Child-Friendly Cities by L5gP4O

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									Child-Friendly Cities
 and Communities

   Barbara Lambourn
      UNICEF NZ
              UNICEF NZ
• Mandate from UN to promote children’s
  rights, interests and healthy development
  with UN Convention on the Rights of the
  Child as platform for advocacy.

• NZ signed in 1993 – Govt. reports every 5
  years. Last report submitted Nov 2008 –
  awaiting response from UN Committee for
  Children
              UNCROC
Article 2:    Non discrimination
Article 6:    Right to life, survival and
              development
Article 12:   Principle of respect for the
              views of the child
Article 3.    The principle of best interests
              of the child
                Child-Friendly Cities
Some reference points:

1959 UN Declaration on the Rights of the Child
1972 UN Conference on the Environment in Stockholm
1980 Club of Rome: Limits to Growth
1987 UN Brundlandt Report: “Our Common Future”
1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro: Agenda 21
1996 UN II Habitat Conference in Istanbul
2000 Establishment of the International Secretariat on
   Child-Friendly Cities at the UNICEF Innocenti Research
   Centre in Florence
       Child-Friendly Cities




Climate Change, Urbanization and
         Children Rights
                 Child-Friendly Cities

Concept introduced by UNICEF at the II UN Habitat
  Conference in Istanbul – 1996

• a “holistic” container for child rights in their everyday
  life (not a sectorial approach)
• Mayors and local administrators as privileged players
• involvement of the whole community (families,
  professionals, associations, business, etc.)
• kids are visible, kids participate
• care for the environment is central
You are only a child once
                  Child-Friendly Cities

Some concepts:

-   Child Rights including participation
-   Sustainability
-   Biodiversity
-   Think globally, act locally
-   Good governance
-   Citizenship
-   Participation
         Child-Friendly Cities

Definition of a Child Friendly City (CFC)

“A Child Friendly City is a local system of good
  governance committed to fulfilling children's
  rights.

  It is a city where the voices, needs, priorities
  and rights of children are an integral part of
  public policies, programmes and decisions.
  It is as a result, a city that is fit for all”
               Child-Friendly Cities

                Around the world

• Italy, The Philippines, Spain, France, Brazil,
  South Africa, Slovenia, Switzerland, Palestine,
  Ukraine, UK and …


         New Zealand☺!!!???
                       Child-Friendly Cities
• A Child Friendly City is actively engaged in
  fulfilling the right of every young citizen to:

• Express opinions and influence decisions about their city (Article 12)
• Participate in family, community and social life (Article 31)
• Receive basic services such as health care, education and recreation
  (Article 24, 28, 31)
• Drink safe water and have access to proper sanitation (Article 24)
• Be protected from exploitation, violence and abuse
• (Article 19)
                   Child-Friendly Cities

• A Child Friendly City is actively engaged in
  ensuring every young citizen can:
•   Be safe in the streets
•   Meet friends and play
•   Have green spaces for plants and animals
•   Live in an unpolluted environment
•   Participate in cultural and social events
•   Be an equal citizen of their city with access to services,
    regardless of ethnic origin, religion, income, gender or
    level of ability
            LGA 2002: S.14
Local Government in NZ is obliged to:
• Make itself aware of, and have regard to, the
  views of all its communities
• Take account of future and current communities
  when making decisions
• Take account of the reasonably foreseeable
  needs of future generations when taking a
  sustainable development approach
              Child-Friendly Cities
         The CFC Toolkit (2004)

A framework for Action
- Good practices and key references
- The CFC database
- The 9 Building Blocks
- Partnerships and networking
                Child-Friendly Cities
The nine building blocks
1. CHILDREN’S PARTICIPATION: promoting
   children’s active involvement in issues that affect
   them; listening to their views and taking them into
   consideration in decision-making processes
        Child-Friendly Cities
                        The nine building blocks




2. A CHILD FRIENDLY LEGAL FRAMEWORK:
  ensuring legislation, regulatory frameworks
  and procedures which consistently promote
  and protect the rights of all children
            Child-Friendly Cities
                                The nine building blocks


3. A CITY-WIDE CHILDREN’S RIGHTS STRATEGY:
   developing a detailed, comprehensive strategy or
   agenda for building a Child Friendly City, based on
   the Convention
                Child-Friendly Cities
                                 The nine building blocks


4. A CHILDREN’S RIGHTS UNIT OR COORDINATING
   MECHANISM: developing permanent structures in
   local government to ensure priority consideration of
   children’s perspective
               Child-Friendly Cities
                               The nine building blocks




5. CHILD IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION:
   ensuring that there is a systematic process to
   assess the impact of law, policy and practice on
   children - in advance, during and after
   implementation
            Child-Friendly Cities
                       The nine building blocks




6. A CHILDREN’S BUDGET: ensuring adequate
  resource commitment and budget analysis
  for children
                 Child-Friendly Cities
                                    The nine building blocks




7. A REGULAR STATE OF THE CITY’S CHILDREN
   REPORT: ensuring sufficient monitoring and data
   collection on the state of children and their rights
             Child-Friendly Cities
                                The nine building blocks



8. MAKING CHILDREN’S RIGHTS KNOWN:
  ensuring awareness of children’s rights
  among adults and children
                Child-Friendly Cities
                                        The nine building blocks


9. INDEPENDENT ADVOCACY FOR CHILDREN:
   supporting nongovernmental organisations and
   developing independent human rights institutions -
   children’s ombudspeople or commissioners for
   children – to promote children’s rights
              Child-Friendly Cities

     A child-friendly city and community has:

•   child-friendly schools
•   baby and child-friendly hospitals and health care
•   child-friendly sports and leisure facilities
•   a sustainable environment
•   inter-generational and multi-cultural relationships
•   means and tools to implement child-rights
•   warning systems on violence, exploitation,marginalization
•   policies against discrimination and exclusion
•   good monitoring tools on the condition of childhood and
    adolescence
                Child-Friendly Cities

The challenge of children’s participation

How to take children’s opinions into account?

   •   children’s town councils
   •   children’s city consultations
   •   participatory urban planning
   •   Mayors as Defenders of children
         Child-Friendly Cities
   The challenge of children’s participation
Children’s Town Councils (ctd)

– some CTCs have a budget from the adults’ Council
– some elect “baby-mayors”
– CTCs have a national Ngo “Democrazia in Erba”
– 750 CTCs were created in the past 15 years, approx.
  500 are currently active
                 Kids want!!!
• cleaner cities (less pollution, less traffic, more
       green)
   • safe playing areas
   • “Go to school alone”
   • more bicycle/skate lanes
   • all children equal
Kids on the move: Rome
           Child-Friendly Cities
     The challenge of children’s participation
Participatory urban planning
  – local administrations involve children in planning
  – schools create laboratories with technical experts
   (architects, urban planners, social workers)
  – children elaborate proposals from design to
    implementation
  – main areas of interest: playing grounds, parks, street
    signals, meeting places, own media tools,…
            Child-Friendly Cities
        The benefit of children’s participation

Participation is also:
   – discovering your own city
   – meeting other generations
   – learning about citizenship: rules and duties
   – caring for the common good
   – becoming environmentally responsible
         Child-Friendly Cities
  The challenge of children’s participation
Some critical points:

– the danger of tokenism and manipulation
– unrealistic expectations
– promises not kept
– superficial imitation of adult structures
– jargon, complex or patronising adult language
– differing time frames for adults and children
                Child-Friendly Cities

            NZ early days- the road ahead

-   Local govt and UNCROC – Unicef position paper
-   Child Impact Assessments
-   Designing toolkit (revive from Christchurch)
-   Invercargill – Blumsky Report
-   5th European Conference on Child-Friendly Cities
    (Florence, 2010)
                      Wise words

Local authorities are on the front line and with trends
towards urbanisation and government centralisation they
are primary actors in matters affecting children’s lives.
Human skills, knowledge, creativity and time along with
wisdom to use resources in the community effectively
and appropriately are basic to a successful child friendly
approach.          Dennis McKinlay, Executive Director, Unicef NZ
Child-Friendly Cities

   www.childfriendlycities.org

        www.unicef.org



  www.unicef.org.nz
    barbara@unicef.org.nz

								
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