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Summer Reading for AP World

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					Summer Reading and Viewing
for AP World History (WHAP)

 Please join us at
http://chswhap2012.ning.com/

 Problems? Contact Mr. Greene at:
 greenej@chelmsford.k12.ma.us

               and

worldhistoryteacher@hotmail.com
         Summer Reading and Viewing for AP World History.

Thank you for signing up for AP World History (affectionately referred
to as WHAP). We will all be reading four books of outside reading for
the course and watching some movies:

  1) A book from the lists provided (submitted by the second time we
     meet first period – we will have breakfast and talk about what we
     read and watched).

  2) A video pairing – see attached (submitted by the second time we
     meet first period – we will have breakfast and talk about what we
     read and watched).

  3) David Christian’s This Fleeting World published by Berkshire
     Publishing, 2007. (Finish by first day of class). The book is a
     quick read - 120 pages long (92 pages of text) – but hard to
     find. So plan accordingly.

  4) Ben Finney’s “The Other One-Third of the Globe,” Journal of World
     History, Vol.5, No. 2, 1994. Available on-line at:
     http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/jwh/jwh052p273.pdf (Due
     second week of class)

  5) Stewart Gordon’s When Asia was the World (Finish by the Friday
     the week after Holiday break – first week in January)

  6) Alfred Crosby’s Children of the Sun (dates are approximate
     guesses - Finish section 3 by 10/10, section 1 by 11/11 and
     section 2 by 2/2 – there will be 3 quizzes using this book)

  7) There is plenty of extra credit available!!!


                              -over-
1) Free Reading Book - Summer Reading/Extra Credit Activity
You may choose to read any of the books on the AP World History Supplemental Reading List. For each
book you read you must write a response outlined below.

The books on the AP World History reading list were chosen for the following reasons:
     Length of 200 or more pages – if not contact me to see if it is okay or what you need to do in
        addition to the book on the list
     They should be of high literary and artistic quality and/or
     They successfully transport the reader to a different place and time and/or
     They point out something fundamentally important to the story of world history or its themes
     They are engaging to the heart and /or the intellect
Paper Format:
     Be written in paragraphs that reflect the question #. For example question #1 = paragraph #1.
     Be at least 3 typed pages in length
     Use font size 12, Times New Roman font
     Be double spaced
     Follow MLA parenthetical citations or Chicago/Turabian numerical footnote citations and include
        a Works Cited page
     Use proper grammar/spelling/academic tone and diction.

Questions to be addressed by books that correspond to a Specific Historical Era or Event (usually
confined to one or two geographical region):
    1. Background of the author. Who is the person writing the book? Why did the author write the
        book? In what historical period was the author writing? Is there a definite viewpoint or bias
        expressed? Is the book a fictional account of a historical event, a true story, an eye-witness or
        autobiographical account, a work of fiction based on general/historical information, or a historical
        monograph? (RESEARCH)
    2. What is the historical and geographical setting(s)? What world history surrounds this story(ies)?
        You will very likely have to do some historical research.
    3. What do you think can be learned in terms of the world history and culture studied in our course
        from reading this book? What WHAP themes are included? Give at least 2 examples from each
        category (that are included in the book).
    4. What parts of the book or quotations from the book will be indelibly etched in your mind and
        heart? What human connections did the book help to make for you with other places and peoples
        and other times? As a citizen of the world, what makes this story part of all of our histories and of
        your life today?

Questions to be addressed by survey books that overview All Human History or Several eras, events,
and places:
    1. Background of the author. Who is the person writing the book? Why did the author write the
        book? Is there a definite viewpoint or bias expressed? (RESEARCH)
    2. What is the premise of the book? How does the book present its survey? Are there new theories,
        or a new interpretation of events? What evidence is provided to support this new material? Do
        you support this new theory?
    3. What do you think can be learned in terms of the world history and culture studied in our course
        from reading this book?
    4. What parts of the book or quotations from the book will be indelibly etched in your mind and
        heart? What human connections did the book help to make for you with other places and peoples
        and other times?

Each of the above questions should be discussed in a paragraph or two. Try not to be vague. Use specific
parts of the book to explain your points, and give a complete, specific and detailed picture of the historical
context. In other words, don’t just say “Western Europe during the Renaissance.” Give definite dates,
places, dynasties or epochs, events in that regime and so on that relate to the material in the book. When
finished submit your paper to the class’ turnitin site and the class’ ning site.
2) MOVIE MAYHEM ASSIGNMENT:

1) For each movie or episode select a ten minute (give or take) clip that you think would be the most
beneficial to show in class. Explain when the clip begins, what happens during the clip that is worth
viewing, and when it ends and why it would be useful to show to WHAP class.

2) Choose the WHAP theme that relates to the pairing of movies or mini-series (and writings when
applicable) and write at least a page (several is probably better - you will be graded on quantity
and quality!) on how the movies address the theme.

3) For extra credit movies: Discuss how and where a clip from a movie(s) could fit into our textbook. 1
Note, our textbook is known for useful integration of visuals into the text. Would it be useful to
integrate the movies into the text (this could happen with an e-text!)? I will forward what I judge
honest and useful suggestions to the author.

Submit required writing to the extra credit section of turnitin.com for our class by the due date
and the NING as required.
3) For David Christian’s This Fleeting World: Use the pdf available at the Ning site and
answer the questions specified below by hand:

Preface - all

Introduction - all

Prequel - first bullet and last bullet (you do not have to read the prequel)

Then all of the questions starting with chapter 1 (pp. 1-105).

To format please write the chapter and the section.

You do not have to write out the questions.

DUE FIRST DAY OF CLASS

For extra credit you may answer up to Four “Worth Debating”/”Thought Experiments”
by replying to the appropriate discussion forum on Ning.
4) For the Finney article:

As a new requirement the powers that be want us to cover the Pacific more than we used
to (you are in the first year of a new WHAP curriculum).

To that end, we are reading a journal article, Ben Finney's "The Other One-Third of the
Globe." Available here: http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/jwh/jwh052p273.pdf

(Note: You will read on average one journal article a quarter - not including this one.
You will have the opportunity to read many of them for extra credit - see syllabus.)

Read the article and take your own notes [1] using the themes of WHAP:

Themes are on the last page of this packet.

There will be a quiz during the second week of class on the article. You may use your
notes.



[1] These are to be your notes, there should be no sharing of notes. Of course, you
can share ideas about the books, but each student is responsible for doing their own
reading and note-taking! You will pass in your notes with the quiz.
5) For the Gordon book:

I recommend reading the last chapter to begin and end your reading –
chapter 10.

Take notes [1] on each explorer / chapter as you see fit, but no more
than one page for each – Chapters 1-9.

You will have a timed open note quiz on one of the chapters.

You will have a timed open note quiz on one of the chapters.
Sample Question: Tell me everything you know about Ibn Battuta

Secondly, take notes on the following themes – 1 page each:

1) Religion
2) commodities – books, silk (robes!), spices, etc.
3) communication between people of different languages and cultures

There will be a timed quiz, using YOUR NOTES on this as well.               You will
pass in your notes with the quiz.

There will be a timed quiz, using YOUR NOTES on this as well.
Sample Question: Explain the different ways of communicating between
cultures described in the book



[1] These are to be your notes, there should be no sharing of notes. Of course, you
can share ideas about the books, but each student is responsible for doing their own
reading and note-taking! You will pass in your notes with the quiz.
6) For the Crosby book:

Write up to a one page summary for each chapter – this includes the
section introduction. Included in this one page summary write how the
content touches upon any of the five themes of the course. Often the
content might focus only on one or two of the themes. The five themes
are listed on the last page.
You may use your notes [1] for the quizzes.


Approximate dates for quizzes:

Finish section 3 (chapters 7-9) by 10/10,

section 1 (chapters 1-3) by 11/11

and section 2 (chapters 4-6) by 2/2

Sample Quiz Question: How is the theme of gender developed in chapter 1/section1
of Crosby



Yes, there will be 3 quizzes using this book!



[1] These are to be your notes, there should be no sharing of notes. Of course, you
can share ideas about the books, but each student is responsible for doing their own
reading and note-taking! You will pass in your notes with the quiz.
World History Fiction/Graphic books2
 1. Books not on the list are acceptable WITH PERMISSION
 2. No double dipping – you cannot read a book you have already read or are
    going to read this year for a class at CHS. This will result in a zero!
 3. Shorter books are often combined with an “and” that means you must read
    both!
 4. You may read extra books on the lists for extra credit after you complete the
    required assignment.
Many of the titles at this site are acceptable: http://www.historicalnovels.info/
Many of the titles on the African Writers Series are acceptable:
http://www.pearsonschoolsandfecolleges.co.uk/International/Africa/Secondary/EnglishLiterature/African%20Writers%
20Series/AfricanWritersSeries/Buy/Buy.aspx
Or the Man Asian Literary Prize selections: http://www.manasianliteraryprize.org/

Marquerite Abouet, Aya trilogy (read all of them)
Susan Abulhawa, Mornings in Jenin
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart* and D.T. Niane, Sundiata
Chinua Achebe, Anthills of the Savannah* or Arrow of God\
Chinua Achebe, Girls at War and Home and Exile
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus or Half a Yellow Sun* or The Thing Around Your Neck
Aravind Adiga, White Tiger or Between the Assassinations
Etel Adnan, Sitt Marie Rose and Joe Sacco, Palestine, or Amos Oz book (see below), or Ghasan Kanafani, Men in the Sun and other
Palestinian Stories or Alifa Rifaat, Distant View of a Minaret
Ama Ata Aidoo, Changes or No Sweetness Here and Other Stories and Our Sister Killjoy
Daniel Alarcon, War by Candlelight or Lost City Radio
Rabih Alemeddine, The Hakawati or Koolaids or I, the Divine
Sherman Alexie, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (may be done for extra credit)
Monica Ali, Brick Lane*
Julia Alvarez, In the Name of Salome or Before We Were Free and How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents or Yo!
Tariq Ali, Shadows of a Pomegranate Tree*
Isabel Allende, Zorro* or the House of Spirits or Daughter of Fortune or others by same author
Hannan Al-Shaykh, Beirut Blues
Anita Amirrezvani, Blood of Flowers
Tahmima Anam, A Golden Age
Kim Antieau, Broken Moon* and read articles about honor killings in Pakistan
Uwem Apkan, Say You’re One of Them
Kwame Kwei Armah, Elmina’s Kitchen and Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners
Nadeem Aslam, The Wasted Vigil or Maps for Lost Lovers or Season of the Rain Birds
Alaa al Aswany, Chicago
Sefi Atta, Everything Good Will Come or News From Home
Tash Aw, The Harmony Silk Factory or Map of the Invisible World
Mariano Azuela, The Underdogs
Miriam Ba, So Long a Letter and a book by Chinua Achebe or at least 100 pages from Apkan, Say You’re One of Them or ?
Adam Bagdasarian, Forgotten Fire
Doreen Baingana, Tropical Fish
Shauna Singh Baldwin, English Lessons and Other Stories or What the Body Remembers or We Are Not in Pakistan
Stephen Barnett, The Road to Makokota
Carolyn Baugh, The View from the Garden City*
William Bayer, Tangier* or Isabelle
Sandra Benitez, Bitter Grounds or The Weight of All Things
Medea Benjamin, Don’t Be Afraid of Gringo

2
  Choose wisely! Choose some region or time period you are interested in. Many of the books deal with
tragedies of the 20th Century and “adult” themes, situations, or actions so if any of these make you
uncomfortable . . . choose something else.
*available at the Learning Commons
Tahar Ben Jelloun, The Last Friend or Leaving Tangier or others by same author with permission
Tom Bissel, God Lives in St. Petersburg
Heinrich Boll, Children are Civilians Too*
Tom Bradby, The Master of Rain or his other novel for extra credit
Mark Brazaitis, Steal My Heart or The River of Lost Voices
Tessa Bridal, Tree of Red Stars*
Geraldine Brooks, The Tree of Red Stars or Year of Wonders or others by same author with permission
Robert Olen Butler, A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain*
Robero Calasso, The Ruin of Kasch* or Ka
Jung Chang, Wild Swans
Michelle Cliff, No Telephone to Heaven or Everything is Now or Abeng and If I Could Write This in Fire or Jamaica Kincaid, A
Small Place
J.M. Coetzee, Life and Times of Michael K or others by same author
Evan Connell, Lost in Udar Pradesh
Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions or The Book of Not
Edwidge Danticat, Brother, I’m Dying or The Farmer of Bones or Krik? Krak! or Breath, Eyes, Memory
Louis de Bernieres, Birds Without Wings
Guy Delisle, two of the following: Burma Chronicles, Pyongyang, Shenzhen (graphic)
Anita Desai, Clear Light of Day
Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss
Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, Sister of My Heart or Arranged Marriage or The Unknown Errors of Our Lives
Assia Djeber, Women of Algiers or Children of the New World or Fantasia or Algerian White or The Tongue’s Blood Does not Run
Dry
Sharon Draper, Copper Sun*
Alan Drew, Gardens of Water*
Eileen Drew, The Ivory Crocodile or Blue Taxis and Paul Eggers’s The Departure Lounge
Stella Pope Duarte, If I Die in Juarez
Dave Eggars, What is the What*
Paul Eggers, Saviors or The Departure Lounge and Eileen Drew’s Blue Taxis
Robert Elegant, Mandarin or Dynasty* or Manchu*
Shusako Endo, Samurai* or Silence
Tan Twan Eng, The Gift of Rain
Bernardine Evaristo, Blonde Roots or Lara
J.G. Farell, Troubles or Singapore Grip or The Siege of Krishnapur
Aminatta Forna, Ancestor Stones
E. M. Forster, A Passage to India*
Frederick Forsyth, The Dogs of War*
Ben Fountain, Brief Encounters with Che Guevara (you can skip the last story)*
George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman or Flashman in the Great Game or any of the Flashman Papers set in the non-
west for regular credit and any for extra credit.
Carlos Fuentes, Crystal Frontier* or The Orange Tree* or others by same author
Kate Furnivall, The Russian Concubine or The Red Scarf or The Girl From Junchow
Josten Gaardner, Sophie’s World*
Eduardo Galeano, Genesis or Faces and Masks or Century of the Wind
Nicole Galland, Crossed*
Jason Goodwin, The Janissary Tree* or The Snake Stone or The Bellini Card
Nadine Gordimer, The Lying Days* or Burger’s Daughter* or others* by same author
Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies or In an Antique Land or Shadow Lines or The Glass Palace or others by same author with permission
Anthony Grey, Saigon*
Vasilly Grossman, Life and Fate or Everything Flows
Heleon Habila, Measuring Time
Laila Halaby, West of the Jordan
Tarquin Hall, The Case of the Missing Servant or The Case of the Man Who Died Laughing or To the Elephant Graveyard
Moshin Hamid, Moth Smoke or The Reluctant Fundamentalist
Muhammad Hanif, The Case of Exploding Mangoes
Le Ly Hayslip, When Heaven and Earth Changed Places
Lawrence Hill, The Book of Negroes or Someone Knows My Name
Merle Hodge, Laetitia and Crick Crack, Monkey
Tess Uriza Holthe, When the Elephants Dance*
Duong Thu Huong, Paradise of the Blind
Sonallah Ibrahim, Zaat
Hala Deeb Jabbour, A Woman of Nazareth*
Mark Jacobs, Stone Cowboy
Arthur Japin, The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi
Ha Jin, Waiting*
Lloyd Jones, Mr. Pip or Biografi
Ghasan Kanafani, Palestine’s Children or Men in the Sun and other Palestinian Stories and Joe Sacco’s, Palestine
Yasmina Khadra, The Attack* or The Swallows of Kabul or The Sirens of Baghdad or In the Name of God or Wolf
Dreams or any of the inspector Llob mysteries
Safar Khalifei, Wild Thorns
Uzma Aslam Khan, Trespassing
Richard Kim, Lost Names and/or Sook Nyul Choi, The Year of Impossible Goodbyes and/or Linda Sue Park, When My
Name was Keoko and/or Yoko Kawahima Watkins, So Far From the Bamboo Grove (read at least 2 of the 4)
David Kherdian, Monkey (extra credit)
Eugenia Kim, The Calligrapher’s Daughter
Jamaica Kincaid, Small Island and Lucy or Autobiography of my Mother
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible*
Uzma Aslam Khan, Trespassing
Elias Khoury, Gate of the Sun
Rachel Kushner, Telex from Cuba
Alex Laguma, In the Fog of the Seasons’ End and others by the same author with permission
Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies* or Unaccustomed Earth
Laila Lalami, Secret Son or Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits
George Lamming, In the Castle of My Skin
Nam Le, The Boat
John Le Carre, Mission Song or A Most Wanted Man
J.M.G. LeClizio, Desert
Andrea Levy, The Long Song or others by the same author with permission
YiYun Li, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers
David Liss, The Coffee Trader or others are acceptable for extra credit
Bette Bao Lord, Spring Moon*
Earl Lovelace, Salt or The Dragon Can’t Dance
Jason Lutes, Berlin (graphic novel) (both books)
Rose Macauley, The Towers of Trebizond
Dandi Dale Mackall, Eva Underground*
David Malouf, The Great World or Remembering Babylon
Rani Manicka, The Rice Mother
Olivia Manning, School for Love
Kamala Markandaya, Nectar in Sieve
Hisham Matar, In the Country of Men
Marsha Mehran, Pomegranate Soup or Rosewater and Soda Bread
Anchee Min, The Last Empress or Wild Ginger or Becoming Madame Mao or Empress Orchid or Katherine
Rohinton Mistry, A Fine Balance* or Swimming Lessons or Such a Long Journey
David Mitchell, Black Swan Green* or Cloud Atlas or Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet or Ghostwritten
Rutu Modan, Exit Wounds (graphic) with a Joe Sacco book
Daniyal Mueenuddin, In Other Rooms, Other Wonders
Marnie Mueller, Green Fires
Alvaro Mutis, The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll (can read selected novellas)
Gina Barkholder Nahai, The Cry of the Peacock or Caspian Rain or others by the same author with permission
V.S. Naipaul, A Bend in the River* or Half a Life or others by the same author with permission
Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, Wizard of the Crow or Petals of Blood (or The River Between for extra credit) or others by the
same author with permission
Malla Nunn, A Beautiful Place to Die or Let the Dead Lie
Flora Nwapa, Efuru
Terence O’Donnell, Garden of the Brave in War or Seven Shades of Memory
Margaret A. Ogola, The River and the Source (one book)
Ben Okri, The Famished Road*
Joanne Omanq, Incident at Akabal
Michael Ondaatje, Anil’s Ghost*
Helen Oyeyemi, The Icarus Girl*
Ferdinand Oyono, Houseboy
Amos Oz, Unto Death* and The Hill of Evil Counsel* or Where the Jackal Howls* or others
Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red or The Black Book
Gaile Parkin, Baking Cakes in Kigali
Alan Paton, Ah, But Your Land is Beautiful* or Too Late the Phalarope*
Mal Peet, Exposure or Tamar or The Keeper and The Penalty
Caryl Phillips, Cambridge or Crossing the River or others by the same author with permission
Amjed Qamar, Beneath My Mother’s Feet*
Kwei Quartey, Wife of the Gods
Nahid Rachlin, Jumping Over Fire or Married to a Stranger or Veils and The Foreigner
Atiq Rahimi, Earth and Ashes and The Patience Stone
Alifa Rifaat, Distant View of a Minaret and Other Stories and Ghasan Khanafani, Men in the Sun or Etel Adnan, Sitt Marie Rose
Robert Rosenberg, This is not Civilization or the Avram Cohen mysteries
Jean Christofe Rufin, The Abyssinian or The Siege of Isfahan or Brazil Red
Norman Rush, Mating or Whites or Mortals
Irene Sabatini, The Boy Next Door
Joe Sacco, Palestine and Safe Area Gorazde (graphic). Others by the same author with permission.
Mark Salzman, Iron and Silk or The Laughing Sutra
Meghan Nuttall Sayres, Anahita’s Woven Riddle*
Lisa See, her detective / mystery books – Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, etc.
Shyam Selvadurai, Funny Boy*
Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners and Kwame Kwei Armah, Elmina’s Kitchen
Eduardo Sguigla, Fordlandia
Kamila Shamsie, Burnt Shadows or Kartography or Broken Verses or Salt and Saffron or others with permission
Kashmira Sheth, Keeping Corner
Bapsi Sidhwa, The Pakistani Bride or An American Brat (Extra Credit)
Joan Silber, The Size of the World
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan
Zadie Smith, White Teeth*
Dalia Sofer, Septembers of Shiraz
Alexander Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
John Speed, The Temple Dancer or Tiger Claws
Michael Stanley, any of the detective Kubu books
Suzanne Fisher Staples, Under the Persimmon Tree*, House of Djinn, Shiva’s Fire, Shabanu, Haveli (read at least 2)
Alan Stratton, Chanda’s War* and Chanda’s Secret*
Melanie Sumner, Polite Society
Indu Sundaresan, The Twentieth Wife or The Feast of Roses or The Splendor of Silence (extra credit) or In the
Convent of Little Flowers
Mashid Suri, Tales of a Persian Teenage Girl
J.P. Stassen, Deogratias: A Tale of Rwanda and at least 120 pages from Philip Gourevitch’s We Wish to Inform You
(see below)
Miguel Syjuco, Illustrado
Junichuro Tanizaki, Naomi
Roma Tearne, Mosquito
Osamu Tezuka, Buddha (graphic - all 8 volumes – 2000 + pages)
Maria Thomas, African Visas* or Come to Africa and Save Your Marriage or Antonia Saw the Oryx First
Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Child of All Nations or House of Glass or The Earth of Mankind or Footsteps or All That is Gone
Sandy Tolan, The Lemon Tree
Thrity N. Umrigar, The Space Between Us or Bombay Time
Barry Unsworth, Land of Marvels* or The Rage of the Vulture or Sacred Hunger
Mario Vargas Llosa, The Storyteller* or The War at the End of the World or others by same author
Padma Venkatraman, Climbing the Stairs*
Abraham Verghese, Cutting for Stone
Padma Viswanathan, The Toss of a Lemon*
Sylvia Townshend Warner, Summer Will Show
Kate Wheeler, Not Where I Started From or When Mountains Walked*
Jenny White, The Sultan’s Seal*
Richard Wiley, Soldiers in Hiding or Festival for Three Thousand Maidens or Ahmed’s Revenge
Oswald Wynd, The Ginger Tree
Carlos Ruiz Zafron, The Shadow of the Wind
Farahad Zama, Marriage Bureau for Rich People


For extra credit: selected titles from The Girls of Many Lands series through
American Girl
Non-Fiction – acceptable for required assignment – other non-fiction books are
acceptable WITH PERMISSION
Many of the memoirs listed on this site can be done with permission: http://memoirreviews.com/memoirs.html

Leila Ahmed, A Border Passage*
Said Hyder Akbar, Come Back to Afghanistan*
Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Infidel
John Amman and Guy Stewart, Black Man’s Grave
Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitanism
Pater Arnett, Live from the Battlefield
Arkady Babchenko, One Soldier’s War
Halima Bashir, Tears of the Desert
Ismael Beah, A Long Way Gone
Gertrude Bell, Persian Pictures and others by the same author with permission
Seyla Benhabib, Another Cosmopolitanism or The Rights of Others
Tom Bissel, Chasing the Sea
Chesa Boudin, Gringo (also read about all his parents!)
Nicholas Bouvier, The Way of the World
Mark Bowden, Killing Pablo
Geraldine Brooks, Nine Parts of Desire*
Eve Brown-Waite, First Comes Love, then Comes Malaria
Tim Butcher, Blood River
Jason Carter, Power Lines
Peter Chapman, Jungle Capitalists or Bananas
Bruce Chatwin, In Patagonia or What am I Doing Here? or Songlines or The Viceroy of Ouidah (fiction – e.credit)
Sarah Chayes, The Punishment of Virtue
Nien Cheng, Life and Death in Shanghai
Linda Colley, The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh*
Paul Collier, The Bottom Billion
Helene Cooper, The House at Sugar Beach
Paul Cowan, The Making of an Un-American
William Dalrymple, City of Djinns or In Xanadu or Age of Kali or others
Mike Davis, In Praise of Barbarians or Planet of Slums
Gerard Degroot, The Sixties Unplugged* or The Bomb
Larry Devlin, Chief of Station, Congo
Wasirie Dirie, Desert Flower or Desert Dawn or
Jeanne D’Haem, True Stories About Somalia
Linda Donelson, Out of Isak Dinesen in Africa
Shirin Ebadi, Iran Awakening
Carlos Eire, Waiting for Snow in Havana
Sarah Erdman, Nine Hills to Nambonkaha
James Fallows, Postcards from Tomorrow Square
Patricia Fara, Science
Noah Feldman, The Rise and Fall of the Islamic State and Bernard Lewis, What Went Wrong
Niall Ferguson, Empire or The Ascent of Money or The War of the World or others by the same author with permission
Patrick Leigh Fermor, A Time of Gifts or Between Woods and the Water or Words of Mercury (Roumeli or Mani or A Time to Keep
Silence for extra credit)
Franklin Foer, How Soccer Explains the World
Aminatta Forna, The Devil that Danced on Water
Thomas Friedman, Lexus and the Olive Tree or Hot, Flat, and Crowded
Alexandra Fuller, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight or Scribbling the Cat
Eduardo Galeano, Soccer in Sun and Shadow or Open Veins in Latin America or others with permission
Jane Fletche Geniesse, Passionate Nomad: The Life of Freya Stark
Fawaz Gerges, Journey of the Jihadist
John Gimlette, At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig (others by same author for extra credit)
Peter Godwin, When a Crocodile Eats the Sun or Mukiwa or Rhodesians Never Die
David Goldblatt, The Ball is Round
Philip Gourevitch, We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow we will be Killed …*
David Grann, The Lost City of Z
Melissa Fay Greene, There is No Me Without You
Greg Grandin, Fordlandia
Amy Butler Greenfield, The Perfect Red
Ramachandra Guha, India After Gandhi
Tarquin Hall, Salaam Brick Lane
Eric Hansen, Motoring with Mohammed or others by same author
Adrian Hartley, The Zanibar Chest
Liang Heng and Judith Shapiro, Son of the Revolution
Arthur Herman, Gandhi and Churchill
Susan Herrera, Mango Elephants in the Sun
Peter Hessler, River Town or Oracle Bones
John Hockenberry, Moving Violations*
Kris Holloway, Monique and the Mango Rains
Martha Hodes, The Sea Captain’s Wife*
Georgina Howell, Gertrude Bell
Anita Jain, Marrying Anita
Mark Jenkins, Worlds to Explore or To Timbuktu or The Book of Marvels or others by same author
Ann Jones, Looking for Lovedu or Kabul in Winter
Bart Jones, Hugo!
William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind
Wendy Kann, Casting with a Fragile Thread
Robert Kaplan, The Ends of the Earth or The Coming Anarchy or Soldiers of God or others by same author
Ryszard Kapucinski, The Soccer War or The Shadow of the Sun or Another Day of Life (for Another Day read short
story from Fountain, “The Lions Mouth” or Apkan or Achebe – other side) or The Emperor
Geraldine Kennedy, Harmattan or From the Center of the Earth
Tracy Kidder, Mountain Beyond Mountains or Strength in What Remains
Dean King, Skeletons of the Zahara
Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine
P.F. Kluge, The Edge of Paradise
Dan Koeppel, Banana
Antjie Krog, Country of My Skull
Bernard Lewis What Went Wrong and Noah Feldman, The Rise and Fall of the Islamic State
Charles Li, Bitter Sea
Bjorn Lomborg, The Skeptical Environmentalist
Waagari Maathai, Unbowed
Neil MacFarquar, The Media Relations Department of Hizbollah Wishes You a Happy Birthday
Tim Mackintosh-Smith, Hall of a Thousand Columns or Travels with a Tangerine or Yemen
Rosemary Mahoney, Down the Nile or The Singular Pilgrim or The Early Arrival of Dreams
Rian Malan, My Traitor’s Heart
Somaly Mam, The Road to Lost Innocence
Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom*
Charles Mann, 1491*
David Maraniss, Rome, 1960
Mark Mathabane, Kaffir Boy
J. R. McNeill, Something New Under the Sun*
Bryan Mealer, All Things Must Fight to Live
Suketa Mehta, Maximum City
Pang Mei-Chang, Bound Feet and Western Dress
Andrew Meldrum, Where We Have Hope
Rigoberta Menchu, I Rigoberta Menchu (you’ll need to read about the “controversy” too)
Anchee Min, Red Azalea
Azadeh Moaveni, Honeymoon in Tehran or Lipstick Jihad
Greg Mortenson, Three Cups of Tea***
Ezekiel (Eskia) Mphahlele, Down Second Avenue
Andrew Mueller, I Wouldn’t Start from Here or Rock and Hard Places (extra credit only)
Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Tehran*
Mende Nazer, Slave
Jewaharlal Nehru, Letters from a Father to His Daughter or Glimpses of World History
Eric Newby, A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush or A Book of Traveler’s Tales or others by same author
Richard Nisbett, The Geography of Thought
Redmond O’Hanlon, No Mercy
George Packer, The Village of Waiting
Robert Pelton, The Hunter, the Hammer, and Heaven or The Adventurist or at least 300 pages of The World’s Most
Dangerous Places
Claire Pettitt, Dr. Livingstone, I Presume?
Rolf Potts, Marco Polo Didn’t Go There
Samantha Power, A Problem from Hell
Dith Pran, Children of Cambodia’s Killing Fields
Nahid Rachlin, Persian Girls
Joshua Cooper Ramo, The Age of the Unthinkable
Ahmed Rashid, Taliban
Martin Rees, Our Final Hour
T.R. Reid, Confucius Lives Next Door
Andrew Rice, The Teeth May Smile but the Heart Does Not Forget
Christopher Robbins, Apples are From Kazakhstan
Douglas Rogers, The Last Resort
Jeffrey Rothfelder, Every Drop for Sale
Jeffrey Sachs, Common Wealth or The End of Poverty*
Kira Salak, The Cruelest Journey
Floyd Sandford, African Oddyssey
Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Death Without Weeping
Stephen Schlesinger, Bitter Fruit
Elaine Sciolino, Persian Mirrors
Robyn Scott, Twenty Chickens for a Saddle
Deborah Scroggins, Emma’s War*
Asne Seierstadt, The Angel of Grozny or A Hundred and One Days or With Their Backs to the World or others
Tanya Shaffer, Somebody’s Heart is Burning
Sadia Shepard, The Girl from Foreign
John Shors, Dragon House or Beneath a Marble Sky
Stephanie Smallwood, Saltwater Slavery
Janet Soskice, The Sisters of Sinai
Wole Soyinka, Ake or You Must Set Forth at Dawn
Randy Sparks, The Two Princes of Calabar
Tom Standage, A History of the World in Six Glasses or An Edible History of Humanity
Freya Stark, The Valleys of the Assassins or The Southern Gates of Arabia or Baghdad Sketches
Rory Stewart, The Places in Between or The Prince of the Marshes
Lauren St. John, Rainbow’s End
William Stolzenburg, Where the Wild Things Were
Jeremy Suri, Henry Kissinger and the American Century
Jeffrey Tayler, Facing the Congo or Angry Wind or others by same author
Moritz Thomsen, Living Poor or The Saddest Pleasure or The Farm on the River of Emeralds
Colin Thubron, Shadow of the Silk Road or Lost Heart of Asia or Among the Russians or others by the same author
Mike Tidwell, In the Mountains of Heaven or Amazon Stranger or The Ponds of Kalambayi
J. Maarten Troost, Lost on Planet China or others by same author
C.W. Truesdale, editor, An Inn Near Kyoto or Tanzania on Tuesday or The House on Via Gombito
Loung Ung, First the Killed My Father*
Jeroen Van Bergeijk, My Mercedes is not for Sale
Allison Wearing, Honeymoon in Purdah
Simon Winchester, The Man Who Loved China or The River at the Center of the World
Kevin Witherspoon, Before the Eyes of the World
Christian Wolmar, Blood, Iron, and Gold
Stanley Wolpert, Gandhi’s Passion*
Donald Wright, The World and a Very Small Place in Africa*
Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress
Lawrence Wright, The Looming Tower*
Muhammad Yunnus, Banker to the Poor
Fareed Zakaria, The Post-American World
Valerie Zenatti, When I was a Soldier
Lijia Zhang, Socialism is Great!*
(Mostly) Non-fiction – extra credit list – acceptable after doing one required book -
other books (especially ones on commodities or biographies of non-westerners) are
acceptable WITH PERMISSION
Reza Aslan, No God but God
Babur, The Baburnama
Moustafa Bayouni, How Does it Feel to be a Problem?
Thomas Bender, A Nation among Nations
Jerry Bentley, Old World Encounters*
Lawrence Bergreen, Marco Polo or Over the Edge of the World
Alexander Blakely, Siberia Bound
John Bowe, Nobodies
Timothy Brook, Vermeer’s Hat
Paul Cowan, The Tribes of America
Roger Crowley, Empires of the Sea
Mike Dash, Tulipomania
Jared Diamond, Collapse* or Guns, Germs, and Steel*
Ross Dunn, The Adventures of Ibn Battuta*
Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, Near a Thousand Tables or other books by same author (this is the author or our textbook)
Timothy Ferris, Coming of Age in the Milky Way
Victoria Finlay, Jewels or Color or Buried Treasure
Eduardo Galeano, Mirrors and others
Donald Gallo, First Crossing*
Simon Garfield, Mauve
Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat, Pray, Love
James Gleick, Chaos
E.H. Gombrich, A Little History of the World
Jason Goodwin, Lords of the Horizon
Matthew Hart, Diamond
Herman Hesse, Siddhartha
Tony Horwitz, A Voyage Long and Strange or Blue Latitudes or Baghdad Without a Map or others by same author
Adam Hochschild, Bury the Chains* or King Leopold’s Ghost
Samuel Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations
Raymond Ibrahim, The Al Qaeda Reader
Stefan Kanfer, The Last Empire
Taylor Lawrence, Tunnel Kids
Lutz Kleveman, The New Great Game
Mark Kurlansky, Cod or A Basque History of the World, or Salt, or 1968* or others by same author
Karen Larsen, Breaking the Limit
Bernard Lewis, The Muslim Discovery of Europe
Robert Marks, The Origins of the Modern World
H.E. Marshall, Our Island Story
Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto
Candace Millard, The River of Doubt
Giles Milton, Nathaniel’s Nutmeg or White Gold or Samurai William and others
Montesquieu, Persian Letters
Keiji Nakazawa, Barefoot Gen (V. 1-4) – graphic novel
David Northrup, Africa’s Discovery of Europe
Robert Ornstein and James Burke, The Axemaker’s Gift
Michael Pastoureau, Blue or Black
John Perkins, Confessions of an Economic Hitman or The Secret History of American Empire
Nathaniel Philbrick, In the Heart of the Sea or Sea of Glory or Mayflower
Michael Pollan, The Botany of Desire
Nancy Prince, A Black Woman’s Oddyssey
Jean Francois Rischard, High Noon
Jonathan Spence, Treason by the Book or other books by same author
Art Spiegelman, Maus I+II and C. Tyler, You’ll Never Know
Ian Tyrrell, Transnational Nation
United Nations, A More Secure World
Voltaire, Candide
Jack Weatherford, Indian Givers* or Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World*
Samuel Wilson, The Emperor’s Giraffe
Wu Cheng En, Monkey*
Daniel Yergin, The Prize*
Howard Zinn, A People’s History of American Empire
Tom Zoellner, Uranium or The Heartless Stone
    Mr. Greene’s Baker’s Dozen of Books that will help you pass the
                     WHAP test and this course:

For an overview of the whole course:
  1)    William and J.R. McNeil’s The Human Web

For the Americas before and after Columbus:
  2) Charles Mann, 1491

For the Mongol impact on world history:
  3) Jack Weatherford, Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

For how China (mostly) and other places influence Europe:
  4) Timothy Brook, Vermeer’s Hat

For Africa:
  5) Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost

For Africa and globalization:
  6) Donald Wright, The World and a Very Small Place in Africa

For the importance of geography:
  7) Jared Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel

For European history:
  8) E.H. Gombrich, A Little History of the World

For how commodities changed the world:
  9) Kenneth Pomeranz and Stephen Topik, The World Trade Created

For how a specific commodity, well six, changed the world:
  10) Tom Standage, The World in Six Glasses

Trade in general:
  11) William Bernstein, A Splendid Exchange

A Quasi-Marxist’s take on world history – in chapters all fewer than 2 pages!:
  12) Eduardo Galleano’s Mirrors

And a review book, I recommend the Princeton Review but others are good too.




Additionally the following books will be helpful for learning about world
history – can be kept in the water closet!:

    b)   Larry Gonick’s Cartoon Histories of the Universe
    c)   William and Robert McNeill, The Human Web
    d)   Judy Jones and William Wilson, An Incomplete Education
    e)   David Kidder and Noah Oppenheim, The Intellectual Devotional
    f)   Eric Sass and Steve Wiegand, The Mental Floss History of the World
    g) Eduardo Galeano, Mirrors

And for your desk (take it out of the water closet!):

    b) William and J.R. McNeill, The Human Web – this is probably the best book
       to compare to Felipe’s in its different judgments and set-up.

Required (+ Extra Credit – one per quarter maximum) Movies34
Note movies in parentheses are additional movies that you could watch. Readings
or activities in parentheses are mandatory unless otherwise noted.

1) Japan in the 1600s: Shogun miniseries (yes, the whole thing! It’s worth it!)

2) French Revolution: Danton + Amazing Grace (visit Amazing Grace website and select
readings on modern slavery and the groups working against it)5 EXTRA CREDIT ONLY

3) Slavery then and now: Amazing Grace + Amistad + Born into Brothels (visit the Amazing
Grace website and select readings on modern slavery and the groups working against it.
Also check out the “Kids with Cameras” website – you can evaluate their curriculum – is it
useful?)

4) China in the 20th Century: The Last Emperor + To Live (+ Birth of the Republic)

5) Jesuit missionaries: The Black Robe + The Mission (+ Dances with Wolves and/or Rabbit
Proof Fence)

6) East Germany and the fall of communism: The Lives of Others + Goodbye, Lenin (and
read this article by Wolf Biermann about The Lives of Others:
http://www.signandsight.com/features/682.html )

7) 19th and 20th C. India under colonialism: Lagaan + Gandhi* (+ Earth or Water from the
Deepa Mehta trilogy) (read “The Gandhi Nobody Knows” at
http://history.eserver.org/ghandi-nobody-knows.txt )

8) The Holocaust: The Grey Zone + The Nasty Girl (+ Conspiracy +/or Schindler’s List , +/or
et. al) (read Ordinary Men’s preface and chapters 7+8)4 EXTRA CREDIT ONLY

8a) modern genocides: any of #8 with Ararat and Hotel Rwanda +/or Sometimes in April
+/or The Devil Came on Horseback (research the debate over the Armenian genocide as it
relates to Turkey joining the European Union)


3
  Obviously you are responsible for getting permission to watch these movies from your parents.
4
  This pairing can only be done for extra credit. After your required review you may do one pairing per
quarter for extra credit
5
  This pairing can only be done for extra credit.
* We have copy of movie in Learning Commons on videotape, not dvd.
9) Buddhism and Tibet: Little Buddha + Seven Years in Tibet (+ Spring, Summer, Fall,
Winter . . . and Spring) (read articles over the last few years about the Dalai Lama, violence
in Tibet before the 2008 Olympics, and the Free Tibet movement)

10) South Africa under apartheid: Biko + A Dry White Season (+ Mandela and DeKlerk
available on VHS through the CHS library)
11) Problems in Africa: Blood Diamond + Hotel Rwanda or Sometimes in April (+ Last King of
Scotland must also watch “Capturing Idi Amin” 30 minute documentary available on the
L.K.S. dvd) (read “The Lion’s Mouth” in Ben Fountain’s Brief Encounters with Che Guevara as
well as research the blood diamond trade and/or watch 50 minute documentary on the dvd)

12) Secret police: A Dry White Season + Lives of Others (+ Cry Freedom)

13) World War I outside Western Europe (and its aftermath): Dr. Zhivago + Lawrence of
Arabia (+ Black and White in Color +/or Gallipoli)

14) Terrorists or anti-colonialists?: The Battle of Algiers + Proof of Life and/or Black Hawk
Down* and/or Munich and/or Charlie Wilson’s War (find and read articles connecting The
Battle of Algiers and the Iraq War and read “Near Extinct Birds of the Central Cordillera”
in Ben Fountain’s Brief Encounters with Che Guevara for Proof of Life or “What Black Hawk
Down Leaves Out” on Slate.com for BHD for CW’sWar read one chapter from the book
focusing on the conflict in Afghanistan and compare it to how it was portrayed in the movie)

15) Non-violence as a weapon: Gandhi* and Romero* (+ Mandela and DeKlerk*) (research
Liberation Theology and read “The Gandhi Nobody Knows” available at
http://history.eserver.org/ghandi-nobody-knows.txt)

16) The Ladies #1 Detective Agency: First Season (also visit the site at HBO.com to read
interviews, diaries and forums)

17) Immigrants to Britain: White Teeth and Small Island (+Bend it Like Beckham)

18) Illegal Immigrants to the USA: El Norte and/or Alambrista and Frozen River

MOVIE MAYHEM ASSIGNMENT:

For each movie select a ten minute (give or take) clip that you think would be the most beneficial to
show in class. Explain when the clip begins, what happens during the clip that is worth viewing, and
when it ends and why it would be useful to show to WHAP class.

Choose the WHAP theme that relates to the pairing of movies or mini-series (and writings when
applicable) and write at least a page (several is probably better - you will be graded on quantity
and quality!) on how the movies address the theme. Also discuss how and where a clip from a movie(s)
could fit into our textbook.6 Note, our textbook is known for useful integration of visuals into the


6
    Not required for first assignment.
text. Would it be useful to integrate the movies into the text (this could happen with an e-text!)? I
will forward what I judge honest and useful suggestions to the author.
Submit required writing to the extra credit section of turnitin.com for our class by the due date
and the social media site as required.
WHAP Themes

The FIVE overarching themes below will serve throughout the course as
unifying threads, helping students to put what is particular about each
period or society into a larger framework. The themes provide ways to
make comparisons over time and facilitate cross-period questions. Each
theme will receive approximately equal attention over the course of the
year.
Social--Development and transformation of social structures• Gender
roles and relations
• Family and kinship
• Racial and ethnic constructions
• Social and economic classes

Political--State-building, expansion, and conflict
• Political structures and forms of governance
• Empires
• Nations and nationalism
• Revolts and revolutions
• Regional, trans-regional, and global structures and organizations

Interaction between humans and the environment
• Demography and disease
• Migration
• Patterns of settlement
• Technology

Cultural--Development and interaction of cultures
• Religions
• Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies
• Science and technology
• The arts and architecture

Economic--Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
• Agricultural and pastoral production
• Trade and commerce
• Labor systems
• Industrialization
• Capitalism and socialism




    *We have a copy of the film in the Learning Commons on videotape, not dvd

				
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