11-12                 (Required)                     1.0

Students consider the purpose of Government by watching Lord of the Flies and reading John
Locke. They then study in depth the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation,
Ordinance of 1785, Federalist 10 and the U. S. Constitution. Emphasis is on the meaning of all
facets of the Constitution and Federalism. Students also study Wisconsin, Door County, and
local government, as well as a look at Native-American reservations.

Second semester, a speaker will come in every Wednesday from a local organization and explain
the group’s purpose and goals to acquaint students with how a community is run. Students
spend a day observing court cases and visiting county offices at the Door County Court House.
They attend a meeting of a local organization and observe Parliamentary Procedures. Fridays, a
current event will be read and discussed with corresponding maps memorized.
Historical Perspectives 3.0/4.0

Historical Perspectives 3.0 offers an intense study of history and the relevance of the historical
events through multiple viewpoints and perspectives. Students will examine the American
experience and be challenged to explore the events and people who crafted America from its
earliest beginnings to contemporary times. Students will be challenged to analyze and process
historical events in open forum discussion.
                                   Department of Science

3151.1 Biology        Even Years      Grades 9-12                                          1.0

Prerequisite: None
Topics include basic characteristics of life and ecology, photosynthesis and respiration, how
DNA carries the blueprint for life, cell reproduction processes of mitosis and meiosis, genetics,
evolution, taxonomy, and cell structures and functions of plants and animals, in simple to
complex forms of life. The biology of organisms is studied in simple life forms, plants and
animals, relating form and functions of various body systems. Since we are living things also,
these topics relate to our everyday life. This is a lab class, in which students do microscope and
dissection work, and other lab activities.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, review assignments, notes, lab reports
Recommended for: Anyone going on to college, especially in areas of math, science, medicine,
etc.

3159.1 Physical Science        Odd years     Grades 9-12                                   1.0

Prerequisite: None
This is an introductory chemistry and physics course, covering topics like the nature of science,
Newton’s Laws, motion, force, gravity, work, and energy. We study simple machines and how
they make work easier, thermal energy, and electrical energy and circuits, and nuclear reactions.
Conservation energy and mass are imbued throughout the course. We study waves, like sound
and light, color, mirrors and lenses, and applications. The structure of matter and atoms, solids
liquids and gasses, chemical bonding and reactions, and writing names and formulas for
compounds are studied. Characteristics of elements are related to the periodic table. General
concepts are stressed, with some quantitative problems included.
These concepts and their applications impact us daily in real life.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, review assignments, notes, lab reports
Recommended for: Anyone going on to college, especially in areas of math, science,
engineering, technology, etc.


3107.1 Chemistry              Odd years      Grades 11-12                                  1.0

Prerequisite: Algebra I
In Chemistry we study the structure of matter, atoms, and their electron configurations. This is
related to chemical behavior of the elements and the periodic table, and to types of chemical
bonds. We study molecular structures and crystalline structures as well. Quantitative
relationships of mass, energy, pressure, volume, and temperature are also studied. A variety of
types of chemical reactions are studied. We do experiments in which we take quantitative data,
equations, and experimental evidence to derive our conclusions.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, review assignments, notes, lab reports
Recommended for: Anyone going on to college, especially in areas of math, science,
engineering, technology, water quality, etc.
3051.1 Physics                Even years              Grades 11-12                          1.0

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry
Physics is a quantitative study of calculation of position, velocity, acceleration, mass, energy,
force, and their effects upon each other. Also studied are the addition of velocities and forces as
vectors, heat and thermal effects, conservation laws of energy, mass, and momentum,
characteristics of waves, and of sound and light. We also study optics, electricity and
magnetism, and nuclear physics.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, review assignments, notes, lab reports
Recommended for: Anyone going on to college, especially in areas of math, science,
engineering, technology, etc.
                                Department of Mathematics

2052.1 Algebra I              All years               Grades 8-12                           1.0

In algebra, we study the use and manipulation of symbols that represent quantities. This is
applied in solving linear equations with one unknown, systems of two linear equations with two
unknowns, and quadratic equations. These equations may be given, or derived from real
problem solving situations. The solutions may include positive and negative numbers. We find
roots and powers of expressions, and use graphing to understand functions with linear or
parabolic graphs.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, assignments
Recommended for: Anyone going on to four year college or technical college, therefore
everyone.

2056.1 Algebra II             Even years              Grades 10-12                          1.0

Prerequisite: Algebra I
This course expands upon Algebra I topics, and continues into: exponents, including positive,
negative, and fractional numbers, solving quadratic equations with complex roots, and solving
polynomial equations. We also study exponential and logarithmic, and rational functions and
equations. And we study quadratic relations and graphing of conic sections. We study
sequences and series, and statistics and probabilities, and matrix math, and apply matrix math to
solving systems of equations. We also study applications of the six basic trigonometry functions.
These equations may be given, or derived from real problem solving situations.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, assignments
Recommended for: Anyone going on to four year college or technical college, especially in areas
of math, science, business, engineering, medicine, etc.

2072.1 Geometry               Odd years               Grades 10-12                          1.0

Prerequisite: Algebra I
In this course, students apply deductive reasoning, in proofs and concrete applications in real life
problems, to topics in Euclidean geometry. Topics include: parallel lines, polygons including
congruent triangles, right triangles and their special properties and related trigonometric
relations. We do compass and straightedge constructions and loci problems, to relate geometric
figures to a hands on approach. We calculate areas and volumes. We apply coordinates to
geometric problems, and use transformations of geometric figures.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, assignments
Recommended for: Anyone going on to four year college or technical college, especially in
areas of math, science, business, engineering, medicine, etc.
2103.1 Trig/PreCalc           All years             Grade 12                              1.0

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry
This course is an in depth study of high school math topics and an introduction to college math
topics, including solving real life problems. These include: linear systems, matrix and vector
math such as dot and cross products, inverses and determinants, polynomial and rational
functions and equations, parametric equations, trig functions and graphs, the Law of Sines and
the Law of Cosines. Topics about series include both arithmetic and geometric series, and
infinite series, sigma notation, and mathematical induction. Also included are topics about
statistics and probability, such as independent and dependent events, exclusive or inclusive
events, and combinations and permutations. Introductory calculus includes finding derivatives
and areas, from limits or other methods. Graph theory, conic sections, complex numbers and
polar coordinates are also covered.
Graded on: tests, quizzes, assignments
Recommended for: Anyone going on to four year college or technical college, especially in
areas of math, science, business, engineering, medicine, etc.
                          Department of Technology Education

17002.1 Construction Technology Even Years Grades 9-12                                        1.0
This class provides students with an introduction to (1) the properties of materials used in
construction; (2) the transformation of standard industrial materials into a finished structure; (3)
construction practices basic to the erection of commercial and residential structures; (4) the
basics of cabinet making and millwork, and “green” building practices. Tools, the nature of
materials and methods of construction will be covered along with the mathematics of
construction, estimating and designing of a project. Projects include, but not limited to
individual projects or a class project, such as a utility shed that can be sold off.

1155.1 Communications Technology              Even Years      Grades 9-12                    1.0

This class provides an overview of the productive systems used to create a message.
 The emphasis is on message construction, design, transmission, storage and retrieval of in a
networked world. Integration of digital text, image, audio and video components are the basis
for communication in an electronic world. The aspects of classic graphic arts, video and
photography are studied and applied to integrated digital communication. Projects include:
graphic arts, video, movie trailers, silk screen printing, business communication tools, podcasts
and web-based video presentations. Communication software is used to create the
communications.

11002.1 Integrated Electronic Communication Technology All Years Grades 9-12 1.0

This class combines the classic elements of crafting an oral presentation with digital media.
Emphasis begins with the elements of constructing a message and a systems approach to
presenting the message. Forms of electronic media include Power point, podcasts and video
presentations. Projects include a demonstration, informative and persuasive presentation to an
audience. The make-up of groups and debate are also covered. Diagnosis on individual needs
and training in: listening, speech organization, writing (using six-trait writing), delivery and
confidence building.
                            Department of Physical Education

8002.1 Team Sports            Even years        Grades 9-12                                 1.0

The students develop a knowledge, understanding and working degree of skill in a variety of
team sports which will include 8 units: soccer, flag football, volleyball, floor hockey, basketball,
team handball, speedball, softball.


8016.1 Lifetime Sports              Odd Years         Grades 9-12                          1.0
The students will develop a knowledge, understanding and working degree of skill in a variety of
sports activities commonly participated in by post high school graduates which will include 8
units: tennis, orienteering-geocaching, volleyball, badminton, weight-training, racquetball, golf
and archery.
                               Department of Art and Design
5154.1 Art I            All Years          Grades 9-12                                         1.0
The students will develop an artistic and perceptual awareness in art, a critical and appreciative
understanding of art, art history and its analysis, and an operational degree of skill in selected art
media including but not limited to: drawing, color properties, painting 3-dimensional work,
printing, metal-smithing and art history.


5154.2 Art II     Prerequisite: ART I Grades 10-12                                             1.0

Introduction and application of basic computer paint and draw techniques as well as advanced
studio studies in the areas of drawing, painting, 3-dimensional work (sculpture), art history,
printing and metal-smithing with an emphasis towards production, exhibition and competition.


5154.3 Art III    Prerequisite: ART II      Grades 11-12                                       1.0

Specialized studies arranged with the instructor.


5154.4 Art IV     Prerequisite: ART III Grade 12                                               1.0

Specialized studies arranged with the instructor.
                             Department of Foreign Language
6101.1 Spanish I
       Spanish will be offered through distance learning (ITV) or through an online provider.

6102.1 Spanish II
       Spanish will be offered through distance learning (ITV) or through an online provider.

6103.1 Spanish III
       Spanish will be offered through distance learning (ITV) or through an online provider.
                                                Electives
COMM 133-Fundamentals of Public Address                                          1.0 WIHS/3.0 UWGB
New for Fall 2012
Examination of the principles of oral message preparation and presentation. Students will prepare and
present actual public communications. Offered through UWGB.

22003.1 Study Skills Fall Semester                All grades                                   .5
Students will examine and develop their personal learning styles, world views, mnemonic devices, study
habits, study techniques and organizational skills. This is a project-based class.

22152.1 Careers           Spring Semester          All grades                                         .5
Students will be exposed to different colleges, careers, and other post-secondary options. They will study
personal finance, the art of the job/career/college interview, job application writing, college essay writing,
and resume writing. Members of the community will give speeches and introduce students to a variety of
career options.
Upcoming Transcripted and Other Elective Courses: Dates to Be Determined
Child and Adolescent Development 10-522-106                                       1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
Child and adolescent development from birth through adolescence. Acquaints the learner with the
fundamental tasks of physical, motor, perceptual, cognitive social/emotional and language development.
Via NWTC


COMM 386-Communicating Effectively 31-801-386                                   1.0 WIHS/3.0 UWGB
This class covers interpersonal communication in the workplace and elsewhere, including the function of
interpersonal communication, verbal communication, nonverbal communication, and listening. Offered
through UWGB

COMM 385-Communicating in Writing 31-801-386                                         1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
 This class covers the nature of business writing, business letters, and the job-seeking process, including
resumes, cover letters, thank-you letters, and employment interviews.

General Anatomy and Physiology 10-806-177                                       1.0 WIHS/4.0 NWTC
 This class provides an overview of the human anatomy/physiology using a body-systems approach,
emphasizing the interrelationships between form/function at the gross and microscopic levels.
(Prerequisite: High School Chemistry with a "C" or better OR College Chemistry transfer credit with a
grade of "C" or better) Offered through NWTC


Medical Terminology 10-501-101                                                     1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
 This class focuses on the component parts of medical terms: Prefixes, suffixes, and root words. Students
practice formation, analysis and reconstruction of terms. Emphasis on spelling, definition and
pronunciation. Introduction to operative, diagnostic, therapeutic and symptomatic terminology of all
body systems, as well as systemic and surgical terminology. Offered through NWTC


Intro to Renewable and Sustainable Energy 10-480-101                             1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
This class provides an overview of various renewable energy technologies and sustainable design
practices and their current applications. Emphasis will be placed on energy consumption, efficiency, and
conservation. Offered through NWTC

Introduction to Educational Practices 10-522-103                                     1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
This class explores the fundamentals of teaching methodologies, learning styles, factors influencing
teaching effectiveness, strategies to meet the needs of all learners, questioning techniques, and basic
assessment practices. Offered through NWTC


ENG 101-Intro to Film                                                              .5 WIHS/3.0 UWGB
New (To Be Determined)
        Examines film as literature, as a visual and aural art, as technology and as a medium
which both reflects and influences social trends, values, and attitudes. Involves viewing a range
of films and examining their place in history.
 Offered through University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
CHEM 211: Principles of Chemistry I and Lab                                        1.0 WIHS/5.0 UWBG
        This lecture and lab class studies atomic structure, chemical bonding, periodic table,
thermochemistry, properties of gasses, molecular structure and properties, solutions, chemical equations,
thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, solubility, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction and
nuclear reactions.
Offered through University of Wisconsin-Green Bay


MATH 10-804-107 College Mathematics                                1.00 for WIHS/3.00 for NWTC

An introductory level course designed to review and develop fundamental concepts of arithmetic, algebra,
geometry, and statistics. Emphasis will be placed on computational skills and applications of rational
numbers; problem solving skills with ratios, proportions, and percent; basic principles and application of
algebra, geometry, graphing, and statistics; measurement skills in U.S. Customary and Metric Systems;
and the use of calculators as a tool.
Offered through NWTC

Science of Wood Technics 31-806-354                                               1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
This class studies measurement systems, problem solving methods, properties of matter, forces, energy,
work, power, simple machines, pressure, heat, electricity, and sound. Offered through NWTC

Solidworks Fundamentals 10-606-157                                                 1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
This class studies terminology, software operation and interface basics, creating basic models, creating
casting and forging models, revolved features, Solidworks drawing environment and fully dimensioned
orthographic drawings. (Requisite: 10-606-119, Sketching-Technical, OR 10-614-113, 2D Essentials
Sketching-Technical; Prerequisite: Familiarity with Windows file management). Offered through NWTC

Welding-Cutting and Visual 31-442-301                                            1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
This is a visual inspection of weld and cut edges, manual and machine oxy fuel gas cutting, air carbon are
cutting, plasma arc cutting, and mechanical cutting methods. (Prerequisite: Accepted into Welding
program) Offered through NWTC

Wood Techniques-Cabinetry 1 31-409-321                                           1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
 Size and cut frame members for doweling, mortise and tenant, pocket drilling, calculate panel sizes and
supports, assemble cabinet both upper & lower. Offered through NWTC

Wood Techniques-Carpentry 1 31-410-311                                           1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
The basics of tool and equipment safety, materials common to residential construction and proper
application, framing theory of floor, wall, and roof systems. Offered through NWTC

Wood Techniques-Carpentry 2 31-410-312                                              1.0 WIHS/3.0 NWTC
The theory and practice of roof and stair calculations and construction, as well as exterior finish systems
and door and window installation. (Co-requisite: 31-410-311, Wood Techniques-Carpentry 1) Offered
through NWTC

ART 243 Introduction to Photography                                                1.0 WIHS/3.0 UWGB

The creative process in photography is studied to develop visual perception and photographic design
ability through active participation, photographic exercises, and discussions analyzing student work.
Camera (35mm) to function in all modes required.
Offered through UWGB
PSYCH 102: Introduction to Psychology                                             1.0 WIHS/3.0 UWGB
New for Fall 2012
Understanding of behavior from psychophysiological, cognitive, social and clinical perspectives. This
class covers important issues, methods and findings in the study of the psychological process.
Offered through UWGB

SOC 10-809-196: Introduction to Sociology                                      1.0 WIHS/3.0NWTC
New for Spring 2013
Sociology is the study of society. The traditional focuses of sociology have included social
stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, and deviance. As all
spheres of human activity are affected by the interplay between social structure and individual
agency, sociology has gradually expanded its focus to further subjects, such
as health, medical, military and penal institutions, the Internet, and the role of social activity in
the development of scientific knowledge.
Offered through NWTC
                              IQ Academy Course Descriptions
Art/Music

Art Appreciation (.5)
This one‐semester course will introduce learners to the various forms of the visual arts, such as
painting, sculpture, film, and more. Students will learn how to look at a work of art, identify and
compare key characteristics in artworks, and understand the role art has played throughout history.
Through hands‐on activities, virtual museum tours, discussion, and research, learners will develop
an overall appreciation for the art they encounter in their daily lives. Prerequisites: none

AP Art History (1.00)
AP Art History is designed to foster in students an understanding and knowledge of architecture,
sculpture, painting, and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts. In the
course, students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past
and the present from a variety of cultures. In addition to visual analysis, this course emphasizes
understanding works in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender and the functions
and effects of works of art. Prior art training is not prerequisite and nor does the course cater
exclusively to future Art History majors. The AP Exam fee is approximately $80. Prerequisites:
sophomore, junior, or senior standing

Music Appreciation (.5)
This one semester course will introduce students to the fundamentals of creating, enjoying, and
listening to music. Students will learn about the basics of creating music including melody,
harmony, and rhythm. Students will also explore instrumental and vocal timbre and will critique
musical performances. Students will also be exposed to many musical styles including traditional,
folk, jazz, opera, popular, and classical music. Through unique online software, students will be
able to compose, arrange, and share their own musical ideas. Students will learn to appreciate the
complexity and the art of music. Prerequisites: none

Business Education

Accounting I (.5)
Accounting… the Language of Business. Success in the business world begins with an
understanding of Accounting. Students will learn the basic accounting procedures including
preparing financial reports for starting, running, and managing a business. If you have plans to
attend college to pursue a degree in any area of business (Marketing, Administration,
Management, Finance, Law, etc.), this course is for you! Prerequisites: none

Entrepreneurship (.5)
Entrepreneurial literacy is a real American necessity, whether you work for someone else or start
your own business. These are the skills that empower everyone to succeed in any type of job in
any industry and fuel the American economy. Do you have what it takes to operate and manage
your own business? This course helps students build a business from the ground up, experiencing
all aspects of planning a new venture--from determining your personal vision to conducting a
market analysis, to looking at start-up costs. Entrepreneurship combines the flexibility of Internet-
based learning with the benefits of face-to-face instruction. Successful completion earns you three
WCTC credits, which are transferable to some four-year universities. Prerequisites: none

Personal Finance (.5)
Understanding financial management concepts is an important life skill. From credit to insurance
to taxes, it is imperative that students understand the consequences of their choices. Wisely
managing their money, students become citizens that are more responsible. A thorough
understanding of financial concepts, with practical application through activities and projects, will
enable students to leave this course with applicable, useful skills for life. This course surveys the
basic personal financial needs of most individuals and emphasizes the basics of budgeting, saving,
checking, investments, credit, the wise use of insurance, and paying and preparing income tax
returns. After high school, students face a world filled with possibilities, and the more knowledge
they can acquire, the higher the probability that their financial future will be secure. Students
taking this course will learn to better prepare for their financial futures. Prerequisites: none




English

English 9 (1.00)
English 9 is a full year course. First semester the focus is on learning the various purposes of
writing, with a focus on introducing research skills and learning how to analyze a piece of fiction.
The two literary genres read first semester are short stories and poetry. All literature reading comes
from the textbook The Elements of Literature - Third Course. Second semester introduces students
to three more genres: the nonfiction essay, drama, and the novel. Students read Shakespeare's
Romeo & Juliet as well as George Orwell's Animal Farm. Students further hone their research and
analytical skills during second semester. Prerequisites: none

Honors English 9 (1.00)
Honors English 9 is a full year course. First semester students review the various purposes of
writing, with a focus on introducing research skills and learning how to analyze a piece of fiction.
The two literary genres read first semester are short stories and poetry, and the literature read
comes from the textbook The Elements of Literature - Third Course. In the honors track, students
must complete an additional project each semester. During first semester, students will
independently read a novel and write a formal book review. Second semester introduces students
to three more genres: the nonfiction essay, drama, and the novel. Students read Shakespeare's
Romeo & Juliet as well as George Orwell's Animal Farm. Students further hone their research and
analytical skills during second semester. Second semester honors students independently read a
nonfiction book and give a Thematic Analysis Speech relating to the book. Prerequisites: none

English 10 (1.00)
This year long required course covers world literature through the use of several reading pieces.
Students will learn how to read and respond to literature utilizing a variety of writing styles. In
addition, students will learn about literary elements and how those elements are present within the
writing pieces. Semester 1 will cover the following: Short Story Unit, Poetry Unit, “Antigone”, by
Sophocles. Semester 2 will cover the following: Non-fiction Unit, The Old Man and The Sea, by
Ernest Hemingway, Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand.
Prerequisites: successful completion of English 9 or Honors English 9

Honors English 10 (1.00)
This year-long required course covers literature through the use of several reading pieces. Students
will learn how to read and respond to literature utilizing a variety of writing styles. In addition,
students will learn about literary elements and how those elements are present within the writing
pieces. The curriculum offers students an opportunity to refine their reading, writing, language,
and speaking skills developed in English 9. Semester 1 will cover the following: Short Story Unit,
Poetry Unit, “Antigone”, by Sophocles, Independent Novel- non-fiction. Semester 2 will cover the
following: Non-fiction Unit, The Old Man and The Sea, by Ernest Hemingway, Cyrano de
Bergerac by Edmond Rostand, Independent Novel- fiction
Prerequisites: since this is a pre-advanced placement prep course, students should maintain a B or
higher in previous English courses.


English 11 (1.00)
The focus of this course is American literature. We will use Holt-McDougal American Literature
online textbook as our main source of material. The course is designed chronologically and moves
from literature of the first settlers of American to contemporary literature. Students will read both
fiction and non-fiction pieces and experiment with different types of writing, from personal essays
to persuasive and research-based papers. There are also visual presentation projects incorporated
into the class to teach students how to create an effective presentation, practice speaking skills and
allow for some creativity. Prerequisites: successful completion of English 9 -10, or Honors 9-10

Honors English 11 (1.00)
Honors English 11 is a year-long required English course. The focus is American literature. We
will use Holt-McDougal American Literature online textbook as our main source of material. The
course is designed chronologically and moves from literature of the first settlers of American to
contemporary literature. Students will read both fiction and non-fiction pieces and experiment with
different types of writing, from personal essays to persuasive and research-based papers. There are
also visual presentation projects incorporated into the class to teach students how to create an
effective presentation, practice speaking skills and allow for some creativity. The honors track has
an additional Enrichment Project built in each semester to enhance the literature read and also
further develop writing and speaking skills in preparation for AP English 12 and college level
English courses. Prerequisites: successful completion of Honors English 9 and Honors English 10
(Since this is a pre-AP prep course, students should maintain a B or higher in previous English
courses)

British Literature (1.00)
British Literature is a year-long English elective. The class provides a survey of British literature.
We will use Holt-McDougal British Literature online textbook as our main source of material.
The course is designed chronologically and moves from literature of the Middle Ages to
contemporary British literature. Students will read both fiction and non-fiction pieces and
experiment with different types of writing, including literary analysis, persuasive writing and
research-based writing. There are also visual presentation projects incorporated into the class to
teach students how to create an effective presentation, practice speaking skills and allow for some
creativity. The class is designed for college bound students and will prepare students for the rigors
of college-level English courses. Prerequisites: English 9-11, or Honors 9-11

Composition (.5)
This semester long English elective focuses on writing that students will likely encounter in
college and the workplace. Various types of writing will be covered including business writing
(resume and cover letter), college admissions essay, research-based writing and persuasive writing.
The 6 traits of writing are used to assess each student's progress during the course of the semester.
Prerequisites: none

Creative Writing (.5)
This semester-long elective course focuses on writing for publication in three genres: poetry, short
story, and creative nonfiction. The purpose of this class is to encourage students to cultivate the
habits, attitudes and the time management of a writer in a writing community. The material is
taught through the reading of a variety of short stories, poems and essays. Emphasis is placed on
incorporating advanced techniques into student writing as well as understanding and recognizing
these techniques in literature. Students will be expected to enter final products into professional
and/or student contests and seek out ways to publish writing. They will conference with the
instructor, participate in writer response/workshop groups, read contemporary published authors,
keep and regularly write in a writer’s notebook, and experiment with and revise writing routinely.
Prerequisites: English 9-11 or Honors 9-11


Basic Grammar (.5)
This semester-long elective is designed for students in grades 9-12 who struggle with the
fundamentals of writing. The purpose of the course is to develop grammar skills to improve
student writing. The course begins with a review of the parts of speech; further topics covered are
capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and sentence structure and fluency. Prerequisites: none

Reading Comprehension (.5)
This course is a year-long elective (though it can be taken on a semester basis) for students grades
9-12 who are below grade level in reading ability. The class uses the online reading program
called Achieve3000. This program gives students an initial reading assessment to set their reading
level then delivers all content for the class at the student’s reading level; it is a highly
individualized program. Students work at their ability level in the areas of reading, vocabulary
development, writing, and grammar. The goal of the class is to advance each student’s reading
level by the end of the semester or year. Prerequisites: none
Speech (.5)
This course concentrates on the structure, composition, style, and delivery techniques of a variety
of oral performances. Students learn about the communication process, including verbal and
nonverbal strategies as well as effective listening techniques. They will participate in small groups
to acquire discussion and problem solving skills. They will also learn how to research, write, and
deliver short speeches. Students will also gain experiences with performing in front of an audience
in face-to-face, technology mediated, and business style presentations. Significant interaction with
other classmates, as well as attendance at specific Elluminate sessions is required. Prerequisites:
none

AP English 12 Literature and Composition (1.00)
Advanced Placement English 12 is recommended for the college bound student. Passing of the
course as well as a score of 3 or higher on the AP English Literature & Composition Exam will
result in the student earning college retro-credits. The class will engage students in a rigorous study
of literature ranging from early texts such as Sophocles' Oedipus Rex and Homer's The Odyssey to
twentieth century poetry and fiction. Students will learn to synthesize textual details and historical
context and express their thoughts effectively in writing. The overall purpose of the class is to not
only prepare students for the AP Exam but also foster an enjoyment of and respect for literature.
Prerequisites: English 9-11

Family and Consumer Science

Career Planning (.5)
In Career planning students will use online inventories to explore career and life options that fit
their individual interests, needs, and skills. Students begin with a thorough examination of their
own interests, skills, aptitudes and personality styles. Students will then interpret individual results
as they explore potential career matches and create an occupational objectives plan. Along the
way, students will learn about factors influencing the ever changing job market and job skills
necessary to gain and maintain employment. Students will practice job applications, resume
writing, and interview skills. Prerequisites: none

Child Development (.5)
The course is a study of the principles of child growth and development for conception though
adolescence. The focus of the course is on meeting children’s physical, social, emotional and
cognitive needs in their homes and classrooms. Students apply their learning in various educational
settings. This course is essential for students with goals to be a parent, k-12 educator, child
psychologist, pediatrician, family practitioner, social worker, child care provider, and family and
human service careers. This course meets the Wisconsin state mandate for Shaken Baby
Syndrome. Prerequisites: none

Life Skills (.5)
Life Skills is designed to increase student knowledge and ability in skills necessary for everyday
living. The course emphasizes goal-setting, decision making and problem solving, communication,
healthy lifestyles and relationships, nutrition, personal safety, citizenship and
consumerism. Prerequisites: none
Information Technology

Computer Applications I (.5)
This class is the ideal way to learn the essential computer skills needed in a student’s future
regardless of career choice. A hands-on approach is used to create word processing documents,
spreadsheets, charts, presentations and databases using Microsoft Office. Students will be
prepared to take Microsoft Office Specialist certification exams. (Transcripted credit with WCTC).
Prerequisites: none

Computer Applications II (.5)
Computer Applications II will increase your knowledge of the productivity capabilities of our
digital world. Efficient use of software means your preparedness for collegiate computer skills
along with career skills will be way above average! Using a project-based curriculum, you’ll
concentrate on the advanced features of Microsoft Office, publishing software and Web 2.0 tools.
Successful completion will earn you three WCTC credits, which are transferable to some four-year
universities. Students will also be prepared to take the Microsoft Office Specialist certification
exam. Prerequisites: successful completion of Computer Apps I

Keyboarding/Word Processing (.5)
Prepare yourself for the computerized workplace. This course is intended for students who need to
learn or improve their keyboarding technique and skills. Students will master touch keyboarding
and improve their proofreading, editing, and writing skills while formatting letters, reports, tables,
and other documents. Master the skill you can’t do without in today’s world where the keyboard is
the primary means of communication and technology input. This course is recommended for
Computer Applications I. Prerequisites: none

Digital Imaging I (.5)
In Digital Imaging, students begin by learning the basic functions of digital cameras and general
photographic concepts such as composition, subject, exposure, lighting and flash. Students then
learn how to use the GIMP, an image-processing program to create and manipulate digital images.
Specific skills taught in this course include using layers, cropping images, color and lighting
concepts such as hue and saturation. As a culminating activity, students build a portfolio of work to
demonstrate the skills they have learned. Students do not need to have access to a digital camera or
photography experience to take this course. Prerequisites: none

Digital Imaging II (.5)
In Digital Imaging 2, after reviewing the image editing skills learned in Digital Imaging, students
will learn more about the capabilities of the GIMP program to modify images. Specific skills
taught in this course will include more advanced image modification techniques such as using
scripts, the GAP animation package, adding light effects, photo separation and retouching,
removing color casts and creating web graphics such as logos and buttons. At the end of the
course, students will submit a portfolio that demonstrates the skills they have learned and will
describe how their image editing skills have changed and improved throughout the course. In order
to take this course, students should have successfully completed Digital Imaging, and have a good
grasp of the basic GIMP tools, but do not need to have access to a camera to take the course.
Prerequisites: successful completion of Digital Imaging I

Programming I (JAVA) (.5)
An introduction to the programming language JAVA. The basics of this programming language
will be covered along with basic programming logic. A basic history of the development of
programming languages and the Java language will be covered, a long with the program basics of
Java and the Applet basics of Java. Graphical User Interface will be introduced in Semester II.
Prerequisites: a basic understanding of computer applications

Programming II (Java) (.5)
This course will continue the programming logic learned in semester I and introduce GUI,
(Graphical User Interface) allowing students to use the GUI to create small practical GUI based
programs which users can use for practical use. i.e. menus, mathematically conversion apps.
Applets for web use will be covered as well. Prerequisites: Programming Java I

Web Design (Editors) (.5)
This one-semester course introduces students to the mechanics and elements of web design.
Students will learn the concepts of planning and organizing websites, and documentation and
copyright issues associated with website design. Students will progress through the course,
engaging in a variety of project-based assessments to evaluate their understanding. After
completing the course, students will be able to have a better understanding of planning and
organizing a website, understand elements of design, explain copyright and fair use doctrines and
how they apply to website creation, and use a WYSIWIG editor and other online tools to create a
website. Prerequisites: none

Web Development A (HTML and CSS) (.5)
In Web Development A (HTML & CSS), students will learn how to create their own web sites by
writing their own HTML code, the backbone behind all web sites. Additionally, students will learn
how to include & use CSS to streamline the development of their sites. Students will publish their
work on a web server. For the culminating final project, students will gain real-world experience as
they create a "real" web site for an adult. Prerequisites: none

Web Development B (Java Script) (.5)
Students will learn how to enhance their websites with dynamic content by adding JavaScript code
to their pages. Students will be introduced to JavaScript basics from a web development
perspective. By the end of the course, they will be able to write their own simple JavaScript
applications. A good working knowledge of HMTL and an introduction to CSS is required for
enrollment. Prerequisites: successful completion of Web Development A (HTML & CSS) or
equivalent knowledge, and a strong Algebra background is also required
Mathematics

Pre Algebra (1.00)
This course is for the student who needs reinforcement of math skills before taking high school
Algebra. It introduces algebraic concepts and builds on prior mathematical knowledge. Students
will review the basics of fractions, decimals, percents, and the order of operations. Students will
be introduced to the set of Integers and how to calculate with positive and negative numbers,
number sets and properties, variables, and solving equations and inequalities. Students will learn
some basic statistic concepts including data collection, analysis and graphing. Students will begin
Coordinate Plane graphing, linear graphing and learn about functions. Students will move from
Rational numbers into Irrational numbers while studying square roots and the Pythagorean
Theorem for right triangles. The basic geometric concepts of triangles, polygons, perimeter, area,
surface area and volume will also be introduced. Prerequisites: none

Algebra I (1.00)
1st semester: Algebra I is the introductory course in the typical high school level mathematics
sequence. Coursework includes evaluating expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities,
graphing lines, operations, and developing algebraic problem solving techniques. All students must
take Algebra I before enrolling in any other mathematics course. 2nd semester: Algebra I is the
introductory course in the typical high school level mathematics sequence. Coursework includes
solving quadratic equations, solving linear systems, performing polynomial arithmetic, solving and
exponential and rational equations, and developing algebraic problem solving techniques. All
students must take Algebra I before enrolling in any other mathematics course. Prerequisites:
successful completion of Math 8 or Pre-Algebra

Geometry (1.00)
Geometry is intended to follow Algebra I in the typical high school level mathematics sequence. It
is designed to help students learn and apply geometric concepts to the real world. First semester
coursework includes geometric reasoning, properties of plane and solid figures and the
relationships among these figures, and logical proofs. Second semester coursework includes
triangles, right triangle trigonometry, surface area and volume of 3 dimensional figures, circles,
and transformations. Successful completion of Geometry (or Honors Geometry) is required for
admission to most colleges. Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra 1

Honors Geometry (1.00)
Honors Geometry covers the same topics as Geometry, with more emphasis placed on formal
proof and applications and many concepts are also covered in greater depth. Students enrolled in
this course are expected to have demonstrated a high level of achievement in Algebra I. Successful
completion of Geometry (or Honors Geometry) is required for admission to most colleges.
Prerequisites: high level of achievement in Algebra I

Algebra II (1.00)
Algebra II is intended to follow Geometry or Honors Geometry and is required for admission to
most post-secondary educational institutions. Topics covered include the real and complex number
systems, solution techniques for linear and quadratic equations, systems of linear equations and
inequalities, polynomials, functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic and rational),
triangle trigonometry, probability and statistics, sequences and series, and real world applications
of all algebraic techniques presented. Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra 1 and
Geometry

Pre Calculus and Trigonometry (1.00)
Students, as mathematic analysts, will investigate how advanced mathematics concepts can solve
problems encountered in operating national parks. The purpose of this course is to study functions
and develop skills necessary for the study of calculus. The pre-calculus course includes analytical
geometry and trigonometry. A graphics calculator is strongly recommended for this course. The
teacher will suggest a specific type. The cost will be about $90. Pre-requisites: successful
completion of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II

Math for Consumers (1.00)
This course provides a practical and comprehensive foundation for everyday math skills. It
covers relevant topics for daily survival including: getting a job, wages, tips, paycheck taxes,
FICA, deductions; cost of buying and maintaining a vehicle; saving and checking accounts with
simple and compound interest calculations; credit cards and how interest is calculated; cost of
raising a family; renting an apartment or buying a home and getting a mortgage; planning a
monthly budget; all types of insurances and filling out income tax forms. It also reviews essential
number and algebraic concepts including: fractions, decimals, percents, order of operations,
solving equations, graphing, linear graphing, and exponential graphing. Prerequisites: successful
completion of Algebra I

Integrated Math (1.00)
This course intended for the student who had passed Algebra I, possibly with difficulty, who is not
yet ready to take Geometry. First semester will review number sense, mathematical operations,
algebraic skills, and probability. Second semester reviews algebraic skills and introduces
geometric concepts. Problem solving, communication skills, reasoning and relating mathematics
to the real world are stressed.
Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra I

AP Calculus A/B (1.00)
This is a college level course that is designed to prepare students to be successful on the College
Board's Advanced Placement Calculus AB Test. This course introduces limits, differentiation, and
integration of functions. Students will find and evaluate finite and infinite limits graphically,
numerically, and analytically. They will find derivatives using a variety of methods including The
Chain Rule and Implicit Differentiation. They will use the First Derivative Test and The Second
Derivative Test to analyze and sketch functions. Each unit contains exam preparation content for
the AP Calculus AB exam. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator for this course.
A suggested type will be recommended by the teacher. Pre-requisites: successful completion of
Pre-Calculus
AP Calculus B/C (1.00)
AP Calculus BC is designed to prepare students who have successfully completed AP Calculus AB
for the College Board's Advanced Placement Calculus BC Test. Since the course will continue to
build on the concepts taught in AP Calculus AB, it is expected that students are proficient with the
skills covered in that course. Additional topics covered beyond those in the AB course include
parametric functions, polar functions, vector functions, sequences, and series. Advanced
antidifferentiation techniques are also taught. Students will be required to have a graphing
calculator for this course. A suggested type will be recommended by the teacher. Prerequisites:
successful completion of AP Calculus A/B

Physical Education/Health

Health (.5)
This course will help students develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy
decisions that allow them to stay active, safe and informed. The lessons and activities are designed
to introduce the student to important aspects of the main types of health: emotional and mental,
social and consumer, and physical. Among other topics, students will explore nutrition,
understanding and avoiding disease, first aid and CPR, and human sexuality. Students will find out
about the components of a healthy lifestyle and ways to approach making healthy choices and
decisions. Prerequisites: none

Intro to Fitness (.5)
Through this online Physical Education course, students will explore many diverse activities, and
will learn a wide variety of fitness concepts that they will be able to use in their everyday life.
Students will learn about physical fitness and how their body works by studying static and
dynamic balance, linear and rotary motion, anatomy and biomechanics. Lifelong skills – such as
golf, tennis, Frisbee, and orienteering, along with stress management concepts incorporated into
Yoga and Pilates – will also be taught. Students will develop a sense of self-esteem and
accomplishment through completion of cardiorespiratory activities and routines, attaining their
personal fitness goals, and learning to care for their body. Integrated assignments will show
students that content areas of Science, Social Studies, Math and English are relevant throughout
Physical Education, and apply in our everyday activities. Pre-assessments and section quizzes will
be given weekly, with exams given after each unit to assess content understanding. After
completion of this course students, will have the knowledge to stay fit and stay active for a
lifetime. Prerequisites: none

Nutrition and Wellness (.5)
This .5 credit course will introduce the student to an overview of good nutrition principles that are
needed for human physical & mental wellness. Discussion of digestion, basic nutrients, weight
management, sports & fitness, and life-span nutrition is included. Application to today's food and
eating trends, plus learning to assess for reliable nutrition information is emphasized. Prerequisites:
none
Personal Fitness (.5)
This course focuses on the fundamental components and principles of fitness. The course examines
safety guidelines, proper technique, and exercise principles such as the FITT. Students will assess
their current level of fitness in relation to the five components of physical fitness: flexibility,
cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition. Students
will also learn strategies to help them begin, design, and maintain an exercise program to keep
them fit for life. Prerequisites: none

Fitness Lifestyle Design (.5)
Throughout this course, students will demonstrate competency or proficiency in self-selected
activities including applying laws of motion and mechanical principles. Students will achieve and
maintain a health enhancing level of physical fitness including cardiovascular fitness, muscular
strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition activities. Students will also analyze and
evaluate personal performance and regular participation in physical activity using technology to
assess, enhance, and maintain fitness and skills. While this is an online Personal Fitness course, the
course standards do require students to participate in weekly cardiovascular, flexibility and
strength and endurance activities. Prerequisites: none

Science

Anatomy and Physiology (1.00)
This course is a fascinating in-depth exploration of the human body. The level of rigorousness is
designed for students who are considering allied health or medicine as a career path; however, it
can also be used by the student to enrich or enhance their biological background. The course will
use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry
on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems
and experiences we face as humans. Online interactives will be required with each unit with an
emphasis on vocabulary building as anatomy is based on a strong vocabulary derived from both
Latin and Greek. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of
the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.
Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Earth Science (1.00)
In the first semester the student will explore the composition and dynamics of the solid earth and
its oceans. Specific attention will be given to composition of matter, minerals, rock formation and
the rock cycle, weathering and erosion, physical features of the earth's surface, mapping and
coordinate systems, interior structure, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, fresh water, ground
water, ocean movement and oceanography. The student will encounter information through print,
audio, and video online sources, doing research, performing lab exercises, and exchanging ideas in
discussion boards. The student will be assessed on both the level of their knowledge of the
concepts encountered and their ability to apply those concepts to real world situations. In the
second semester the student will explore a survey of topics related to the earth. Specific attention
will be given to the geologic and fossil records supporting geologic time scales, structure and
characteristics of the atmosphere, energy flow in the atmosphere, determination and change in
world climates, effect of pressure, temperature, and moisture on the atmosphere, weather and
forecasting, effects of the moon and sun, the solar system, structures in the universe. The student
will encounter information through print, audio, and video online sources, doing research,
performing lab exercises, and exchanging ideas in discussion boards. The student will be assessed
on both the level of their knowledge of the concepts encountered and their ability to apply those
concepts to real world situations. Prerequisites: none

Environmental Science (1.00)
This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental science and
environmental studies. Environmental Science is a multidisciplinary field that draws from all the
sciences in addition to other fields. This course will help students better understand the relationship
between humans and the world in which we live, including environmental impact of population
growth on natural resources; mineral and resource extraction; water resource uses; and renewable
and non-renewable sources for power generation. The course will evaluate natural environmental
processes, as well as human impacts to these processes. Prerequisites: Life Science and Physical
Science

Physical Science (1.00)
During the first semester the student will be able to describe and apply the basic concepts of
chemistry - structure of matter, atomic theory, organization and trends of the periodic table,
chemical reactions, chemical equations, solutions, acids/bases, and organic chemistry. Students
will use a variety of methods of instruction including, reading, research, online discussion,
experiments, and problem solving. Students will be assessed on both their knowledge of factual
information and their application of those concepts to real world situations. During the second
semester the student will be able to describe and apply the basic concepts of physics - nature of
energy, Electrical Energy, electromagnetism, thermal energy, sound, geometric optics, nuclear
energy, fluids, motion, forces, and Newton's Laws. Students will use a variety of methods of
instruction including, reading, research, online discussion, experiments, and problem solving.
Students will be assessed on both their knowledge of factual information and their application of
those concepts to real world situations. Prerequisites: none

Biology (1.00)
This course is an introduction to general biology and to the processes of scientific inquiry and
thinking. It will include the fundamental principles of living organisms including physical and
chemical properties of life, cellular organization and function, the transfer of energy through
metabolic systems, cellular reproduction, the classification of living things, the six kingdoms of
life will be examined. The main focus is to present biological information in an understandable and
straight forward way that will capture the students’ interest dealing with up to date principles and
concepts.
Prerequisites: none

Chemistry (1.00)
This course emphasizes the mathematical, theoretical, and experimental basis of modern
chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the use of theoretical and mathematical concepts to explain and
predict chemical behavior. An overview of the significant learning objectives that are presented in
this course include Measurement, Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Conservation of Matter,
Stoichiometry, Gases, Acids and Bases, Solutions, Reaction Rates, Chemical Equilibrium, Organic
Nomenclature, and Nuclear Chemistry. Prerequisites: Algebra I

 Physics (1.00)
This course is an algebra based survey which explores the fundamental physical and energy
processes in our world. Students encounter the material through print, audio, and visual online
sources, practice problem sets, lab experiments, discussion board exchanges, and real time
instruction. Their achievement is assessed through objective and short answer quizzes, written lab
reports, discussion board posts, and exams composed of both objective and free response questions.
The first semester includes the topics of kinematics, two-dimensional motion, Forces, Newton's
Laws of Motion, work, energy, momentum, circular motion, and heat. The second semester
includes the topics of vibration and waves, sound, light, optics, electrostatics, current electricity,
magnetism, and atomic physics. Prerequisites: Algebra I

Forensic Science (.5)
The world of forensic science encompasses many science disciplines as they are used to support
the legal system. Often thought of only in connection with criminal cases, the forensic techniques
have a wide range of application. This survey course of the fundamentals of forensic science helps
the student understand how the concepts of crime scene documentation, drug analysis, toxicology,
microscopy, serology, DNA analysis, fiber analysis, fingerprinting, document analysis, computer
forensics, and fire analysis are used in criminalistics. Students encounter the material through
print, audio, and video online sources, discussion board exchanges, lab exercises, and real time
instruction. Their achievement is assessed though objective and short answer quizzes, discussion
board posts, lab reports, and research projects. Prerequisites: none

AP Biology (1.00)
This course is a comprehensive analysis of general biology that includes biochemistry, molecular
biology, genetics, mechanisms of evolution, evolutionary history of biological diversity, plant and
animal form and function, and ecology. The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of
a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors or pre-medical students their
first year. The textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, discussion topics and kinds of
labs done in this course are equivalent to those taking this course in college. College Board
guidelines are followed in determining the course. The AP Exam fee is approximately $80.
Prerequisites: Biology and Junior or Senior Standing

AP Chemistry (1.00)
AP Chemistry builds students' understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying
the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, students move on to solve quantitative chemical
problems and explore how molecular structure relates to chemical and physical properties.
Students will examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to predictably
transform them through chemical reactions. AP Chemistry prepares students for the AP Exam. The
content aligns to the scope and sequence specified by the College Board and to widely used
textbooks. The AP Exam fee is approximately $80. Prerequisites: Chemistry and Junior or Senior
Standing
AP Physics (1.00)
Physics is the science of matter and energy - how the universe is put together. The course has two
major goals: 1) to prepare students to be successful on the AP Physics B Exam and 2) to provide
students with an understanding of how our world works as it does. This course is a non-calculus
survey course covering five general areas: Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and
magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. The first semester includes the
topics of kinematics, Newton's Laws of Motion, work, power, and energy, circular motion and
rotation, fluids, and thermal physics. The second semester includes the topics of electrostatics,
current electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, optics, nuclear physics, and the standard model.
Students will encounter the material through print, audio, and visual online sources, readings and
problem sets in a textbook, lab experiments and real time instruction. Their achievement is
assessed through objective quizzes, graded problem sets and exams composed of both objective
and free response questions. Prerequisites: a previous course in Physics is recommended, but not
strictly required

Social Studies

American Government (1.00)
The study of American Government is extremely important. At the end of the course you should
clearly know and understand the responsibilities and duties of being a citizen of the United States.
The yearlong course is divided into six units, with three being studied each semester. Units
include: The Path to Democracy, Law Making, Law Interpreting, Rights and Freedoms, Politics in
the United States and Beyond Washington (State and Local Governments, other forms of
Government and Politics in a Global Society). Prerequisites: none

World Cultures (1.00)
This World Cultures course will examine a broad range of geographical perspectives covering all
of the major regions of the world. Each region will be reviewed in a similar structure in order for
students to more clearly see the similarities and differences between each region. Specifically, the
course will explore where each region is located along with its physical characteristics, including
absolute and relative location, climate, and significant geographical features. The exploration will
then continue on to look at each region from a cultural, economic, and political perspective, closely
examining the human impact on each region from these perspectives as well as how human
activities impact the environments of the region. The first semester will cover North America,
South America, and Western Europe. The second semester of the course will cover Eastern
Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa. Prerequisites: none

Psychology (1.00)
Psychology is the study of behavior and mental processes. This course is a survey of
psychological topics with emphasis on contemporary psychological investigation. Topics
discussed in first semester of the course are psychological research, biology of behavior, sensation
and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, and intelligence. Topics
discussed in second semester of the course are development, motivation and emotion, theories of
personality, psychological tests, gender roles, stress and health, psychological disorders,
psychotherapy, and social psychology. Prerequisites: none

Social Issues (1.00)
This is a yearlong course that determines the relationship between human behavior and culture,
and society. The objective is to determine how humans perceive the positive and negative aspects
of society relating to human behavior. Prerequisites: none

Crime and Law (.5)
This one semester elective course allows students to examine the background and current status of
our legal system. Topics such as constitutional law, law enforcement, the trial system and
corrections are part of the curriculum. Student skills developed in the course will include
discussion/debate, group work, research and writing, and analysis of current events. Prerequisites:
none

World History (1.00)
This course provides students with a thorough survey of the significant political, socio-economic,
and cultural features of human history from the beginnings of civilization to the contemporary
period. Using both primary and secondary sources and document-based investigation, students
trace the emergence of the interdependence between world regions -- an interaction stimulated by
European invasions and colonization and sustained by the contributions of the non-western regions.
First semester begins with the beginnings of civilization through the Middle Ages (about 15000
CE). Second semester students start by studying the Renaissance, Reformation and the Age of
Exploration and they finish by learning about and discussing current situations in Latin America,
Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Prerequisites: none

Economics (1.00)
Economics is the study of how societies use limited resources to satisfy their unlimited wants and
needs. It is the foundation of this course as students learn how fundamental decisions about the
four factors of production; land, labor, capital, and entrepreneurship are made. Key topics covered
include: law of supply and demand; saving, borrowing, and spending; the Federal Reserve System
and the money supply; and the role of government in an open market economy. Prerequisites:
none

AP Econ - Micro (.5)
Microeconomics emphasizes how individuals make choices with limited resources. Students will
examine concepts such as supply and demand, factors of production, roles of labor and
management, the relationship between the environment and the economy, and the impact of the
government on individual decision making processes. Students study the stock market as an
investment option and trace various stocks through the semester using the Wall Street Journal and
the Internet as resources. This course prepares students for the AP Exam in Microeconomics.
Offered 1st semester only. Prerequisites: none

AP Econ - Macro (.5)
Macroeconomics is an emphasis on how the economic system works as a whole. Students study
how the economy is measured by using concepts such as gross domestic product (GDP) and other
indicators. They examine concepts such as inflation, unemployment, world trade patterns, and the
role of the Federal Reserve Bank. Students engage in decision-making processes to create an
environment where high employment and a higher standard of living are achievable by using the
economic tools of fiscal and monetary policy. This course prepares students for the AP Exam in
Macroeconomics. Offered 2nd semester only. Prerequisites: none

US History (1.00)
US History will allow students will build on their concepts of geography, civics, and political
societies beginning with the world as it was in the 1500's followed by the natural unfolding of
events from the explorations, the establishment the colonies, the colonial era leading up to the
causes of and including the French and Indian War and The Revolutionary War. The development
of American government from a confederation to a constitutional one, the launching of the
Republic, through the War of 1812, the growth and development of the nation through the
Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark exploration on through Manifest Destiny and the
Mexican War will follow. Students will explore the changes in the nation from immigration and
abolition issues to the Civil War and Reconstruction, westward expansion, to the development of
the U.S. as a world power and into World War One. They will explore the 1920's, the Great
Depression and World War II. In the second semester, is a survey of American history from the
pre-Columbian Era through the Civil War. During this course, students will examine the political,
economic, and social development of the United States from the formation of the land bridge
through the causes that led the nation to engage in a volatile civil war. Included in this course will
be activities that will allow students to further explore such subject matter through written
exercises, discussions, and individual research, Prerequisites: 8th grade SS

AP European History (1.00)
This course is a study of the social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political and diplomatic history
of Modern Europe and its place in the history of the world from the fall of Constantinople to the
fall of the Berlin wall and the Soviet Union. The course will be taught at a level and rigor
equivalent to that required of students in a college freshman or sophomore Modern European
History course. The course objective is to develop an understanding of the major periods, ideas,
movements, trends, and themes that characterize European history from approximately 1450 (the
high Renaissance) to the present. Students develop the ability to analyze historical evidence and
express understanding and analysis in writing. We try to prepare our students to be successful at
undertaking university-level work. The course will correspond to recent trends in history curricula
at the undergraduate level and will prepare students for the College Board examination in
European History given in the spring. First semester content begins with the Late Middle Ages and
Renaissance period in Europe and concludes with the study of Napoleon. Second semester content
begins with the Conservative Order and reform movements of the early 1800s and ends with
modern times - the study of the West at the dawn of the 21st century. Prerequisites: none

AP Psychology (1.00)
Advanced Placement Psychology offers qualified students who wish to complete studies
equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology while still in secondary school.
Psychology helps students to more clearly understand their own mental processes and behavior,
and that of others. The first semester major units of study include history, research, biological,
sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, and
intelligence. The second semester major units of study include motivation, emotion, stress and
health, personality, psychological disorders, psychotherapy, and social psychology plus an
extensive review for the College Board Advanced Placement Psychology Exam.
Prerequisites: sophomore standing

AP US History (1.00)
This History curriculum covers all of the material outlined by the College Board as necessary to
prepare you to pass the AP U.S. History exam. The iQ APUSH course has been approved by the
College Board through a recent audit process that involved review of the course syllabus we
utilize. As a result of audit approval, the iQ APUSH course will appear on a list of courses
designated by the College Board as meeting requirements to be officially recognized as an
Advanced Placement class. Our text is The American Pageant, which is the most frequently used
text in APUSH classes across the country. The passing rate on the AP exam for iQ APUSH
students is above 80%! The nationwide passing rate (3 or above) is just slightly over 50%, so iQ
students do extraordinarily well. Through this course you will have the opportunity to:
Demonstrate comprehension of a broad body of historical knowledge, express ideas clearly in
writing, work with classmates to research an historical issue, interpret and apply data from original
documents, identify underrepresented historical viewpoints, write to persuade with evidence,
compare and contrast alternate interpretations of an historical figure, event, or trend, explain how
an historical event connects to or causes a larger trend or theme, develop essay responses that
include a clear, defensible thesis statement and supporting evidence, effectively argue a position on
an historical issue, critique and respond to arguments made by others, raise and explore questions
about policies, institutions, beliefs, and actions in an historical context, evaluate primary materials,
such as historical documents, political cartoons, and first-person narratives, evaluate secondary
materials, such as scholarly works or statistical analyses, assess the historical significance and
cultural impact of key literary works (e.g. Common Sense, Uncle Tom's Cabin). Prerequisites: none

AP World History (1.00)
Advanced Placement World History (WHAP) is a course that is offered by the Waukesha School
using the outlines of World History provided by the College Board. The course will study world
history from 8000 BCE (the Neolithic Revolution) to present day. Our study of world history will
divide history into five time periods, which we will study using "major trends" that help to define
each era. As we study these major trends, we will also look at changes and continuities seen in
world history looking at themes including interactions, gender relationships, social structures,
political power, technology, demography and intellectual/religious ideas. To help us analyze and
evaluate these themes, changes, and continuities we will use the "habits of minds" that all
historians use to help them think through and understand how history has happened and how to
draw conclusions from it.
Prerequisites: none
World Languages

Spanish 1 (1.00)
In this course, the student will begin their foreign language study through listening, speaking,
reading and writing activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language
instruction. In first semester, students will study Greetings, The Calendar, Weather, Time and
Colors. In second semester, the topics of study are Community, Family, Food, Pastimes and
School. Through these topics students learn to express themselves using an ever- increasing
vocabulary, present tense verbs, articles and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in
innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled
throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Spanish-speaking world and
their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national
Foreign Language standards. Prerequisites: none

Spanish 2 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of the learning that began in the first year that will help the student
improve their skills in the Spanish language. In this course, the student will increase their skills by
completing listening, speaking, reading and writing activities that are based on pedagogically
proven methods of foreign language instruction. In first semester, students will study travel, health,
routine and shopping vocabulary. In second semester, the topics of study are communities, food,
movies and relationships. Through these topics, students learn to express themselves using an ever-
increasing vocabulary, present and past tense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex
grammatical structures. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways
with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course to help the
learner focus on the Spanish-speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and
histories. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards. Prerequisites: Spanish
1


Spanish 3 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of the beginning level courses that will help the student continue
learning the Spanish language. In this course, the student will practice and learn listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven
methods of foreign language instruction. In first semester, students will study Chores, Directions,
Feelings, Travel and Geography. In second semester, the topics of study are Health, Household
Items, Measurements, Occupations, and Personal History. Through these topics students learn to
express themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present, past, future and conditional-
tense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical structures. Grammar is
introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in
mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the
Spanish-speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course
is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards. Prerequisites: Spanish 2
Spanish 4 (1.00)
The fourth year of Spanish is a continuation of the first three years. The student will continue to
sharpen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on
pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. In first semester, students will
study People, Accomplishments, Future Plans, Activities and Celebrations. In second semester, the
topics of study are Possibilities, The Past, Art, Technology, and History. Through these topics
students learn to express themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present, past, future,
conditional and subjunctive-tense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical
structures. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety
of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the
learner focus on the Spanish-speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and
histories. Prerequisites: Spanish 3

AP Spanish (1.00)
In the AP Spanish Language course, students practice perfecting their Spanish speaking, listening,
reading, and writing skills. They study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language,
and then apply what they've learned in extensive written and spoken exercises. By the end of the
course, students will have an expansive vocabulary and a solid, working knowledge of all verb
forms and tenses. As the equivalent of a college-level language course, AP Spanish Language
prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study of Spanish language, culture, or literature.
Prerequisites: Spanish 4

French 1 (1.00)
In this course, the student will begin their foreign language study through listening, speaking,
reading and writing activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language
instruction. In first semester, students will study Greetings, The Calendar, Weather, Time and
Colors. In second semester, the topics of study are Community, Family, Food, Pastimes and
School. Through these topics students learn to express themselves using an ever- increasing
vocabulary, present tense verbs, articles and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in
innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled
throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the French-speaking world and
their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national
Foreign Language standards.
Prerequisites: none

French 2 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of the learning that began in the first year that will help the student
improve their skills in the French language. In this course, the student will increase their skills by
completing listening, speaking, reading and writing activities that are based on pedagogically
proven methods of foreign language instruction. In first semester, students will study Daily
Routine, Animals, Entertainment, Body Parts, and Descriptions. In second semester, the topics of
study are The House, Shopping, Meals, Sports, and Transportation. Through these topics students
learn to express themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present, and past tense verbs,
articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical structures. Grammar is introduced and
practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is
sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the French-speaking
world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the
national Foreign Language standards. Prerequisites: French 1




French 3 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of the beginning level courses that will help the student continue
learning the French language. In this course, the student will practice and learn listening, speaking,
reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of
foreign language instruction. In first semester, students will study Chores, Directions, Feelings,
Travel and Geography. In second semester, the topics of study are Health, Household Items,
Measurements, Occupations, and Personal History. Through these topics students learn to express
themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present, past, future and conditional- tense verbs,
articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical structures. Grammar is introduced and
practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is
sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the French-speaking
world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the
national Foreign Language standards. Prerequisites: French 2


French 4 (1.00)
The fourth year of French is a continuation of the first three years. The student will continue to
sharpen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on
pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. In first semester, students will
study People, Accomplishments, Future Plans, Activities and Celebrations. In second semester, the
topics of study are Possibilities, The Past, Art, Technology, and History. Through these topics
students learn to express themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present, past, future,
conditional and subjunctive-tense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical
structures. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety
of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the
learner focus on the French-speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and
histories. Prerequisites: French 3

German 1 (1.00)
In this course, the student will begin their foreign language study through listening, speaking,
reading and writing activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language
instruction. In first semester, students will study Greetings, Calendar, Weather, Time, and Colors.
In second semester the topics of study are Community, Family, Food, Pastimes and School.
Students learn to express themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present tense verbs,
articles and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways
with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt
to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world and their culture, people, geographical
locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards.
German 2 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of the learning that began in the first year that will help the student
improve their skills in the German language. In this course, the student will increase their skills by
completing listening, speaking, reading and writing activities that are based on pedagogically
proven methods of foreign language instruction. In the first semester, students will study, Daily
Routine, Animals, Entertainment, and Body Parts. In the second semester topic of study are
Descriptions, House, Shopping, Meals, Sports, and Transportation. Students learn to express
themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present, and past tense verbs, articles, adjectives
and increasingly complex grammatical structures. Grammar is introduced and practiced in
innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled
throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world and
their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national
Foreign Language standards. Prerequisites: German 1

German 3 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of the beginning level courses that will help the student continue
learning the German language. In this course, the student will practice and learn listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven
methods of foreign language instruction. In the first semester, students will study Transportation,
Health, Chores, Personal Relationships, and Animals. In second semester the topic of study are
Media, Childhood, Future, Food, and Environment. Students learn to express themselves using an
ever-increasing vocabulary, present, past, future and conditional-tense verbs, articles, adjectives
and increasingly complex grammatical structures. Grammar is introduced and practiced in
innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled
throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world and
their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national
Foreign Language standards Prerequisites: German 2

German 4 (1.00)
The fourth year of German builds upon the first three levels. Students will continue to sharpen
their reading, writing, and listening skills as well as learn skills to think critically and express
themselves on topics relevant to German culture. This fourth level will include authentic texts,
current culture, and literature from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Students will learn
vocabulary, refinement of grammar skills, and cultural competency to express themselves on a
variety of topics in German. First semester topics include: German history, Environment, Youth
and Multiculturalism. In the second semester the topics are: Youth culture, Art, Holidays, and
Travel. This course is aligned to the national foreign language standards. Prerequisites: German 3

Latin 1 (1.00)
Latin 1 is the introduction to the basics of Latin grammar as well as an introduction to Roman life,
culture, mythology, and history. The grammar portion of the course is intended to help you
develop the skills necessary to translate basic sentences from Latin to English and English to Latin,
and for reading simple connected passages of Latin prose and poetry. The culture portion of the
course is to give you an overview of ancient Roman culture and history, an overview of some of
the more popular Greek and Roman myths. In the first semester, you will study Roman geography,
architecture, life and history plus learn about noun functions, number, gender and person, verbs
and modifiers. In the second semester, you will look at heroes and the Trojan War plus verb tenses
and moods, noun cases, pronouns and prepositions. You will also do more in-depth translations.
Prerequisites: none

Latin 2 (1.00)
Semester One: Latin II is the continuation of Latin grammar and a deeper study of Roman
Mythology and history. The grammar in Semester One consists of a lot of review from Latin I with
expanding use of declensions, adjectives, adverbs, and the 4th and 5th declension of nouns
Reflexive, Demonstrative and Interrogative pronouns, numerals and conjunctions. These skills
will be used to translate longer Latin texts to English that require more knowledge of grammar
rather than just vocabulary recall. The culture part of the course is an in-depth study of the
following: in Semester One, you will look at Jason and the Argonauts, Heroes, Roman
Entertainment, The Odyssey, and Julius Caesar. In Semester Two, you will study enclitics, types of
ablatives, participles, the Ablative Absolute, Indirect Statements, and impersonal verbs among
other constructions. Translation becomes more intense and challenging. In culture, you will
examine the Underworld, Antony and Cleopatra, Caesar Augustus, the Punic Wars and Mythology
and Roman History in Hollywood. Discussion boards will be part of this course in the second
semester. Prerequisites: Latin 1

Latin 3 (1.00)
Welcome to our world of Latin authors. Throughout the year, you will translate and learn about
some of the brightest minds of the Classical World. Through the literature of these authors you will
learn more about the culture and history of the fabulous Romans. In the first semester, you will
meet the great Julius Caesar and learn first hand about his Gallic campaigns. Through the letters of
Pliny the Younger, you will get a first hand account of the eruption of Vesuvius. The grammar in
the first semester will focus on various forms of the subjunction mood. Your journey into famous
Roman authors will continue in the second semester where you will meet the great orator, Cicero.
The poets Martial, Catullus and Ovid will also share their works with you. Our special guest author
will be the greatest of the Roman authors, Publius Vergilus Naso. The grammar will focus on
stylistic devices and scansion of poetry. Prerequisites: Latin 2

Mandarin Chinese 1 (1.00)
This is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin
Chinese (simplified). In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing
skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language
instruction. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety
of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the
learner focus on the Chinese speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and
histories.
Prerequisites: none
Mandarin Chinese 2 (1.00)
This course is a continuation of a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety
of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading and
writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign
language instruction. Throughout the five units of material (Daily Routine, Animals, Hobbies, The
Body and Descriptions), students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary,
present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative
and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the
course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Chinese speaking world and their culture,
people, geographical locations and histories. Prerequisite: Chinese I. Prerequisites: Mandarin
Chinese 1

								
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