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					W


                                 2 532   0
                           FILE: 1OA-7
                           Ks.s.




                   McCHORD AFB
                   WASHINGTON




    ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD
              COVERSHEET


          AR File Number


          ---
                                            253 2       1   AR-42 53)_
                McChord Air Force Base
Remedial Action-Operation Area D/American Lake Garden
          Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant
              Operations and Maintenance
             (Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12)
                              FINAL

                   QUALITY PROJECT PLAN

                            Work Plan
                       Field Sampling Plan
                  Quality Assurance Project Plan
                 Basewide Health and Safety Plan


                             0




                            Prepared for:
            Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
                 Environmental Restoration Division
                        Brooks City-Base, TX

                           U.S. Air Force
                           62 CES/CEV
                         McChord AFB, WA

                           Prepared by:
             Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation
                             July 2005
              25 32   2




Section Tab

  3e&Dvl )
                                                                25 32   3




             UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
       INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM


                               FINAL

                           Work Plan

                  Remedial Action-Operation
Area D/American Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant
                 Operations and Maintenance
                (Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12)
             McChord Air Force Base, Washington




                              Prepandfor.
            Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
                 Environmental Restoration Division
                       Brooks City-Base, Texas
                                  and
                 McChord Air Force Base, Washington


                              Preparrdby:
                              TETRATECH FW. INC.


                    143 Union Boulevard, Suite 1010
                      Lakewood, Colorado 80228
                            (303) 988-2202




                              July 2005
                                                                                              2532   4




                                            NOTICE
This Work Plan was prepared for the U.S. Air Force (Air Force) by Tetra Tech FW, Inc. to guide
the implementation of the McChord Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance
project under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The limited objectives of this
plan and the ongoing nature of the IRP, alongwith the evolving knowledge of site conditions and
chemical effects on the environment and health, must be considered when evaluating Ns plan,
because subsequent facts may become known that may make this plan premature or inaccurate.
Acceptance does not mean that the Air Force adopts the conclusions, recommendations, or other
views expressed herein, which arc those of the contractor alone and do not necessarily reflect the
official position of the Air Force.
                                                                                                                                25 3 2


                     ENT PAGE                                           Fonn approved OMB No. 0704-0189
   u c reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing
 instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection
 of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including
 suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports,
 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork
 Red               ct (0704-0188). ashington, DC 20503.
                   E ONLY            2. REPORT DATE                      3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED
                                     July 2005                           Final
                                                                         Calendar Year 2005



4 7TITLE                                                               5. FUNDING NUMBERS
 Work Plan-Remedial Action-Operation Area D/American Lake              F41624-03-D-8600
 Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and               Delivery Order 0007
  Maintenance (Project No. PCYWY 92-7001-12), McChord Air
  Force Base, Washington
  S. ALITHOR(S)
  Mr. M. Ingersoll
  Mr. R. Weingarz


   . PERFORMIN             NIZATION NAME (S) AND                        8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER
  ADDRESS(ES)                                                           N/A
  Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
  143 Union Blvd. Lakewood. CO 80228
   . PONSORIN             ITORING AGENCY NAME (S) AND                   10. SPONSORINGIMONITORING AGENCY REPORT
  ADDRESS(ES)                                                           NUMBER
  Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, AFCEE/ERD,             WA
  3300 Sidney Brooks, Building 532, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235-
  5363
  11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
  This is a final document; only Section 2 of the Work Plan was modified for the final submittal.


  12a. DISTRIBUTIONIAVAILABILITY STATEMENT                              12.b DISTRIBUTION CODE
  For use by AFCEE, McChord AFB, 62 CES/CEV



  13. ABSTRACT                                                           15. NUMBER OF PAGES
  The Work Plan describes the work to be completed for the Area          50
  D/American Lake Garden Tract (ALGT) Groundwater Treatment
  Plant Operations and Maintenance project at McChord AFB,
  Washington.
  14. SUBJ ECT TERMS                                                     116. PRICE CODE
   • McChord Air Force Base
   • Work Plan
      Groundwater Monitoring Area    D/ALGT
      GroundwaterTrestmentPlant
      Granular Activated Carbon
  17. SECURITY                           ECURITY                         19. SECURITY                      20. LIMITATION OF
  CLASSIFICATION OF.                 CLASSIFICATION OF THIS              CLASSIFICATION OF                 ABSTRACT
  REPORT                             PAGE                                ABSTRACT                          UL
  Unclassified                       Unclassified                        Unclassified


                                                                                                         Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89)
   Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18-298-102
                                                                                               2 53 2


                                          PREFACE
This Work Plan describes the work tasks to be completed for the Area D/American Lake Garden
Tract (ALGT) Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance project at McChord Air
Force Base (AFB). The purpose of the project is to perform compliance monitoring of the Area
D/ALGT remedial action and monitor, inspect, evaluate, -and optimize treatment plant system
performance.

Key personnel involved in the project include Ms. Brenda Zehr, Remedial Project Manager,
Environmental Management Flight, McChord AFB 62 CES/CEV, 253-982-6202; Mr. Brian Lee,
Team Chief, Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE), 210-536-8379; Mr. Randie
Strom, Program Manager, Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (ItFW), 210-226-2922; Mr. Mark Ingersoll, Delivery
Order Manager, TtFW, 406-494-3446; and Mr. Mike Kuntz, Remedial Project Manager, Washington
State Department of Ecology, 360-407-7239.

The Work Plan was prepared using the AFCEE Model Work Plan as guidance. The AFCEE Model
Work Plan was designed by the AFCEE Environmental Restoration Consultant Operations
Division, including Lt. Col. Darrel R. Cornell, Chief, Consultant Operations Division; Major Eric A.
Banks, Chemistry Leader; Ms. Beth Garland, Chemist; and Dr. R. William Kessler, Chemist.
                                                                                                                                                      25 3 2
                                                                                                                                                  Contents



                                                                  CONTENTS
Section                                                                                                                                               Page

1. IN TRO DU CT ION ................................................................................................................................       1-1
    1.1 The Air Force Installation Restoration Program ......................................................................                              1-1
    1.2 H istory ofPastIRP Work atA reaD /A LG T ............................................................................                              1-2
    1.3 D escription of Project ...................................................................................................................        1-5
        1.3.1 Project Objectives ............................................................................................................              1-5
         1.3.2 Scoping D ocum ents ........................................................................................................                1-6

2. SU M MA RY O F EX ISTIN G IN FO RMATIO N ..............................................................................                                 2-1
   2.1 Site M onitoring ...............................................................................................................................    2-1
   2.2 Environm ental Setting ..................................................................................................................           2-1
        2.2.1 G eology .............................................................................................................................       2-1
        2.2.2 G roundw ater ....................................................................................................................           2-3
        2.2.3 Surface Water ...................................................................................................................            2-4
        2.2.4 Air ......................................................................................................................................   2-4
        2.2.5 Biology ...............................................................................................................................      2-7
        2.2.6 D em ographics ..................................................................................................................            2-9

3. PROJE CT TA SK S ................................................................................................................................. 3-1
   3.1 Field Investigation Tasks .............................................................................................................. 3-1
       3.1.1 M obilization ...................................................................................................................... 3-1
               3.1.2       G roundw ater Sam pling and A nalysis A ctivities .......................................................... 3-1
               3.1.3       G roundw ater Level M easurem ents ...............................................................................              3-4
               3.1.4       Treatm ent System Inspections .......................................................................................           3-5
               3.1.5       Carbon Vessel Backwashing, Sampling, -and Change-Out ........................................                                   3-5
               3.1.6       Treatm ent System Periodic M aintenance .....................................................................                   3-6

4. DATA ASSESSMENT, RECORDS, AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ....................... 4-1
   4.1 D ata A ssessm ent ............................................................................................................................ 4-1
   4.2 Record-K eeping ............................................................................................................................. 4-1
   4.3 Reporting Requirem ents ............................................................................................................... 4-1
       4.3.1 W ork Plan ......................................................................................................................... 4-2
       4.3.2 H ealth and Safety Plan .................................................................................................... 4-2
       4.3.3 Sam pling and A nalysis Plan ............................................................................................ 4-2
       4.3.4 Q uarterly Status Reports ................................................................................................. 4-2
       4.3.5 CY 2005 A nnual Report ................................................................................................. 4-2
       4.3.6 A nalytical D ata Report .................................................................................................... .$_2
       4.3.7 Environmental Restoration Program Information Management System ............... 4-2

 5. PROJECT SCH E DU LE ....................................................................................................................... 5-1

 6. RE FEREN CES ....................................................................................................................................... 6-1




                                                                                                          Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
                                                                                i                                                 January 2005
           2 532   8
Contents




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                                                             Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
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                                                                                                                                           25 32
                                                                                                                                  Tables/Figures



                                                        LIST OF TABLES
Table                                                                                                                                         Page
Table 1-1. Groundwater Remediation Goals for Area D/ALGT .......................................................... 1-5
Table 2-1. Geologic Units Reported Beneath McChord AFB ................................................................ 2-2
Table 2-2. M ean M ond-Ay Tem peratures .................................................................................................... 2-5
T able 2-3. M ean M onthly Precipitation ...................................................................................................... 2-6
Table 2-4. M ean M onthly W ind Conditions .............................................................................................. 2-7
Table 2-5. Monthly Total Evaporation at Puyallup .................................................................................. 2-7
Table 2-6. Federal and State Species of Concern that May Occur at McChord AFB,......................... 2-9
Table 3-1. Summary of CY 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Locations ................................................ 3-2
Table 3-2. Summary of CY 2005 Sampling Frequency ............................................................. .............. 3-3
Table 3-3. Estimated CY 2005 Sample Quantities ................................................................................... 3-3
Table 3-4. CY 2005 Static Water Level Measurement Locations ........................................................... 3-5
Table 3-5. Preventative Maintenance Schedule ...................................... :.................................................. 3-6
Table 4-1. Summary of Typical Technical Deliverables ........................................................................... 4-1


                                                         LIST OF FIGURES
 Figure                                                                                                                                  Page
 Figure 1-1. M cChord A FB Location M ap ................................................................................................. 1-3
 Figure 1-2. CY 2005 Area D/ALGT Groundwater Monitoring Location Map .................................. 1-7
 Figure 5-1. E stim ated Schedule ................................................................................................................... 5-3




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                 2532 10
TableslFiqures




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                                                                       Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
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                                                                                           25 32
                                                                       Acronyms and Abbreviations



                 LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

AFB                    Air Force Base
AFCEE                  Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
Air Force              U.S. Air Force
ALGT                   American Lake Garden Tract
AR                     air-rotaxy
ARAR                   Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirement


bgs                    below ground surface
BNRR                   Burlington Northern Railroad

CERCLA                 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability
                       Act
CDRL                   Contracts Data Requirements List
cis-1,2-DCE            cis-1,2-dichloroethene
CY                     calendar year

1,1 -DCE               1,1 -dichloroethene
DEQPPM                 Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy Memorandum
DOD                    (U.S.) Department of Defense


Ecology                Washington State Department of Ecology
EP                     effluent point
EPA                    (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency
ERPIMS                 Environmental Resources Program Information Management System

 OF                    degrees Fahrenheit
 ft                    foot or feet
 ft/mfle               feet per mile
 FSP                   Field Sampling Plan

 GAC                   granular activated carbon

 HSA                   hollow-stem auger
 HSP                   Health and Safety Plan

 IRP                    Installation Restoration Program

 MCL                    maximum contaminant level
 ig/L                   micrograms per liter
 MTCA                   Model Toxics Control Act




                                                             Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
 GWC          LTC QM                                                               January2005
             25 32 1 2
Acronyms and Abbreviations


           LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Concluded)
NAD                          North American Datum
NCP                          National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan
NGVD                         National Geodetic Vertical Daturn

PARCC                        precision, accuracy, representativeness, completeness, and
                             comparability
PVC                          polyvinyl chloride

QAPP                         Quality Assurance Project Plan
QC                           quality control
Qv                           Undifferentiated Alluvium/Curwash
Qva                          Vashon Advance Outwash
Qvr                          Vashon Recessional Outwash
Qvs                          Steilacoom, Gravel
Qvt                          Vashon Till

RAO                          remedial action objective
RCRA                         Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RI/FS                        Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

SAIC                         Science Applications International Corporation
SAP                          Sampling and Analysis PI=
SARA                         Superfand Amendments and Reauthorization Act
 Sea-Tac                     Seattle-Tacoma
 sow                         statement of work

 TCE                         trichloroethene
 TtFW                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

 USACE                       U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

 VOC                         volatile organic compound




                                                                     Operationsand MaintenanceWork Plan
                                                   Vi                                      January2005
                                                                                                   25 32 1 3


                                  1. INTRODUCTION

1.11    The Air Force Installation Restoration Program
The objective of the U.S. Air Force (Air Force) Installation Restoration Program (IRP) is to assess
past hazardous waste disposal and spill sites at Air Force installations and to develop remedial
actions consistent with the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan,
more commonly called the National Contingency Plan (NCP), for sites that pose a threat to human
health and welfare or the environment. This section presents information on the program origins,
objectives, and organization.
The 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is one of the primary federal laws
governing the disposal of hazardous wastes. Sections 6001 and 6003 of RCRA require federal
agencies to comply with local and state environmental regulations and provide information to the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning past disposal practices at federal sites.
RCRA Section 3012 requires state -agencies to inventory past hazardous waste disposal sites and
provide information to the EPA concerning those sites.
In 1980, Congress enacted the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and
Liability Act (CERCLA) (i.e., Superfund). CERCLA outlines the responsibility for identifying and
rcmediating contaminated sites in the United States and its possessions. The CERCLA legislation
identifies EPA as the primary policy and enforcement agency regarding contarninated sites.

The 1986 Superfand Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) extends the requirements of
CERCLA and modifies CERCLA with respect to goals for remediation and the steps that lead to
the selection of a remedial process. Under SARA, technologies that provide permanent removal or
destruction of a contaminant are preferable to action that only contains or isolates the contaminant.
SARA also provides for greater interaction with public and state agencies and extends the EPA's
role in evaluating health risks associated with contamination. Under SARA, early deterrnination of
Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) is required, and the consideration
of potential remediation alternatives is recommended at the initiation of a Remedial
Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). SARA is the primary legislation governing remedial action
at past hazardous waste disposal sites.
 Executive Order 12580, adopted in 1987, gave various federal agencies, including the U.S.
 Department of Defense POD), the responsibility to act as lead agencies for conducting
 investigations and implementing remediation efforts when these agencies are the sole or co-
 contributor to contamination on or off their properties.

 To ensure compliance with CERCLA, its regulations, and Executive Order 12580, the DOD
 developed the IRP, under the Defense Environmental Restoration Program, to identify potentially
 contaminated sites, investigate these sites, and evaluate and select remedial actions for potentially
 contaminated facilities. The DOD issued the Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy
 Memorandum (DEQPPM 80-6 regarding the IRP program in June 1980 and implemented the
 policies outlined in this memorandum in December 1980. EPA issued the NCP in 1980 to provide
 guidance on a process by which (1) contaminant release could be reported, (2) contamination could

                                                                    Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
 GW            LM         TO                                                              January2005
                 25 3 2 14
Section 1


be identified and quantified, and (3) remedial actions could be selected. The NCP describes the
responsibility of federal and state governments and those responsible for contaminant releases.

The DOD formally revised and expanded the existing IRP directives and amplified all previous
directives and memoranda concerning the IRP through DEQPPM 81-5, dated December 11, 1981.
The memorandum was implemented by an Air Force message dated January 21, 1982.

The IRP is the DOD's primary mechanism for response actions on Air Force installations affected
by the provisions of SARA. In November 1986, in response to SARA and other EPA interim
guidance, the Air Force modified the IRP to provide for an RI/FS program. The IRP was modified
so that RI/FS could be conducted as parallel activities. The program now includes ARAR
determinations, identification and screening of technologies, and development of altematives.The
IRP may include multiple field activities and pilot studies prior to a detailed final analysis of
alternatives. Over the years, requirements of the IRP have been developed and modified to ensure
that DOD compliance with federal laws, such as RCRA, NCP, CERCLA, and SARA, can be met.

1.2      History of Past IRP Work at Area D/ALGT
The Area D/American Lake Garden Tract (ALGT) remediation site is located approximately 7 miles
south of the city of Tacoma in Pierce County, Washington. The site is roughly bounded by
Interstate 5 and Porter Hill to the northwest; the McChord Air Force Base (AFB) ammunition
storage area to the north; "A" Street and the Burlington Northern Railroad (BNRR) to the east, and
Fort Lewis Logistic Center to the south (Figure 1-1).

From the mid-1940s to the early 1970s, several waste disposal sites in various stages of operation
were located at Area D, in the southwest portion of McChord AFB. The southwest portion of Area
D also contains a large residential area with approximately 3,500 onbase residents. Additional onbase
housing units were completed in 1998.The ALGT is an offbase residential tract abutting the
southwest boundary of Area D between McChord AFB and Fort Lewis Logistic Center. This tract
consists of 1,1 83 housing units with approximately 3,400 residents.

The DOD IRP was initiated at McChord AFB in March 1981. Past and current potential waste
disposal sites were identified during the Phase I record search (CH2M Hill 1982) and the Phase II
investigation (SAIC 1986); low4evel organic chemical contamination was measured at several of
these sites. Based on the Phase II investigation, it was recommended that further studies be
conducted to confirm contaminant characteristics and distribution. Concurrent with the Phase II
IRP investigation, EPA discovered trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichlotoethene (cis-1,2-DCE)
in groundwater samples collected from resource protection wells installed at the ALGT. In 1984,
EPA concluded that the volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in groundwater at the
ALGT most likely originated from Area D. The ALGT was added to the National Priorities List
(also known as Superfand) in October 1984. Following the listing of the ALGT, the IRP
investigation was incorporated into the process governed under CERCLA, and an RI/FS was
completed.

The nature and extent of contamination in the groundwater, soil, surface water, and sediments was
presented in the RI, as was an estimation of potential risks to human health and the environment
(Ebasco Environmental 1991 a). Alternatives for rernediation of the groundwater contamination
were presented in the FS (Ebasco Environmental 1991b).

                                                                   Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
G           L"               Tow.                 1-2                                    January2005
                                                                                          25 3 2 1 5




                                      Ile
                                                           4




                                 Groundwater
                                 Treatment
      Porter Hill                Plant       Ignominiousness
                                               STONAGE

                                          A ea D,,                t
                                                                  I
                                                                                   If

Ami                 Lake
   ric a"'
Garde!) 7I:6
                                                                                                    <
                                                                                           4


New Housing
Development                PROJECT AREk,,
                                         Fort Lew.s
                                         Logistic Center



                             R.d.d




                                                                             McChord AFIB
                                                                 Groundwater Treatment Plant Monitoring
           N                         Project Area                     and Optimization, Work Plan

       +                    IV       Base Boundary                            Figure 1-1
                                                                      McChord AFB Location Map
0    1,500   3,000
NNWMNWMNC====== Feet                                           F Date:   1/2005            T"TECH   .INC
            25 32 16
Section I




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                                                                                                               Section 1


As determined by the regulatory agencies and documented in the Record of Decision (EPA,
McChord AFB, and Washington Department of Ecology [Ecology] 1991), remedial action was not
necessary for soil, surface water, or sediments to ensure protection of human health and the
environment. However, VOC concentrations in groundwater exceeded healdi-based levels and/or
maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and required remediation. Groundwater remediation goals
were established for four contaminants of concern: TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-
DCE), and vinyl chloride. Remediation goals for these VOCs are listed in Table 1-1.

                   Table I -1. Groundwater Rernediation Goals for Area DIALGT
                                       Groundwater Rernediation Goal
           Contaminant of Concem                 (pg/L)'                      Basis of Remediation GoaI2
                     TCE                               5                                  MCL
                 cis-1,2-DCE                           70                                 MCL
                  1,1-DCE                             0.07                          MTCA Method B'
                Vinyl chloride                        0.04                          MTCA Method B3
             TreatmentplanteffluentmustmeetthegroundwaterremediationgoalsandhaveapHbetween6.5and8.5.
           2Determination of remediation goals is presented in the Record of Decision (EPA, McChord AFB, and
             Ecology `1991).
           3 Washington State Department of Ecology MTCA Method B cleanup level for groundwater in 1991.


To address water supply concerns, the Air Force asked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
to study, design, and oversee the installation of a water line connecting the ALGT to a local water
utility, the Lakewood Water District. By mid-1986, the residents located within the areal extent of
the plume with TCE concentrations of 5 micrograms per liter (jig/L)had been connected to the
public water system. The areal extent of the plume was based on estimates in the RI (Ebasco
Environmental 1991 a), specifically Figure 19 of the RI. The Air Force offered free drinking water
hookups to all property owners in the ALGT in 1992. All property owners in the ALGT who
accepted the offer were connected to Lakewood Water District's water supply system by June 1993.

 1.3       Description of Project
 1.3.1     Project Objectives
 The primary objectives of the project are to perform compliance monitoring of the Area D/ALGT
 remedial action activities and perform inspections of the treatment system in accordance with the
 FinalRemedialAction Work Plan (USACE 1994a) to assess:

       •   Containment of the contaminant plume

       •   Remedi2tion progress in terms of changes in groundwater quality and contaminant mass
           removal from the aquifer


       •   Treatment system performance


 Evaluation objectives will be met by performing quarterly compliance monitoring of the Area
 D/ALGT groundwater treatment plant system, conducting weekly inspections of the treatment
 system components, and completing routine maintenance in accordance with the FinalRemedial
 Action Work Plan (USACE 1994a) and the FinalOperationsandMaintenancePlan,Arra DIALGT
 Gromndwater Treatment (USACE 1994b).



                                                                                Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
 Gwc              LTOQ =To                                   1-5                                      January2005
             25 32 18
Section I


Groundwater monitoring activities will include collection and laboratory analysis of groundwater
samples from existing Area D/ALGT resource protection wells and extraction wells in accordance
with the schedule presented in the CY (CalendarYear)2004 AnnualReport,Area DIAmerican Lake
Garden Tract GroundwaterTnalment Plant Operationsand Maintenanceat McChord AFI3 (retra Tech FW,
Inc. 2005). Groundwater monitoring locations at Area D/ALGT for CY 2005 are shown on Figure
1-2.

1.3.2 Scoping Documents
The primary scoping document for the project is the statement of work (SOW), Remedial Action-
Operation, Area D/Ametican Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and
Maintenance, Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12, McChord Air Force Base, Washington, dated
Match 99, 2004.

Other documents important to completion of the project include all applicable (1) federal, state
(including the Ecology's Model Toxics Control Act WCA]), and local environmental statutes,
instructions, manuals, handbooks, regulations, guidance, policy letters, and rules (including all
changes and amendments) and (2) Presidential Executive Orders in effect on the date of issuance of
Delivery Order 0007. The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) Technical
Services Quality Assurance Program, Guidance for Contract Dcliverables, current version, will be
used as a reference for the generation of contract deliverables.




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                                                                                                                                       2 53 2             9




                                                                                                 AMMUNITION



                                                                                                     STORAGE




                      DA-13a
                                                                     DR-05
                                         DA 28                   DX-'2
                                                                    DT-2
                                                          DO-f
                                                       ODA-1 la                    DX-3     DA-9b.
                                                                     DB-6            to
                                                                        'b DA-29          DO-3
                                                           DA-30a
                                  DO-la                                                       DA-21b
                                               DT-1       0 DA-30b                           ODA-21a
                                                          LINCOLN-BLVD,
                                                                     DA-25b
                               ox-I%
                                       DZ-13                                                       DA-71b                           DA6a

    EPA-W-5




                                                                                   Note: This a color drawing. Do Not reprod.o, in Black   Mite

          N                                     Wells to be Sampled at                             McChord AFB
    W          E                           Area D/ALGT During CY2005                       Groundwater Treatment Plant
     +                                     Additional Static Water Level               Monitoring and Optimization, Work Plan
          S                                Measurement Locations
                                       /VBase Boundary                                                Figure 1-2
                                               Unpaved Road Limits                         CY2005 Area D/ALGT Groundwater
                      Feet                     Drainage Limits                                 Monitoring Location Map
0        Soo       1,000                       Fence,


                                                                                   F       Date: 1/2005                               TRA TEC14 F-4 INC
                                                                                              2532 20


              2. SUMMARY OF EXISTING INFORMATION

2.1     Site Monitoring
The Area D/ALGT pump-and-treat system was designed to create a hydraulic barrier to prevent
further migration of contaminants offbase and to extract and treat the most contaminated
groundwater beneath the site. The system consists of three groundwater extraction wells, a
groundwater treatment plant utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC), and two recharge trenches.
The groundwater pump-and-treat system for the Area D/ALGT site has been operating since
February 1994.

The first and second years of operation (CY 1994 and CY 1995) were documented in annual reports
by Hart Crowser (1995,1996). Annual reports for CY 1996 through CY 1999 were prepared by URS
Greiner, Inc. and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (1997,1998) and URS Greiner
Woodward Clyde and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (1999,2000). The annual reports
for CY 2000, CY 2001, and CY 2002 were prepared by Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation
(2001, 2002, 2003). The annual reports for CY 2003 and CY 2004 were prepared by Tetra Tech FW,
Inc. (2004, 2005).
2.2      Environmental Setting
2.2.1 Geology
The geology and hydrology of the base have been described by Griffin et al. (1962), Walters and
Kirnmel(1968),andBrownandCaldweil(1985).Additionalhydrogeologicstudies,suchasjRB
Associates(1983),ShannonandWilson(1986),ScienceApplicationsInternationalCorpor-ation
(SAIC) (1986), Envirosphere (1   988), and Ebasco Environmental (1991 a, 1992), were conducted as
part of the IRP-related investigations of the site.

McChord AFB is in the south-central portion of the Puget Trough, which is a large north-south-
trending structural depression bounded by the Cascade Mountains on the east and the Olympic
Mountains on the west. The trough is filled with a thick sequence of Tertiary fluvial and shallow
marine sediments. During the Quaternary period, a thick sequence of unconsolidated, fluvial, and
glacial sediments was deposited on top of the older basin 0 material. In the vicinity of McChord
AFB, the sequence is up to 2,000 feet (ft) thick.

The Quaternary sequence beneath McChord AFB is composed of interbedded glacial and nonglacial
sediments deposited during a series of glacial advances and retreats into the southern Puget
Lowland. The Quaternary sequence underlying the base is summarized in Table 2-1 (Ebasco
Environmental 1991a).

Four glacial events have been identified in the southern Puget Lowland sediments. From youngest
to oldest, they are represented by (1) the Vashon Drift (Vashon Stade-Fraser), (2) pre-Vashon/post-
Kitsap age undifferentiated till, (3)Salmon Springs Drift, and (4) Stuck Drift. One or more of the
glacial sequence deposits of advance outwash, till, and recessional outwash have been recognized
beneath McChord AFB.



                                                                  Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
G WC          LTOQP      TO   d.                2-1                                    Rev. July 2005
                  25 3 2 2 1

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                                                                                                 2532 22
                                                                                                Section 2


Geologic units beneath Area D/ALGT are described in detail in Ebasco Environmental (1991 a) and
are briefly described in this section. The Vashon Drift is comprised of the Steilacoorn Gravel (Qvs),
the Vashon Recessional Cutwash (Qvr), the Vashon Till (Qvt), and the Vashon Advance Outwash
(Qva).

The Qvs is a laterally continuous, essentially unsaturated surficial deposit consisting of open-work
coarse gravel with abundant cobbles. The Qvs beneath Area D/ALGT is generally 20 ft thick.
Below the Qvs is the Qvr, which consists of glacial ourwash gravels (sandy gravel with lenses of
gravelly sand and silt) and outwash sands. Below the Qvr is the Qvt, which consists of shallow
discontinuous layers and lenses of lodgement till (compact gravel in a clay, silt, and sand matrix) and
ablation tiff (loose, heterogeneous mixture of gravel, sand, silt, and clay). The Qva is the next unit
encountered and is underneath the Qvt, where present, or the Qvr. The Qva is predominantly sandy
gravel with lenses of gravelly sand and is dense where overlain by Qvt.

Between each major glacial interval, fluvial and lacustrine deposits accumulated, forming three
recognizable nonglacial units. From youngest to oldest, these are (1) unnamed nonglacial deposits of
pre-Vashon/post-Kitsap age (noted as undifferentiated alluvium/outwash and lacustrine silt in
Table 2-1), (2) the Kitsap Formation, and (3) the Puyallup Formation.

At least two post-Ktsap glacial advances and retreats (the Vashon and an earlier occurrence) are
evidenced in the stratigraphic record by die presence of sand and gravel lenses and dB that cannot be
assigned to a single glacial event.

Recent geologic processes in the Puget Sound region and central Pierce County include postglacial
erosion and deposition. Thin deposits of Recent age cover the project area discontinuously and
consist predominantly of peat and stream alluvium. Topsoil has developed locally on top of the
exposed Quaternary units. Fill composed mainly of silty gravel and concrete rubble is found within
the boundaries of the base.

2.2.2   Groundwater
Two ncar-surface aquifers occur at McChord AFB that are commonly used for water supply systems
in the area: the Vashon Drift/post-Kitsap Aquifer (coramonly referred to as the Vashon Aquifer)
and the Salmon Springs Aquifer. Beneath most of the base, the Kitsap Aquitard separates these two
aquifers.

The Vashon Drift/post-Kitsap Aquifer comprises all of the Pleistocene deposits above the Kitsap
Formation. It is equivalent to Hydrostratigraphic Layer A identified by Brown and Caldwell (1985).
This aquifer actually contains several units with aquitard properties, including the Qvt, a deeper
undifferentiated till, and a lacustrine silt (Table 2-1). In some places beneath the base, the units may
separate the Vashon Drift/post-Kitsap sequence into an upper unconfined aquifer (i.e., Qvr) and a
lower confined aquifer (i.e., Qva). The Qvt has been identified in all borings; however, base-wide,
the aquitards have been shown to be laterally discontinuous and therefore have only local effects on
the vertical movement of groundwater.

Seasonal fluctuations in water table elevations typically average around 6 to 7 ft in Area D/ALGT
wells. The lowest levels are generally observed in late summer/early fall, and the highest levels
generally occur in early spring.


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 Section 2



The predominant flow direction in the Qvr unconfined aquifer at Area D/ALGT is to the west. The
average horizontal site gradient during CY 2004 was about 6 feet per mile (ft/mile). The overall
groundwater gradient in the unconfined aquifer across the Clover Creek/Charnbers Creek basin is
about 25 ft/mile (Brown and Caldwell 1985). The upper aquifer receives precipitation recharge
onbase, and creeks such as Clover Creek tend to lose water to the aquifer throughout the year
(Ebasco Environmental 1992). There are no known springs onbase, but the ephemeral lakes within
the Area D/ALGT site are mainly fed by the unconfined aquifer. There is generally a downward
gradient within the upper aquifers (Qvr and Qva) and between the upper aquifers and the Salmon
Springs Aquifer. The predominant flow direction in the Qva confined aquifer is to the northwest.
The Salmon Springs Aquifer comprises the entire Salmon Springs Drift and is equivalent to
Hydrostratigraphic Layer C identified by Brown and Caldwell (1985). The bottom of the Salmon
Springs Aquifer is bounded by the Puyallup Aquitard. The Salmon Springs Tin is the only aquitard
unit within this aquifer, but it is laterally discontinuous and is known to be missing in some areas
beneath the base.

Where the till is present, the Salmon Springs Aquifer may locally act as two distinct aquifers. Below
Area D on the base, a difference in head of 15 ft has been observed above and below the Salmon
Springs Till (Ebasco Environmental 1991 a). The predominant groundwater flow direction within the
Salmon Springs Aquifer is to the north or northwest, generally subparallel to the flow direction
within the Vashon/post-Kitsap Aquifer, although locally the flow may be somewhat at variance with
this general direction.

2.2.3   Surface Water
Area D/ALGT is within the American Lake Subwatershed of the Clover Creek/Charnbers Creek
basin; however, no continuously flowing channels are present because surface water quickly
infiltrates the soil and because the topography is level (Fbasco Environmental 1991a). Surface water
bodies in the western portion of the area include Emerson Lake, Carter Lake, and an unnamed pond
in ALGT. Other surface water bodies within the Whispering Firs Golf Course include Whitman
Lake, Baxter Lake, the Duck Pond (southern remnant of Baxter Lake), and Lamont Lake. The
surface water bodies are mainly fed by groundwater.

Surface water and surface water sediment samples are not included in die Area D/ALGT
compliance monitoring program.

2.2.4   Air
The climate of McChord AFB and environs may be described by the long-term meteorological
conditions of Olympia, Washington, located about 24 miles to the southwest, and Puyallup,
Washington, located about 15 miles to the east; and the Scattle-Tacoma <Sea-Tac) Airport, located
about 27 miles to the northeast. Meteorological conditions at McChord AFB, may be described as
midway between conditions at Olympia and Sea-Tac and similar to those found at Puyallup. An
three stations have meteorologicalrecords in excess of 30 years. The Puyallup Experimental Station,
about 13 miles east-northeast, is the source of evaporation information in the Puget Sound
Lowlands (Ebasco Environmental 1992).

The Cascade Mountains, east of the Puget Sound Lowlands, effectively exclude continental
influences from the area. The prevailing southwesterly winds keep the average winter daytime


                                                                  Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
                                                2-4                                    Rev. July 2005
                                                                                                 2532 24
                                                                                                Section 2


temperatures in the 40s (degrees Fahrenheit rF]) and the nighttime temperatures in the 30s CF)
(Western Regional Climate Center 2001). Frequent maritime disturbances bring almost continuous
rain into the region from October until March. The occurrence of snow in the area is extremely
variable. Any snow that falls often melts before accumulating to any depth. Exterded periods (10 to
14 days) of cold temperatures are associated with the southward flow of air originating in Canada
(Ebasco Environmental 1992).

During spring the semipermanent Pacific anticyclone moves northward, blocking the tracks of
casrward-moving storms. The amount of precipitation diminishes as the summer season progresses.
Summer temperatures are moderated by the relative proximity to the Pacific Ocean. Summer
nighttime temperatures are typically in the 50s and daytime temperatures are in the high 70s or low
80s (Western Regional Climate Center 2001). Periods of extreme temperatures last only for a short
while. Winds are relatively light during the summer months (Ebasco Environmental 1992). The
climate is generally frost-free with an average growing season of approximately 250 days (URS
Consultants, Inc. 1989). Monthly mean temperatures for the area, in degrees Fahrenheit, are shown
on Table 2-2 (Western Regional Climate Center 2001).

                                 Table 2-2. Mean Monthly Temperatures

                                                   Temperature (OF)
                     Olympia (1948-2000)         Sea-Tac (1931-2000)       Puyallup (1931-1995)
                   Daily     Daily             Daily      Daily           Daily     Daily
         Month   Maximum Minimum Mean         Maximum Minimum Mean Maximum Minimum Mean
      January      44.3      31.4     37.8      44.6      34.7     39.7   46.3       32.0    39.2
      February     49.1      32.7     40.9      49.0      36.7     42.8   50.5       33.6    42.1
      March     1 53.3       33.7     43.5      52.2      38.0     45.1   54.8    -35.3      45.0
      April        59.1      36.5     47.8      57.5      41.2     49.3   60.9       38.5    49.7
      May          65.8      41.5     53.7      64.2      46.4     55.3   68.1      .43.1    55.6
      June         71.0      46.6     58.8      69.4      51.2     60.3   72.6       47.9    60.2
      July         77.0      49.4     63.2      75.1      54.5     64.8   78.2       50.3    64.3
      August       77.0      49.5     63.3      74.7      54.8     64.8   78.0       50.1    64.0
      September    71.6      45.2     58.4      69.5      51.3     60.4   72.2       46.5    59.3
                                                                   52.3            -1.6      51.9
      October      60.7      39.6     50. 1     59.4      45.3            62.3 1
      November     50.5      35.6     43.0      50.5      39.6     45.0   51.9 1 36.1        44.0
      December     44.8      32.7     38.7      45.4      35.8     40.6   47.0       33.4    40.2
      Annual       60.4      39.5     49.9      59.3      44.1     51.7   61.9       40.7    51.3
      Winter       46.1      3 .2     39.1      46.3      35.8     41.0   48.0       33.0    40.5
      Spring       59.4               4                   41.9     49.9   61.3       39.0    50.1
     ISummer       75.0                                   53.5     63.3   76.3       494
     lFall         60.9                                   A-9; A   -- - '


ne mean annual precipitation at McChord AFB is approximately 39 inches, with roughly 75
percent of the yearly rainfall occurring between October and Match (Western Regional Climate
Center 2001). Mountainous terrain to the east (Cascade Range) and west (Olympic Range), the
presence of hills, and the immediate vicinity of Puget Sound all contribute to a complex distribution
of precipitation amounts. Localized summer showers and a few thundershowers occur in the area



                                                                      Operations and Maintenance Wofk Plan
GW           SLTOQ        LTO.                     2-5                                      Rev. July 2005
                2532 25
    Section 2



    but do not materially contribute to the average precipitation. Monthly mean precipitation totals
    (I'able 2-3) indicate a wide range of precipitation amounts over relatively short distances (Western
    Regional Climate Center 2001).

                                 Table 2-3. Mean Monthly Precipitation

                                                     Precipitation (inches)
                              Olympia (1948-2000)    Sea-Tac (1931-2000)      Puyallup (1931-1995)
                  Month    F-        Mean                    Mean                     Mean
            January                   8.0                     5.7                      5.6
            February                  6.1                     4.2                      4.5
            March                     5.1                     3.8                      4.0
            April                     3.4                     2.5                      2.8
            May                       2.0                     1.7                      1.9
            June                      1.6                     1.4                      1.8
            July                      0.8                     0.8                      0.8
           August                     1.2                     1.1                      1.1
           September                  2.1                     1.8                      1.9
           October                    4.7                     3.5                      3.6
           November                   8.2                     6.1                      5.
           December                   8.3                     5.9                      6.2
           Annual                    51.4                    38.4                     39.8
           Winter                    22.4                    15.8                     16.3
            p ng                     10.4                     7.9                      8.8
            ummer                    3.5                      3.3                      3-7           1
                                     15.1                    113


Because the southern end of the Puget Sound Trough is open, the prevalent wind direction is from
the southwest. Mean monthly wind speeds and the prevailing wind direction are presented in
Table 2-4. The difference in mean monthly wind conditions at Olympia and Sea-Tac: is related to the
fact that Sea-Tac is situated atop a low north-south ridge (Ebasco Environmental 1992).

Evaporation is measured in the Puget Sound Lowlands at the Puyallup Experimental Station.
Evaporation is normally measured only during the summer months.The Puyallup Experimental
Station operates a measurement program from April through October and sometimes March
through November. Monthly evaporation totals (Table 2-5) for the 6-year period, 1983 through
1988, indicate that evaporation greatly exceeds precipitation during the summer months (Ebasco
Environmental 1992).

On a yearly basis, evapotranspiration is low because most of the precipitation occurs during the
winter months. Yearly evapotranspiration is estimated to be 20 inches (estimated at the Puyallup
Experimental Station). The frequent winter rainfalls combine with the low seasonal evaporation
potentials, resulting in increased surface runoff and aquifer recharge. Based on annual average
precipitation and assuming that the soil capacity at McChord AFB ranges from 6 to 2 inches, it is
estimated that between 13 and 17 inches of net annual precipitation infiltrates to groundwater (SAIC
1985).




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                                                                                                     Section 2


                               Table 2-4. Mean Monthly Wind Conditions
                                  Mean Wind Speed (miles per hour) and Prevailing Direction
                                        Olympia                         Sea-Tac
                 Month            Speed       Direction         Speed            Direction
           January                 7.3          SSW               9.9              SSW
           February                7.2          SSW               9.7               SW
           March                   7.5          SSW               9.9              SSW
           April                   7.3           SW               9.6               SW
           May                     6.8           SW               9.0               SW
           June                    6.7          SSW               8.8
           July                    6.2           SW               8.3               SW
           August                  5.9           SW               7.9               SW
           September               5.7           SW               8.1                N
           October                 5.8          SSW               8.6                S
           November                6.7           SW               9.2
           December                7.5          SSW               9.8              SSW
          IYear                    6.7          SSW
           Sources; NQAA 1987a and 1987b.

                         Table 2-5. Monthly Total Evaporation at Puyallup
                                                     Evaporation (inches)
           Month          1983          1984          1985         1986        '1987          1988
     March                 -              -              -          -           1.5            -
     April                 3.2           2.4           2.4          2.1         2.4            2.4
     May                   4.1           4.0           4.1          3.3         4.3            3.5
     June                  4.3           4.4           5.0          5.9         5.7            4.8
     July                  4.0           6.4           7.6          4.5         4.9            5.7
     August                4.8           5.3           54                                      5.2
     September             2.6           3.1           2.7          2.9         3.6            3.6
     October               1.3            1.5           1.7         1.1         1.6            1.2
     November              -              -             -           -           0.6            -
     Sources: NQAA 1988,1987c, 1986,1985,1984, and 1983.

2.2.5 Biology
The habitat and inventory of species at McChord AFB have been documented in numerous reports.
Ile foUowing discussion is based mainly on an April 1996 report, Defending Biadivern6i,prepared in
cooperation by The Nature Conservancy of Washington, the Washington State Department of
Natural Resources Washington Natural Heritage Program, McChord AFB, and the DOD Legacy
Resource Management Program (ne Nature Conservancy of Washington et al. 1996).

More than one-third of McChord AFB has been protected from the explosive growth that has
reshaped the Puget Sound region in the last few decades. The natural environment of McChord
AFB is shaped by a moist winter season that is followed by summer drought. Historically, the
landscape composed a mosaic of oak woods, ponderosa pine forests, and prairie grasslands,

                                                                       Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
GW           5 LTO        TO                        2-7                                      Rev. July 2005
             2532 27
Section 2


interspersed with rich wetlands. The invasive Douglas fit has affected the present-day landscape, as
has the rapid spread of introduced plant species (Me Nature Conservancy of Washington et al.
1996).

Garry oak and ponderosa pine, typically found as open woodlands with an understory of
wildflowers, grasses, and shrubs, are scattered throughout McChord AFB. Biologists have mapped
120 stands of oak and a single ponderosa pine stand. Where the oak woodland canopy opens up, the
landscape at McChord resembles dry savannah (Ihe Nature Conservancy of Washington et al.
1996). Biologists have also identified and mapped 36 distinct wetlands on McChord AFB (The
Nature Conservatory of Washington and Washington State Department of Natural Resources
Natural Heritage Program 1996). Another important aquatic habitat is Clover Creek, which runs east
to west through the base.

Clover Creek plant species include manroot (Marab oirganus), rose (Rosa sp.), Scot's broom (Cy&us
scoparius), black cottonwood (Poomius trichocarpa), Oregon white oak (Querusganyafla), red alder (Alnus
rubra), willow (Sahc sp.), and Sitka spruce (Piceasitchensis).Aquatic plants in the creek include itis (Iris
pseadacorys) and duckweed (Lemna sp.). Himalayan blackberry (Ruhus discolo and evergreen
blackberry (K latiniatus)are also reported to occur in the area (Ebasco Environmental 1992).

 Several fish species inhabiting Clover Creek were identified during electric shock surveys, including
 sculpin (Coitus sp.), dace (Rbinichlbys sp.), cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki), and yellow perch (Perra
fiavescrns). Western brook lamprey (LxVetra fichardronz) has also been observed in the creek (Ebasco
 Environmental 1992).

Systematic surveys have tallied 11 8 different bird species within the habitats on McChord AFB, 9 of
which are considered state species of concern in the state of Washington. The little-willow flycatcher
(Empidonaxtra&i brmsten) is also a federal candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act. In
addition to the flycatcher, the pileated woodpecker (Dgocopuspileatus), streaked hom. lark (Errmopbila
a0estris), and western bluebird (Siafia me.,dcana) are presumed to be breeding on the base. The
western bluebird is a neotropical migratory species currently recognized as a state candidate for
listing as endangered. ne    western bluebird typically occupies oak woodland habitats at the edge of
prairie grasslands (Me Nature Conservancy of Washington et al. 1996).The bald eagle (Hafixelus
leucocefibalus), a federally threatened species, has been occasionally sighted flying over the base;
however, the base does not contain suitable nest sites, perch trees, or food supplies necessary to
sustain wintering or nesting bald eagles (Ebasco Environmental 1991a).


The oak woodlands also provide a preferred habitat for the western gray squirrel (Samrusgriseus). The
western gray squirrel, listed as a threatened species in the state of Washington, has been sighted on
the base a number of times (Ihe Nature Conservancy of Washington et al. 1996). A small black-
tailed deet herd inhabits the densely vegetated western portion of the base. Sensitive, threatened, or
endangered plant and animal species that may occur or have been sighted at McChord AFB are
listed in Table 2-6.




                                                                        Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
G:          LTO             TO                       2-8                                     Rev. July 2005
                                                                                                                    2532 28
                                                                                                                 Section 2


         Table 2-6. Federal and State Species of Concern that May Occur at McChord AFB
 -      Common Name                      Scientific Name                 State Status               Federal Status
                                                             Birds
             Bald eagle              Haliaeetusleucoc                     Threatened                  Threatened
             Black swift                Cypseloides niger                   Monitor                      None
         Great blue heron                Ardea herodias                                                  None
            Green heron                 Butorides striatus                  Monitor
      Little-willow flycatcher       Empidonax traildbrewsteri               None                        None
       Loggerhead shrike               Lanius ludovicianus                 Candidate              Species of Concern
               Merlin                   Falco columbarius                  Candidate                     None
        Northern goshawk                Accipiter genitilis                Candidate              Ssciesof Concern
     Oregon vesper sparrow          Poocecetes gamineus affinis            Candidate              Species of Concern
               Osprey                   Pandion haliaetus                   Monitor                      None
      Pileated woodpecker              D[Yocopus pileatus                  Candidate                     None
            Purple martin                 Prognesubis                     -Candidate                     None
       Streaked horn lark              Eremophila alpestris                Candidate               ___one
           lurke ulture                  Cathartesa                         Monitor                      None
            V.u.%vswift                  Chaetura                          C
        Western blue bird                Sialia mexicana
                                                            Mammals
 -Western      gray squirrel              Sciurus griseus                 Threatened              Species of Concern
                                                            Reptiles
     Northern red-legged

     Puget Sound silverspot        Speyeria cybele pugetensis               Monitor                       None
        Purplish copper     t          Lycaena helloides                    Monitor                       None
                                                         Plants
     Torrey's pea vine                  Lathyrus torreyi                   Threatened             Species of Concern
    White-topped aster                    Aster curl                                              Species of Concern
      Water howellia             _ _towellia aq                                                       Threatened
Sources:
The Nature Conservancy of Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (2002).
The Nature Conservancy of Washington (1998).
The Nature Conservancy of Washington and the University of Washington (1999).
The Washington State Department of Natural Resources Washington Natural Heritage Program (2002ab).
The Nature Conservancy of Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources Washington Natural Heritage
Program (1996).

2.2.6       Demographics
McChord AFB occupies 4,638 acres in Pierce County, Washington, within the central part of the
Puget Sound Lowland physiographic province. The base is situated on a flat upland plain
approximately 1 mile south of Tacoma, Washington, and about 7 miles east of Puget Sound. A
north/south BNRR right-of-way divides the base. McChord AFB is adjacent to and northeast of the
Fort Lewis Military Reservation. Primary access to the base from Interstate 5 is through die main
McChord AFB entrance on Bridgeport Way. Public access is restricted for all areas on
McChord AFB.

Several Tacoma suburbs surround the base-the closest are the Springbrook subdivision and
Ponders Comer to the west and Clover Park to the northwest. The communities of Parkland,
Spanaway, and Brookdale are located east of the base. Based on the 1990 census, populations for


                                                                                Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
G VF                LM QPP        10"                         2-9                                     Rev. July 2005
            2532 29
Section 2


these areas range from 1,934 at Ponders Comer to 20,882 at Parkland. Onbase housing areas consist
of the Hartwood housing area in the southwest and several dormitory complexes near the industrial
area.




                                                                 Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
                                               2-10                                     Rev. July 2005
                                                                                                2532 30


                                3. PROJECT TASKS

Groundwater monitoring of Area D/ALGT resource protection wells and extraction wells should
be implemented in accordance with the FinalRemedialAcdon Work Plan (USACE 1994a), as amended
by agreements between the Air Force and Ecology, and following the recommendations and
schedule presented in the CY 2004 Annual Report (Tetra Tech FW, Inc. 2005), after approval by die
Air Force, in concurrence with Ecology.

Treatment plant system routine activities should include weekly inspections of system components,
quarterly backwashing of carbon vessels, and periodic maintenance of system components. Non-
routine activities consist of GAC replacement and system repairs, which are performed as needed or
as required by the compliance monitoring.

Quarterly status reports are typically prepared after the end of three periods Ganuary through March
2005, April through June 2005, and July through September 2005). An annual report is typically
prepared that summarizes all field activities completed during the calendar year for the Area
D/ALGT Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance project.

3.1    Field Investigation Tasks
3.1.1 Mobilization
Mobilization tasks typically include:

    •   Procurement of the analytical laboratory subcontractor and engineering specialty
        subcontractor

    •   Procurement and mobilization of Environmental Health and Safety field monitoring
        equipment

    •   Procurement and mobilization of sampling equipment and water collection equipment

Material storage and temporary water containers are located at the McChord AFB Area D/ALGT
treatment plant.

3.1.2 GroundwaterSamplingandAnalysisActivides
During CY 2005, groundwater samples may be collected from approximately 10 or 11 resource
protection wells, I or 2 extraction wells, and the treatment plant system effluent sampling point
within Area D/ALGT, as presented on Tables 3-1 and 3-2. All samples collected in Match 2005 win
be analyzed by Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc., Seattle, Washington, for TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, 1,1-
DCE, and vinyl chloride using EPA Method 8260B.

 Field parameters to be measured during each sampling event will include temperature, specific
 conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and oxidation reduction potential. Estimated
 quantities for the envirorunental and field quality control (QC) samples are shown on Table 3-3.




                                                                    Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
                                                 3-1                                        January2005
                         2    5 3 2 31

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                                                                                                                          2532 32
                                                                                                                    Section 3


                         Table 3-2. Summary of CY 2005 Sampling Frequency
                                                                                  Proposed CY 2005 Sampling
         Sample Location           CY 2004 Sampling Frequency                                 Frequency
        DA-7b                                  Semiannual                                    Semiannual
        DA-9b                                      Annual                                       Annual
        DA-21 b                                 Semiannual                                    Semiannual
        DA-28                                      Annual                                       Annual
        DA-29                                     Annual'                                       Annual'
        DA-30a                                    Annual'                                       AnnuaI2
        CA-30b                                    AnnuaI2                                       AnnUaI2

        DB-6                                      Annual'                                       Annual'
        DO-2                     Quarterly, if DX-2 is not in operation                          None
        DR-05                                      Annual                                       Annual
        DT-1                                      Quarterly                                    Quarterly
        DX-2                            Quarterly, if in operation                             Quarterly
        DX-3                                      Quarterly                                     Quarterly
        System Effluent                               A                                            A
          Stagger DA-29 and DB-6 to provide data during wet and dry season sampling events.
          Stagger DA-30a and DA-30b to provide data during wet and dry season sampling events.A = Quarterly at
          cis-1,2-13CE <5 Vg/L; monthly at cis-1,2-13CE > 5 to 10 itg/L; bi-weekly at cis-1,2-DCE >10 vg/L

                             Table 3-3. Estimated CY 2005 Sample Quantities
                                                                     VOCs (EPA Method 8260B)'
                                                                                                                 Additional
                                                                                Round 3           Round 4      Effluent Point
                                           Round I           Round 2           September         December       Sampling, If
            Sample Type                  March 2005         June 2005             2005              2005        Necessary`2
 Environmental                                 11                4                  8                 4              8
 Field QC Matrix Spike                          I                 1                 1                 1              0
 Field QC Matrix Spike Duplicate                1                 1                 1                 1               0
 Field QC Duplicate                             1                 1                 1                 1               0
 Field QC Equipment Blank                       1                                   1                 1               o
 Field QC Trip Blank                            I                                    1                1               0
                Sample Event Total              16                                  13                9               8
 TA,,otated list of EPA 8260B compounds includes only TCE, cis-11,2-DCE, 11,11-13CE, and vinyl chloride.
 2Quarterly at cis-1,2-DCE <5 iLgtL; monthly at cis-1,2-DCE >5 to 10 iLg/L; biweekly at cis-1,2-DCE >10 pg&.


3.1.2.1 Resource Protection Well Sampling
The FinalRemeaialAction Work Plan (USACE 1994a) established the initial rationale for groundwater
monitoring at Area D/ALGT. Modifications to the sampling schedule are documented in the annual
reports for CY 2000, CY 2001, and CY 2002 (Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation 2001,
2002, 2003) and CY 2003 and CY 2004 (retra Tech FW, Inc. 2004, 2005). The current rationale for
groundwater sampling of resource protection wells is as follows:

         Wells DR-05 and DA-9b monitor contaminant containment along the plume's northern
         edge.



                                                                                     Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
Gw                LM                                           3-3                                         January 2005
                2532 33
Section 3


    •   Well DA-28 monitors contaminant plume containment downgradient (west) of extraction
        well DX-2.

    •   Wells DA-7b and DA-21b monitor the secondary source of contamination between
        Landfill 5 and extraction well DX-3.

    •   Wells DA-30a and DA-30b, a two-well cluster located between extraction wells DX-l and
        DX-3, monitor the performance of DX-3.

    •   Wells DA-29 and DB-6, a two-well cluster located between extraction wells DX-2 and
        DX-3, also monitor the performance of DX-3.

    •    Monitoring results from well clusters DA-30a/DA-30b and DA-29/DB-6 are also used to
         evaluate the vertical distribution of contaminants.

    •    Well DT-1 monitors contaminant concentrations associated with extraction well DX-1
         (currently on standby). Should levels of TCE exceed the remedial action objective (RAO) of
         5 ig/L, then extraction well DX-1 may be restarted.

3.1.2.2 Extraction Well Sampling
Extraction well samples provide information on contaminant mass removal from the individual
wells. The FinalRemedialActiom Work Plan (USACE 1994a) established the initial rationale for
groundwater monitoring at Area D/ALGT. Modifications to the sampling schedule are documented
in the annual reports for CY 2000, CY 2001, and CY 2002 (Foster Wheeler Environmental
Corporation 2001, 2002,2003), and CY 2003 and CY 2004 (Tetra Tech FW, Inc. 2004,2005). The
current rationale for groundwater sampling of extraction wells is as follows:

            Extraction wells DX-2 and DX-3 should be used during CY 2005 for extraction of
            groundwater at Area D/ALGT. Quarterly sampling of extraction wells DX-2 and DX-3 is
            typically conducted to monitor contaminant concentrations and provide data to calculate
            mass contaminant removal. In the event that well DX-2 is off-lineresource protection well
            DO-2 will be sampled quarterly instead.

3.1.2.3 Effluent Point Sampling
Treatment system effluent is monitored to ensure that treated groundwater meets the discharge
criteria stated in the Final State Discharge Substantive Requirement. Water samples will be collected
from the treatment system effluent point (EP) for analysis of TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, 1,1-DCE, and
vinyl chloride using EPA Method 8260B. The sampling frequency will depend on the concentration
of cis-1,2-DCE in the treatment effluent, but will occur quarterly at a minimum.

3.1.3 GroundwaterLevelMeasurements
Static groundwater level measurements are typically collected quarterly from 18 resource protection
wells, 3 extraction wells (direct readings from the treatment plant controls), 3 observation wells, and
2 piezorneters. A summary of water level measurement locations is presented on Table 3-4.




                                                                     Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
 GIAFCM            LTOQ      To                     34                                     January2005
                                                                                                             2532 34
                                                                                                            Section 3


                 Table 3-4. CY 2005 Static Water Level Measurement Locations
                                Survey Datal
                                          Measuring Point          Round 1       Round 2      Round 3     Round 4
                                             Elevation              March         June       September   December
    Well No.     Northing       Easting      (ft-NGVD)              2005          2005          2005       2005
      a           660132        1501596        295.27                 X             X             X          X
                  660153        1500359        281.34                 X             X             X          X
                  660843        1500151         285.92                X             X             X          X
                  660907        1498677         272.79                X             X             X          X
                  661371        1497410         273.65                X             X             X          X
       a          660538        1500255         283.55                X             X             X          X
D                 660546        1500253         283.24                X
                  660324        1499246         2 7 E9O               X
                       51       1498191         266.19                X
                       31       1499446         268.
                        A       IAQQRnn
DA-30b            660562        1498790            270.36              X
FB:               660741        1499440            269.29              X               X           X          X
ER--05            661336        1499132            270.77              X               X           X          X
DO-1 a            660451        1497988            270.90              X               X           X          X
DO-2              661103        1498942            274.10              X               X           X          X
DO-3              660763        1500015            282.20              X               X           X          X
FO-5a             661294        1497825            270.40              X               X           X          X
FO-5b             661294        1497825            270.50              X               X           X          X
DT-1              660460        1498226            271.77              X               X           X          X
DT-2              661024        1499087            274.37              X                X          X          X
DX-1              660360        1497957            270.54              X                X          X          X
DX-2              661124        1498965            269.91              X                X           X         X
1DX-3             660752        14     7           277.68              X                X           X         X
117_13          1 660321        14:97::6           272.61              X                X           X         X
JEPA-W-5          1 659817 1 1496604 1              266.84          1     X             X          X           X
 ' Horizontal datum is NAD 27, Washington South zone; vertical datum is NGVD 1929.

3.1.4 Treatment System Inspections
The Area D/ALGT pump-and-treat system (treatment plant and three extraction wells) will be
inspected weekly. In general, the inspections will focus on system integrity (e.g., inspection of piping,
pumps, and plant for leaks); system components (e.g., instrumentation); and system operation.

A weekly inspection checklist will be completed that includes information about the extraction wells
(totalizer readings) and treatment plant (ambient temperature, extraction well flow rates and water
levels, influent valve totalizer reading, and differential pressure across the carbon vessels).

3.1.5 Carbon Vessel Backwashing, Sampling, and Change-Out
At the request of the Air Force, the carbon vessel(s) will be backwashed quarterly. Protocols and
procedures for backwashing are contained in the Operationsand Maintenance Manual,McCbordALGT
GroundwaterTreatment System, Bmikkng No. 887 (Williams Bros. Construction 1994) and FinalOperations
andMaintenancePlan,Area DIALGT GroundwaterTreatment (USACE 1994b).

                                                                                     Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
                                                             3-5                                           January2005
                   2532 35
Section 3


if effluent sample concentrations indicate the need for change-out of spent GAC from the lead
vessel during CY 2005 (criterion is >15 Vg/L ds-1,2-DCE), sampling of the GAC and change-out
of carbon should occur. Spent carbon will be analyzed for Toxicity Characteristic Leaching
Procedure volatiles and for carbon reactivation acceptance testing if required by the Air Force's
carbon vendor.

Carbon change-out will be conducted according to manufacturer's specifications under a
subcontract to be determined and managed by 62 CES/CEV.

3.1.6       TreatmentSystemPeriodicMaintenance
Maintenance of the treatment system will be conducted in accordance with the manufacturer's
recommended specifications, as referenced in the Building No. 887 Operations and Maintenance
Manual (Williams Bros. Construction 1994). A maintenance schedule summary is presented on
Table 3-5.

                           Table 3-5. Preventative Maintenance Schedule
                       Equipment                            Maintenance Recommendations
         Well pump motors (US Motor Type TU)     N Grease bearings every 6 months.
         Sump pu npl                             0 Pump wash-down every 6 months.
                                                 2 Clean float switch every 3 months.
                                                 N Check seal oil once per year.
         Backwash pump                           0 Grease pump bearings 2 to 3 times yearly.
                                                 0 Grease motor bearings 2 to 3 times yearly.
         Booster pump                            0 Grease motor and pump bearings every 3 months.
         7 -------- 77
         Air compressor                          N Change oil every 3 months.
                                                 , Check air intake filter weekly.
                                                 n Check oil level weekly.
                                                 E Check and tighten all bolts and nuts monthly.
                                                 n Check belt tension monthly.
         Well flow meter                         X Clean and inspect transmitter unit every 5 years.
                                                 m Remove and inspect turbine meter as required.
         Flow control valves                     0 Replace grease in worm drive housing every 5 years.
            Preventativemaintenancereoommendationsforthesedemsarenotrequiredattheintervalsshowndueto
            the low duty factor of the equipment




                                                                            Operations and Maintenance Wofk Plan
 GWCEE       OffLTOO         .                        3-6                                           January 2005
                                                                                                  2532 36


                4. DATA ASSESSMENT, RECORDS, AND
                      REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

4.1     Data Assessment
Project data collected through March 2005 will be assessed by TtFW technical staff and undergo
senior technical review. Field and analytical laboratory data WM be reviewed for compliance with the
pro)ect-specific Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the goals for precision, accuracy,
representativeness, completeness, and comparability (PARCC criteria).
Data packages produced by the project analytical laboratory win be independently assessed and
validated by a third-party contractor.

4.2      Record-Keeping
Project files will be maintained at TtFW AFCEE Program Office in Lakewood, Colorado. Examples
of documents in the project file include all project correspondence, copies of field records and the
field logbook(s), final laboratory data packages, and final deliverables.
Working files may also be maintained at TtFW's Bothell, Washington, and Butte, Montana, offices.
Documents in the working files include copies of project correspondence, original field records, and
all field logbooks, draft laboratory data (fax copies), and draft deliverables.
 Field records that will be used to document site activities (site logbook, water sampling logs, and
 chain-of-custody forms) are described in the project-specific FSP.

 4.3     Reporting Requirements
 The technical deliverables typically prepared for each calendar year of sampling are listed on
 Table 4-1. A brief discussion of the content and preparation of each of the documents required by
 the SOW is presented below.
                      Table 4-1. Summary of Typical Technical Deliverables
                                                           Itera one
                                Document Name                  raft          no
                                    Work P                      X
                              Health and So     an              X
                            Sampling and Ana s an               X
                             Quarterly Status   po              X
                              CY 2005 Annual Report
                              Analytical Data Report
                                     ERPIMS




                                                                      Operations and Maintenance Work Pion
                                                     4-1                                     January2005
              2532 37
Section 4


4.3.1 Work Plan
The AFCEE Technical Services Quality Assurance Program will be used as guidance for all phases
of work. The Work Plan summarizes existing site data and proposed project tasks, discusses
reporting requirements, and contains the overall project schedule.

4.3.2 Health and Safety Plan
The Health and Safety Plan (HSP) is written to comply with the Air Force, Occupational Safety and
Health Administration, EPA, state, and local health and safety regulations regarding the proposed
work effort. TtFW used, to the fullest extent possible, existing corporate health and safety
information to develop the HSP, tailoring this information to project-specific needs. EPA guidelines
were used to designate the appropriate levels of protection needed at the project site. Tetra Tech
FW, Inc. will provide certification to AFCEE that the approved HSP has been reviewed with each
employee, including subcontractor employees, before the employees engage in field activities.

4.3.3 SamplingandAnalysisPlan
The Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) was prepared using the AFCEE QAPP and AFCEE
Technical Services Quality Assurance Program as general guidance to ensure that die project data
quality objectives are achieved. The SAP consists of both an FSP and a QAPP. The FSP outlines in
detail the specific procedures that will be followed to perform the groundwater sampling activities.

4.3.4 QuarterlyStatus Reports
TtFW will prepare a quarterly status report for the treatment plant system following completion of
the March 2005 sampling event. Additional quarterly reports should be prepared following the
completion of the June 2005 and September 2005 sampling events. The status reports should be
consistent in content and format with the status reports prepared for the Area D/ALGT treatment
plant system from CY 1995 to CY 2004. Each report should provide a brief summary of the
sampling and analysis results as well as the treatment system performance.

4.3.5 CY 2005 Annual Report
The CY 2005 Annual Report should be prepared consistent in content and formatwith annual
reports prepared for the Area D/ALGT groundwater treatment plant system project firom. CY 1995
to CY 2004. The report should summarize the CY 2005 project activities and sampling and analysis
results and present conclusions.

4.3.6 Analytical Data Report
TtFW will submit all analytical data associated with the March 2005 sampling event, including QC
results and cross-reference tables, following receipt of laboratory analytical data packages. Additional
analytical data summary reports should be prepared following completion of the June 2005 and
September 2005 sampling events.

4.3.7 Environmental RestorationProgram Information ManagementSystem
Individual ERPIMS data files (e.g., analytical results, groundwater level data, etc), including
resubmissions, will be deliveredwith a transmittal letter in sequence according to a controlled time
schedule as identified in the current version of the ERPIMS Data Handbook. TtFW` will include a
copy of the items of interest report, e.g., output from the ERPTOOLS/PC, for each ERPIMS file
submission. The error report will be submitted as hard copy with the transmittal letter.

                                                                    Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
G.          LTO           W                       4-2                                     January2005
                                                                                      2532 38



0                                5. PROJECT SCHEDULE
    A project schedule is presented as Figure 5-1.




            I




                                                           Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
     Q:              LTOQ   TO                       5-1                         January2005
            2532 39
Section 5




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                                                            operations and Maintenance Work Plan
                                      5-2                                           January 2005
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Section 5




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                                                               Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
G           AFUQMLM      M                   &4                                       January 2005
                                                                                           2532 42


                                  6. REFERENCES

Brown and Caldwell. 1985. Clover/Chambers Creek Geohydrologic Study. Tacoma-Pierce County
   Health Department. July 1985.

CH2M Hill. 1982. Installation Restoration Program Records Search. August 1982.

Ebasco Environmental. 1992. Remedial Investigation Report of the Washrack/Treatment Area,
   McChord Air Force Base, Final. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy.

      _. 1991 a. Final Remedial Investigational Report, McChord Air Force Base Area D/Ametican
     Lake Garden Tract. In association with Shannon & Wilson, Inc. Department of the Army,
     Seattle District, Corps of Engineers. March 1991.

        . 1991b. Final Feasibility Study Report, McChord Air Force Base Area D/American Lake
     Garden Tract. Department of the Army, Seattle District, Corps of Engineers. March 1991.

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1993. Data Quality Objectives Process for
   Superfund, Interim Final Guidance.

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), McChord Air Force Base (McChord AFB), and
  Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). 1991. Record of Decision, McChord Air
   Force Base, Washington/American Lake Garden Tract. September 1991.

Envirosphere. 1988. Remedial Investigation Report, Fort Lewis Logistics Center for Department of
   the Army. Prepared for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District. November 1988.

Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation. 2003. CY 2002 Annual Report, Groundwater
   Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air
   Force Base. October 2003.

        . 2002. CY 2001 Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area
     D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base. October 2002.

      _. 2001, CY 2000 Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area
     D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChoid Air Force Base. August 2001.

Griffin, W.C., J.E. Sceva, H-A. Swenson, and M.J. Mundorff. 1962. Water Resources of the Tacoma
    Area. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 1499-B. Prepared in cooperation with the Tacoma
    Washington Department of Public Utility, Water Division, Tacoma, Washington.

Hart Crowser. 1996. Second Annual Report, Groundwater Pump and Treat System, Area
   D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington. July 1996.

        . 1995. Annual Report, Groundwater Pump and Treat System, Area D/American Lake
     Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington. July 1995.


                                                                Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
GV             LTOW      LTO                   6-1                                    January2005
              2532 43
Section 6


JRB Associates. 1983. IRP, Phase IIb Confirmation Quantification Report for McChord AFB,
      Seattle, Washington.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 1988. Climatological Data, Annual
    Summary-Washington 1988. Annual Summary with Comparative Data-Seattle-Tacoma
    Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina.

         . 1987a. Local Climatological Data, Annual Summary with Comparative Data-Olympia,
      Washington. National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina.

         . 1987b. Local Climatological Data, Annual Summary with Comparative Data-Seattle-
      Tacoma Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina.

         . 1987c. Climatological Data, Annual Surnmary-Washington 1987. Annual Summary with
      Comparative Data-Seattle-Tacorna Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center,
      Asheville, North Carolina.

           . 1986. Climatological Data, Annual Surnmary-Washington 1986. Annual Summary with
      Comparative Data-Seattle-Tacorna Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center,
      Asheville, North Carolina.

          .1985. Climatological Data, Annual Summary-Washington 1985. Annual Summary with
      Comparative Data-Seattle-Tacotna Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center,
      Asheville, North Carolina.

          .1984. Climatological Data, Annual Summary-Washington 1984. Annual Summary with
      Comparative Data-Seattle-Tacoma Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center,
      Asheville, North Carolina.

          . 1983. Climatological Data, Annual Summary-Washington 1983. Annual Summary with
      Comparative Data-Seattle-Tacoma Airport, Washington. National Climatic Data Center,
      Asheville, North Carolina.

The Nature Conservancy of Washington. 1998. Assessment of Neotropical Migrant Landbirds on
   McChord Air Force Base, Washington. December 1998.

The Nature Conservancy of Washington and the University of Washington. 1999. Inventory of
      Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths) on McChord Air Force Base. February 1999.

The Nature Conservancy of Washington, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources
   Washington Natural Heritage Program, McChord AFB, and the U.S. Department of Defense
   Legacy Resource Management Program. 1996. Defending Biodiversity, Safeguarding America's
   Natural Heritage at McChord Air Force Base, Washington. April 1996.

Ile    Nature Conservancy of Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural
      Resources. 2002. Washington Animal Species List - January 2002, accessed at
      http://www.wa.gov/dnr/htdocs/fr/nhp/refdesk/lists/animaLranks.htmI


                                                                 Operationsand Maintenance Work Plan
G               LM           To M               6-2                                    January2005
                                                                                              2532 44
                                                                                           Section 6


The Nature Conservancy of Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural
   Resources Washington Natural Heritage Program. 1996. Inventory of Wetlands, Species of
   Concern, and Sensitive Habitats at McChord Air Force Base, Pierce County, Washington.
   February.

SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation). 1986. Installation Restoration Program
   Phase 11-Confirmation/Quantification, Stage 2, Final Report for McChord Air Force Base,
   Washington. Prepared for Military Airlift Command WC), Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, and
   U.S. Air Force Occupational Environmental Health Laboratory, Brooks Air Force Base, Texas.

         . 1985. Installation Restoration Program Phase II-Confinnation/Quantification, Stage 1,
     McChord Air Force Base, Washington. Prepared for Military Airlift Command WC), Scott Air
     Force Base, Illinois, and U.S. Air Force Occupational Environmental Health Laboratory, Brooks
     Air Force Base, Texas.

Shannon and Wilson. 1986. Conceptual Hydrocarbon Recovery Plan Contaminant Area "C"
   McChord AFB.

Tetra Tech FW, Inc. 2004. Final CY 2003 Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System
    Monitoring Project, Area D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base. June 2004.

        .2005. Draft CY 2004 Annual Report, Area D/American Lake Garden Tract Groundwater
     Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance, Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12, McChord Air
     Force Base. In preparation.

Urquhart, L.C. 1962. Civil Engineering Handbook, 4th edition, pp. 96, 97.

URS Consultants, Inc. 1989. Air Force Installation Restoration Program Characterization of JP-4
   Fuel Spill in Area A, Final Report, McChord Air Force Base, Washington. Prepared for U.S.
   Department of Energy, Contract DE-AC-05-84OR21400.

URS Greiner, Inc. and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation. 1998. CY 1997 Annual Report,
  January 7, 1997 through December 31, 1997, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring
  Project, Area D/ALGT, McChord Air Force Base, Washington, Final. September 1998.

      -. 1997. Third Annual Report, February 14, 1996 through February 13, 1997, Groundwater
     Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air
     Force Base, Washington, Final. October 1997.

URS Greiner Woodward Clyde and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation. 2000. CY 1999
  Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/ALGT, McChord
  Air Force Base, Washington, Final. September 2000.

         . 1999. CY 1998 Annual Report, January 1, 1998 through December 31, 1998, Groundwater
     Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/ALGT, McChord Air Force Base, Washington,
     Final. May 1999.




                                                                  Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
GW             LTOQPPOWMQSM                     6-3                                      January2005
            2537- 45
Section 6


USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), Seattle District. 1994a. Final Remedial Action Work Plan,
  Area D/American Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatmcnt McChord Air Force Base,
    Seattle, Washington.

       . 1994b. Final Operations and Maintenance Plan, Area D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract
    Groundwater Treatment, McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington.

Walters, K.I.L. and G.E. Kimmel. 1968. Groundwater Occurrence and Stratigraphy of
   Unconsolidated Deposits, Central Pierce County, Washington, State of Washington Department
    of Water Resources. Water Supply Bulletin No. 22.

Washington State Department of Natural Resources Washington Natural Heritage Program. 2002a.
  Known Occurrence of Rare Plants in Washington, Pierce County, January 2002. Accessed at
  http:///www.wa.gov/dnr/htdocs/fr/nhp/refdesk/hsts/plantsxco/piercc.hw3l.

         . 2002b. Survey of Amphibians and Reptiles at McChord Air Force Base, Washington.

Western Regional Climate Center. 2001. Accessed at http:///www.wrcc.dri.cdu/summary March
    2001.

Williams Bros. Construction. 1994. Operations and Maintenance Manual, McChord ALGT
    Groundwater Treatment System, Building No. 887, McChord AFB, Washington, prepared for
    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.




                                                                Operations and Maintenance Work Plan
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              2532 46




Section Tab

  " 00, Z
                                                                2532 47




             UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
       INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM


                               FINAL

                     Field Sampling Plan

                  Remedial Action-Operation
Area D/American Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant
                 Operations and Maintenance
                (Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12)
             McChord Air Force Base, Washington




                              Prepandfor
            Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
                   Environmental Restoration Division
                        Brooks City-Base, Texas
                                  and
                  McChord Air Force Base, Washington


                              Preparvdly:


                      f9      TETRATECH FWINC.

                    143 Union Boulevard, Suite 1010
                      Lakewood, Colorado 80228
                            (303) 988-2202




                             January 2005
                                                                                           2532 48




                                            NOTICE
This Field Sampling Plan was prepared for the U.S. Air Force (Air Force) by Tetra Tech FW, Inc. to
guide the implementation of the McChord Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and
Maintenance project under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The lin-Aited
objectives of this plan and the ongoing nature of the IRP, along with the evolving knowledge of site
conditions and chemical effects on the environment and health, must be considered when evaluating
this plan, because subsequent facts may become known that may make this plan premature or
inaccurate. Acceptance does not mean that the Air Force adopts the conclusions, recommendations,
or other views expressed herein, which are those of the contractor alone and do not necessarily
reflect the official position of the Air Force.
                                                                                                                             2532 49

REPORT                                                                                    IMB No. 0704-0189
                                                                                                                      time
Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including Fhefor     revievAng
instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection
of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including
suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports,
1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork
Reduction Pro6ect (0704-0188),        shington, DC 20503.
1. AGENCY USE ONLY                  2. REPORT DATE                      3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVER D
                                    January 2005                        Final
                                                                        Calendar Year 2005


4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE                                               S. FUNDING NUMBERS
Field Sampling Plan-Remedial Action-Operation Area                  F41624-03-D-8600
D/American Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant            Delivery Order 0007
Operations and Maintenance (Project No. POWY 92-7001-112),
McChord Air Force Base, Washington
6. AUTHOR(S)
Mr. M. Ingersoll
Mr. R. Weingarz


7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND                               8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER
ADDRESS(ES)                                                          NIA
Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
143 Union Blvd; Lakewood, CO 80228
9. SPONSORINGIMONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND                          10. SPONSORING/MONITORIKG AGENCY REPORT
ADDRESS(ES)                                                          NUMBER
Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, AFCEE/ERD,            N/A
3300 Sidney Brooks, Building 532, Brooks City-Base, TX 78236-
5363
11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
This is a final document.


12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT                             12.b DISTRIBUTION CODE
For use by AFCEE, McChord AFB, 62 CES/CEV



113. ABSTRACT                                                        15. NUMBER OF PAGES
The Field Sampling Plan describes the field sampling                 75
requirements and procedures to be implemented for the Area
D/American Lake Garden Tract (ALGT) Groundwater Treatment
Plant Operations and Maintenance project at McChord AFB,
Washington.




114. SUBJECT TERMS                                                   16. PRICE CODE
      McChord Air Force Base
      Field Sampling Plan
      Groundwater Monitoring Area D/ALGT
      Groundwater Treatment Plant
      Granular Activated Carbon
17. SECURITY                      18. SECURITY                      19. SECURITY                        20. LIMITATION OF
CLASSIFICATION OF                 CLASSIFICATION OF THIS            CLASSIFICATION OF                   ABSTRACT
REPORT                            PAGE                              ABSTRACT                            UL
Unclassified                      Unclassified                      Unclassified



SN 7540-01-280-5500                                                                                   Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89)
Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18-298-102
                                                                                            , r.-
                                                                                            (.J32 50

                                         PREFACE
The Field Sampling Plan describes the requirements and procedures to be implemented for the Area
D/American Lake Garden Tract (ALGI) Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and
Maintenance project at McChord Air Force Base (AFB). The purpose of the project is to perform
compliance monitoring of the Area D/ALGT remedial action and monitor, inspect, evaluate, and
optimize treatment plant system performance.

Key personnel involved in the project include Ms. Brenda Zehr, Remedial Project Manager,
Environmental Management Flight, McChord AFB 62 CES/CEV, 253-982-6202; Mr. Brian Lee,
Team Chief, Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE), 210-536-8379; Mr. Randie
Strom, Program Manager, Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (rtFW), 210-226-2922; Mr. Mark Ingersoll, Delivery
Order Manager, TtFW, 406-494-3446; and Mr. Mike Kuntz, Remedial Project Manager, Washington
State Department of Ecology, 360-407-7239.

The Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance Work Plan was prepared using the
AFCEE Model Work Plan as guidance. The AFCEE Model Work Plan was designed by the
AFCEE Environmental Restoration Consultant Operations Division, including Lt. Col. Darrel R.
Comell, Chief, Consultant Operations Division; Major Eric A. Banks, Chemistry Leader; Ms. Beth
Garland, Chemist; and Dr. R. William Kessler, Chemist.
                                                                                                                                                               253 2 5 1
                                                                                                                                                           Contents



                                                                       CONTENTS
Section                                                                                                                                                         Page

1. IN TRO D U CT IO N ................................................................................................................................ 1-1

2. PROJECT BA CKG RO UN D ............................................................................................................... 2-1
          2.1     The A ir Force Installation Restoration Program ......................................................................                             2-1
          2.2     Project Purpose and Scope ...........................................................................................................              2-2
          2.3     Project Site D escription ................................................................................................................         2-2
          2.4     Project Site C ontam ination H istory ............................................................................................                 2-5

3.        PROJE CT SC O PE A N D O BJECTIVES ..........................................................................................                               3-1
          3.1 O bjectives ........................................................................................................................................    3-1
           3.2 Resource Protection W ell Sam pling ............................................................................................                       3-1
           3.3 E xtraction W ell Sampling .............................................................................................................               3-2
           3.4 E ffl uent Point Sam pling ...............................................................................................................             3-2
           3.5 Sample Analysis Sum mary ............................................................................................................                  3-2
           3.6 Field A ctivities ................................................................................................................................     3-2

 4.       PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES ....................................................... 4-1
          4.1 Prim e Contractor ........................................................................................................................... 4-1
          4.2 Subcontractors ................................................................................................................................ 4-1

 5.        FIELD O PE R ATIO N S ........................................................................................................................             5-1
           5.1 G eologic Standards ........................................................................................................................           5-1
           5.2 Site Reconnaissance, Preparation, and Restoration Procedures .............................................                                             5-1
                5.2.1   Staging A reas ....................................................................................................................           5-1
                5.2.2   Site Restoration ................................................................................................................             5-1
           5.3 D ecorrunissioning Resource Protection W ells ..........................................................................                               5-1
           5.4 Surveying ...................... :..................................................................................................................   5-2
            5.5 Equipm ent D econtam mation ......................................................................................................                    5-2
            5.6 G eneral Waste H andling Procedures ..........................................................................................                        5-2
            5.7 Corrective A ction ...........................................................................................................................        5-2

  6.        ENV IRO N M E N TA L SA MPLIN G ................................................................................................... 6-1
            6.1 Sam pling Procedures ..................................................................................................................... 6-1
                 6.1.1   Resource Protection W ell Sam pling .............................................................................. 6-1
                 6.1.2 W ater Level M easurem ent .............................................................................................. 6-2
                 6.1.3   Purging Prior to Sam pling .............................................................................................. 6-2
                 6.1.4   Sam ple Collection ............................................................................................................ 6-2
             6.2 Sam ple H andling ............................................................................................................................ 6-3
                 6.2.1   Sam ple Containers ........................................................................................................... 6-3
                 6.2.2   Sample Volumes, Container Types, and Preservation Requirements ...................... 6-3
                 6.2.3   Sample Identification ...................................................................................................... 6-3
             6.3 Sample Custody .............................................................................................................................. 6-4
             6.4 Field Q uality Control Samples ..................................................................................................... 6-5
                 6.4.1   Equipm ent Blank ............................................................................................................. 6-5


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                                                    CONTENTS (Concluded)
Section                                                                                                                                                  Page
              6.4.2        Trip Blank ......................................................................................................................... 6-5
              6.4.3        Field D vphcates ............................................................................................................... 6-5
7. FIELD M EA SUREM EN TS .................................................................................................................                  7-1
   7.1 Param eters .......................................................................................................................................   7-1
   7.2 Equipm ent Calibration and Q uality Control .............................................................................                             7-1
   7.3 Equipm ent M aintenance and D econtam ination .......................................................................                                 7-1
   7.4 Field M onitoring Measurem ents ..................................................................................................                    7-1
       7.4.1 G roundwater Level Measurem ents ...............................................................................                                7-1
       7.4.2 G roundwater Discharge Measurem ents .......................................................................                                    7-2
   7.5 Field Perform ance and System Audits ........................................................................................                         7-2

8. GROUNDWATER TREATMENT PLANT INSPECTIONS AND MAINTENANCE ......                                                                                            8-1
   8.1 Inspections ......................................................................................................................................    8-1
   8.2 Periodic M aintenance ....................................................................................................................            8-1
   8.3 Carbon V essel Backwashing, Sam pling, and Change-out ........................................................                                        8-1
   8.4 Emergency Procedures .................................................................................................................                8-1
9. RECO RD -KEEPIN G ........................................................................................................................... 9-1
10. REFEREN CES..................................................................................................................................... 10-1


                                                       LIST OF APPENDICES
Appendix A               Standard Operating Procedures




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                                                                                                                                                 2532 53
                                                                                                                                    TableslFigures



                                                         LIST OF TABLES
Table                                                                                                                                           Page
Table 2-1. Groundwater Rernediation Goals for Area D/ALGT .......................................................... 2-6
Table 3-1. Summary of CY 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Locations ................................................ 3-5
Table 3-2. Summary of CY 2005 Sampling Frequency ............................................................................ 3-6
Table 3-3. Estimated CY 2005 Sample Quantities ................................................................................... 3-6
Table 3-4. Recommended CY 2005 Sampling Schedule .......................................................................... 3-7
Table 3-5. CY 2005 Static Water Level Measurement Locations ........................................................... 3-8
Table 6-1. Requirements for Containers, Preservation Techniques, Sample Volumes, and
            H olding Times ......................................................................................................................... 6-3
Table 8-1. Preventative Maintenance Schedule ......................................................................................... 8-2



                                                         LIST OF FIGURES
Figure                                                                                                                                           Page
 Figure 2-1. McChord AFB Site Location Map .......................................................................................... 2-3
 Figure 3-1. CY 2005 Area D/ALGT Groundwater Monitoring Location Map .................................. 3-3
 Figure 4-1. Project O rganization ................................................................................................................. 4-3
 Figure 4-2. Subcontractor Organization ..................................................................................................... 4-5
 Figure 8-1. W eekly Inspection Checklist .................................................................................................... 8-3




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TableslFigures




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                                                           operations and Maintenance FSP
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                                                                                              2532 55
                                                                   List of Acronyms and Abbreviations



                  LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
AFB                   Air Force Base
AFCEE                 Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
Air Force             U.S. Air Force
ALGT                  American Lake Garden Tract
AR                    air-rotary
AR-AR                 Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirement
ASTM                  American Society for Testing and Materials


bgs                   below ground surface

0C                    degrees Celsius
CERCLA                Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act
C-0-C                 chain-of-custody
cis-1,2-DCE           cis-1,2-dichlorocthenc
CY                    calendar year

1,1-DCE               1,1 -dichloroethene
DEQPPM                Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy Memorandum
DOD                   (U.S.) Department of Defense

Ecology               Washington State Department of Ecology
EP                    effluent point
EPA                   (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency
ERPIMS                Environmental Resources Program Information Management System
ESQ                   Environmental Safety and Quality Manager

FSP                    Field Sampling Plan
ft                     foot or feet

 HCL                   hydrochloric acid
 HSA                   hollow-stem auger

 IRP                   Installation Restoration Program

 Laucks                Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc.

 MCL                   maximum contarninant level
 Lg/L                  micrograms per liter
 ML                    milliliters
 MTCA                  Model Toxics Control Act




                                                                      Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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            2532 56
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations



           LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Concluded)
Na2S203                    sodium thiosulfate
NAD                        North American Datum
NCP                        National Contingency Plan
NGVD                       National Geodetic Vertical Datum
NPL                        National Priorities List


PVC                        polyvinyl chloride

QAPP                       Quality Assurance Project Plan
QC                         quality control
Qv                         Undifferentiated Alluvium/Outwash
Qva                        Vashon Advance Outwash
QVr                        Vashon Recessional Outwash
Qvs                        Steilacoorn Gravel

RAO                         remedial action objective
RCRA                        Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RI/FS                       remedial investigation/feasibility study

SAP                         Sampling and Analysis Plan
SARA                        Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act


TCE                         trichloroethene
TCLP                        To3dcity Characteristic Leaching Procedure
TtFW                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

USACE                       U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

VOC                         volatile organic compound

 3-D                        three-dimensional




                                                                         Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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                                                                                                  2532 57


                                  1. INTRODUCTION

This Field Sampling Plan (FSP) presents, in specific terms, the requirements and procedures to
conduct field operations and investigations for the Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and
Maintenance project at McChord Air Force Base (AFB). This project-specific FSP was prepared to
ensure that (1) the data quality objectives specified for this project are met, (2) the field sampling
protocols are documented and reviewed in a consistent manner, and (3) the data collected are
scientifically valid and defensible. This site-specific FSP and the Air Force Center for Environmental
Excellence (AFCEE) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) will constitute, by definition, an
AFCEE Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP).

'Me National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan, more commonly called the
National Contingency Plan (NCP), specifies circumstances under which an FSP is necessary for
 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) response
 actions. For cleanup actions at the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) stage, the NCP
 requires lead agencies to develop SAPs that provide a process for obtaining data of sufficient quality
 and quantity to satisfy data needs. Such sampling and analysis plans must include an FSP (40 Code
 of Federal Regulations 300.430 (b)(8)(ii)).

 Guidelines followed in the preparation of this plan are set out in the Data.QuafiD,Objectims Processfor
 Superfund, Interim FinalGuidance (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] 1993).

 This FSP must be read by all staff participating in the work effort, and will be in the possession of
 the field teams collecting samples. All Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtM personnel and subcontractors
 are required to comply with the procedures documented in this FSP to ensure the comparability and
 representativeness of the collected and generated data.




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Section I




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                          2. PROJECT BACKGROUND

2.1      The Air Force Installation Restoration Program
'ne objective of the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP) is to assess past hazardous
waste disposal and spill sites at Air Force installations and to develop remedial actions consistent
with the NCP for sites that pose a threat to human health and welfare or the environment. This
 section presents information on the program origins, objectives, and organization.

The 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is one of the primary federal laws
governing the disposal of hazardous wastes. Sections 6001 and 6003 of RCRA require federal
agencies to comply with local and state enviromnental regulations and provide information to the
EPA concerning past disposal practices at federal sites. RCRA Section 3012 requires state agencies
to inventory past hazardous waste disposal sites and provide information to the EPA concerning
those sites.
In 1980, Congress enacted CERCLA (Superfund). CERCLA outlines the responsibility for
identifying and rernediating contaminated sites in the United States and its possessions. The
CERCLA legislation identifies the EPA as the primary policy and enforcement agency regarding
contaminated sites.
'ne 1986 Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) extends the requirements of
CERCLA and modifies CERCLA with respect to goals for remediation and the steps that lead to
the selection of a remedial process. Under SARA, technologies that provide permanent removal or
 destruction of a contaminant are preferable to action that only contains or isolates the contaminant.
 SARA also provides for greater interaction with public and state agencies and extends the EPA's
 role in evaluating health risks associated with contamination. Under SARA, early determination of
 Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) is required, and die consideration
 of potential ternediation alternatives is recommended at the initiation of an RI/FS. SARA is the
 primary legislation governing remedial action at past hazardous waste disposal sites.

 Executive Order 12580, adopted in 1987, gave various federal agencies, including the U.S.
 Department of Defense (DOD), the responsibility to act as lead agencies for conducting
 investigations and implementing remediation efforts when they are the sole or co-contributor to
 contamination on or off their properties.
 To ensure compliance with CERCIA, its regulations, and Executive Order 12580, the DOD
 developed the IRP, under the Defense Environmental Restoration Program, to identify potentially
 contaminated sites, investigate these sites, and evaluate and select remedial actions for potentially
 contaminated facilities. The DOD issued the Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy
 Memorandum PEQPPM) 80-6 regarding the IRP program in June 1980 and implemented the
 policies outlined in this memorandum in December 1980. The EPA issued the NCP in 1980 to
 provide guidance on a process by which (1) contaminant release could be reported, (2)
 contamination could be identified and quantified, and (3)remedial actions could be selected. The
 NCP describes the responsibility of federal and state governments and those responsible for
 contaminant releases.

                                                                            Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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Section 2


The DOD formally revised and expanded the existing IRP directives and amplified all previous
directives and memoranda concerning the IRP through DEQPPM 81-5, dated December 11, 1981.
The memorandum was implemented by an Air Force message dated January 21, 1982.

The IRP is the DOD's primary mechanism for response actions on Air Force installations affected
by the provisions of SARA. In November 1986, in response to SARA and other EPA interim
guidance, the Air Force modified the IRP to provide for an RI/FS program. The IRP was modified
so that RI/FS could be conducted as parallel activities. The program now includes ARAR
determinations, identification and screening of technologies, and development of alternatives. The
IRP may include, multiple field activities and pilot studies prior to a detailed final analysis of
alternatives. Over the years, requirements of the IRP have been modified to ensure that DOD
compliance with federal laws, such as RCRA, NCP, CERCLA, and SARA, can be met

2.2       Project Purpose and Scope
The primary objectives of the project are to perform compliance monitoring of the Area
D/American Lake Garden Tract (ALGI) remedial action and perforni inspections of the treatment
plant system to assess:

      •   Containment of the contaminant plume

      •   Remediation progress in terms of changes in groundwater quality and contaminant mass
          removal from the aquifer

      •   Treatment system performance

Evaluation objectives will be met by performing quarterly compliance monitoring of the Area
D/ALGT groundwater treatment plant operations, conducting weekly inspections of the treatment
system components, and completing routine maintenance in accordance with the Area D/ALGT
groundwater treatment FinalRemedialActionWork Plan (USACE 1994a) and FinalOperationsand
MaintenancePlan,Area DIA-T-GT GroundwaterTreatment (USACE 1994b).

2.3         Project Site Description
McChord AFB is an active military installation comprising 4,616 acres, located approximately 7
miles south of the city of Tacoma in Pierce County, Washington (Figure 2-1). The majority of
McChord AFB was developed between 1938 and 1941. Primary construction consisted of two
runways and four hangars. The base administration building, hospital, radio transmitter building, Air
Corps barracks, maintenance building, coal-fircd heating plant, and six residential buildings were also
completed during this time. McChord Field was formally dedicated on July 3, 1940.

After dedication of the airfield, McChord served primarily as a bomber base and the home of the
17th Bombardment Group and the 89th Reconnaissance Squadron. The base mission greatly
increased at the onset of World War II when McCbord became the largest bomber-training base.
Ile current host unit, the 62nd Air Mobility Command (then designated the 62nd Transport
Group), was assigned to McChord in 1947, and on January 1, 1948, McChord Field was redesignated
McChord AFB.




                                                                         Operations and MaintenanceFSP
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                                                                                                25 32 6 1

                                                                    J




                                                     vt
                                                          I 1'J




                              Groundwater
                            'Treatment
   Porter Hill   I.Z          Plant I I-- I
                                                                        J 'I
                                      AMMUNITION
                                       STONAGE
                                                                        R-

                                     Area, D
                                              "J
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New Housing
Development
                 PROJECT AREX
                                    Fort Lffivi
                                    Logisfic C,,tr                               ----   ----




                        R.H.d




                                                                           McChord AFB
                                                                    Groundwater Treatment Plant
           N                     Project Area                        Monitoring and Optimization

       +               IV        Base Boundary                             Figure 2-1
                                                                  McChord AFB Site Location Map

                                                                  Date: 1/2005                 TET"   TECH FW. INC
            2532 62
Section 2




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                                                                  Operationsand MaintenanceFSP
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                                                                                             Section 2



Until the 1950s, the base experienced little or no growth, but the second major construction phase
began when significant traffic in both personnel and supplies passed through McChord in support
of the United Nations operations in Korea. This construction effort consisted primarily of installing
improved weapons systems and fighter operational facilities and lengthening the runway to 8,100
feet (ft). In 1960, the runway was lengthened again to 10,100 ft.

During the 1960s, McChord became a major gateway to Southeast Asia. Ile base became a Military
Airlift Command installation in 1968, when the 62nd Military Airlift Wing assumed command of the
base from the 25th Air Defense Command. The 1970s marked the third development phase of
McChord AFB, when improved navigation equipment was installed, the central heating plant was
converted from coal to natural gas, and other support services were constructed.

A Federal Facilities Agreement between the Air Force, EPA Region 10, and the Washington State
Department of Ecology (Ecology), signed August 23, 1989, governs the National Priorities List
(NPL) sites at McChord AFB. A consent decree between McChord AFB and Ecology was signed
February 27, 1992, to govern 29 non-NPL sites at the base. Air Force decision documents have been
prepared for all 29 sites.

Beginning in 1982, the Air Force identified 62 IRP sites at McChord AFB. Three additional sites
were added in 1984,1989, and 1991. McChord AFB has investigated the sites and conducted
remedial action where necessary. Currently, there is one area listed on the NPL, Site LF-05 within
Area D/ ALGT.The Notice of Deletion of the Washrack/Treatment Area from the NPL, which
included sites SD-54 and DP-60, was published in the Federal Register on September 26, 1996. Six
sites axe currently on the state's hazardous sites list.

 2.4     Project Site Contamination History
 The Area D/ALGT remediation site is located approximately 7 miles south of the city of Tacoma in
 Pierce County, Washington. The site is roughly bounded by Interstate 5 and Porter Hill to the
 northwest; McChord AFB ammunition storage area to the north; "A" Street and Burlington
 Northern Railroad to the east; and Fort Lewis Logistic Center to the south (Figure 2-1). From the
 mid-1940s to the early 1970s, several waste disposal sites in various stages of operation were located
 at Area D, in the southwest portion of McChord AFB.

 The southwestern portion of Area D also contains a large residential area with approximately 3,500
 onbase residents. Additional onbase housing units were completed in 1998. The ALGT is an offbase
 residential tract abutting the southwest boundary of Area D between McChord AFB and Fort Lewis
 Logistic Center. This tract consists of 1,1 83 housing units with approximately 3,400 residents.

 The DOD IRP was initiated at McChord AFB in March 1981. Past and current potential waste
 disposal sites were identified during the Phase I records search (CH2M Hill 1982) and the Phase II
 investigation (SAIC 1986); low-level organic chemical Contamination was measured at several of
 these sites. Based on the Phase II investigation, it was recommended that further studies be
 conducted to confirm contaminant characteristics and distribution. Concurrent with the Phase II
 IRP investigation, EPA discovered ttichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-diclAoroethene (cis-1,2-DCE)
 in groundwater samples collected from resource protection wells installed at the ALGT. In 1984,
 EPA concluded that the volatile organic compound (VOC) Contamination in groundwater at the


                                                                          Operations and MaintenanceFSP
                 LM          Sp                    2-5                                      January2005
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Section 2


ALGT most likely originated from Area D. The ALGT was added to the NPL in October 1984.
Following the listing of the ALGT, the IRP investigation was incorporated into the process
governed under CERCLA, and an RI/FS was completed.

The nature and extent of the contamination in the groundwater, soil, surface water, and sediments
was presented in the RI, as was an estimation of potential risks to human health and the
environment (Ebasco Environmental 1991 a). Alternatives for remediation of the groundwater
contamination were presented in the FS (Ebasco Environmental 1991b).

As determined by the regulatory agencies and documented in the Record of Decision (EPA,
McChord AFB, and Ecology 1991), remedial action was not necessary for soil, surface water, or
sediments to ensure protection of human health and the environment. However, groundwater
contamination exceeded health-based levels and/or maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and
required remediation.

Groundwater remediation goals were established for four contaminants of concern: TCE, cis-1,2-
DCE, 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), and vinyl chloride. Remediation goals for these VOCs are
provided in Table 2-1.

                      Table 2-1. Groundwater Rernediation Goals for Area D/ALGT
                                           Groundwater Remediation Goal'
            Contaminant of Concern                         (pgIL)                     Basis of Rernediation Goal2
                        TCE                                   5                                    MCL
                    cis-1,2-DCE                              70                                    MCL
                      Ij-DCE                                0.07                            MTCA Method Ba
                  'Vinyl chloride                           0.04                            MTCA Method B4
            'Treatment plant effluent must meet the groundwater rernediation goals and have a pH between 6.5 and 8.5.
             Determination of remediation goals is presented inthe Record of Decision (EPA, Mcchord AF5, and Ecology
             1991):
            3Washington State Department of Ecology MTCA Method B cleanup level for groundwater in 1991.


To address water supply concerns, the Air Force asked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
to study, design, arid oversee the installation of a water line connecting the ALGT to a local water
utility, the Lakewood Water District. By rnid-1 986, the residents located within the areal extent of
the plume with TCE concentrations of 5 micrograms per liter (ugIL) had been connected to the
public water system. The areal extent of the plume was based on estimates in the RI (Ebasco
Environmental 1991a), specifically Figure 19 of the RI. The Air Force offered free drinking water
hookups to all property owners in the ALGT in 1992. All property owners in the ALGT who
accepted the offer were connected to Lakewood Water Districes water supply system by June 1993.

The Area D/ALGT pump-and-treat system was designed to create a hydraulic barrier to prevent
further migration of contaminants off the base and to extract arid treat the most contaminated
groundwater beneath the site. The system consists of three groundwater extraction wells, a
groundwater treatment plant using granular activated carbon, and two recharge trenches. The
groundwater pump-and-treat system for the Area D/ALGT site began operation in February 1994.

ne first and second years of operation (calendar year [CY] 1994 and CY 1995) were documented in
annual reports by Hart Crowser (1995,1996). The annual reports for CY 1996 through CY 1999


                                                                                             Operations and Maintenance FSP
                                                                2-6                                            January 2005
                                                                                                   2532 65
                                                                                          Section 2



a   were prepared by URS Greiner, Inc. and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (1997, 1998)
    and URS Greiner Woodward Clyde and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (1999, 2000).
    The annual reports for CY 2000, CY 2001, and CY 2002 were prepared by Foster Wheeler
    Environmental Corporation (2001, 2002, 2003). The annual reports for CY 2003 and CY 2004 were
    prepared by Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (2004, 2005).




                                                                         Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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                                                            operationsand Maintenance FSP
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                       3. PROJECT SCOPE AND OBJECTIVES

3A     Objectives
The primary objectives of the project are to perform compliance monitoring of the Area D/ALGT
remedial action and perform inspections of the treatment plant system to assess:

      •       Containment of the contaminant plume

      • Remediation progress in terms of changes in groundwater quality and contaminant mass
        removal from the aquifer

      •       Treatment system performance
Evaluation objectives are met by performing quarterly compliance monitoring of the Area D/ALGT
groundwater treatment plant operations, conducting weekly inspections of the treatment system
components, and completing routine maintenance in accordance with the FinalRemedialAction Work
Plan (USACE 1994a) and FinalOperationsand MaintenancePlan,Area DIALGT GroundwaterTreatment
(USACE 1994b).
3.2     Resource Protection Well Sampling
The FinalRemedialAction Work Plan (USACE 1994a) established the initial rationale for groundwater
monitoring at Area D/ALGT. Modifications to the sampling schedule are documented in the annual
reports for CY 2000 through CY 2004 (Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation 2001, 2002,
2003; Tetra Tech FW, Inc. 2004, 2005). The current rationale for groundwater sampling of resource
protection wells is as follows:
      •       Wells DR-05 and DA-9b monitor contaminant containment along the plume's northern
              edge.
          • Well DA-28 monitors contaminant plume containment downgradient (west) of extraction
            well DX-2.

          • Wells DA-7b and DA-21b monitor the secondary source of contamination between
            Landfill 5 and extraction well DX-3.
          • Wells DA-30a and DA-30b, a two-well cluster located between extraction wells DX-1 and
            DX-3, monitor the performance of DX-3.
          • Wells DA-29 and DB-6, a two-well cluster located between extraction wells DX-2 and
            DX-3, also monitor the performance of DX-3.
          •     Monitoring results from well clusters DA-30a/DA-30b and DA-29/DB-6 are used to
               evaluate the vertical distribution of contaminants.




                                                                          Operationsand Maintenance FSP
 Gw              LTO          T                      3-1                                   January2005
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Section 3


          Well DT-1 monitors contaminant concentrations associated with extraction well DX-l
          (currently on standby). Should levels of TCE exceed the remedial action objective (R-AO) of
          5 Lg/L, then extraction well DX-l may be restarted.

3.3     Extraction Well Sampling
Extraction well samples provide information on contaminant mass removal from the individual
wells. The FinalRemedialAction Work Plan (USACE 1994a) established the initial rationale for
groundwater monitoring at Area D/ALGT. Modifications to the sampling schedule are documented
in the annual reports for CY 2000 through CY 2004 (Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation
2001, 2002, 2003; Tetra Tech FW, Inc. 2004, 2005). During CY 2005, quarterly sampling of
extraction wells DX-2 and DX-3 should be completed to monitor contaminant concentrations and
provide data to calculate mass contaminant removal.

3.4       Effluent Point Sampling
Treatment system effluent is monitored to ensure that treated groundwater meets the discharge
criteria stated in the Final State Discharge Substantive Requirement. Water samples will be collected
from the treatment system effluent point (EP) for analysis of TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, 1,1-DCE, and
vinyl chloride using EPA Method 8260B. The sampling frequency will depend on the concentration
of cis-1,2-DCE in the treatment effluent, but will occur quarterly at a minimum.

3.5     Sample Analysis Summary
Groundwater samples will be collected from approximately 10 or 1 1 resource protection wells, 1 or
2 extraction wells, and the treatment plant effluent sampling point within Area D/ALGT (Figure
3-1). A summary of wells that may be sampled during CY 2005 is presented in Table 3-1. Sampling
frequencies are shown in Table 3-2. Samples collected during March 2005 will be analyzed by Laucks
Testing Laboratories, Inc. (Laucks), Seattle, Washington, for TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, 1,1-DCE, and vinyl
chloride using EPA Method 8260B. Estimated sample quantities are shown on Table 3-3. The CY
2005 sampling schedule is presented on Table 3-4.

3.6      Field Activities
Field activities for the Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance project typically
include:

      •     Collection of groundwater samples from resource protection wells, extraction wells, and the
            treatment plant effluent according to the schedule presented on Table 3-2.

      •     Quarterly measurement of static water levels from approximately 18 resource protection
            wells, 3 extraction wells (direct readings from the treatment plant controls), 3 observation
            wells, and 2 piezometers as presented on Table 3-5.

      •     Weekly inspections of the treatment plant system, including extraction wells, flow meters,
            and system controls.

      •     Periodic preventative maintenance of treatment plant system components.




                                                                              Operationsand Maintenance FSP
 G            MQ              W                       3-2                                      Januaty2005
                                                                                                                                  2532 69




                                                                                              AMMUNITION



                                                                                                      STORAGE




                           DAA3a                                        DR-05
                                             DA-28                   DX'2
                                                                        DT-2
                                                            DC)
                                                         411DA-11a                           DA-9b.
                                                                                      DX-3
                                                                          0 DA-29       *D*04-'
                                                             DA-30a '             I
                                       DO-la                0 DA-30b -                         DA-21 b
                                                            LINCOLN BLVD,                      DA-21a
                                                                       DA-25b
                                   DX-1%
                                           DZ-13                                                 DA-7b                        DAL6a    h
                                                                                                                          a

         EPA-W-5




J!




                                                                                      Note:ThisamiardravAng.DoNotmpmduminBlack&Wnite
                 N                                 Wells to be Sampled at                             McChord AFB
           W          E                            Area DIALGT During CY2005              Groundwater Treatment Plant Monitoring
                                                   Additional Static Water Level
            +
                 S                                 Measurement Locatlons                   and Optimization, Field Sampling Plan
                                            /V    Base Boundary                                          Figure 3-1
                                            / \ / Unpaved Road Limits                              CY2005 Area D/ALGT
                             Feet                  Drainage Limits                          Groundwater Monitoring Location Map
     0          500       1,000                    Fence


                                                                                      F      Date: 1/2005                  TETRATECH F
                                                                                                                                             J3 2 70


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Section 3


                           Table 3-2. Summary of CY 2005 Sampling Frequency

                                           CY   2004 Sampling               Proposed CY 2005 Sampling
               Sample Location                  Frequency                             Frequency
                   DA-7b                        Semiannual                            Semiannual
                   DA-9b                          Annual                                Annual
                   DA-21 b                      Semiannual                            Semiannual
                   DA-28                          Annual                                 Annual
                   DA-29                          Annual'                               Annual'
                   DA-30a                         Annud                                 Annuae
                   DA-30b                         Annud                                 Annuae
                    DB-6                          Annual'                               Annual'
                    DO-2                Quarterly, ifDX-2 is not in                       None
                                                 operation
                     DR-05                        Annual                                 Annual
                       DT-1                      Quarterly                              Quarterly
                       DX-2               Quarterly, ifin operation                     Quarterly
                       DX-3                       Quarterly                             Quarterly
                System Effluent                       A                                     A
                Stagger DA-29 and D13-6 to provide coverage during wet and dry season sampling events
              2 Stagger DA-30s and DA-30b to provide coverage during wet and dry season sampling events
              A = Quarterly at cis-DCE < 5Vg[L: monthly at cis-DCE >5 to 10 pg/L; bkvftkly at cis DCE >10 ggfL


                             Table 3-3. Estimated CY 2005 Sample Quantities
                                                                    VOCs (EPA Method 8260B)l
                                                                                                                  Additional
                                                                                                                   Effluent
                                                                                   Round 3         Round 4          Point
                                                Round I          Round 2         September         December      Sampling, If
               Sample Type                    March 2005 June 2005                   2005            2005        NecessarY2
  Environmental                                     11                4                8               4               8
  Field QC-Matrix Spike                              1                1                 1              1               0
  Field QC-Matrix Spike Duplicate                    1                1                 1        1      1              0
  Field QC-Duplicate                                 1                1                 1               1              0
  Field QC-Equipment Blank                           I                I                 1               1              0
  Field QC-Trip Blank                                I                1                 1               i              0
  Sample Event Total                       1        16                                                  9              8
'Annotated list of EPA Method 8260B analytes includes only TCE, cis-1,2.DCE, 11,1 -DCE, and vinyl chloride.
2Quarterly at cis-1,2-DCE <5 Ag/L; monthly at cis-1,2-I)CE >5 to 10 pg/L; bl-weekty at cis-1,24)CE >10 Vg/L.




                                                                                           Operationsand Maintenance FSP
 G                 L70 0         W                            3-6                                           January2005
                                                                                                             (.U32 72
                                                                                                         Section 3



       Table 3-4. Recommended CY 2005 Sampling Schedule
                                                              Round 3              Round 4
                          Round I            Round 2         September            December
Sample Location          March 2005         June 2005           2005                2005
       DA-7b                   x                                   x
       DA-9b                   x
      DA-21 b                  x                                    x
       DA-28                   x
       DA-29                                                        x
      DA-30a                                                        x
       DA-30b                  x
        DB-66                  x
       DR-05                   x
        DT-1                   x                  x                 x                     x
        DX-2                    x                 x                 x                     x
        DX-3                    x                 x                 x                     x
  System Effluent               A                 A                 A                     A
A = Quarterly at cis-DCE <5 gg/L; monthly at cis-DCE >5 to 10 lLg/L; bi-weekly   at   d5-DCE > IO gg/L




                                                                                 Operations and Maintenance FSP
                                                3-7                                                January 2005
            2532 73
Section 3


               Table 3-5. CY 2005 Static Water Level Measurement Locations
                            Survey Data'
                                      Measuring Point                           Round 3     Round 4
                                          Elevation        Round 1     Round 2 September   December
   Well No.                Easting        (ft-NGVD)       March 2005 June 2005    2005       2005
 DA-6a           660132    1501596          295.27            x           x        x           x
 DA-7b           660153    1500359          281.34            x           x         x          x
 DA-9b           660843    1500151          285.92            x           x         x          x
 DA-11a          660907    1498677          272.79            x           x         x          x
 DA-13a          661371    1497410          273.65            x           x         x          x
 DA-21a          660538    1500255          283.55            x           x         x          x
 DA-21 b         660546    1500253          283.24            x           x         x          x
 DA-25b          660324    1499246          276.90            x           x         x          x
 DA-28           661151    1498191          266.19            x           x         x          x
 DA-29           660731    1499446           268.63           x           x         x          x
  DA-30a         660565    1498800           270.63           x           x         x          x
  DA-30b         660562    1498790           270.36           x           x         x          x
  DB-6           660741    1499440           269.29           x           x         x           x
  DR-05          661336    1499132           270.77            x          x         x           x
  DO-la          660451    1497988           270.90            x          x         x           x
  DO-2           661103    1498942           274.10            x          x         x           x
  DO-3           660763    1500015           282.20            x          x         x           x
  DO-5a          661294    1497825           270.40            x          x         x           x
  DO-5b          661294    1497825           270.50            x          x         x           x
  DT-I           660460    1498226           271.77            x           x         x          x
  DT-2           661024    1499087           274.37            x           x         x          x
  DX-1           660360    1497957           270.54            x           x         x          x
  DX-2           661124    1498965           269.91            x           x         x          x
  DX-3           660752    1469987           277.68            x           x
 IDZ-13
 IEPA-W-5
                 660321
              1 659817
                           1497986
                           1496604
                                             272.61
                                             266.84
                                                           x   x
                                                                       x   x 4
   HorizontaidatumisNAD27,WashingtonSoLdhzone;verticaidatumisNGVD1929.




                                                                           Operationsand Maintenance FSP
  W            LTO                                3-8                                       January2005
                                                                                                    2532 74


    4. PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES

4A      Prime Contractor
TtFW is the prime contractor for the Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance
project through the March 2005 sampling event. Key TtFW personnel and their project
responsibilities are summarized below.
Mr. Mark Ingersoll is the Delivery Order Manager. He is responsible for the successful
implementation of the work in regard to scope, schedule, budget, and level of quality. He will be the
point of contact for AFCEE and McChord AFB for discussion of technical direction. Ms. Pamela
Moss will support the project as the Environmental Safety and Quality Manager for quality
assurance. She will manage the analytical subcontractor and oversee Environmental Resources
Program Information Management System (ERPIMS) data manageme nt and data validation. She
,%U also be responsible for audits of the laboratory and the field program. Mr. Pick Weingarz is the
 Field Operations Leader and Site Health and Safety Officer for the project. He is responsible for
 onsite supervision of all field activities and for ensuring that all field activities are carried out in
 accordance with the Health and Safety Plan.
 Figure 4-1 presents an organization chart that identifies key project personnel.

 4.2     Subcontractors
 Laucks, Seattle, Washington, will provide project analytical services for the March 2005 sampling
 event. Laucks will analyze groundwater samples for VOCs using EPA Method 8260B. A
 subcontractor organization chart is presented in Figure 4-2.




                                                                              Operations and Maintenance FSP
                 L= 0    TW                          4-1                                        January 2005
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Section 4




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                                                            Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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                                                                       2532 76



           -----------------------------------




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               -------------------
            2532 77
Section 4




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                                                            Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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                                        e.532 78




       U)
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Section 4        2532 79




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                                                                     operationsand MaintenanceFSP
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                               5. FIELD OPERATIONS

5.1     Geologic Standards
The lithologic descriptions for unconsolidated materials (soils [engineering usage] or deposits) will
use the name of the predominant particle size (e.g., silt, fine sand, etc.). The dimensions of the
predominant and secondary sizes will be recorded using the metric system. A description of the
predominant mineral content, accessory minerals, color, particle angularity, and any other
characteristics will accompany the grain size and name of the deposit. The classic deposit
descriptions will include, as a supplement, symbols of the Unified Soil Classification System. The
Munsell Color System will be used to designate the color descriptions.

The scales for maps, cross sections, or three-dimensional (3-D) diagrams will be selected in
accordance with the geologic and hydrologic complexity of the area and the purposes of the
illustrations. Geophysical logs will be run at a constant vertical scale of 1 inch equals 20 ft. When
geophysical logs are superimposed on geologic logs, cross sections, or 3-D diagrams, the scales will
be the same. If defining geological conditions require other scales, additional logs at those scales will
be provided.
 For orientation, the cross sections will show the northern end on the viewer's right. If the line of
 cross section is predominantly east-west, the eastern end will be shown on the right. Maps win be
 oriented with north toward the top, unless the shape of the area dictates otherwise. Orientation will
 be indicated with a north arrow.
 5.2     Site Reconnaissance, Preparation, and Restoration Procedures
 5.2.1 Staging Areas
 The Area D/ALGT treatment plant will be used as a staging area for sampling equipment.
 Emergency equipment will be staged at the Area D/ALGT treatment plant and will be collocated
 with the sampling crew.
 5.2.2 Site Restoration
 Each work site or sampling location will be returned to its original condition when possible. Efforts
 will be made to minimize impacts to work sites and sampling locations, particularly those in or near
 sensitive environments such as wetlands. Following the completion of work at a site, all drums,
 trash, and other waste will be removed. Decontamination and/or purge water will be transported to
 the designated locations as described in Section 5.6.

 5.3     Decommissioning Resource Protection Wells
 The Air Force may request that a limited number of existing resource protection wells be
 decommissioned. If requested, the wells will be deconunissioned in accordance with state or local
 requirements, including Washington Administrative Code 173-160, Minimum Standards for
 Construction and Maintenance of Wells. All permits, applications, and other documents required by
 state and local authorities will be completed prior to decommissioning.



                                                                            Operationsand Maintenance FSP
                                                        5-1                                  January2005
              2   5 3 2 81
Section 5


6.4     Surveying
AU surveying locations of field activities will be measured by a certified land surveyor as the distance,
in ft, from a reference location that is tied to the state plane system. The surveys will be third order
(Urquhart 1962). An XY-coordinate system will be used to identify locations. The X-coordinate will
be the east-west axis; the Y-coordinate will be the north-south axis. The reference location is the
origin. AU surveyed locations will be reported using the state plane coordinate system. The surveyed
control information for all data collection points will be recorded and displayed in a table. The table
will give the X and Y coordinates in state plane coordinate values, the ground elevation, and the
measuring point elevation if the location is a groundwater resource protection well. The elevation of
all newly installed wells and piezometers will be surveyed at the water level measuring point (notch)
on the riser pipe. 'ne elevation of the ground surface will be included in the survey.

5.5     Equipment Decontamination
All equipment that may directly or indirectly contact samples will be decontaminated. This
equipment includes sampling devices and instruments such as slugs and sounders. In addition, care
must be taken to prevent the sample from coming into contact with potentially contaminating
substances such as tape, oil, engine exhaust, corroded surfaces, or dirt.

Procedures for decontaminating sampling equipment are presented in Appendix A.

5.6      General Waste Handling Procedures
Waste handling will be dealtwith on a site-by-site basis. Waste may be classified as noninvestigative
waste or investigative waste.

Noninvestigative waste, such as Etter and household garbage, will be collected on an as-needed basis
to maintain each site in a clean and orderly manner. This waste will be containerized and transported
to the designated sanitary landfill or collection bin. Acceptable containers will be sealed boxes or
plastic garbage bags.

Investigation-derived liquids (i.e., purge water from sampling) will be handled in one of two ways,
depending on concurrence by Ecology. It is recommended that the purge water be discharged to
ground, consistent with prior monitoring protocols, because any groundwater containing VOCs with
concentrations exceeding the site RAOs will be captured by the Area D/ALGT extraction well
network and subsequently treated. An alternative protocol is to temporarily contain all purgewater
and transport the containers to the Area D/ALGT treatment plant, where the water can be
discharged to the sump for treatment by granular activated carbon.

The investigative-derived waste will be segregated at die site according to matrix (solid or liquid) and
as to how it was derived (drill cuttings, drilling fluid, decontamination fluids, and purged
groundwater). Each container will be properly labeled with site identification, sampling point, depth,
matrix, constituents of concern, and other pertinent information for handling.

5.7         Corrective Action
Implementation of corrective action(s), if necessary, is discussed in the QAPP, Section I 1.




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                       6. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING

6.1     Sampling Procedures
The construction material of the sampling devices (e.g., plastic, polyvinyl chloride, metal) discussed
below will be appropriate for the contaminant of concern and will not interfere with the chemical
analyses being performed.

AU purging and sampling equipment will be decontaminated according to the specifications in
Section 5.5 prior to any sampling activities and will be protected from contamination until ready for
Use.
Sampling procedures and protocol arc described in Standard Operating Procedures 1 (Appendix A).

6.1.1 ResourceProtectionWeflSampling
When numerous resource protection wells are to be sampled in succession, those wells expected to
have low concentrations of contamination or no contamination will be sampled prior to those wells
expected to have higher levels of contamination. This practice will help reduce the potential for
cross-contamination between wells. All sampling activities will be recorded in the field logbook.
Additionally, all sampling data will be recorded on a wen sampling form.

Before groundwater sampling begins, wells will be inspected for signs of tampering or other damage.
If tampering is suspected (e.g., the casing is damaged or the lock or cap is missing), this incident will
be recorded in the field logbook and on the well sampling form and reported to the Field
Operations Leader. If is it suspected that a well has been tampered with, it will not be sampled. In
this instance, the Delivery Order Manager and Field Operations Leader will decide whether to
sample the well.

 Before the start of sampling activities, plastic sheeting will be placed on the ground surrounding the
 well, if necessary, to provide a clean working area around the well head and prevent any soil
 contaminants from contacting sampling equipment. The water in the protective casing or in the
 vaults around the well casing will be removed prior to venting and purging. Procedures in the Health
 and Safety Plan will be followed when high concentrations of organic vapors or explosive gases are
 detected; however, this occurrence is deerned highly unlikely for this site.

 Purge pump intakes will be equipped with 2 positive foot check valve to prevent purged water from
 flowing back into the well. Purging and sampling will be performed in a manner that minimizes
 aeration in the well bore and the agitation of sediments in the well and formation. Equipment will
 not be allowed to free-fall into a well.
 In addition to the inspection and maintenance information (see Section 8), the following
 information will be recorded each time a well is purged and sampled:

      • Depth to water before and after purging
      • Well bore volume calculation

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        •   Sounded total depth of the resource protection well

        •   The condition of each well, including visual (mirror) survey

        •   The thickness of any nonaqueous layer

        •   Field parameters, such as pH, temperature, specific conductance, and turbidity. This
            information will be encoded in ERPIMS files when required.

6.1.2 Water Level Measurement
The groundwater level will be measured to the nearest 0.01 ft using an electric water level indicator.
Water levels will be measured from the notch located at the top of the wen casing and recorded on
the well sampling form. If well casings are not notched, measurements will be taken from the
northern edge of the top of the well casing, and a notch will be made using a decontaminated metal
file.

Following water level measurement, the total depth of the well from the top of the casing will be
determined using a weighted tape or electric sounder and recorded on the well sampling form. The
water level depth will then be subtracted from the total depth of the well to determine the height of
the water column present in the well casing. All water level and total depth measuring devices will be
routinely checked with a tape measure to ensure measurements are accurate.

6.1.3 Purging Priorto Sampling
Purging of resource protection wells is performed to evacuate water that has been stagnant in the
well and may not be representative of the aquifer. Purging win be accomplished using a submersible
Grundfos pump.

Mcropurge is an acceptable procedure to use for AFCEE projects. Nficropurge is a low flow rate
resource protection well purging and sampling method that induces laminar (nonturbulent) flow in
the immediate vicinity of the sampling pump intake, thus drawing groundwater directly from the
sampled aquifer, horizontally through the well screen, and into the sampling device. Low-flow
pumping rates associated with the micropurge technique are in the approximate range of 0.2 to 2.0
liters per minutes These low flow rates minimize disturbance in the screened aquifer, resulting in (1)
minimal production of artificial turbidity and oxidation, (2) minimal mixing of chemically distinct
zones, (3) minimal loss of VOCs, and (4) collection of representative samples while minimizing
purge volume.

6.1.4 Sample Collection
Using low-flow purging, the sample may be collected after the temperature, pH, specific
conductance, and turbidity have stabilized. Stabilization will be defined as follows: temperature
degree Celsius (C), pH ± 0.1 units, specific conductivity ± 5 percent, turbidity ± 1 0 nephelometric
turbidity units. Field equipment will be calibrated in accordance with the AFCEE QAPP, Section 6,
and in Section 7.2 of this FSP.

 Samples will be collected after the water level has recovered to 80 percent of its static level or
 16 hours after completion of purging, whichever occurs first. If a resource protection well is


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pumped dry before parameters have stabilized, the sample will be collected when a sufficient volume
of water has accumulated in the well.

Before collecting groundwater samples, the sampler will don clean, protective gloves. Samples to be
analyzed for VC)Cs will be collected directly from the discharge bib on the Grundfos pump
system. If the water table is too low to allow use of the low-flow system, then the samples will be
collected using a bottom-filling Teflon bailer. Disposable nylon rope will be used to lower and
retrieve the bailers. A new length of nylon rope will be used for each well, and the rope will be
disposed of following the sampling activities. Each bailer will be equippedwith a dedicated stainless
steel or Teflon-coated leader so that the nylon rope will not contact the water in the well.

Pre-preserved sample containers will be used when required for certain analyses. Required sample
containers, preservation methods, volumes, and holding times are presented in Section 6.2 and Table
6-1. Sampling equipment will be decontaminated in accordance with Section 5.5 upon completion of
sampling activities.

                          Table 6-1. Requirements for Containers, Preservation
                           Techniques, Sample Volumes, and Holding Times
                                                                            Minimum
                          Analytical                                    Sample Volume    Maximum Holding
          Name             Methods      Container        Preservation      or Weight            Time
  Volatile organics      SW8260B       Glass,         4.r-C, HCL to     3 x 40 mL       14 days; 7 days if
  (water)                              Teflon-lined   pH < 2, 0.008%                    unpreserved with acid
                                       septum         Na2S2O3




 6.2       Sample Handling
 6.2.1     Sample Containers
 Sample containers are purchased precleaned and treated according to EPA specifications for the
 method. Sampling containers that are reused are decontaminated between uses by the EPA-
 recommended procedures (e.g., EPA 540/R-93/051). Containers are stored in clean areas to prevent
 exposure to fuels, solvents, and other contaminants. Amber glass bottles are used routinely where
 glass containers are specified in the sampling protocol.


  6.2.2    Sample Volumes, Container Types, and Preservation Requirements
  Sample volumes, container types, and preservation requirements for the analytical method
  performed on AFCEE groundwater samples are listed in Table 6-1.

  The tracking of sample holding time begins with the collection of samples and continues until the
  analysis is complete. Holding time requirements are specified in Table 6-1.

  6.2.3    Sample Identification
  Samples will be numbered sequentially using the following nomenclature:

                                                      AD-yy-7zz
  Where:     AD       = project identifier


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             yy     = calendar year (05 for CY 2005)
             zzz    = sequential number

For example, groundwater samples collected during CY 2005 at Area D/ALGT will begin with
AD-05-001, AD-05-002, AD-05-003, and so on.

6.3       Sample Custody
Procedures to ensure the custody and integrity of the samples begin at the time of sampling and
continue through transport, sample receipt, preparation, analysis and storage, data generation and
reporting, and sample disposal. Records concerning the custody and condition of the samples are
maintained in field and laboratory records.

The contractor will maintain chain-of-custody (C-0-C) records for all environmental and field
quality control (QC) samples. A sample is defined as being under a person's custody if any of the
following conditions exist: (1) it is in his/her possession; (2) it is in his/her view, after being in their
possession; (3) it was in his/her possession when the sample was locked up; or (4) it is in a
designated secure area.

AU sample containers will be scaled in a manner that will prevent or detect tampering if it occurs. In
no case will tape be used to seal sample containers. Samples will not be packaged with activated
carbon unless prior approval is obtained from AFCEE.

The following minimum information concerning the sample will be documented on the laboratory-
supplied C-0-C form:

      •     Unique sample identification

      •     Date and time of sample collection

      •     Source of sample (including name, location, and sample type)

      •     Designation of matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate

      •     Preservative used

      •     Analyses required

      •     Name of collector(s)

      •     Pertinent field data (pH, temperature, etc.)

      •     Serial numbers of custody seals and transportat.Lon cases   Cif used)

      •     Custody transfer signatures and dates and times of sample transfer from the     field to
            transporters and to the laboratory or laboratories

 All samples will be uniquely identified, labeled, and documented in the field at the time of collection
 in accordance with Section 6.2.3.

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                                                                                             Section 6


Samples collected in the field will be transported to the laboratory or field-testing site as
expeditiously as possible. When a 4'C requirement for preserving the sample is indicated, the
samples will be packed in ice to keep them cool during collection and transport to the laboratory.

6.4     Field Quality Control Samples
6.4.1 Equipment Blank
An equipment blank is a sample of American Society for Testing -andMaterials (ASTM) Type II
reagent-grade water poured into or over or pumped through the sampling device, collected in a
sample container, and transported to the laboratory for analysis. Equipment blanks are used to
assess the effectiveness of equipment decontamination procedures. The frequency of collection for
 equipment blanks is specified in Table 3-3. Equipment blanks will be collected immediately after the
 equipment has been decontaminated. The blank will be analyzed for all laboratory analyses requested
 for the environmental samples collected at the site.

 6.4.2 Trip Blank
 The trip blank consists of a VOC sample vial filled in the laboratorywith ASTM Type II reagent-
 grade water, transported to the sampling site, handled like an environmental sample, and returned to
 the laboratory for analysis. Trip blanks are not opened in the field. Trip blanks are prepared only
 when VOC samples are taken and are analyzed only for VOC analyses. Trip blanks are used to
 assess the potential introduction of contaminants from sample containers or during the
 transportation and storage procedures. One trip blank will accompany each cooler of samples sent
 to the laboratory for analysis of VOCs.

 6.4.3 Field Duplicates
 A field duplicate sample is a second sample collected at the same location as die original sample.
 Duplicate samples arc collected simultaneously or in immediate succession, using identical recovery
 techniques, and treated in an identical manner during storage, transportation, andanalysis. The
 sample containers are assigned an identification number in the field so that they cannot be identified
 (blind duplicate) as duplicate samples by laboratory personnel performing the analysis. Specific
 locations are designated for collection of field duplicate samples prior to the beginning of sample
 collection.

 Duplicate sample results are used to assess precision of the sample collection process. Precision of
 soil samples to be analyzed for VOCs is assessed from collocated samples because the compositing
 process required to obtain uniform samples could result in loss of the compounds of interest. 'Me
 frequency of collection for field duplicates is specified in Table 3-3.




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                          7. FIELD MEASUREMENTS

7.1    Parameters
Parameters to be measured in the field include:

       Total depth of resource protection well (ft)
       Depth to static water in resource protection well (ft)
       Temperature CC)
       Specific conductance (micromhos per centimeter)
       pH (standard units)
       Dissolved oxygen (milligrams per liter)
       Oxidation reduction potential
       Turbidity (nephelometric turbidity units)

Equipment that will be used for the measurements includes a sounding tape (for total depth and
depth to static water) and a Hydrolab Data Sonde/Surveyor 4 (for the aquifer parameters).
Parameters will be measured in-line using a flowthrough cell.

 7.2     Equipment Calibration and Quality Control
 Field equipment will be calibrated in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended instructions.
 Instruments will be calibrated at least once per day. One field duplicate measurement will be taken
 for every 10 field measurements (10 percent). The equipment vendor will provide calibration
 solutions. A summary of QC procedures for field measurements, including calibration, QC checks,
 frequency of measurements, acceptance ctiteria, corrective action(s), and appropriate flagging, is
 contained in Table 6-2 of the QAPP.

 7.3      Equipment Maintenance and Decontamination
 The vendors will maintain the field equipment in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended
 instructions and schedules. AU field measurement equipment will be decontaminated according to
 the specifications in Section 5.5 prior to any measurement activities and will be protected from
 contamination until ready for use.

 7.4      Field Monitoring Measurements
 7.4.1 GroundwaterLevelMeasurements
 Water level measurements will be taken in all resource protection wells to determine the elevation of
 the water table at least once within a single 24-hour period. These measurements will be taken after
 all wells have been installed and developed and their water levels have recovered completely. Any
 conditions (e.g., barometric pressure) that may affect water levels will be recorded in the field log.
 The field log will also include the previous water level measurement for each well (to determine if
 current water level is reasonable).

 Water level measurements will be taken with electric sounders. All measuring equipment will be
 decontaminated according to the specifications in Sections 7.3 and 5.5. Groundwater level will be



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Section 7


measured to the nearest 0.01 ft. (Two or more sequential measurements will be taken at each
location until two measurements agree to within ±0.01 ft.)

Static water levels will be measured each time a well is sampled -and before any equipment enters the
well. If the casing cap is airtight, time will be allowed prior to measurement for equilibration of
pressures after the cap is removed. Measurements will be repeated until the water level is stabilized.

7.4.2    Groundwater Discharge Measurements
Groundwater discharge measurements will be obtained during resource protection well purging.
Groundwater discharges may be measured with orifice meters, containers of known volume, in-line
meters, flumes, or weirs following the guidelines specified in the Bureau of Reclamation Water
ManagementManual (Bureau of Reclamation 1967). Measurement devices will be calibrated using
containers of known volume.

7.5         Field Performance and System Audits
Field performance and system audits are discussed in the QAPP, Section 9.




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                 8. GROUNDWATER TREATMENT PLANT
                     INSPECTIONS AND MAINTENANCE

8.1      Inspections
TtFW will conduct weekly inspections of the Area D/ALGT pump-and treat system, including
treatment plant systems and extraction wells. In general, the inspections will focus on system
integrity (e.g., inspection of piping, pumps, and plant for leaks), system components (e.g.,
instrumentation), and overall system operation. An inspection checklist (Figure 8-1) win be
completed on a weekly basis that includes information about the extraction wells (totalizer readings)
and treatment plant (ambient temperature, extraction well flow rates and water levels, influent valve
totalizer reading, and differential pressure across the carbon vessels), and information will be
transferred to a master electronic worksheet.

8.2       Periodic Maintenance
Maintenance of the treatment system will be conducted in accordance with the manufacturer's
recommended specifications as referenced in the OperationsandMaintenance Manual,McChordALGT
GroundwaterTreatment System, Building No. 887 (Williams Bros. Construction 1994) and FinalOperations
andMaintenance Plan,Area DIALGT GroundwaterTreatment (USACE 1994b). A maintenance schedule
is presented on Table 8-1.

8.3       Carbon Vessel Backwashing, Sampling, and Change-out
At the request of the Air Force, the carbon vessel(s) will be back-washed quarterly. Protocols and
procedures for back-washing are contained in the OperationsandMaintenanceManual,McChordALGT
GroundwaterTreatment System, Building No. 887 (Williams Bros. Construction 1994) and FinalOperations
andMaintenance Plan,Area DIALGT GroundwaterTreatment (USACE 1994b).

If effluent sample concentrations indicate the need for change-out of spent carbon from the lead
vessel during CY 2005 (critctia is >15 jig/L cis-1,2-DCE), then sampling of the carbon and change-
out of carbon should occur. Sampling of the carbon is detailed in the Standard Operating Procedure
2 (Appendix A). Spent carbon should be -analyzed for Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure
(TCLP) volatiles and for carbon reactivation acceptance testing if required by the Air Force's carbon
 vendor.
 8.4      Emergency Procedures
 Although the treatment system functioned at almost 100 percent during the first 8 years of
 operation, circumstances could occur that would require immediate notification and appropriate
 response action(s). Potential circumstances that would require immediate attention include power
 disruption to the treatment system (e.g., from wind storms or construction activities), system failure
 (e.g., broken pipeline), or other natural phenomena (e.g., earthquakes, as recent as February 28,
 2001). In the event of an unplanned system shutdown, the following steps should be taken:

       1. Identification.-Identify the problem and the current status of the treatment system.



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Section 8


    2.   Notification. Immediately notify the Air Force (Ms. Brenda Zehr-253-982-6202) and TtFW
         (Mr. Mark Ingersoll-406-494-3446).

    3.   Response. If the system is in operation, but the system integrity is compromised, immediately
         shut down the system following the procedures in Standard Operating Procedure 3
         (Appendix A). If the system is shut down because the power was interrupted, but the system
         integrity is intact, restart the system following the procedures in Standard Operating
         Procedure 4 (Appendix A).

                                Table 8-1. Preventative Maintenance Schedule

                          Equipmentt                                  Maintenance Recommendations
         Well pump motors (US Motor Type TU)              0 Grease bearings every 6 months
         sump pump'                                       0 Pump wash-down every 6 months
                                                          8 Clean float switch every 3 months
                                                          0 Check seal oil once per year
         Backwash pump'                                      Grease pump bearings 2 to 3 times yearly
                                                             Grease motor bearings 2 to 3 times yearly
         Booster pump                                        Grease motor and pump beadngs every 3 months
         Air compresso                                       Change oil every 3 months
                                                             Check air intake filter weekly
                                                             Check oil level weekly
                                                             Check and tighten all bolts and nuts monthly
                                                             Check belt tension monthly
         Well flow meter                                     Clean and inspect transmitter unit every 5 years
                                                             Remove and inspect turbine meter as required
                                                           Replace grease in worm drive housing every 5 years
            Preventative maintenance recommendations for these items are not required at the intervals shown due to the
            low duty factor of the equipment.




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Figure 8-1 Weekly Inspection Checklist


                           ALGT GroundwaterTreatment System
                    WEEKLY INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE OMCK-OFF SHEEr

       I)ATE:                                               INSPECrED 13Y.


WEATM
                                                                              Ambient        Plant
        Note weather conditions and                                            Temp.         Temp.
        ambient temperature-
        Note the plant temperature inOm
        treatment plant

 EXTRACTIONWELIS
                                                                 Design        Ob;-u ed      Water    Observed
      Note the recorded flow rate                                 Rate           Rate        Level     Water
         for each extraction w                                   (RPM)          (spin)        SP       Level
         displayed on the digilLil raesadoiiit                     25                        2435
         in the plant                             DX-2             40                        240.0
         Note the recorded water level            DX-3             75
         elevation for each extraction well
         as displayed on the digital readout in the PIM
         Check the vertical line shaft pujps to verify correct operation. Note the time.
         inspect pump system and piping for leaks.                                                    Totalizer
         Note the totalizer reading from the                                       Purim      Time
         top of the pump in the pump vaults.                                       DX-1
                                                                                   DX-2
                                                                                   DX-3
         Inspect carbon absorption tanks for leaks.
         Verify the correct water flow through the carbon units.
         Note the totalizer reading from the influent valve as well as the time.
          Inspect piping leading to and from the plant                          Totalizer      Time
          Check tank valves for proper operation Note                          (cubic fee)
          flow Pattern,
          Check preunre across carbon units (backwash
          required afI5 psi). Note which unit is lead and lag.                                         Pressure
                                                                                    Unit
  POST INSPECTION                                                                   CA-I       La
  Z      Update records and film                                                   CA-2
          Secure area; verify all doors and gates are closed sail locked prior to leaving.


                  AQ
  COMWNTS AND QL!jFR




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                                 9. RECORD-KEEPING

TtFW will maintain field records sufficient to recreate all sampling and measurement activities and
to meet all ERPIMS data loading requirements. The requirements listed in this section apply to all
measuring and sampling activities. Requirements specific to individual activities are listed in the
section that addresses each activity. The information will be recorded with indelible ink in a
permanently bound notebook with sequentially numbered pages. These records will be archived in
 an easily accessible form and made available to the Air Force upon request. Other field records that
 will be completed include boring logs and well completion diagrams (during drilling), well
 development logs (during well development), water sampling logs (during groundwater, surface
 water, and sediment sampling), water level measurement forms (during static water level
 measurements), and C-O-C forms (supplied by the laboratory and used during collection, transport,
 and relinquishment of samples).

 The following information will be recorded for all field activities: (1) location, (2) date and time,
 (3) identity of people performing activity, and (4) weather conditions. The numerical value and units
 of each measurement and the identity of and calibration results for each field instrument will also be
 recorded.
 The following additional information will be recorded for all sampling activities: (1) sample type and
 sampling method; (2) sample identification and depth(s), where applicable; (3) the amount of each
 sample; (4) sample description (e.g., color, odor, clarity); (5) identification of sampling devices; and
 (6) identification of conditions that might affect the representativeness of a sample (e.g., refueling
 operations, damaged casing).




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                                             1




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                                  10.REFERENCES

Bureau of Reclamation. 1967. Water Management Manual.

CH2M Hill. 1982. Installation Restoration Program Records Search. August 1982.


Ebasco Environmental. 1991 a. Final Remedial Investigational Report: McChord Air Force Base
    Area D/Amcrican Lake Garden Tract. In association with Shannon & Wilson, Inc. Department
    of the Army, Seattle District, Corps of Engineers. March 1991.

       . 1991b. Final Feasibility Study Report, McCbord Air Force Base Area D/American Lake
    Garden Tract. Department of the Army, Seattle District, Corps of Engineers. March 1991.

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1993. Data Quality Objectives Process for
    Superfund, Interim Final Guidance.

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), McChord Air Force Base (McChord AFB), and
    Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). 1991. Record of Decision, McChord Air
    Force Base, Washington/American Lake Garden Tract. September 1991.

Foster Wheeler Environmental (Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation). 2003. CY 2002
    Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/American Lake
    Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base. October 2003.

        .2002. CY 2001 Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area
    D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base. October 2002.

        .2001. CY 2000 Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area
    D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base. August 2001.

Hart Crowser. 1996. Second Annual Report, Groundwater Pump and Treat System, Area
    D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington. July 1996.

       . 1995. Annual Report, Groundwater Pump and Treat System, Area D/Ame:rican Lake
    Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington. July 1995.

 SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation). 1986. Installation Restoration Program
    Phase II-Confirmation/Quantification, Stage 2, Final Report for McChord Air Force Base,
    Washington. Prepared for Military Airlift Command (MAC), Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, and
    U.S. Air Force Occupational Environmental Health Laboratory, Brooks Air Force Base, Texas.

        . 1985. Installation Restoration Program Phase II-Confirmation/Quantification, Stage 1,
    McChord Air Force Base, Washington. Prepared for Military Airlift Command WC),        Scott Air
    Force Base, Illinois, and U.S. Air Force Occupational Environmental Health Laboratory, Brooks
    Air Force Base, Texas.




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Section 10


Tetra Tech FW, Inc. 2004. Final CY 2003 Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System
    Monitoring Project, Area D /American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air Force Base. June 2004.

        .2005. Draft CY 2004 Annual Report, Area D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract Groundwater
     Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance, Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12, McChord Air
     Force Base. In preparation.

Urquhart, L.C. 1962. Civil Engineering Handbook, 4th edition, pp. 96,97.

URS Greiner Woodward Clyde and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation. 2000. CY 1999
  Annual Report, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/ALGT, McChord
  Air Force Base, Washington, Final. September 2000.

         . 1999. CY 1998 Annual Report, January 1, 1998 through December 31, 1998, Groundwater
     Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/ALGT, McChord Air Force Base, Washington,
     Final. May 1999.

URS Greiner, Inc. and Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation. 1998. CY 1997 Annual Report,
  January 7, 1997 through December 31, 1997, Groundwater Treatment System Monitoring
  Project, Area D/ALGT, McChord Air Force Base, Washington, Final. September 1998.

        . 1997. Third Annual Report, February 14,1996 through February 13,1997, Groundwater
     Treatment System Monitoring Project, Area D/American Lake Garden Tract, McChord Air
     Force Base, Washington, Final. October 1997.

USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), Seattle District. 1994a. Final Remedial Action Work Plan,
  Area D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment McChord Air Force Base,
  Seattle, Washington.

      -. 1994b. Final Operations and Maintenance Plan, Area D/American Lake Garden Tract
     Groundwater Treatment McChord Air Force Base, Seattle, Washington.

Williams Bros. Construction. 1994. Operations and Maintenance Manual, McChord ALGT
    Groundwater Treatment System, Building No. 887, McChord AFB, Washington, prepared for
    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.




                                                                       Operationsand Maintenance FSP
 G           Lmo                                10-2                                    January2005
                           2532 98




                  Appendix A
Standard Operating Procedures
                                                                                                 2532 99


                           Standard Operating Procedure 1
                           Low-Flow Groundwater Sampling

Required Equipment
  • Final project plans

   •       Field logbook
   •       Indelible black-ink pens and markers

   •       Sample tags/labels and appropriate documentation

    • pH/conductivity/temperature meter, water level meter, turbidity meter, and dissolved
      oxygen meter

    • Flowthrough box
    •      Insulated cooler(s), chain-of-custody seals, Ziploc' bags

    •      Sample containers, coolers, blue ice, or equivalent
    •      Sampling equipment: Grundfos Redi-Flow submersible pump and Reel E-2:m system,
           including control box; 3600 MultiQuip`rm, or equivalent, portable generator
    •      Decontamination equipment: two 15-gallon jugs of potable water (Lakewood Water
           District), Liquinox, deionized water

       •    Sample log forms

 Typical Procedures
 Preparation
    1. Record necessary data in field logbook.
       2. Prepare sampling equipment, including calibration of field meters prior to use.
       3. Move equipment and supplies to sampling location.

 Purging
    1. Remove well cap and measure static water level. Also measure the total depth of the well if it
       is not known.
       2. Remove the pump from the pump holder and rinse the pump off with distilled water. Slowly
       lower the pump into the well to a depth at the midpoint of the screened interval (Iable A-1).




                                                                           Operationsand Maintenance FSP
 GWCEE             LM                                 A-1                                   January2005
               253 2100
Appendix A


    3.    Connect the discharge hose and cable for the control box to the Reel E-Z:m system. Start
          the generator and set to 120 volts. Make sure the generator is kept downwind from the
          sampling system.

    4. Place the discharge hose in the flow-through box. Place the probes for the calibrated field
       meters into the flow-through box. If applicable, put the bucket beneath the flowthrough box
          to catch purged water.

    5.    Turn on the pump and adjust the flow rate to approximately I to 2 liters per minute.

    6.    After approximately 4 liters of water have been purged from the well, reduce the flow rate to
          1 liter per minute.

    7.    Start recording field parameters for every 3 liters of water purged. Purging should continue
          at a constant rate until the dissolved oxygen and specific conductance stabilize. Stabilization
          is considered achieved when three sequential measurements are within 1 0 percent.

Sampling
   1 .After specified parameters have stabilized, reduce the flow rate on the control box to create
       a trickle of water.

    2.    Disconnect discharge hose from Reel E-Zm system.

    3.    Connect Teflon sampling tube to Reel 11-2m system. If applicable, put the bucket beneath
          the sampling tube to catch unsampled water.

    4. Change to clean sampling gloves.

     5.   Fill necessary sample bottles. If they are scheduled, collect volatile organic compounds;
          benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; and total petroleum hydrocarb6n-gasohne
          samples first. When sampling for volatile organic compounds, keep flow rate at a trickle of
          water. When sampling for other analytes, increase flow rate to approximately 1 liter per
          minute.

 Decontamination
    1. Put the pump in one of the 15-gallon drums containing potable water and a small amount of
          Iiquinox or Alconox. Place discharge hose into same bucket.

     2.    Standby with additiorml potable water.

     3.    Turn on the system and pump water through the sampling system. Add more water as
           needed and pump for approximately 3 minutes.

     4. Put the pump in the second 15-gallon drum of potable water and turn on system. Pump
        until the soapy water has filled the first bucket. Place the discharge hose into the second 15-
           gallon bucket of potable water and pump for approximately 1 minute.




                                                                             Operationsand MaintenanceFSP
                                                     A-2                                      January2005
                                                                                                   25 3 2101
                                                                                               Appendix A


  5.    Remove the pump from the decontamination bucket and place the pump in its holder on the
        Reel E-Zm system.

  6.    Pour unsampled water, purge water, and decontamination water into a 55-gallon drum
        marked "development water," if applicable, for transport to the onsite water storage tank.

Documentation
   1.   Fill out one sample log form for each sample collected. Record all necessary information in
        the field logbook.

                     Table AA. Mid-Screen Intervals for Low-Flow Sampling
                                                      Screen Interval            Estimated
                                Boring Depth     Top              Bottom        Pump Depth
                  Well ID            (ft)      (ft bgs)           (Ift bgs)       (Ift bgs)
                  DA-7b             68.7         60.1                65.1              63
                  DA-9b              69          60.5                65.5              63
                  DA-21 b            65            58                  63              61
                  DA-28               38         21.2                31.2              26
                  DA-29              49           38.2               48.2              43
                  DA-30a              33           23                  33              28
                  DA-30b              63           49                  59              54
                   DB-6               17          9.4                 14.4             12
                   DO-2               71           40                  70              55
                   DR-05              50            8                  48              28
                   DT-1               32           18                  28              2_71
            bgs    below ground surface




                                                                              Operations and Maintenance FSP
                                                  A-3                                           January 2005
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Appendix A




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                                                                      Operations and MaintenanceFSP
 G           Mc             W                   A-4                                     January2005
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                          Standard Operating Procedure 2
                                 Carbon Sampling

Required Equipment
   • Final project plans

   • Field logbook

   •      Indelible black-ink pens and markers

   •      Sample tags/labels and appropriate documentation

    •     Insulated cooler(s), chain of custody seals, ZiplocTm bags

    •     Sample containers, coolers, blue ice, or equivalent
    • Sampling equipment: Drum thief (provided by McChord AFB, located in Area D/A-LGT
      treatment plant)
    • Wrenches (for opening sampling vent)
    • Decontamination equipment: two 5-gallon jugs of potable water (Lakewood Water District);
      Liquinox 7; 4-foot length of 2-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC); deionized (DI) water

    •      Sample log forms
    •      Personal protective equipment (PPE): hardhat, steel-toed boots, safety glasses, fall protection
           harness
Typical Procedures
Preparation
   1. Shut system down:
           a. Shut off the booster pump by switching the P2 "Hand-Off" switch to "Off."

           b. Stop the DX-1, DX-2, and DX-3 well-head pumps by turning the "Hand-Off-Auto"
              switch for each pump to the "Off' position.

           c. Close valves BV-1 and BV-2.
           d. Allow the water to continue draining from the piping and vessels to the effluent line
              until the flow stops.

        2. Open the sampling port at the top of the lead carbon vessel:

           a. Loosentheextemalclampboltswithanadjustablewrench.

                                                                             Operations and MaintenanceFSP
                                                     A-5                                       January2005
                  2532104
Appendix A


           b. After the bolts are loosened, slip the bolts from the slotted receivers on the access
                 opening cover and set aside.

           c.    Maintain a firm grip on the cover to avoid dropping it inside the tank. After the bolts are
                 removed, gently push the cover in and rotate it towithdraw it up through the opening.
                 Take care to avoid dropping or damaging the rubber gasket as the cover is withdrawn.

     3.    Move the sampling equipment and supplies to the sampling port.

     4.    Cover the sampling platform with a plastic sheet.

Sampling
     1. Advance sampling probe a minimum of 5 feet into the approximate center of the carbon
           bed.

     2.    Remove probe and transfer carbon into stainless steel sampling bowl.

     3.    Repeat steps 1 and 2 until approximately 3 quarts of sample have been collected.

     4.    Mix composite sample using a stainless steel spoon.

     5.    Transfer sample to appropriate containers:

           a.     FiUtwo8-ounceglassjarsforToxicityCharacteristicLeachingProcedure(TCLP)
                 volatile analysis.

           b. If requested by the Air Force, put approximately 2 quarts of carbon sample in 2-quart
              containers with Teflon liners on die lid for carbon reactivation acceptance testing.

     6.    Bag the samples and place in coolers with ice.

     7.     Return excess carbon to vessel.

      8.    Decontaminate sampling equipment using potable water, Uquinox 7 or Alconox 7,
            methanol, and DI water.

 Post-Sampling
      1. Close sample ports:

            a.    Install rubber gasket on access opening cover and smooth and center it as required. If
                  gasket is damaged, replace it with a new gasket.

            b.    CarefiMy insert cover into opening, rotate it 90 degrees, and bring it up to backside of
                  access opening to seat gasket. Center the cover and gasket in opening.

            c.    Install bolts in the slotted receiver on cover and install the clamp bridges over opening.
                  Install the nut on the bolt and finger-tighten nuts.



                                                                                Operationsand MaintenanceFSP
 G                      T                                A-6                                     January2005
                                                                                                       253 21 05
                                                                                                Appendix A



        d. Tighten both nuts alternately with the adjustable wrench approximately one-half to one
              additional filll turn. Do not over tighten the nuts.

        e.    Check access the opening for leaks after vessels are in service and under pressure. If
              leakage is observed, the covers and/or gaskets are misaligned and the system must be
              shut down and the covers reinstalled. Do not over tighten the nuts to stop leaks.

  2. Remove sampling equipment and supplies from manway.

  3.    Start the system:

        a.    Position valves BV-1 through BV-8 so that they ate correctly aligned for placing CA-1
              and CA-2 in the appropriate lead/lag configuration. Ensure that power is provided to
              the control panel and that the instruments axe functioning properly.

        b.    Ensure that valves GV1, GV2, and BV9 are open.

         c.   Ensure that valves GV3, GV4, BV1 0, BV1 1, and BVI 3 are closed.

         d. Start the well pump for DX-1 by turning the "Hand-Off-Auto" switch to "Auto." Verify
            that the flow rate increases from zero. Repeat this procedure for DX-2 and DX-3.

         e.    Start the booster pump by turning the P2 "Hand-Off" switch to "Hand."

         f.    Verify that the well flow rates are correct. Adjust the flow rate controllers as required to
               obtain the required flow rate.

         g.    After the flow rate is established, bleed off any air trapped in CA-1 and CA-2 by cracking
               open the valve on the 3/4-inch compressed air line connected to the top of each vessel.
               The 4-inch carbon fill line on each vessel also can be used to bleed trapped air if
               necessary.

Documentation
   1.    FM out field notebook, sample log, and chain-of-custody form(s).

Shipping
   1. Ship (or deliver) samples for TCLP analysis to Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc., Seattle,
Washington.

   2.    Ship samples for reactivation acceptance testing, if requested by the Air Force, to the Air
         Force contractor responsible for carbon replacement in accordancewith United States
         Department of Transportation requirements.




                                                                               Operationsand Maintenance FSP
                   LTO                                 A-7                                      Jenuary2005
                  25 32 106
Appendix A




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                                                                          Operations and Maintenance FSP
 G           MQ               W                    A-8                                      January 2005
                                                                                                   253 2107

                    Standard Operating Procedure 3
               Area D/ALGT Treatment System Shutdown

To shut down treatment system:

    1. Shut off booster pump by switching the P2 "Hand-Off' switch to "Off."

    2. Stop DX-1, DX-2, and DX-3 wellhead pumps by turning the "Hand-Off-Auto" switch for
       each pump to the "Off"position.

    3. Close valves BV-1 -andBV-2.

    4. Open valves BV-3, BV-4, BV-5, BV-6, BV-7, and BV-8 to allow all lines and vessels to
       drain.

    5. Allow the water to continue draining from the piping and vessels to the effluent line until the
       flow stops.

    6. Close valves GV-1, GV-2, and BV-9.




                                                                         Operationsand Maintenance FSP
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             2532108
Appendix A




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                                                                  operations and Maintenance FSP
 G            LWQ      TW                   A-1 0                                   Januaiy 2005
                                                                                                  2 53 2 10 9


                     Standard Operating Procedure 4
                 Area DIALGT Treatment System Re-Start

To restart treatment system:

    1. Position valves BV-1 through BV-8 so that they are correctly aligned for placing CA-1 and
       CA-2 in the appropriate lead/lag configuration. Ensure that power is provided to the control
       panel and that the instruments ate functioning properly.

    2. Verify that the master power switches for DX-1, DX-2, and DX-3 are in the "On" position.
       (Omit the appropriate well if it is to remain shut down.)

    3. Verify that the remote power switches located at the DX-1, DX-2, and DX-3 well vaults are
       in the "On" position. (Omit the appropriate well if a well is to remain shut down.)

    4. Ensure that valves GV-1, GV-2, and BV-9 are open.

    5. Ensure that valves GV-3, GV-4, BV-10, BV-1 1, BV-12,and BV-13 are closed.

    6. Start the well pump for DX-1 by turning the "Hand-Off-Auto" switch to Auto. Verify that
       the flow rate increases from zero. Repeat this procedure for DX-2 and DX-3.

    7. Verify that the large double-throw booster/backwash power switch is in the booster pump
       position.

     8. Start the booster pump by turning the P2 "Hand-Off" switch to "Hand."

     9. Verify that the well flow rates are correct. Adjust the flow rate as required to obtain the
        required flow rate.

     10. After the flow rate is established, bleed off any air trapped in CA-1 and CA-2 by cracking
         open the valve on the 3/4-inch compressed air line connected to the top of each vessel. The
         4-inch carbon fill line on each vessel can also be used to bleed trapped air if necessary.

     I 1. Verify that the PI (sump pump) "Hand-Off-Auto" switch is in the "Auto" position and that
          the PI master power switch is in the "On" position.




                                                                            Operationsand Maintenance FSP
                                                   A-1 I                                     January2005
                25 32 110
Appendix A




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                                                                  Operations and Maintenance FSP
 0           LTOV                           A-12                                    January 2005
              2 53 2 1 11




Section Tab
                                                                     LJ3 21 1 2



lb
                  UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
            INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM


                                   FINAL

                  Quality Assurance Project Plan

                       Remedial Action-Operation
     Area D/American Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment Plant
                      Operations and Maintenance
                     (Project No. PQWY 92-7001-12)
                  McChord Air Force Base, Washington




                                   Prrparrdfor

                 Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
                        Environmental Restoration Division
                             Brooks City-Base, Texas
                                       and
                       McChord Air Force Base, Washington


                                   P"paredv.

                                   TETRA TECH FW, INC.


                         143 Union Boulevard, Suite 1010
                           Lakewood, Colorado 80228
                                 (303) 988-2202




                                 January 2005
                                                                                                03 2 1 13




                                            NOTICE
This Quality Assurance Project Plan was prepared for the U.S. Air Force (Air Force) by Tetra Tech
FW, Inc. to guide the implementation of the McChord Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations
and Maintenance project under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The limited
objectives of this plan and the ongoing nature of the IRP, along with the evolving knowledge of site
conditions and chemical effects on the environment and health, must be considered when evaluating
this plan, because subsequent facts may become known that may make this plan premature or
inaccurate. Acceptance does not mean that the Air Force adopts the conclusions, recommendations,
or other views expressed herein, which are those of the contractor alone and do not necessarily
reflect the official position of the Air Force.
                                                                                                                                n C.
                                                                                                                                ,Z;3211

REPORT DOCUME             AGE                                           Form approved OMB No. 0704-0189
Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewinT_
instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection
of information. Send comments regarding this burden esftate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including
suggestions for reducing this burden, toWashington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports,
1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork
     uct on ro              18 , ashington, DC 20503.
I.AGENCY                            2. REPORT DATE                       3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED
                                    January2OO5                          Final
                                                                         Calendar Year 2005


           ND SUBTITLE                                               5. FUNDING NUMBERS
Quality Assurance Project Plan-Remedial Action-Operation             F41624-03-D-8600
Area DIAmerican Lake Garden Tract Groundwater Treatment              Delivery Order 0007
Plant Operations and Maintenance (Project No. POWY 92-7001-
12) McChord Air Force Base, Washington
6. AUTHOR(S)
Mr. M. Ingersoll
Mr. R. Weingarz
Ms. P. Moss

7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND                                S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER
ADDRESS(ES)                                                           N/A
Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
143 Union=,L=od
     PONS               T6 CO 80228
9. S                       RING AGENCY NAME(S) AND                    10. SPONSORINGWONITORING AGENCY REPORT
ADDRESS(ES)                                                           NUMBER
Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, AFCEE/ERD,             N/A
3300 Sidney Brooks, Building 532, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235-
5363
 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
 This is a final document.

  2a. DISTRIBUTIONIAVAILABILITY STATEMENT                             12.b DISTRIBUTION CODE
 For use by AFCEE, McChord AFB, 62 CES/CEV



 13. ABSTRACT                                                         15. NUMBER OF PAGES
 The Quality Assurance Project Plan describes the quality             80
 assurance1quality control requirements and procedures to be
 implemented for the Area D/American Lake Garden Tract
 (ALGT) Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and
 Maintenance project at McChord AFB.
 14. SUBJECT TERMS                                                    16. PRICE CODE
    • McChord Air Force Base
    • QualityAssuranceProgramPlan
        Groundwater Monitoring Area D/ALGT
        GroundwaterTreatmentPlant
 117. SECURITY                     IS. SECURITY                       19. SECURITY                       20 LIMITATION OF
 CLASSIFICATION OF                 CLASSIFICATION OF THIS             CLASSIFICATION OF                  ABSTRACT
 REPORT                            PAGE                               ABSTRACT                           UL
 Unclassified                      Unclassified                       Unclassified



 SIN 754D-01-280-5500                                                                                   Standard Form 298 (Rev 2.89)
 Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18-298-102
                                                                                              Z53 2 1 I 5

                                          PREFACE
This Quality Assurance Project Plan presents the policies, organization, functions, and quality
assurance/quality control requirements to achieve the data quality objectives for the Groundwater
Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance project at McChord Air Force Base (AFB). The
purpose of the project is to perform compliance monitoring of the Area D/Ametican Lake Garden
Tract (ALGT) remedial action and monitor, inspect, evaluate, and optimize treatment plant system
performance.

Key personnel involved in the project include: Ms. Brenda Zehr, Remedial Project Manager,
Environmental Management Flight, McChord AFB 62 CES/CEV, 253-982-6202; Mr. Brian Lee,
Team Chief, Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE), 210-536-8379; Mr. Randie
Strom, Program Manager, Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW), 210-226-2922; Mr. Mark Ingersoll, Delivery
Order Manager, TtFW, 406-494-3446; and Mr. Mike Kuntz, Remedial Project Manager, Washington
State Department of Ecology, 360-407-7239.
                                                                                                                                                        2532116
                                                                                                                                                 Contents



                                                                 CONTENTS
Section                                                                                                                                                 Page

1. INTRO D U CT IO N ................................................................................................................................    1-1

2. PR OJECT D E SCRIPTIO N .................................................................................................................             2-1
   2.1 The Air Force Installation Restoration Program ......................................................................                             2-1
   2.2 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................................................        2-2
   2.3 Project Background .......................................................................................................................        2-2
   2.4 Project Scope and O bjectives .......................................................................................................             2-2

3. PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES ....................................................... 3-1

4. QUALITY PROGRAM AND DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES ............................................... 4-1
   4.1 D ata Categories .............................................................................................................................. 4-1
   4.2 Precision, Accuracy, Representativeness, Completeness, and Comparability ....................... 4-1
        4.2.1 Precision ............................................................................................................................ 4-1
        4.2.2 A ccuracy ............................................................................................................................ 4-2
        4.2.3 Representativeness ........................................................................................................... 4-2
        4.2.4 Completeness ................................................................................................................... 4-2
        4.2.5 C om parability ................................................................................................................... 4-3
   4.3 Method Detection Limits, AFCEE Reporting Limits, and Instrument Calibration
        Requirem ents .................................................................................................................................. 4-4
        4.3.1 M ethod D etection Limits ............................................................................................... 4-4
        4.3.2 Reporting Lim its .............................................................................................................. 4-5
        4.3.3 Instrum ent Calibration Requirem ents .......................................................................... 4-5
    4.4 E lements of Q uality Control ........................................................................................................ 4-5
        4.4.1 Laboratory Control Sam ple ............................................................................................ 4-6
        4.4.2 M atrix Spikc/M atrix Spike D uplicate ........................................................................... 4-6
        4.4.3 Surrogates .......................................................................................................................... 4-7
        4.4.4 Internal Standards ............................................................................................................ 4-7
        4.4.5 Retention Tim e Window s............................................................................................... 4-7
        4.4.6 Interference Check Sam ple ............................................................................................ 4-8
        4.4.7 M ethod Blank ................................................................................................................... 4-8
        4.4.8 Am bient Blank ................................................................................................................. 4-8
        4.4.9 Equipm ent Blank ............................................................................................................. 4-8
        4.4.10 Trip Blank ......................................................................................................................... 4-9
        4.4.11 Field 'Duplicates ............................................................................................................... .-q
    4.5 Quality Control Procedures .......................................................................................................... 4-9
        4.5.1 H olding Tim e Compliance ............................................................................................. 4-9
        4.5.2 Confirm ation .................................................................................................................. 4-10
        4.5.3 Standard M aterials ......................................................................................................... 4-10
        4.5.4 Supplies and Consurnables ........................................................................................... 4-11

 5. SA MPLIN G PR O CED U RES .............................................................................................................. 5-1
    5.1 Field Sampling ................................................................................................................................ 5-1
        5.1.1 Sam ple Containers ........................................................................................................... 5-1

                                                                                                                Operationsand MaintenanceQAPP
                                                                                i                                                 January2005
                 2 5 32 1 17
Contents


                                                     CONTENTS (Continued)
Section                                                                                                                                                     Page
          5.1.2   Sample Volumes, Container Types, and Preservation Requirements ...................... 5-1
      5.2 Sam ple H andling and Custody ..................................................................................................... 5-1

6.   SCREENING ANALYTICAL METHODS .................................................................................... 6-1
     6.1 Analytical Screening Method Descriptions ................................................................................ 6-1
         6.1.1   EPA Method SW904OB-Hydrogen Ion (pH)........................................................... 6-1
         6.1.2   EPA Method SW905OA--Conductance ...................................................................... 6-1
         6.1.3   EPA Method 170.1-Temperature .............................................................................. 6-1
         6.1.4 EPA Method 180.1-Turbidity ..................................................................................... 6-1
         6.1.5    EPA Method 360.1-Dissolved Oxygen ..................................................................... 6-2
         6.1.6   ASTM D1498--Oxidadon Reduction Potential ......................................................... 6-2
         6.1.7 Real-Time Portable Organic Vapor Analyzers ............................................................ 6-2
     6.2 Calibration and Quality Control Procedures for Screening Methods .................................... 6-3

7.   DEFINITIVE DATA ANALYIICAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES ............................. 7-1
     7.1 Preparation M ethods ..................................................................................................................... 7-1
     7.2 Analytical Procedures .................................................................................................................... 7-1

8.   DATA REDUCTION, REVIEW, REPORTING, VALIDATION, AND RECORD-
     K E E P IN G ...............................................................................................................................................   8-1
     8.1 Data Review, Validation, and Reporting Requirements for Screening Data ........................                                                            8-1
     8.2 Data Review, Validation, and Reporting Requirements for Definitive Data ........................                                                           8-1
     8.3 Q uality A ssurance Reports ...........................................................................................................                    8-4
     8.4 ERPIMS Electronic Data Reports ..............................................................................................                              8-4
     8.5 Archiving .........................................................................................................................................        8-5
     8.6 Project Data Flow and Transfer ..................................................................................................                          8-5
     8.7 R ecord-K eeping .............................................................................................................................             8-5
     8.8 Hard Copy Data Reports for Definitive Data ...........................................................................                                     8-5

9. SYSTEMS AND PERFORMANCE AUDITS, PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
   PROGRAMS, MAGNETIC TAPE AUDITS, AND TRAINING ............................................... 9-1
      9.1 Project Audits ................................................................................................................................. 9-1
          9.1.1   State/FederalProjectAudits .......................................................................................... 9-1
              9.1.2        Technical System s Audits ............................................................................................... 9-1
          9.1.3 M agnetic Tape A udits ..................................................................................................... 9-2
          9.1.4 Performance Evaluation Sample Programs ................................................................. 9-2
      9.2 T raining ........................................................................................................................................... 9-2

1 0. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE ..................................................................................................                                      10-1
     10.1 Maintenance Responsibilities .....................................................................................................                        10-1
     10.2 M aintenance Schedules ...............................................................................................................                    10-1
     10.3 Spare Parts ....................................................................................................................................          10-1
     10.4 M aintenance R ecords ..................................................................................................................                  10-1



                                                                                                                     Operations and MaintenanceQAPP
                        LM Q              T                                        ii                                                    January2005
                                                                                                                                                            253 211 8
                                                                                                                                                      Contents


                                                     CONTENTS (Concluded)
Section                                                                                                                                                     Page

1 1. CO RRE CT IV E A CTIO N .................................................................................................................. 11-1
     1 1.1 C orrective A ction R eport ........................................................................................................... 11-1
     1 1.2 C orrective A ction System ........................................................................................................... 11-1

12. QUALITY ASSURANCE REPORTS TO MANAGEMENT .................................................... 12-1

13. R EFE RE N C E S.....................................................................................................................................   13-1


                                                        LIST OF APPENDICES
Appendix A               Laucks Testing Laboratories Practical Quantitation and Target Control Limits
Appendix B               Proposed Variances to the AFCEE QAPP, Version 3.1, August 2001




                                                                                                                    Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
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                                                                Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
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                                                                                                                                                                  32120
                                                                                                                                          TableslFigures



                                                            LIST OF TABLES
Table                                                                                                                                                 Page
T able 4-1. Statistical Calculations ................................................................................................................ 4-3
Table 5-1. Requirements for Containers, Preservation, Techniques, Sample Volumes, and
            H olding T imes ...........................................................................................................................   5-1
Table 6- 1. Screening Analytical Methods ................................................................................................... 6-1
Table 6-2. Summary of Calibration and QC Procedures for Screening Methods ................................ 6-4

Table 7-1. Extraction and Digestion Procedure ....................................................................................... 7-1
T able 7-2. Analytical Procedure ................................................................................................................... 7-1
Table 7-3. Reporting Limits for Method SW8260B (Water) ................................................................... 7-2

 Table 7-4. Quality Assurance Acceptance Criteria for Method SW8260B ........................................... 7-2
 Table 7-5. Summary of Calibration and Quality Control Procedures for Method SW8260B ........... 7-4
 T able 8-1. D ata Q ualifiers ............................................................................................................................ 8-1
 Table 8-2. General Flagging Conventions ................................................................................................. 8-2
 Table 8-3. Flagging Conventions Specific to Organic Methods ............................................................. 8-3




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TableslFigures




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                                                             Acronyms and Abbreviations



            LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
%R              percent recovery

AAB             AFCEE analytical batch
A2LA            American Association for Laboratory Accreditation
AFCEE           Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
Air Force       U.S. Air Force
AR-AR           Applicable or Relevant -and Appropriate Requirement
ASCII           American Standard Code Information Interchange
ASTM            American Society for Testing and Materials

BFB              bromofluorobenzenc

0C               degrees Celsius
CCC              calibration check compound
CERCLA           Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability
                 Act
CFR              Code of Federal Regulations
CL               control limit
C-0-C            chain-of-custody
COD              coefficient of deterniiiiation

DEQPPM           Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy Memorandum
DOD              (U.S.) Department of Defense
DQO              data quality objective

EICP             extended ion chromatogram. profile
EPA              U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
ERPIMS           Environmental Resources Program Information Management System

 FID             flame ionization detector
 FSP             Field Sampling Plan

 G               glass
 GC/MS           gas chromatography/mass spectrometry
 gin             grain

 HCI             hydrochloric acid
 HPLC            high-performance liquid chromatography




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Acro


          LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Continued)
ICAL                   initial calibration
ICP                    inductively coupled plasma
ICS                    interference check sample
IRP                    Installation Restoration Program
is                     internal standard

Laucks                 Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc.
LCL                    lower control limit
LCS                    laboratory control sample

NML                    method detection limit
[tg/L                  micrograms per liter
mi-                    miffiliter
mm                     millimeter
Ms                     matrix spike
MSD                    matrix spike duplicate

N/A                    not applicable
Na2S203                sodium thiosulfate
NCP                    National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan
NIST                   National Institute of Standards and Technology
NTU                    nephelomettic turbidity unit

ORP                    oxidation reduction potential

PE                     performance evaluation
PID                    photoionization detector
PPM                    parts per Union
Ppmv                   parts per million volume

QA                     quality assurance
QAPP                   Quality Assurance Project Plan
QC                     quality control

 R                     recovery
 RCA                   recommendations for corrective action
 RCRA                  Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
 RF                    response factor
 RI/FS                 remedial investigation/feasibility study
 RL                    reporting limit
 RPD                   relative percent difference

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                                                           Acronyms and Abbreviations



       LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Concluded)
RPM              Remedial Project Manager
RRT              relative retention time
RSD              relative standard deviation


S                soil
SAP              Sampling and Analysis Plan
SARA             Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act
SOP              standard operating procedure
sow              statement of work
SPCC             system performance check compound
Svoc             sernivolatile organic compound


TCE              trichloroethene
TtFW             Tetra Tech FW, Inc.


UCL              upper control limit

voc              volatile organic compound




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                                  1. INTRODUCTION

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) presents, in specific terms, the policies, organization,
functions, and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements designed to achieve the
data quality goals described in the -approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the project. This
QAPP and a site-specific Field Sampling Plan (FSP) constitute, by definition, an Aix Force Center
for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) SAP.

The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan, more commonly called the
National Contingency Plan (NCP), specifies circumstances under which a QAPP is necessary for
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Lability Act (CERCLA) response
actions. For cleanup actions at the remedial investigation/feasibility study W/FS) stage, the NCP
requires lead agencies to develop SAPs that provide a process for obtaining data of sufficient quality
and quantity to satisfy data needs. Such SAPs must include a QAPP "which describes policy,
organization, and functional activities and the data quality objectives and measures necessary to
achieve adequate data for use in selecting the appropriate remedy" (40 Code of Federal Regulations
 [CFR) 300.430 (b)(8)(ii)).

ne U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QA policy requires a QAPP for every
monitoring and measurement project mandated or supported by the EPA through regulations,
contracts, or other formalized means not currently covered by regulation. Guidelines followed in the
preparation of this plan are set out in Interim Guidelines andS ecifica o sJor P a nua         Assura ce
                                                                 .p     fi n    rrp ri g.Q fio
ProiectPlans (EPA 1983) and EPA Region IX.QAPP.-GuidanceforPrepaiing.Q,4PPsforSmperfund
 Reme&alPmjeas (EPA 1989). Other documents that have been referenced for this plan include
 GuidanceforConducting Remedial Invesligafions and Feaxibiliy Studies Under CERCLA, Interim Final(EPA
 1988); Requirrmentsfor.Qmaliv Assurance Pmject PlansforEnvironmentalData Operations,Dn* Final(EPA
 1993a); Compendium of Superfund Field OperationsMethods (EPA 1987); Dala.Quali_oObjectives Processfor
 Syperfund, Interim FinalGuidance (EPA 1993b); ContractI-aboratagProgramNationalFunctional      Guidelines
for Inoganic Data Review (EPA 1994a); ContractLaboratogProgramNationalFunctionalGuidefinesfer
 Oganic Data Review (EPA 1994b); Test MethodsJorEvalmafing Solid Waste, PhysicallChemicalMethods
 (EPA 1986); and the HandbookforInstallationRestorationProgram aRl')RemeaialInvestigationsand
 Feasibi,6_0Studies (FJIFS)(Handbook) (EPA 1993c).

 This detailed QAPP was prepared for use by contractors who perform enviromnental services to
 ensure the data are scientifically valid and defensible and establishes the analytical protocols and
 documentation requirements to ensure the data are collected, reviewed, and analyzed in a consistent
 manner. It is required reading for all staff participating in the work effort. The QAPP will be in the
 possession of the field teams and in the laboratories performing an analytical methods. Tetra Tech
 FW, Inc. (TtFW) and its subcontractors will be required to comply with the procedures documented
 in this QAPP to maintain comparability and representativeness of the data produced.




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                            2. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

21      The Air Force Installation Restoration Program
The objective of the Air Force Installation Restoration Project (IRP) is to assess past hazardous
waste disposal and spill sites at Air Force installations and to develop remedial actions consistent
with the NCP for sites that pose a threat to human health and welfare or the environment. This
section presents information on the program origins, objectives, and organization.

The 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is one of the primary federal laws
governing the disposal of hazardous wastes. Sections 6001 and 6003 of RCRA require federal
agencies to comply with local and state environmental regulations and provide information to the
EPA concerning past disposal practices at federal sites. RCRA Section 3012 requires state agencies
to inventory past hazardous waste disposal sites and provide information to the EPA concerning
those sites.
In 1980, Congress enacted CERCIA (Superfund). CERCLA outlines the responsibility for
identifying -and remediating contaminated sites in the United States and its possessions. The
CERCLA legislation identifies the EPA as the primary policy and enforcement agency regarding
contaminated sites.
The 1986 Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) extends the requirements of
CERCLA and modifies CERCLA with respect to goals for remediation and the steps that lead to
the selection of a remedial process. Under SARA, technologies that provide permanent removal or
destruction of a contaminant are preferable to actions that only contain or isolate the contaminant.
SARA also provides for greater interaction with public and state agencies and extends the EPA's
role in evaluating health risks associated with contamination. Under SARA, early determination of
Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) is required, and the consideration
of potential remediation alternatives is recommended at the initiation of an RI/FS. SARA is the
primary legislation governing remedial action at past hazardous waste disposal sites.
 Executive Order 12580, adopted in 1987, gave various federal agencies, including the U.S.
 Department of Defense POD), the responsibility toact as lead agencies for conducting
 investigations and implementing remediation efforts when they are the sole or co-contributor to
 contamination on or off their properties.
 To ensure compliance with CERCLA, its regulations, and Executive Order 12580, the DOD
 developed the IRP, under the Defense Environmental Restoration Program, to identify potentially
 contaminated sites, investigate these sites, and evaluate and select remedial actions for potentially
 contaminated facilities. The DOD issued the Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy
 Memorandum (DEQPPM) 80-6 regarding the IRP program in June 1980 and implemented the
 policies outlined in this memorandum in December 1980. EPA issued the NCP in 1980 to provide
 guidance on a process by which (1)contaminant releases could be reported, (2) contamination could
 be identified and quantified, and (3) remedial actions could be selected. Thc NCP describes the
 responsibility of federal and state governments and those responsible for contaminant releases.


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Section 2


The DOD formally revised and expanded the existing IRP directives and amplified all previous
directives and memoranda concerning the IRP through DEQPPM 81-5, dated December 11, 1981.
The memorandum was implemented by an Air Force message dated January 21, 1982.

The IRP is the DOD's primary mechanism for response actions on Air Force installations affected
by the provisions of SARA. In November 1986, in response to SARA and other EPA interim
guidance, the Air Force modified the IRP to provide for an RI/FS program. The IRP was modified
so that RI/FS studies could be conducted as parallel activities rather than serial activities. The
program now includes ARAR determinations, identification and screening of technologies, and
development of alternatives. The IRP may include multiple field activities and pilot studies prior to a
detailed final analysis of alternatives. Over the years, requirements of the IRP have been developed
and modified to ensure that DOD compliance with federal laws, such as RCRA, NCP, CERCLA,
and SARA, can be met.

2.2    Purpose and Scope
The purpose, scope, and use of this work effort are briefly discussed in Section 2.2 of the FSP.

2.3     Project Background
A project background description, including the locations of sites at the base, a summary of the
contamination history at the site, and the findings from previous investigations, is included in
Sections 2.3 and 2.4 of the FSP.

2.4     Project Scope and Objectives
A summary of the objectives and the proposed work for the Area D/American Lake Garden Tract
Groundwater Treatment Plant Operations and Maintenance, Project No. PQXW 92-7001-12 is
included in Section 3 of the FSP.




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      3. PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The project organization and responsibility discussion, including a project organizational chart
identifying task managers and individuals responsible for performance of the project; a list of names
of all key participants, including organization names and telephone numbers for project, field, and
laboratory QA officers; a description of the authority given to each key participant with an emphasis
on die authority of the key individuals to initiate and approve corrective actions; and the role of
regulatory representatives, is included in Section 4 of the FSP.

All contractors and subcontractors are identified, and the scope of their performance in the project
is clearly defined. Subcontractors proposed to provide backup services are identified. An
organizational chart, a list of key personnel, and summary of responsibilities for the project are
included for each subcontractor in Section 4.2 of the FSP.




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                           I




                                                                Operations and Maintenance OAPP
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 4. QUALITY PROGRAM AND DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES

Data quality objectives (DQOs) specify the data type, quality, quantity, and uses needed to make
decisions and are the basis for designing data collection activities. The DQCs for the project are
specified in Section 3.1 of the FSP.


4.1     Data Categories
The two general categories of data to be used for this project are screening data and definitive data.

Screening data are generated by rapid methods of analysis with lessrigorous sample preparation,
calibration, and/or QC requirements than are necessary to produce definitive data. Sample
preparation steps may be restricted to simple procedures such as dilution with a solvent instead of
elaborate extraction/digestion and cleanup. Screening data may provide analyte identification and
quantitation, although the quantitation may be relatively imprecise. Physical test methods, e.g.,
dissolved oxygen measurements, temperature and pH measurements, moisture content, turbidity,
conductance, etc., have been designated by definition as screening methods.

Screening methods may be confirmed, where necessary, by analyses that generate definitive data.
Confirmation samples will be selected to include both detected and nondetected results from the
screening method.

Definitive data arc generated using rigorous analytical methods, such as approved EPA reference
methods. The data can be generated in a mobile or offsite laboratory. Data are analyte-specific, and
both identification and quantitation are confirmed. These methods have standardized QC and
documentation requirements. Definitive data are not restricted in their use unless quality problems
require data qualification.

4.2     Precision, Accuracy, Representativeness, Completeness, and
        Comparability
The basis for assessing each of these elements of data quality is discussed in the following
subsections. Precision and accuracy QC limits for each method and matrix are identified in Sections
6 and 7 of this plan.

4.2.1   Precision
Precision measures the reproducibility of measurements. It is strictly defined as the degree of mutual
agreement among independent measurements as the result of repeated application of the same
process under similar conditions. Analytical precision is the measurement of the variability
associated with duplicate (two) or replicate (more than two) analyses. Laboratory control samples
(LCS) are to be used to determine the precision of each analytical method. If the recoveries of
analytes in the LCS are within established control limits, then precision is within limits. In this case,
the comparison is not between a sample and a duplicate sample analyzed in the same batch; rather,
the comparison is between the sample and samples analyzed in previous batches. Total precision is
the measurement of the variability associated with the entire sampling and analysis process. It is
determined by analysis of duplicate or replicate field samples and measures variability introduced by
both the laboratory and field operations. Field duplicate samples and matrix duplicate spiked


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            2   5 3 2 1 33
Section 4


samples will be analyzed to assess field and analytical precision, and the precision measurement is
determined using the relative percent difference (RPD) between the duplicate sample results. The
formula for the calculation of precision is provided in Table 4-1 as RPD. For replicate analyses, the
relative standard deviation (RSD) is determined. The formula for the calculation of RSD is provided
in Table 4-1.

4.2.2 Accuracy
Accuracy is a statistical measurement of correctness and includes components of random error
(variability due to imprecision) and systernic error. It therefore reflects the total error associated with
a measurement. A measurement is accurate when the value reported does not differ from the true
value or known concentration of the spike or standard. Analytical accuracy is measured by
comparing the percent recovery of analy-tes spiked into an LCS to a control limit. For volatile and
sernivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs, respectively), surrogate compound recoveries
are also used to assess accuracy and method performance for each sample analyzed.

Both accuracy and precision are calculated for each analytical batch, and the associated sample
results are interpreted by considering these specific measurements. The formula for calculation of
accuracy is included in Table 4-1 as percent recovery C/ol() from pure and sample matrices.

4.2.3 Representativeness
Objectives for representativeness are defined for each sampling and analysis task and are a function
of the investigative objectives. Representativeness is achieved through use of the standard field,
sampling, and analytical procedures. Representativeness is also determined by appropriate program
design, with consideration of elements such as proper well locations, drilling and installation
procedures, and sampling locations.

4.2.4 Completeness
Completeness is calculated for the aggregation of data for each analyte measured for any particular
sampling event or other defined set of samples. Completeness is calculated and reported for each
method, matrix, and analyte combination. The number of valid results divided by the number of
possible individual analyte results, expressed as a percentage, determines the completeness of the
data set. For completeness requirements, valid results are all results not qualified with an "W' flag
(see Section 8 for an explanation of flagging critetia). The requirement for completeness is 95
percent for aqueous samples and 90 percent for soil samples. For any instances of samples that
could not be analyzed for any reason (holding time violations in which resarnpling and analysis were
not possible, samples spilled or broken, etc.), the numerator of this calculation becomes the number
of valid results minus the number of possible results not reported. The formula for calculation of
completeness is presented below:
                        % Completeness = number of valid (i.e., non - R ffiqed) results
                                                 number of possible results




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                                                                                                            2 53 2 1 34
                                                                                                            Section 4


                                       Table 4-1. Statistical Calculations
      statistic            Symbol                  Formula                   Definition                Uses
Mean                                                    n                Measure of central    Used to determine
                             X                               Xi          tendency              average value of
                                                                                               measurements
                                                         n
Standard deviation           S                                )2 1112    Measure of            Used in calculating
                                               [z (" _;                  relative scatter of   variation of
                                                   n-I                   the date              measurements


Relative standard           RSD                                          Relative standard     Used to assess
deviation                                          S/x X100              deviation, adjusts    precision for replicate
                                                                         for magnitude of      results
                                                                         observations
Percent difference           %D                xi - x                    Measure of the        Used to assess
                                                            2 X100       difference of two     accuracy
                                                    XI                   observations

Relative percent            RPD                                          Measure of            Used to assess total
difference
                                               (XI - X2)

                                            (Tx;'X.'
                                                    -    T_
                                                          /2)x100
                                                                         variability that
                                                                         adjusts for the
                                                                                               and analytical
                                                                                               precision of duplicate
                                                                         magnitude of          measurements
                                                                         observations
                                                                          Recovery of          Used to assess
Percent recovery             %R                    Xmas       X100        spiked compound      accuracy
                                                                          in pure matrix
Percent recovery             %R         value of        value of           ecovery of           Used to assess matrix
                                                                          spiked compound       effects and total
                                        spiked - unspiked                 in sample matrix      precision
                                       Sample       sample x 100
                                        value of added spike
Correlation                   r        See EPA SW8000B, Section 7.5.3                           Evaluation of
coefficient                                                                                     .goodness of fit' of a
                                                                                                regression line

Coefficient of              COD        See EPA SW8000B, Section 7.5.3                           Evaluation of
determination                                                                                    goodness of fit' of a
                                                                                                polynomial equation
Notes:    x - observation
          n = number of observations


4.2.5 Comparability
Comparability is the confidence with which one data set can be compared to another data set. The
objective for this QA/QC program is to produce data with the greatest possible degree of compara-
bility. Ile number of matrices that are sampled and the range of field conditions encountered are
considered in determining comparability. Comparability is achieved by using standard methods for
sampling and analysis, reporting data in standard units, normalizing results to standard conditions, and
using standard and comprehensive reporting formats. Complete field documentation using standard-
ized data collection forms will support the assessment of comparability. Reports from audits will also
be used to provide additional information for assessing the comparability of analytical data produced
by the subcontractor laboratory. ffistorical comparability will be achieved through consistent use of
methods and documentation procedures throughout the project.

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Section 4


4.3   Method Detection Limits, AFCEE Reporting Limits, and Instrument
      Calibration Requirements
4.3.1 Method Detection Limits
The method detection limit (N1DL) is the minimum concentration of a substance that can be
measured and reported with 99 percent confidence that the analyte concentration is greater than
zero. The laboratory will establish MDLs for each method, matrix, and analyte for each instrument
the laboratory plans to use for the project. The laboratory will revalidate these MDLs at least once
per 12-month period. The laboratory will provide the MDL demonstrations to AFCEE at the
beginning of the project (i.e., before project samples are analyzed) and upon request in the format
specified in Section 8. Results less than or equal to the MDL will be reported as the MDL value and
flagged with a "U" (see Section 8).

IAboratories participating in this work effort will demonstrate the MDLs for each instrument,
including confirmatory columns, method of analysis, analyte, and matrix (Le., water and soil) using
the following instructions:

      1.   Estimate the MDL using one of the following:

           a.   The concentration value that corresponds to an instrument signal/noise ratio in the
                range of 2.5 to 5, or

           b.   The concentration equivalent of three times the standard deviation of replicate
                measurement of the analyte in reagent water, or

           c.   The region of the standard curve where there is a significant change in sensitivity (i.e., a
                break in the slope of the standard curve).

      2.   Prepare (i.e., extract, digest, etc.) and analyze seven samples of a matrix spike (American
           Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM] Type II water for aqueous methods, Ottawa sand
           for soil methods, glass beads of 1 millimeter (mm) diameter or smaller for metals) containing
           the analyte of interest at a concentration three to five times the estimated MDL.

      3.    Determine the variance (S for each analyte as follows:
                                                  I [ n (xi        2
                                           s2                  x


            where Y, = the itb measurement of the variable x and x = the average value of x
                                                 - I n
                                                 X = -Exi
                                                       n i-,
      4. Determine the standard deviation(s) for each analyte as follows:

                                                    S = (S2Y 2

      5.    Determine the MDL for each analyte as follows:

                                                MDL = 3.14<s)

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                                                                                                  Section 4



        (Note: 3.14 is the one-sided t-statistic at the 99 percent confidence level appropriate for
        determining the MDL using seven samples.)

   6.   If the spike level used in step 2 is more than five times the calculated MDL, repeat the
        process using a smaller spiking level.

        Where multiple instruments are used, the MDL used for reporting purposes will represent
        the least-sensitive instrument.

4.3.2   Reporting Limits
The laboratories participating in this work effort will compare the results of the NfDL
demonstrations to the reporting lirrits (R1,s) for each method that is listed in Section 7. The MDL
may not be more than one-half the corresponding RL. The laboratories will also verify RLs by
including a standard at or below the RL as the lowest point on the calibration curve. All results will
be reported at or above the MDL values; however, for those results falling between the MDL and
the RL, an "F" flag will be applied to the results, indicating the variability associated with. the result
(see Section 8). No results will be reported below the NOL.

4.3.3   Instrument Calibration Requirements
Analytical instruments will be calibrated in accordance with the analytical methods. All analytes
reported will be present in the initial and continuing calibrations, and these calibrations will meet the
QC acceptance criteria specified in Table 7-5. AU results reported will be within the calibration
range. Records of standard preparation and instrument calibration will be maintained. Records will
unambiguously trace the preparation of standards and their use in calibration and quantitation of
sample results. Calibration standards will be traceable to standard materials.

Instrument calibration will be checked using all of the analytes listed for the method in Table 7-4.
This applies equally to multiresponse analytes (except as noted in Section 7). AU calibration criteria
will satisfy EPA SW846 method requirements at a minimum. The initial calibration will be checked
at the frequency specified in the method using materials prepared independently of the calibration
standards. Multipoint calibrations will contain the minimum number of calibration points specified
in the method, with all points used for the calibration being contiguous. If more than the minimum
 number of standards is analyzed for the initial calibration, an of the standards analyzed will be
 included in the initial calibration. Ile only exception to this rule is a standard that has been
 statistically determined as being an outlier, which can be dropped from the calibration providing the
 requirement for the minimum number of standards is met. Acceptance criteria for die calibration
 check are presented in Section 7. Analyte concentrations are determined with either calibration
 curves or response factors (RFs). The average RF from the initial five-point calibration will be used
 when RFs are used to determine analytc concentrations for gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass
 spectroscopy (GC/MS) methods. The continuing calibration will not be used to update the RFs
 from the initial five-point calibration. The continuing calibration verification cannot be used as the
 LCS.

 4.4     Elements of Quality Control
 QC elements relevant to screening data are presented in Section 6. This section presents QC
 requirements relevant to analysis of environmental samples that will be followed during all analytical


                                                                             Operationsand MaintenanceQAPP
                                                     4-5                                        January2005
            25 32 1 37
Section 4


activities for fixed-base, mobile, and field laboratories producing definitive data. The purpose of this
QC program is to produce data of known quality that satisfy the project objectives and that meet or
exceed the requirements of the standard methods of analysis. This program provides a mechanism
for ongoing control and evaluation of data quality measurements through the use of QC materials.

Laboratory QC samples (e.g., blanks and LCS) will be included in the preparation batch with the
field samples. An AFCEE analytical batch (AAB) is a number of samples (not to exceed 20
environmental samples plus the associated laboratory QC samples) that are similar in composition
(matrix) and that are extracted or digested at the same time and with the same lot of reagents. Matrix
spike (MS) and matrix spike duplicate (MSD) samples count as environmental samples. The term
A-AB also extends to cover samples that do not need separate extraction or digestion (e.g., volatile
analyses by purge and trap). The AAB is a number of samples (not to exceed 20 environmental
samples plus the associated laboratory QC samples) that are similar in composition (matrix) and
analyzed sequentially. The identity of each AAB will be unambiguously reported with the analyses so
that a reviewer can identify the QC samples and the associated environmental samples. All
references to the analytical batch in the following sections and tables in this QAPP refer to the AAB.

The type of QC samples and the frequency of use of these samples are discussed below and in the
method-specific subsections of Section 7.

4.4.1    LaboratoryControl Sample
The LCS is analyte-free water for aqueous analyses or Ottawa sand for soil analyses (except metals,
for which glass beads of 1 mm diameter or smaller may be used) spiked with all analytes listed for
the method in Table 7-4. Each analyte in the LCS will be spiked at a level less than or equal to the
midpoint of the calibration curve for each analyte. The LCS will be carried through the complete
sample preparation and analysis procedure.

The LCS is used to evaluate each AAB and to determine whether the method is in control. The LCS
cannot be used as the continuing calibration verification.

One LCS will be included in every AAB. If more than one LCS is analyzed in an AAB, results from
all LCS analyzed will be reported. A QC failure of an analyte in any of the LCS will require
appropriate corrective action, including qualification of the failed analyte in all of the samples as
required.

The performance of the LCS is evaluated against the QC acceptance limits listed in Table 7-5.

Whenever an analyte in an LCS is outside the acceptance limit, corrective action will be performed.
After the system problems have been resolved and system control has been reestablished, 0
samples in the AAB will be reanalyzed for the out-of-control analyte(s). When an analyte in an LCS
exceeds the upper or lower control Emit and no corrective action is performed or the corrective
action was ineffective, the appropriate validation flag, as described in Sections 7 and 8, will be
applied to all affected results.

4.4.2 MatrixSpikelMatrix.SpikeDupticate
The MS and MSD are aliquots of sample spiked with known concentrations of all analytes listed in
Table 7-4.The spiking occurs prior to sample preparation and analysis. Each analyte in the MS and

                                                                          Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
                                                   4-6                                       January2005
                                                                                                     25 3 21 3 8
                                                                                                Section 4



MSD will be spiked at a level less than or equal to the midpoint of the calibration curve for each
analyte. Only AFCEE samples will be used for spiking. The MS/MSD win be designated on the
chain-of-custody (C-O-C) form.

The MS /MSD is used to document the bias of a method due to sample matrix. AFCEE does not
use MS and MSDs to control the analytical process.

A minimum. of 1 MS and I MSD sample will be analyzed for every 20 AFCEE samples.

Tbe performance of the MS and MSD is evaluated against the QC acceptance limits listed in Table
7-5. If either the MS or the MSD is outside the QC acceptance limits, the analytes in all related
samples will be qualified according to the data flagging criteria in Sections 7 and 8.

4.4.3 Surrogates
Surrogates are organic compounds that are similar to the target analyte(s) in chemical composition
and behavior in the analytical process but that are not normally found in environmental samples.
They are used to evaluate accuracy, method performance, and extraction efficiency. Surrogates will
be added to environmental samples, controls, and blanks, in accordance with the method
requirements.

When surrogate recoveries are outside of the QC acceptance limits (Table 7-5), corrective action
must be performed. After the system problems have been resolved and system control has been
reestablished, all samples analyzed while the system was malfunctioning will be re-prepped and
reanalyzed. If corrective actions are not performed, or are ineffective, the appropriate validation flag,
as described in Sections 7 and 8, will be applied to the sample results.

 4.4.4   InternalStandards
 Internal standards (IS) are measured amounts of certain compounds added after preparation or
 extraction of a sample. They are used in an IS calibration method to correct sample results affected
 by column injection losses, purging losses, or viscosity effects. IS will be added to environmental
 samples, controls, and blanks, in accordance with the method requirements.

 When the IS results are outside of the QC acceptance limits (Table 7-5), corrective actions will be
 performed. After the system problems have been resolved and system control has been
 reestablished, all samples analyzed while the system was malfunctioning will be reanalyzed. If
 corrective actions are not performed, or are ineffective, the appropriate validation flag, as described
 in Sections 7 and 8, will be applied to the sample results.

 4.4.5 Retention Time Windows
 Retention time windows are used in GC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)
 analysis for qualitative identification of analytes. They are calculated from replicate analyses of a
 standard on multiple days. The procedure and calculation method are given in EPA method
 SW8000B.

 When the retention time is outside of the acceptance limits (Iable 7-5), corrective action will be
 performed. After the system problems have been resolved and system control has been


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reestablished, all samples analyzed since the last acceptable retention time check will be reanalyzed.
If corrective actions are not performed, the appropriate validation flag, as described in Sections 7
and 8, will be applied to the sample results.

4.4.6    Interference Check Sample
The interference check sample (ICS), used in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses only,
contains both interfering and analyte elements of known concentrations. It is used to verify
background and inter-element correction factors and is run at the beginning and end of each run
sequence.

When the ICS results are outside of the acceptance limits stated in the method, corrective action will
be performed. After the system problems have been resolved and system control has been
reestablished, the ICS will be reanalyzed. If the ICS result is acceptable, all affected samples will be
reanalyzed. If corrective action is not performed, or the corrective action was ineffective, the
appropriate validation fla& as described in Sections 7 and 8, will be applied to all affected results.

4.4.7    Method         Blank
A method blank is an analyte-free matrix to which all reagents are added in the same volumes or
proportions as used in sample processing. The method blank is used to identify contamination
resulting from the analytical process. The method blank will be carried through the complete sample
preparation and analytical procedure and win be included in every AAB.

The presence of analytes in a method blank at concentrations equal to or greater than the RL
indicates a need for corrective action. Corrective action will be performed to eliminate the source of
contamination prior to proceeding with analysis. After the source of contamination has been
eliminated, all samples in the analytical batch will be reprepped and reanalyzed. No analytical data
will be corrected for die presence of analytes in blanks. When an analyte is detected in the method
blank and in the associated samples and corrective actions are not performed or are ineffective, the
appropriate validation flag, as described in Sections 7 and 8, will be applied to the sample results.

4.4.8       AmbientBlank
The ambient blank consists of ASTM Type II reagent-grade water poured into a VOC sample vial at
the sampling site (in the same vicinity as the associated samples). It is handled like an environmental
sample and transported to the laboratory for analysis. Ambient blanks are prepared only when VOC
 samples are taken and are analyzed only for VOC analytes.


 Ambient blanks are used to assess the potential introduction of contaminants from ambient sources
 (e.g., active runways, engine test cells, gasoline motors in operation, etc) to the samples during

 sample collection.

 Because the sampling plan is not associated with potential ambient sources of trichloroethene
 (rCE), ambient blanks will not be collected.


 4.4.9      Equipment           Blank
 An equipment blank is a sample of ASTM Type II reagent-grade water poured into or over or
 pumped through the sampling device, collected in a sample container, and transported to the



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laboratory for analysis. It is used to assess the effectiveness of equipment decontamination
procedures.

The frequency of collection for equipment blanks is specified in Section 3.2 of the FSP. Equipment
blanks will be collected immediately after the equipment has been decontaminated. The blank will be
analyzed for all laboratory analyses requested for the environmental samples collected at the site.

When an analyte is detected in the equipment blank, the appropriate validation flag, as described in
Section 8, will be applied to all sample results from samples collected with the affected equipment.

4.4.10 Trip Blank
The trip blank consists of a VOC sample vial filled in the laboratory with ASIM Type II reagent-
grade water, transported to the sampling site, handled like an environmental sample, and returned to
the laboratory for analysis. Trip blanks are not opened in the field. Trip blanks are prepared only
when VOC samples are collected and analyzed for the field program.

Trip blanks are used to assess the potential introduction of contaminants from sample containers or
during the transportation and storage process.

When an analyte is detected in the trip blank, the appropriate validation flag, as described in
Section 8, will be applied to all sample results from samples in the cooler with the affected trip
 blank.

 One trip blank will accompany each cooler of samples sent to the laboratory for analysis of VOCs.

 4.4. 11 Field Duplicates
 A field duplicate sample is a second sample collected at the same location as the original sample.
 Duplicate samples are collected simultaneously or in immediate succession, using identical recovery
 techniques, and treated in an identical manner during storage, transportation, and analysis. The
 sample containers are assigned an identification number in the field so that they cannot be identified
 (blind duplicate) as duplicate samples by laboratory personnel performing the analysis. Specific
 locations are designated for collection of field duplicate samples prior to the beginning of sample
 collection.

 Duplicate sample results are used to assess prec ision of the sample collection process. Precision of
 soil samples to be analyzed for VOCs is assessed from collocated samples because the compositing
 process required to obtain uniform samples could result in loss of the compounds of interest.

 The frequency of collection for field duplicates is specified in Section 3.2 of the FSP.

 4.5      Quality Control Procedures
 4.5.1    Holding Time Compliance
 All sample preparation and analysis will be completed within the method-required holding times.
 The holding time for a sample begins at the time of sample collection. Some methods have more
 than one holding time requirement (e.g., EPA methods SW8081A, SW8270C, etc.). The preparation
 holding time is calculated from the time of sample collection to the time of completion of the


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sample preparation process as described in the applicable method, prior to any necessary extraction,
cleanup, and/or volume reduction procedures. If no preparation (e.g., extraction) is required, the
analysis holding time is calculated from the time of sample collection to the time of completion of
all analytical runs, including dilutions, second column confirmations, and any required reanalyses. In
methods requiring sample preparation prior to analysis, the analysis holding time is calculated from
the time of preparation completion to the time of completion of all analytical runs, including
dilutions, second column confirmations, and any required reanalysis.

If holding times are exceeded and the analyses are performed, the results will be flagged according to
the procedures as described in Section 8.

4.5.2      Confirmation
Quantitative confirmation of results at or above the RL for samples analyzed by GC or HPLC will
be required, unless otherwise specified for the method in Section 7, and will be completed within the
method-required holding times. For CTC methods, a second column is used for confirmation. For
HPLC methods, a second column or a different detector is used. 'Me result of the first
column/detector will be the result reported. If holding times are exceeded and the analyses are
performed, the results will be flagged according to the procedures as described in Section 8.

4.5.3 StandardMaterials
Standard materials, including second-source materials, used in calibration and to prepare samples
will be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), EPA, American
Association for Laboratory Accreditation (AMA), or other equivalent AFCEE-approved sources, if
available. If an NIST, EPA, or A2LA standard material is not available, the standard material
proposed for use will be included in an addendum to the SAP and approved before use. The
standard materials will be current, and the expiration policy described in the following paragraph will
be followed.

The expiration dates for amputated solutions will not exceed the manufacturer's expiration date or 1
year from the date of receipt, whichever comes first. Expiration dates for laboratory-prepared stock
and diluted standards will be no later than the expiration date of the stock solution or material or the
date calculated from the holding time allowed by the applicable analytical method, whichever comes
first. Expiration dates for pure chemicals will be established by the laboratoryand be based on
chemical stability, possibility of contamination, and environmental and storage conditions. Expired
standard materials will be either revalidated prior to use or discarded. Revalidation may be
performed through assignment of 2 true value and error window statistically derived from replicate
analyses of the material as compared to an unexpired standard. The laboratory will label standard
and QC materials with expiration dates.

A second-source standard is used to independently confirm initial calibration. A second-source
standard is a standard purchased from a different vendor than the vendor supplying the material
used in the initial calibration standards. The second-source material can be used for the continuing
calibration standards or for the LCS (but will be used for only one of the two). Two different lot
numbers from the same vendor do not constitute a second source.




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4.5.4 Supplies and Consumables
The laboratory will inspect supplies and consurnables prior to their use in analysis. The materials
description in the analysis methods will be used as a guideline for establishing the acceptance criteria
for these materials. Purity of reagents will be monitored by analysis of the LCS. An inventory and
storage system for these materials will ensure use before manufacturers expiration dates and will
ensure storage under safe and chemically compatible conditions.




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                           5. SAMPLING PROCEDURES

5.1     Field Sampling
The methods and procedures to be implemented for the field sampling program are included in
Section 6 of the FSP.
5.1.1 Sample Containers
Sample containers are purchased precleaned and treated according to EPA specifications for the
method. Sampling containers that are reused are decontaminated between uses by the EPA-
recommended procedures (i.e., EPA 540/R-93/051). Containers are stored in dean areas to prevent
exposure to fuels, solvents, and other contaminants. Amber glass bottles are used routinely where
glass containers are specified in the sampling protocol.
5.1.2 Sample Volumes, Container Types, and Preservation Requirements
Sample volumes, container types, and preservation requirements for the analytical methods
performed on AFCEE groundwater samples are listed in Table 5-1. The required sample volumes,
container types, and preservation requirements for analytical methods proposed for project work
not listed in Table 5-1 will be included in an addendum to the FSP and approved by AFCEE before
use.
                      Table 5-1. Requirements for Containers, Preservation,
                        Techniques, Sample Volumes, and Holding Times
                                                                   Minimum
        NamaMethods    Analytical
                                        Container      or Weight Holding Time
                                                                    Maximum
                                                                Sample Volume
                                                        Preservation
                              li a Tel o pH < 0.t0o08% 3 40 mLifdays;d 7
  Volatielr) organics SW8260B Glnedss,septulmn- 40C,
                                                                       12


  (Wat e                                         HCI x
                                                  2,
                                                Na2S203
                                                                            days
                                                                 14unpreserved
                                                                 %vithaci
 'PresemationvAtho.oo8percentNaSO isonlyrequiredwhenresiduatchlorineispresent.
 5.2     Sample Handling and Custody
 Procedures to ensure the custody and integrity of the samples begin at the time of sampling and
 continue through transport, sample receipt, preparation, analysis and storage, data generation and
 reporting, and sample disposal. Records concerning the custody and condition of the samples are
             fieldand
 maintained in laboratory records.
 The contractor will maintain C-0-C records for all environmental and field QC samples. Asample is
                                                                                     it his/her
 defined as being under aperson's custody ifany of the following conditions exist: (1)isin
                it                                their               it
 possession; (2)isinhis/her view, after being in possession; (3)was inhis/her possession
                              it a
 when itwas locked up; or (4)isin designated secure area.
 The following minimum information concerning the sample will be documented on the COC form:
         Unique sample identification

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Section 5


    •   Date and time of sample collection

    •   Source of sample (including name, location, and sample type)

    •   Designation of MS/MSD

    •   Preservative used

    •   Analyses required

    •   Name of collector(s)

    •   Pertinent field data (pH, temperature, etc)

    •   Serial numbers of custody seals and transportation cases (if used)

    •   Custody transfer signatures and dates and times of sample transfer from the field to
        transporters and to the laboratory or laboratories

    •   Bill of lading or transporter tracking number (if applicable)

All samples will be uniquely identified, labeled, and documented in the field at the time of collection
in accordance with Section 6.2.3 of the FSP.

Samples collected in the field will be transported to the laboratory or field-testing site as
expeditiously as possible. When a requirement of 4 degrees Celsius ('C) for preserving the samples is
indicated, the samples will be packed in ice to keep theta cool during collection and transportation.
During transit, it is not always possible to rigorously control the temperature of the samples. In
general, storage at low temperature is the best way to preserve most samples. A temperature blank (a
VOC sampling vial filled with tap water) will be included in every cooler and used to determine the
internal temperature of the cooler upon receipt of the cooler at the laboratory. If the temperature of
the samples upon receipt exceeds the temperature requirements, the exceedance will be documented
in laboratory records and discussed with AFCEE. The decision regarding the potentially affected
samples will also be documented.

Once the samples reach the laboratory, they will be checked against information on the C-O-C form
for anomalies. The condition, temperature, and appropriate preservation of samples will be checked
and documented on the C-O-C form. Checking an aliquot of the sample using pH paper is an
acceptable procedure except for VOCs when an additional sample is required to check preservation.
The occurrence of any anomalies in the received samples and their resolution will be documented in
laboratory records. All sample information will then be entered into a tracking system and unique
analytical sample identifiers will be assigned. The laboratory will review a copy of this information
for accuracy. Sample holding time tracking begins with the collection of samples and continues until
the analysis is complete. Holding times are specified in Table 5-1. Subcontracted analyses will be
documentedwith the AFCEE C-O-C form. Procedures ensuring internal laboratory C-O-C will also
be implemented and documented by the laboratory. Specific instructions concerning the analysis
specified for each sample will be communicated to the analysts. Analytical batches will be created
and laboratory QC samples will be introduced into each batch.

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While in the laboratory, samples will be stored in limited-access, temperature-controlled areas.
Refrigerators, coolers, and freezers will be monitored for temperature 7 days a week. The acceptance
criterion for the temperatures of the refrigerators and coolers is 4'C ± 2'C. The acceptance criterion
for the temperatures of the freezers is less than O'C. All of the cold storage areas will be monitored
by thermometers that have been calibrated with an NIST-traceable thermometer. As indicated by
the findings of the calibration, correction factors will be applied to each thermometer. Records that
include acceptance criteria will be maintained. Samples for volatile organics detertnination will be
stored separately from other samples, standards, and sample extracts. Samples will be stored after
analysis until disposed of in accordance with applicable local, state, and federal regulations. The
laboratory will maintain disposal records.

The laboratory will maintain standard operating procedures (SOPs) describing sample control and
custody.




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                6. SCREENING ANALYTICAL METHODS

The analytical screenin 9 methods contained in this section are shown in Table 6-1.
                     .                                                           This section
includes brief descriptions of the methods and QC required for screening procedures commonly
used to conduct work efforts. The methods and QC procedures were taken from Test Metboasjor
EvaluafirrgSolid Waste, PbysicallCbemicalMelbods(EPA 1986), MethodsjorCbenricalAnalysisof Water and
 Waste (EPA 1979), ASTMAnnualBook ofStandards (1993), and from manufacturers'literature.

                            Table 6-1. Screening Analytical Methods
                            Method                   Parameter
                           SW9G40B   pH (water)
                           SW9050A   Conductance
                            E170.1   Temperature
                            E180.1   Turbidity
                            E360.1    Dissolved oxygen
                          _______tOxidation reduction p
                          ASTM D1498


6.1     Analytical Screening Method Descriptions
Section 6.1 contains subsections for each analytical procedure. Each subsection contains the
following information:

        Brief method description
        RL (if applicable)

6.1.1 EPAMethodSW904OB-Hydrogenton(pH)
Hydrogen ion (pH) measurements will be performed for water samples using EPA method
SW9040B. Measurements are determined electrometrically using either a glass electrode in
combination with a reference potential or a combination electrode.

 6.1.2 EPA Method SW905OA-Conductance
 Standard conductivity meters are used. Temperature is also reported.

6.1.3 EPA Method 170. I-Temperature
Temperature measurements are made with a mercury-filled or dial-type centigrade thermometer or a
 thermistor.

 6.1.4 EPA Method 180.1-Turbidity
 This method is based on a comparison of the light scattered by the sample under defined conditions
 with the light intensity scattered by a standard reference suspension. The higher the intensity is, the
 greater the turbidity. Turbidity measurements are made in a nephelometer and are reported in terms
 of nephelometric turbidity units (NTUs). The working range for the method is from 0 to 40 NTU.
 Higher levels of turbidity can be measured by diluting the sample with turbidity-free deionized
 water.


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Section 6


6.1.5 EPAMethod360.1-DissolvedOxygen
An instrumental probe, usually dependent upon an electrochemical reaction, is used for
determination of dissolved oxygen in water. Under steady-state conditions, the current or potential
can be correlated with dissolved oxygen concentrations.

6.1.6 ASTM D1498-OxidationReduction Potential
This method is designed to measure the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) in water, which is
defined as the electromotive force between a noble metal electrode and a reference electrode when
immersed in a solution.

6.1.7 Real-Time PortableOrganic VaporAnalyzers
Two types of portable analyzers will be used to perform real-time nonspecific analyses of
hydrocarbon vapors. The instruments include a flame ionization detector (FID) (e.g., Foxboro
Century organic vapor analyzer) and a photoionization detector (PID) (e.g., HNuOD Systems
[HNuV] trace gas analyzer) organic vapor monitor. One or more of these instruments may be used
at a specific site, depending on the contaminant species of interest. When used together, the
instruments provide complementary information because they are sensitive to different types of
hydrocarbon vapors.

The portable analyzers will be used as a screening tool to help determine the optimum locations for
the collection of samples. Field data recorded on the C-O-C forms give the laboratory analysts an
indication of the approximate concentration of Contaminants and helps them calculate dilution
factors before analysis. Additionally, the real-dine instruments are used to aid in selecting the proper
level of personal protective equipment and monitoring air emissions during sampling activities. The
comparability of results obtained from the PID and FID instruments can be considered only to be
within the variability of this type of screening instrument. Comparability is greatest when the
instruments are calibrated with the same standards and operated within similar concentration ranges.

The FID uses the principle of hydrogen flame ionization to detect and measure total hydrocarbon
vapors. The FID has a dynamic operating range from 1 part per million volume (ppmv) to 10 ppmv
or I ppmv to 100,000 ppniv, depending on the instrument, and provides a nonspecific response to
total hydrocarbons. If concentrations exceed the range of the instrument, a dilution probe will be
attached to the FID to allow elevated vapor concentrations to be measured. The instrument is highly
sensitive to compounds such as methane, benzene, and acetone, but it is less sensitive to alcohols
and halogenated compounds.

During operation, a sample is drawn into the probe and transmitted to the detection chamber by an
internal pumping system. Inside the chamber, the sample is exposed to a hydrogen flame that
ionizes the organic vapors. As the organic vapors bum, the ions produced are collected on an
electrode in the chamber and a current proportional to the hydrocarbon concentration is generated.
This current is measured and displayed on the meter.

The PID uses a photoionization detector to detect and measure total hydrocarbon vapors. The
instrument has an operating range of 0 to 2,000 parts per million (ppm). During operation, a gas
sample is drawn into the probe and past an ultraviolet light source by an internal pumping system.
Contaminants in the sample are ionized, producing an instrument response if their ionization


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potential is equal to or less than the ionizing energy supplied by the lamp. The radiation produces a
free electron for each molecule of ionized contaminant, which generates a current directly
proportional to the number of ions produced. This current is measured and displayed on the meter.
The PID measures the total value for all species present with ionization potentials less than or equal
to that of the lamp.

6.2        Calibration and Quality Control Procedures for Screening Methods
AD screening data reported for the project will be flagged with an S data qualifier (see Section 8).
'Me other data qualifiers that will be used with screening data are shown in Table 6-2 and Section 8.
Flagging criteria are -applied (except for the S flag) when acceptance criteria were not met and
corrective action was not successful or corrective action was not performed.

Table 6-2 presents the calibration and QC procedures for each method. These requirements, as well
as the corrective actions and data flagging criteria, are included. In this table, the first two colurnns
designate the method number and the class of analytes that may be determined by the method. The
third column lists the method-required calibration and QC elements. The fourth column designates
the minimum frequency for performing each calibration and QC element. The fifth column
designates the acceptance criteria for each calibration and QC element. The sixth column designates
the corrective action in the event that a calibration or QC element does not meet the acceptance
criteria. The last column designates the data flagging criteria that must be applied in the event that
the method-required calibration and QC acceptance criteria are not met.




                                                                           Operationsand MaintenanceQAPP
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                     2 5 3 21 5 1

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            7. DEFINITIVEDATAANALYTICALMETHODS
                         AND PROCEDURES

The procedures for definitive data are described in Section 7.1 (preparation methods) and Section
7.2 (analytical methods).

This information was obtained from the Test MethodsjorEvaluatingSoAd Irlaste, PhysicallChemical
Methods (EPA 1986); Hanchookforthe InstallationRestoration Program (IRP)RemedialInvestigations and
FeasibihoStudies (RIIFS) (Handbook), (EPA 1993c); EPA ContractLaboratogProgramNational
FunctionalGuidelinesforInoganic Data Review (EPA 1994a); and EPA ContractLaboratogProgram
NationalFAmcrionalGuidelinesforOqanic Data Review (EPA 1994b). Definitions of terms are given in
Section 4, and data validation procedures are presented in Section 8.

7.1     Preparation Methods
The extraction and digestion procedure for liquid matrices presented in this section is listed in
Table 7-1.
                         Table 7-1. Extraction and Digestion Procedure
                                 Method                      Procedure
                                SW5030B                   Purge and trap

Method SW5030B describes sample preparation and extraction for the analysis of VOCs. The
method is applicable to nearly all types of samples, including aqueous sludges, caustic liquors, acid
 liquors, waste catalysts, soils, and sediments. The success of this method depends on the level of
 interferences in the sample. Results may vary because of the large variability and complexity of
 matrices of solid waste samples.

 An inert gas is bubbled through the sample solution at ambient temperature to transfer the volatile
 components to the vapor phase. The vapor is swept through a sorbent column where the volatile
 components are trapped. After purging is completed, the sorbent column is heated and backflushed
 with inert gas to desorb the components onto a GC column.

 7.2    Analytical Procedures
 The analytical procedure presented in this section is listed in Table 7-2.

                                   Table 7-2. Analytical Procedure
                  Analytical Method       I        Parameter               Preparatory Method
                        8260B             I Volatile organics (water)            5030B

 A brief description and tables summari7ing EPA method 8260B are included in this section.
 Table 7-3 presents the RLs for EPA method SW8260B. Table 7-4 presents the acceptance criteria
 for the accuracy of spiked analyte and surrogate recoveries and for the precision of matrix, field, and
 laboratory duplicate recoveries. Table 7-5 presents the calibration and QC procedures, corrective
 actions, and data flagging criteria for EPA method SW8260B.

                                                                               Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
 G              LTO        T                           7-1                                        January2005
              5 32 15 3
Section 7


                   Table 7-3. Reporting Limits for Method SW8260B (Water)
                                                              We ter
                                 Analyte                     RL               Unit
             Aromatic and Halogenated Volatile Organics
             II-Dichloroethene                               0.50             pg/L
             cis-1,2-Dichloroethene                          0.50             Pg/L
             Trichloroethene                                 0.50             Pg/L
             Vinyl chloride                                  0.50             Pg/L



            Table 7-4. Quality Assurance Acceptance Criteria for Method SW8260B
                                   I                         Water
               Control Lim              LCS                 matrix Spike Sample Duplicate
                   Paramete          % Recovery    RPD      %Recovery          RPD
        Volatile )rgank Compounds (SW846 Method 8260B with 25-mL purge)
        Li -Dichlo ro eth ane                                             NA         12
        Trichloroethene                78-119                             NA         16
        Volatile Organic Compounds (SW846 Method 8260B with 5-mLpurge)
        1.1-Dichloroethene             64-140       20        56-146      NA
        Trichloroethene                60-140       15        53-134       NA         12
        Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds (SW846 Method 8260B)
        1,1-Dichloroethene             60-133       22        60-133
        cis-1,2-Dichloroethene         50-138       19         50-138      NA         19
        Trichloroethene                35-146       50         35-146      NA         50
            yl
         chlo6de                       62-120       17         6


                                      Surrogate Limits                     Water
                                         Chemical                     I %Recovery
                 Volatile Organic Compounds (SW846 Method 8260B with 25-mL purge)
                 1,2-Dichoroethane-d4                                     60-140
                 Toluene-0                                                60-140
                 p-Bromofluorobenzene                                     60-140
                 Volatile Organic Compounds (S W846 Method 8260B with 5-mL or 5-gm
                 purge)
                 1,2-Dichoroethane-d4                                     60-140
                 Toluene-dB                                                60-i4O
                 p-Bromofluorobenzene                                      60-140

In Table 7-5, the first column lists the mcthod-rcquited calibration and QC elements. The second
column designates the minimum frequency for performing each calibration and QC element. The
third column designates the acceptance criteria for each calibration and QC element The fourth
column designates the corrective action in the event that a calibration or QC element does not meet
the acceptance criteria. The last column designates the data flagging criteria that will be applied in
the event that the method-required calibration and QC acceptance criteria are not met.



                                                                       Operations and Maintenance OAPP
                                                   7-2                                         July 2003
                                                                                               2532154
                                                                                           Section 7



Volatile (or purgeable) organics in water are analyzed using method SW8260B. This method uses a
capillary column GC/MS technique. Volatile compounds are introduced into the GC by purge and
trap (SW5030B). An inert gas is bubbled through the water samples (or a soil-water slurry for soil
samples) to transfer the purgeable orgartic compounds from the liquid to vapor phase. Soil samples
with higher contaminant concentrations are extracted using methanol before purging. The vapor is
then swept through a sorbent trap where the purgeable organics are trapped. The trap is backflushed
 and heated to desorb the purgeable organics onto a capillary GC column where they are separated
 and then detected with a mass spectrometer. The calibration, QC, corrective action, and data
flagging requirements are provided in the AFCEE QAPP Version 3.1 (AFCEE 2001). Requirements
for confirmation of analytes are described in Section 4.5.2. Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc.
(Laucks) proposed variances to SW8260B are presented in Appendix A.




                                                                       Operations and Maintenance QAPP
                                                  7-3                                      January 2005
                           U3 21 55



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            8. DATA REDUCTION, REVIEW, REPORTING
                VALIDATION, AND RECORD-KEEPING

The data reduction, review, reporting, and validation procedures described in this section will ensure
(1) complete documentation is maintained, (2) transcription and data reduction errors are
minimized, (3) the data are reviewed and documented, and (4) the reported results are qualified if
necessary. Laboratory data reduction and verification procedures are required to ensure the overall
objectives of analysis and reporting meet method and project specifications.

8.1      Data Review, Validation, and Reporting Requirements for Screening Data
One hundred percent of the screening data listed in Table 6-1 will be reviewed. AU screening data
reported for the project will be qualified with an S flag and will be further qualified if critical
calibration and QC requirements are not acceptable. The calibration requirements, QC requirements,
corrective action requirements, and flagging criteria are shown in Table 6-2. The flagging criteria will
be applied when acceptance criteria are not met and corrective action was not successful or
corrective action was not performed. The analyst will apply a final qualifier to any data affected by
multiple qualifiers that reflects the following data qualifier hierarchy (SR, SJ, SB, and SU, listed from
most severe through least severe). The definitions of the data qualifiers are shown in Table 8-1.

                                         Table 8-1. Data Qualifiers
               Qualifier                                   Description
                  i         The analyte was positively identified, the quantitation is an estimation.
                  U         The analyte was analyzed for but not detected. The associated numerical
                            value is at or below the MDL.
                   F        The analyte was positively identified but the associated numerical value is
                            below the RL.
                  R         The data are unusable due to defiiencies in the ability to analyze the
                            sample and meet QC criteria.
                            The analyte was found in an associated blank, as well as in the sample.
                  M         A matrix effect was present.
                            To be applied to all field screening data.
                            Tentatively identified compound (using GUMS).

 8.2     Data Review, Validation, and Reporting Requirements for Definitive Data
 MI)Ls and analytical results will be reported to one decimal place more than the corresponding RL.
 Soil/sedirnent samples will have results reported on a dry-weight basis. A wet-weight aliquot of
 sample equivalent to the method specified dry-weight aliquot of sample will be taken for analysis
 (i.e., RLs and MDLs are not adjusted for dry weight). RLs and MDLs are adjusted for dilutions.

 In each laboratory analytical section, the analyst performing the tests will review 100 percent of the
 definitive data. After the analyst's review has been completed, 1 00 percent of the data will be
 reviewed independently by a senior analyst or by the supervisor of the respective analytical section
 using the same criteria.



                                                                                     Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
                                                           8_1                                          January2005
                 Z532159
Section 8


The definitive data methods are identified in Section 7.2. The calibration, QC requirements,
corrective action requirements, and flagging criteria required for definitive data are shown in the
tables in Section 7.2, and in summary Tables 8-2 and 8-3. The flagging criteria will be applied when
acceptance criteria are not met and corrective action was not successful or corrective action was not
performed.

                                    Table B-2. General Flagging Conventions

 QC Requirement                     Criteria                                    Flag                      Flag Applied To
 Holding time           Time exceeded for extraction or                          R                  All analytes in the sample
                        analysis
 LCS                    % R > UCL                                  J for the positive results        The specific analyte(s) in all
                        %R < LCL                                   J for the positive results R      samples in the associated
                                                                   for the nondetects                AAB
 Method blank           Analyte(s) detected k RL                                  B                  The specific analyte(s) in all
                                                                                                     samples in the associated
                                                                                                     AAB
 Equipment blank        Analyte(s) detected - RL                                  B                  The specific onalyte(s) in all
                                                                                                     samples with the same
                                                                                                     sampling date as the
                                                                                                     equipment blank
 Field duplicates       Field duplicates > RI s and RPD             J for the positive results       The specific analyte(s) in all
                        outside CL                                  R for the nondetects             samples collected on the
                                                                                                     same sampling date
 MS/MSD                  MS or MSD % R > UCL                        Mfor all results                 The specific analyte(s) in all
                         OR                                                                          samples collected from the
                         MS or MSD % R < LCL                                                         same site as the parent
                         OR                                                                          sample
                         MS/MSD RPID > CIL
 Sample                  Preservation/collection                    R for all results                 All analytes in the sample
 preservations           requirements not met
 collection
 Sample storage          < 20C or > 60C                             J for the positive results        All analytes in
                                                                    R for the nonde

Examples:
                      Criteria                    Flag*
                      !5IVDL                        U
                      > IVIDL < RL                  F
                      2: RL                    As needed
Example 1: If the IVIDL is 0.04, the RIL is 0.9, and the result is 0.03, the concentration reported on the result form would be 0.04 (the
MDL) and the qualifier flag would be U.
Example 2: Ifthe MDIL is 0.04, the RL is 0.9, and the result is 0.07, the concentration reported on the result form would be 0.07 and
the qualifier flag would be F.
Example 3: Ifthe IVIDL is 0.04, the RIL is 0.9, and the result is 1.2, the concentration reported on the result form would be 1.2 and the
qualifier would be any flag needed because of a data quality problem (e.g., R, J. B, etc.).




                                                                                               Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
GIAFCEE Mff L"                                                    8-2                                             January2005
                                                                                                                                                                                                          4 J3   2 16 0

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             25      16
                  3 9- 1
Section 8


Data qualifiers will be added or, if applied by a software package, reviewed by the laboratory
supervisor of the respective analytical section after the first and second levels of laboratory data
reviews have been performed. Analytical batch comments will be aded to the first page of the
definitive data report packages to explain any nonconformance or other issues. When data are
qualified, the laboratory supervisor will apply a final qualifier to any data that have been affected by
multiple qualifiers. This final qualifier will reflect the most severe qualifier that was applied to the
data, i.e., all data will have only one flag associated with it. The allowable final data qualifiers for
definitive data and the hierarchy of data qualifiers, listed in order of the most severe through the
least severe, are R, M, F, J, B, and U. The definitions of the data qualifiers are shown in Table 8-1.

The laboratory QA section will perform a 100 percent review of 10 percent of the completed data
packages, and the laboratory project manager will perform a review of aU the completed data
packages.

TtFW's project manager will review the entire definitive data report package and, with the field
records, apply the final data qualifiers for the definitive data. The laboratory will apply data
qualifying flags to each environmental field QC sample, i.e., ambient blanks, equipment blanks, trip
blanks, field duplicates, MS samples, and MSD samples. TtFW will review the field QC samples and
field logs and will then flag any of the associated samples identified with the field QC sample
appropriately, as explained in Tables 8-2 and 8-3. The laboratory will only quaffy each matrix spike
sample; TtFW will apply the final qualifying flag for a matrix effect to all samples collected from the
 same site as the parent sample or all samples showing the same lithologic characteristics as the
MS/MSD. TtFW will determine whether the data quality objectives have been met and calculate the
 data completeness for the project. These results WM be included in the data package deliverable as
described in Section 8-8.

8.3         Quality Assurance Reports
The laboratory QA staff will issue QA reports to the laboratory management, laboratory
supervisors, and task leaders. These reports will describe the results of QC measurements,
performance, and systems audits, and confirmation sample comparisons performed for each
sampling and analysis task. Quality problems associated with performance of methods, completeness
of data, comparability of data including field and confirmatory data, and data storage will be
documented with the corrective actions that have been taken to correct the deficiencies identified.

8.4         ERPIMS Electronic Data Reports
TtFW will. provide an electronic deliverable report in the Environmental Resources Program
Information Management System (ERPIMS) format as specified by the statement of work (SO'W)
for the project.

ERPIMS is a data management system designed to accommodate all types of data collected for IRP
projects. Specific codes and data forms have been developed to allow consistent and efficient input
of information to the system. TtFW will provide the database information via ASCII (American
Standard Code Information Interchange) files in specified ERPIMS format on compact disk. The.
information transferred will include all required technical data such as site information; well
characteristics; and hydrogeologic, geologic, physical, and chemical analysis results. Electronic data



                                                                           Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
G                  LM       T                       8-4                                       Janualy2005
                                                                                                    2 53 2 1 6 2
                                                                                                Section 8



reporting formats and requirements are given in the most current version of the ERPLMS Data
Loading Handbook.

8.5     Archiving
Hard copy and electronic data will be archived in project files and on electronic archive tapes for the
duration of the project or a minimum of 5 years, whichever is longer.

8.6     Project Data Fiow and Transfer
'ne data flow from the laboratory and field to the project staff and data users will be sufficiently
 documented to ensure the data are properly tracked, reviewed, and validated for use.

8.7     Record-Keeping
The laboratory will maintain electronic and hard copy records sufficient to recreate each analytical
event conducted pursuant to the SOW. The minimum records the laboratory will keep contain the
following: (1) C-O-C forms; (2) initial and continuing calibration records, including standards
preparation traceable to the original material and lot number; (3) instrument tuning records (as
applicable); (4) method blank results; (5) IS results; (6) surrogate spiking records and results (as
applicable); (7) spike and spike duplicate records and results; (8) laboratory records; (9) raw data
 including instrument printouts, bench work sheets, and/or chromatograms with compound
 identification and quantitation reports; (1 0) corrective action reports; (1 1) other method and project
 required QC samples and results; and (1 2) laboratory-specific written SOPs for each analytical
 method and QA/QC function in place at the time of analysis of project samples.

 8.8     Hard Copy Data Reports for Definitive Data
 The hard copy data reports will conform to the formats identified in this section.

 A definitive data organic report package will be comparable to the following AFCEE forms: C-O-C,
 0-1, 0-2, 0-3 or O-3A, 0-4, 0-5 or O-5A, 0-6, 0-7, 0-8, 0-9, and 0-1 0 for each AAB with
 organic analyses performed. Laucks Contract Laboratory Program reporting format will be used.




                                                                           Operationsand MaintenanceOAPP
                                                     8-5                                      January2005
            253 2 16 3
Section 8




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                                                               Operationsand MaintenanceOAPP
,             LTO                        8-6                                      January2005
                                                                                                  25 32 1 6 4


9. SYSTEMS AND PERFORMANCE AUDITS, PERFORMANCE
     EVALUATION PROGRAMS, MAGNETIC TAPE AUDITS,
                    AND TRAINING

Technical systems and performance audits will be perfoffned as independent assessments of sample
collection and analysis procedures. Audit results will be used to evaluate the ability of an analytical
contractor to (1) produce data that fulfill the objectives established for the program, (2) comply with
the QC criteria, and (3) identify any areas requiring corrective action. The systems audit is a
qualitative review of the overall sampling or measurement system, while the performance audit is a
quantitative assessment of a measurement system. Audit guidance can be found in the H.Q AFCEE
TecbnicalSermces.QualioAssmranceProgram (AFCEE 1998). Full data validation is also a quantitative
check of the analytical process, where all documentation and calculations are evaluated and verified.
Data validation is discussed in Section 8.

9.1     Project Audits
9.1.1 StatelFederalProjectAudits
Audits by various state and federal agencies are commonly conducted for the laboratories that will
analyze project samples. Audit reports from these agencies will be reviewed by TtFW to determine
whether data produced by the analytical contractor will fulfill the objectives of the program.

Response and resolution audit findings will be transmitted from the laboratory to TtFW and
AFCEE. This report will include the recommended corrective actions or procedures to correct the
deficiencies identified during the state/federal audits(s). The audit results -anddiscussion will be
incorporated into the QA report for each sampling effort.

9.1.2 Technical Systems Audits
A technical systems audit is an onsite, qualitative review of the sampling or analytical system to
ensure that the activity is being performed in compliance with the SAP specifications. TtFW will
audit sampling and field procedures associated with the project on an as-needed basis. AFCEE may
perform a laboratory systems audit if previous audit reports indicate corrective actions are
outstanding, a recent audit has not been conducted, or quality concerns have arisen based upon the
use of that laboratory for other projects. The laboratory systems audit results win be used to assess
TtFW's oversight and to review laboratory operation and ensure the technical procedures and
documentation are in place and operating to provide data that fulfill the project objectives and to
ensure outstanding corrective actions have been addressed.

 Critical items for a laboratory or field systems audit include (1) sample custody procedures;
 (2) calibration procedures and documentation; (3) completeness of data forms, notebooks, and other
 reporting requirements; (4) data review and validation procedures; (5) data storage, filing, and
 record-keeping procedures; (6) QC procedures, tolerances, and documentation; (7) operating
 conditions of facilities and equipment; (8) documentation of training and maintenance activities;
 (9) systems and operations overview; and (10) security of laboratory automated systems.



                                                                          Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
           M    M                                  9-1                                       January2005
              2 53 2 16 5
Section 9


Critical items for a sampling systems audit include (1) calibration procedures and documentation for
field equipment; (2) documentation in field logbooks and sampling data sheets; (3) organization and
minimization of potential contamination sources while in the field; (4) proper sample collection,
storage, and transportation procedures; and (5) compliance with established C-C-C and transfer
procedures.

After each onsite audit, a debriefing session will be held for all participants to discuss the preliminary
audit results. The auditor will then complete the audit evaluation and submit an audit report
including observations of the deficiencies and the necessary recommendations for corrective actions
to TtFW. Compliance with the specifications presented in the SAP will be noted, and
noncompliance or deviations will be addressed in writing by TtFW to AFCEE with corrective
actions and a time frame for implementation of the corrective actions. Follow-up audits will be
performed prior to completion of the project to ensure corrective actions have been taken.

9.1.3   Magnetic Tape Audits
Magnetic tape audits involve the examination of the electronic media used by the analytical
laboratory and by TtFW to collect, analyze, report, and store data. These audits are used to assess
the authenticity of the data generated and assess the implementation of good automated laboratory
practices. AFCEE may perform magnetic tape audits of the laboratories or of TtFW when
warranted by project performance evaluation (PE) results, onsite audit results, or by other
state/ federal investigations.

9.1.4       Performance Evaluation Sample Programs
AD laboratories wM participate in the EPA PE Water Supply and Water Pollution Studies programs
or equivalent programs for state certifications. Satisfactory performance in these nonproject-spedfic
PE programs also demonstrates proficiency in methods used to analyze AFCEE samples. The
laboratory will document the corrective actions to unacceptable PE results to demonstrate
resolution of the problems.

9.2     Training
Training will be provided to all project personnel to ensure compliance with the Health and Safety
Plan and technical competence in performing the work effort. Documentation of this trainingwill
be maintained in the records of the contracted organizations.




                                                                           Operationsand Maintenance CAPP
                 LM                                 9-2                                       January 2005
                                                                                               25 3 21 6 6


                      10. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

A preventive maintenance program will be in place to promote the timely and effective completion
of a measurement effort. The preventive maintenance program is designed to minimize the
downtime of crucial sampling and/or analytical equipment due to unexpected component failure. In
implementing this program, efforts are focused in three primary areas: maintenance responsibilities,
maintenance schedules for major and/or critical instrumentation and apparatus, and establishment
of an adequate inventory of critical spare parts and equipment.

10.1 Maintenance Responsibilities
The respective facility managers assume maintenance responsibilities for equipment and
instruments. The managers then establish maintenance procedures and schedules for each major
equipment item. This responsibility may be delegated to laboratory personnel, although the
managers retain responsibility for ensuring adherence to the prescribed protocols.

10.2 Maintenance Schedules
The effectiveness of any maintenance program depends to a large extent on adherence to specific
maintenance schedules for each major equipment item. Other maintenance activities are conducted
as needed. Manufacturers' recommendations provide the primary basis for the established
maintenance schedules, and manufacturers' service contracts provide primary maintenance for many
major instruments (e.g., GC/MS instruments, atomic absorption spectrometers, and analytical
balances).

10.3 Spare Parts
Along with a schedule for maintenance activities, an adequate inventory of spare parts will minimize
equipment downtime. The inventory could include those puts (and supplies) that are subject to
frequent failure, have limited useful lifetimes, or cannot be obtained in a timely manner should
failure occur.

 10.4 Maintenance Records
 Maintenance and repair of major field and laboratory equipment will be recorded in field or
 laboratory logbooks. These records will document the serial numbers of the equipment, the person
 performing the maintenance or repairs, the date of the repair, the procedures used during the repair,
 and proof of successful repair prior to the use of the equipment.




                                                                        Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
 G         LWQ            T                       10-1                                     January2005
                     1
              2 5 3 9- 6 7
Section 10




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                                                                   operations and Maintenance QAPP
 G;          LTOO                            10-2                                      January 2005
                                                                                                  5
                                                                                                 2. 3 2 16 8


                            11. CORRECTIVE ACTION

Corrective actions, if necessary, will be completed once. If acceptance criteria were not met and a
corrective action was not successful or corrective action was not performed, the appropriate flagging
critena will be applied. Requirements and procedures for documenting the need for corrective
actions are described in this section.

11.1 CorrectiveActionReport
Problems requiring corrective action in the laboratory will be documented by the use of a corrective
action report. The QA coordinator or any other laboratory member can initiate the corrective action
request in the event QC results exceed acceptability limits or upon identification of some other
laboratory problem. Corrective actions can include reanalysis of the sample or samples affected,
resampling and analysis, or a change in procedures, depending upon the severity of the problem.

11.2 Corrective Action System
A system for issuing, tracking, and documenting completion of formal Recommendations for
Corrective Action (RCA) exists for addressing significant and systematic problems. Only a member
of the QA group or a designee in a specific QA role issues recommendations for corrective actions.
Each RCA addresses a specific problem or deficiency, usually identified during QA audits of
laboratory or project operations. An RCA requires a written response from the party to whom the
RCA was issued. A summary of unresolved RCAs is included in the monthly QA report to
management. The report lists all RCAs that have been issued, the manager responsible for the work
area, and the current status of each RCA. An RCA requires verification by the QA group that the
corrective action has been implemented before the RCA is considered to be resolved. In the event
there is no response to an RCA within 30 days, or if the proposed corrective action is disputed, the
recommendation and/or conflict is pursued to successively higher management levels until the issue
is resolved.




                                                                        Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
                                                                                           January2005
             Z532169
Section 11




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                        I




                                                             Operations and Maintenance QAPP
Q              Lm                      11-2                                      January 2W5
                                                                                                     3 -91 7 0



    12. QUALITY ASSURANCE REPORTS TO MANAGEMENT

At a minimum, the QA coordinator of the laboratory will prepare a quarterly summary report of the
status of the project, QA/QC problems, corrective actions taken, and unresolved RCAs with
recommended solutions for management. 'Me report will also include results from an PE samples,
audit findings, and periodic data quality assessments. This report will be available for review by
AFCEE auditors upon request.




                                                                      Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
0         LMO             T                     12-1                                     January 2005
                 (Z539-171
    Section 12




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                                                                         operations and Maintenance QAPP
I                AFWLWQ      TO4                   12-2                                      January 2005
                                                                                                    3 172


                                  11REFERENCES

AFCEE (Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence). 2001. Quality Assurance Program Plan
   Revisions 3.1. August 2001.

ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials). 1993. Annual Book of Standards.

EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1994a. Contract Laboratory Program National
   Functional Guidelines for Inorganic Data Review. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency
   Response. Washington D.C. Publication 9240.1-05-01, EPA-540/R-94-013, PB94-963502.
   February 1994.

          . 1994b. Contract Laboratory Program National Functional Guidelines for Organic Data
      Review. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. Washington D.C. Publication 9240.1-
      05, EPA-540/R-94-012, PB94-963501. February 1994.

         . 1993a. Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Environmental Data
      Operations, Draft Final. EPA QA/R-5.

           1993b. Data Quality Objectives Process for Superfund, Interim Final Guidance.

           1993c. Handbook for the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Remedial Investigations
      and Feasibility Studies (RI/FS). September 1993.

           19 89. Region IX QAPP: Guidance for Preparing QAPPs for Superfund Remedial Projects.

         1988. Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under
      CERCLA, Interim Final.

           1987. Compendium of Supcrfimd Field Operations Methods.

           1986. Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods. EPA SW946,
      Third Edition, including updates.

           1983. Interim Guidelines and Spedfications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans.

           1979. Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Waste.




                                                                       Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
 GW              LW                               13-1                                    January2005
                  r,
             el   Z)39-173
Section 13




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                                                                   Operationsand Maintenance QAPP
                                            13-2                                      January 2005
                         25 3 21 74




                Appendix A
Laucks Testing Laboratories
  Practical Quantitation and
       Target Control Limits
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             Appendix B
Proposed Variances to the
AFCEE QAPP, Version 3.1,
             August 2001
                                                                                                        CD32131
Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP

                         Tetra Tech FW - McChord AFB project
                                    January 19,2005

                    Section 4.3.1, Paragraph I (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001,
QAPP VarianceNumberg-
QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria: "Results less than or equal to the MDL shall be reported as the MDL value and flagged
with a 'lull..,

Proposed Variance: For organic analyses, Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc. (Laucks) proposes to report
results not detected as the RL value and flag with a "U". Results detected below the RL will be reported
with the detected value, flagged with a "J". For metals analyses, Laucks will report results less than the
IDL as the IDL value and flag with a "U". Results for metals reported between the IDL and the RL will
be flagged "B".

Rationale: This reporting and flagging criteria is consistent with that used for USEPA CLP SOW
protocols. Laucks current forms generation software is capable of producing CLP-like forms, but we
cannot, at this time, produce AFCEE forms for all methods.

Impact on Data Usability: None

QAPP VarianceNumber I.- Section 4.3.2, Paragraph I (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001,
QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria:          however, for those results falling between the MDL and the RL, an "F" flag shall
be applied to the results indicating the variability associated with the result (see Section 8.0). No results
shall be reported below the

Proposed Variance: For organic analyses, Laucks Testing Laboratories, Inc. (Laucks) proposes to report
results not detected as the RL value and flag with a "U". Results detected below the RL will be reported
with the detected value, flagged with a "J". For metals analyses, Laucks will report results less than the
IDL as the IDL value and flag with a "U". Results for metals reported between the IDL and the RL will
be flagged "B".

 Rationale: This reporting and flagging criteria is consistent with that used for USEPA CLP SOW
 protocols. Laucks current forms generation software is capable of producing CLP-like forms, but we
 cannot, at this time, produce AFCEE forms for all methods.

 Impact on Data Usability: None

 QAPP Variance Number g- Section 4.4.1, Paragraph I (Original AFCEE Version 3. 1, August 2001,
 QAPP Reference).

 AFCEE Criteria: "The LCS ... spiked with all analytes listed in the QC acceptance criteria table in
 Section 7 for the method".

 Proposed Variance: Laucks will use a list similar to the CLP subset spiking list of the target analytes for
 Methods 8260B, 8270C, 8081A and 8082. For some samples, where a short list of VOAs is requested by
 Method 826013, the entire requested analyte list is spiked.



 January 19, 2005                Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                      Page I
               Z532132
 Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP
Rationale: Laucks is providing CLP forms and the practice of spiking the CLP subset list can be reported
using the CLP forms. In addition, these compounds were chosen by CLP for their characteristics in
chemically representing the larger set of target analytes for methods with large target analyte lists and/or
target analytes that cannot be spiked together without coelution problems. The DOD Quality Systems
Manual - Version 1, allows this practice in Section D. 1.I b) 4), where it states: "In cases where
components interfere with accurate assesinent (such as simultaneously spiking chlordane, toxaphene and
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Method 608), the test method has an extrememly long list of
components or components are incompatible, a representative number (at a minimum 10%) of the listed
components may be used to control the test method."

Impact on Data Usability: Precision and accuracy values will be determined for the class of compounds
analyzed, rather than for each individual analyte for Methods 826013, 8270C, 8081A and 8082.

QAPP VarianceNumber & Section 4.4.2, Paragraph I (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001,
QAPP Reference).

AFCEE Criteria: "A matrix spike (MS) and matrix spike duplicate (MSD) ... spiked with known
concentrations of all analytes listed in the QC acceptance criteria table in Section 7 for the method".

Proposed Variance: Laucks will use a list similar to the CLP subset spiking list of the target analytes for
Methods 8260B, 8270C, 8081A and 8082. For some samples, where a short list of VOAs is requested by
Method 8260B, the entire requested analyte list is spiked.

Rationale: Laucks is providing CLP forms and the practice of spiking the CLP subset list can be reported
using the CLP forms. In addition, these compounds were chosen by CLP for their characteristics in
chemically representing the larger set of target analytes for methods with large target analyte lists and/or
target analytes that cannot be spiked together without coelution problems. The DOD Quality Systems
Manual - Version 1, allows this practice in Section D. 1.I b) 4), where it states: "In cases where
components interfere with accurate assesment (such as simultaneously spiking chlordane, toxaphene and
polychlorinated bipbenyls (PCBs) in Method 608), the test method has an extrememly long list of
components or components are incompatible, a representative number (at a minimum 10%) of the listed
components may be used to control the test method."

 Impact on Data Usability: There are no Data Quality Objectives based on MS/MSD analysis. Only field
 and analytical precision are measured based on the RPD between duplicate measurements of MS/MSD,
 which can still be determined with a reduced set of spiking components.

 QAPP VarianceNumber IS- Section 5.2, Paragraph 6 (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001,
 QAPP reference).
 AFCEE Criteria: "Samples not preserved or analyzed in accordance with these requirements [as specified
 in the referenced section and on Table 5.1.2-1] shall be resampled and analyzed, at no additional cost to
 AFCEE."
 Proposed Variance: For samples that are not collected for the purpose of site closure decisions, Laucks
 proposes that samples should not automatically be resampled and analyzed in the case where the cooler
 receipt temperature was measured up to 10 'C. In these cases, sample results may either be flagged as
 estimated because of the temperature receipt nonconformance, or, pending discussion with AFCEE,
 samples may be recollected and analyzed. As specified in Section 5.2, Paragraph 5, page 5-6 and 5-7, "If
 the temperature of the samples upon receipt exceeds the temperature requirements, the exceedance shall


 January 19, 2005                Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                       Page 2
                                                                                                       2 53 2 1 3
Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP
be documented in laboratory records and discussed with AFCEE. The decision regarding potentially
affected samples shall also be documented." Sample(s) will be qualified as estimated, and these data will
not be used to support site closure decisions.

Rationale: Results from samples received up to 10 'C may be usable, as determined with AFCEE.

Impact on Data Usability: Since samples will not be used for site closure purposes, data obtained slightly
outside the cooler receipt temperature criteria of 4 'C may be usable as estimated data.

QAPP Variance Number S: Table 7.2-1., Row #s 7 and 13 (SW8082) (Original AFCEE Version 3.1,
August 2001, QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria: The preparatory Method 3545 is not listed for this analytical method.

Proposed Variance: Laucks proposes a variance to allow use of Method 3545 for preparation for
analytical method 8082.

 Rationale: Extraction of PCBs is allowed in the text of Method 3545.

 Impact on Data Usability: Method 3545 is a highly efficient extraction method and may produce more
 accurate results than other methods listed for soil extraction. No negative affect on data usability.

 QAPP Variance Number 1: Table 7.2.2-2, Rows # 2 and # 6-9 (SW80 I 5B) (Original AFCEE Version
 3.1, August 200 1, QAPP reference).

 AFCEE Criteria: The surrogate listed for GRO is chlorobenzene with accuracy limits of 74-138 for water
 and 64-148 for soil. The surrogates listed for DRO (of which two are to be chosen) are Octacosane (with
 limits of 26-152 for water and 25-162 for soil), o-Terphenyl (with limits of 57-132 for water and 47-142
 for soil), Fluorobenzene (with limits of 75-125 for water and 65-135 for soil) and Tricontaine (with limits
 of 40-140 for water and 30-150 for soil).

 Proposed Variance: Laucks will use the surrogates and reporting and control limits required by the
 Washington State methods, NWTH-G and NWTPH-Dx. These are the methods required at the site and
 have method specific surrogates and limits.

 Rationale: The surrogates and control limits Laucks uses for GRO and DRO are acceptable for the site.
 If both state and AFCEE criteria are to be satisfied, we would prefer to use the surrogates that are
 specified in the state method. Also, the AFCEE QAPP 4.0 draft includes more options for the selection
 of surrogates for Method 8015.

  Impact on Data Usability: Data will be technically usable. No negative affect on data usability.

  QAPP Variance Number E.- Table 7.2.2-3, Row #s 2 and 3 (SW8015 Modified), Table 7.2.3-3, Row #s 6
  and 7 (SW8021B), Table 7.2.5-3, Row #s 6 and 7 (SW8081A), Table 7.2.6-3, Row #s 6 and 7 (SW8082),
  Table 7.2.7-3, Row #s 6 and 7 (SW8141A), Table 7.2.8-3, Row #s 6 and 7 (SW8151A), Table 7.2.9-3,
  Row 4s 7 and 8 (SW8260B), Table 7.2.10-3, Row #s 7 and 8 (SW8270C), Table 7.2.12-3, Row #s 6 and
  7 (SW83 10) and Table 7.2.14-3, Row #a 6 and 7 (SW8330), (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001,
  QAPP reference).

  AFCEE Criteria: The initial calibration verification flagging criteria specifies, "Apply R to all results for


  January 19, 2005                Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                     Page 3
               2   5 3 2 18 4
 Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP
the specific analyte(s) for all samples associated with the calibration," and the subsequent calibration
verification flagging criteria specifies, "Apply R to all results for the specific analyte(s) in all samples
since the last acceptable calibration verification.'

Proposed Variance: Laucks proposes a variance to J flag results for all specific analyte(s) in all samples
that are not detected and where the percent deviation from the initial calibration is positive or high.

Rationale: In cases where the percent deviation from the initial calibration is positive or high, there is a
potential for false positive results; however, if the sample result is reported as not detected, then the false
positive outcome was not realized, and there is no need to reject the data. Data would be qualified as J to
indicate AFCEE criteria nonconformance.

Impact on Data Usability: Technically usable data will not be rejected. No negative affect on data
usability.

QAPP VarianceNumber 1: Table 7.2.2-3, Row # 9 (SW8015 Modified), Table 7.2.3-3, Row # I I
(SW802 IB), Table 7.2.5-3, Row # I I (SW808 IA), Table 7.2.6-3, Row # I I (SW8082), Table 7.2.7-3,
Row # I I (SW814 IA), Table 7.2.8-3, Row # I I (SW815 I A), Table 7.2.9-3, Row # I 5 (SW8260B),
Table 7.2.10-3, Row # 15 (SW8270C), Table 7.2.12-3, Row # I I (SW83 10) and Table 7.2.14-3, Row
I I (SW8330) (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria: The surrogate spike flagging criteria specifies, "For the samples; if the O/oR > UCL for a
surrogate, apply J to all positive results. If the O/oR < LCL for a surrogate, apply J to all positive results;
apply R to all non-detected results, if any surrogate recovery is < IO%, apply R to all results."

Proposed Variance: Laucks proposes to qualify per the specified criteria in all cases where the sample
extract is not diluted. If sample extract dilution is required, and the surrogates are "diluted out" (i.e., no
or extremely low recovery), then the data will be qualified as estimated, but not rejected. In addition, the
LCS associated with the sample(s) must be in control.

Rationale: If a sample extract needs to be diluted because the concentration of one or more target
compound is greater than the upper calibration range or because of some chromatographic interference,
then the dilution of the sample extract is required to accurately assess the chemical concentration in the
sample. If in the course of diluting the sample extract, surrogate spikes are diluted out, then this does not
render the results of the dilution analysis unusable.

impact on Data Usability: Technically usable data will not be rejected. Data will be qualified as
estimated, indicating that there is some uncertainty regarding the extraction efficiency for the particular
sample (other quality control data such as the LCS will be available to confirm extraction efficiency for
the batch).

QAPP VarianceNumber 9.- omiued

QAPP VarianceNumber II- Table 7.2.9-2 (SW8260B) (Original AFCEE Version 3. 1, August 200 1,
QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria: Lower control limits for surrogates are listed as follows: Dibromofluoromethane
(water) 85%, Toluene-D8 (water) 81% and (soil) 84%,4-Bromofluorobenzene (soil) 84%.

Proposed Variance: Laucks proposes the following changes to the lower control limits for surrogates:


January 19,2005                  Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                        Page 4
                                                                                                       2 53 2 1 3
 Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP
Dibromofluoromethane (water) 75%, Toluene-D8 (water and soil) 75%, 4-Bromofluorobenzene (soil)
75%.

Rationale: Laucks in-house control limits (based on historical data) show that the control limits in the
proposed variance will be achievable by our laboratory for the majority of samples we receive. Control
limits established in-house for different laboratories do vary. Lower control limits for some other
surrogate compounds are lower than those we have generated.

Impact on Data Usability: This results in a minor change to the lower control limits of several
surrogates, but not for all surrogates listed for this method. This should allow Laucks to complete data
analyses more efficiently and still not affect data quality.

 QAPP VarianceNumber ff Table 7.2.9-1 (SW8260B) (Original AFCEE Version 3. 1, August 2001,
 QAPP reference).

 AFCEE Criteria: Water RLs at levels varying from 0.3 ugIL to 5.0 ug/L (and IOugIL for the ketones).

 Proposed Variance: Laucks will report results for VOC analyses to 0.5 ug/L for all analytes (except for
 0.6 ug/L for Total Xylenes, 0.8 ug/L for Bromobenzene and Dibromomethane, and 3 ug/L for
 Bromomethane and Methylene Chloride).

 Rationale: Laucks is reporting to limits specified for the project.

 Impact on Data Usability: Sample will be reported to limits that are required for the project, although
 they do vary slightly from the limits specified in the AFCEE QAPP 3.1, and there will be no impact on
 data usability.

 QAPP VarianceNumber By Section 8.2 (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP reference).

 AFCEE Criteria: For LAUCKS, MDLs and results will be reported to one decimal place more than the
 corresponding RL, unless the appropriate number of significant figures for the measurement dictates
 otherwise.

 Proposed Variance: MDLs and results will be reported to the same degree of accuracy as the reporting
 limit (ie., the same decimal place).

  Rationale: Reporting results to a greater degree of accuracy than the reporting limit (i.e., one decimal
  place further) is not scientific. Results should not be expected to be more accurate than the reporting
  limit.

  Impact on Data Usability: None.

  QAPP VarianceNumber la-Section 8.2, Paragraph I (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 200 1,
  QAPP reference).

  AFCEE Criteria: "A wet weight aliquot of sample equivalent to the method specified dry weight aliquot
  of sample shall be taken for analysis.... RLs are NOT adjusted for sample moisture.

  Proposed Variance: Sample aliquots will be taken following the method-prescribed weights on an as-
  received basis. RLs will be adjusted for dry weight.


  January 19, 2005                Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                     Page 5
                   C.-
               (.J32186
 Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP

Rationale: The SW-846 methods do not specify equivalent dry weight aliquots and were not necessarily
designed or validated by EPA for use with larger amounts of materials. Further, putting critical
analytical tests on hold while percent moisture testing is being conducted could jeopardize the
laboratory's ability to meet holding times. Laucks current software packages automatically adjust the
RLs and MDLs for dry weight.

Impact on Data Usability: Percent moisture in the soil samples is not expected to be greater than 50
percent. Using this value, the reporting limits based on a dry-weight value would still be less than the
AFCEE RLs in most cases.

QAPP Variance Number ff, Section 8.2, Paragraph 4 (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 200 1,
QAPP Reference).

AFCEE Criteria: AFCEE flagging conventions.

Proposed Variance: Laucks will use CLP standard flags.

Rationale: Laucks does not utilize software equipped with the AFCEE flags.

Impact on Data Usability: None (the data validators will apply AFCEE flags as appropriate.)

QAPP VarianceNumber ff- Section 8.8, Paragraph I (Original AFCEE Version 3.1, August 200 1,
QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria: "The hard copy data report shall conform to the formats identified in this section."

Proposed Variance: Results will be provided on standard laboratory forms (CLP or equivalent) as
specified by Laucks. Forms will provide all AFCEE required information. See Attachment A for Laucks'
standard forms.

Rationale: The use of alternative hard copy report formats, if they meet the client's and AFCEE's needs
for a specific project, can reduce costs.

Impact on Data Usability: None.

QAPP VarianceNumber ff- Section 9.1.3, Paragraph 4 (Original AFCEE Version 3. 1, August 200 1,
QAPP reference).

AFCEE Criteria: "The percent recovery shall be calculated and the results assessed according to the
accuracy criteria for the LCS presented in Section 7.'

Proposed Variance: The percent recovery for PE samples shall be calculated and the results assessed
according to the accuracy criteria specified by the manufacturer of the PE sample.

Rationale: The LCS and PE spike concentrations are different, so there will be inherent differences
between comparison of the PE sample recoveries to those specified on the control limit tables in Section
7 versus those provided by the manufacturer. The recovery limits from the manufacturer are based on
historical data.



January 19, 2005                 Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                        Page 6
                                                                                                         " r' 9
                                                                                                         40J-l        3

 Laucks' Proposed Variances to the AFCEE Version 3.1, August 2001, QAPP
Impact on Data Usability: Unless the recoveries from the PE samples were significantly (e.g., 50 percent)
less than the lower control limit (i.e., indicating the potential for false negatives for field sample results
and, consequently, the possible rejection of project data), then the corrective action based on PE samples
would be approached from a quality assurance perspective (i.e., implementation of corrective action may
 involve a laboratory audit, a discussion with interested parties and modification of the extraction and/or
 analytical procedure, etc.). As such, the impact of using the manufacturers accuracy criteria versus the
 LCS recovery criteria would be negligible.




 January 19, 2005                 Foster Wheeler McChord AFB Project                                         Page 7
              ,   r
              4532138




Section Tab

  3p-&,D'w
                                                  53 2 199




    UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM


                     FINAL

 Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan-
 Environmental Restoration Projects,
 McChord Air Force Base, Washington




                     Preparedfor
  Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
          Envirorunental Restoration Division
                Brooks City-Base, Texas
                          and
         McChord Air Force Base, Washington


                     Pnparedby--

                     TETRATECH FW. INC.



           143 Union Boulevard, Suite 1010
             Lakewood, Colorado 80228
                   (303) 988-2202



                    January 2005
                                                                                                2   5 3 21 9o




                                             NOTICE
This Base-Widc Health and Safety Plan was prepared for the United States Air Force (Air Force) by
Tetra Tech FW, Inc. to guide the implementation of environmental restoration projects under the
Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP).The limited objectives of this plan and the
ongoing nature of the IRP, along with the evolving knowledge of site conditions and chemical
effects on the environment and health, must be considered when evaluating this plan, because
subsequent facts may become known that may make this plan premature or inaccurate. Acceptance
does not mean that the Air Force adopts the conclusions, recommendations, or other views
expressed herein, which are those of the contractor alone and do not necessarily reflect the official
position of the Air Force.
                                                                                                                             2 532 1 3


       FIT DOCUMENT PAGE                                               Form approved OMB No. 0704-0189_
  u c reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average I hour per response, including the time for reviewing
instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection
of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including
suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports,
1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork
Reduction Project (0704-0188),         hington, DC 20503.
       ENCY USE ONLY                2. REPORT DATE                     3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED
                                    January2OO5                        Final
                                                                       Calendar Year 2005


4, TITLE AND SUBTITLE                                                S. FUNDING NUMBERS
Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan-Environmental Restoration           F41624-03-D-8600
Projects, McChord Air Force Base, Washington                         Delivery Order 0007


 6. AUTHOR(S)
 Mr. M. Ingersoll
 Mr. R. Weingarz
 Ms. P. Moss
 Mr. C. Rhodes
  7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND                              S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER
  ADDRESS(ES)                                                         N/A
  Tetra Tech FW. Inc.
  143 Union Blvd., Lakewood, CO 80228
-i.-SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND                          110. SPONSCRING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT
  ADDRESS(ES)                                                         NUMBER
  Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, AFCEE/ERD,           N/A
  3300 Sidney Brooks, Building 532, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235-
  5363
 1 1. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
 This is a final document.

 12a. DISTRIBUTIONIAVAILABILITY STATEMENT                             12.b DISTRIBUTION CODE
 For use by AFCEE, McChord AFB, 62 CES/CEV



 13. ABSTRACT                                                         15. NUMBER OF PAGES
 The Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan describes the health and
 safety policies, procedures, and protocols to be followed while
 conducting environmental restoration projects at McChord AFB.
 14 .SUBJECT TERMS                                                    16. PRICE CODE
 McChord Air Force Base Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan



 17. SECURITY                      18. SECURITY                       19. SECURITY                       20. LIMITATION OF
 CLASSIFICATION OF                 CLASSIFICATION OF THIS             CLASSIFICATION OF                  ABSTRACT
 REPORT                            PAGE                               ABSTRACT                           UL
 Unclassified                      Unclassified                       Unclassified



 SN 7540-01-280-5500                                                                                    Standard Form 298 (Rev 2.89)
 Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18-298-102
                                                                                                     r
                                                                                                   4 33 2   192

                                            PREFACE
Ths Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan describes the health and safety practices and controls that
will be implemented by all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (rtFW) employees and its subcontractors
participating in the activities associated with environmental restoration projects at McChord Air
Force Base (AFB), Pierce County, Washington. The purpose of this plan is to provide a means of
conducting all aspects of environmental restoration projects, including groundwater sampling,
surface water sampling, drilling activities, and well decommissioning, as well as inspecting, sampling,
and maintaining the Area D/American Lake Garden Tract groundwater treatment plant in a safe
and effective manner.

Key personnel involved in the project include Ms. Brenda Zehr, Remedial Project Manager,
Environmental Management Flight, McChord AFB 62 CES/CEV, 253-982-6202; Mr. Brian Lee,
Team Chief, Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE), 210-536-8379; Mr. Randie
Strom, Program Manager, TtFW, 210-226-2922; Mr. Mark Ingersoll, Delivery Order Manager,
TtFW, 406-494-3446; and Mr. Mike Kuntz, Remedial Project Manager, Washington State
Department of Ecology, 360-407-7239.
                                                                                                                                                           2532193
                                                                                                                                                      Contents


                                                                   CONTENTS
Section                                                                                                                                                   Page

1. IN TR O DU CTIO N ................................................................................................................................. 1-1

2. BA CKG ROU N D .................................................................................................................................... 2-1

3.    ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................                                                                3-1
      3.1 D elivery O rder M anager ...............................................................................................................             3-1
      3.2 Field Operations Leader ...............................................................................................................               3-1
      3.3 Project H ealth and Safety M anager .............................................................................................                     3-1
      3.4 Site H ealth and Safety O ffi cer .....................................................................................................               3-1
      3.5 H ealth and Safety Technician .......................................................................................................                 3-2
      3.6 Site W orkers ....................................................................................................................................    3-2

4.    CO M PREH EN SIVE W O RK PLAN ..................................................................................................                          4-1
      4.1 Installation of Shallow Groundwater Resource Protection Wells ..........................................                                              4-1
      4.2 Installation of Intermediate Resource Protection Wells ..........................................................                                     4-1
      4.3 Groundw ater Sampling .................................................................................................................               4-2
      4.4 Surface W ater/Sedim ent Sam pling .............................................................................................                      4-2
      4.5 Well D ecomm issioning .................................................................................................................              4-2
      4.6 Surveying .........................................................................................................................................   4-2
      4.7 Weekly Inspections of Area D/ALGT Treatment Plant .........................................................                                           4-2
      4.8 Maintenance of the Area D/ALGT Treatment System ...........................................................                                           4-2

5. SITE CH ARA CTERIZATIO N ............................................................................................................                        5-1
   5.1 Chem ical Contam inants ................................................................................................................                 5-1
       5.1.1   LTO ...................................................................................................................................          5-1
       5.1.2 LIM ...................................................................................................................................            5-1
   5.2 Toxicological Properties of Contam inants of Concern ...........................................................                                         5-2
   5.3 Physical H azards ............................................................................................................................           5-5
       5.3.1 Fall Protection ..................................................................................................................                 5-5
       5.3.2 Confined Spaces ...............................................................................................................                    5-5
       5.3.3 Lockout/Tagout ..............................................................................................................                      5-6
       5.3.4 H eavy Lifting ....................................................................................................................                5-6
       5.3.5 Shp, Trip, and Fall H azards ............................................................................................                          5-6
       5.3.6 Tlerm al Stress ..................................................................................................................                 5-6
       5.3.7 Contact with M echanical Equipm ent ...........................................................................                                    5-6
       5.3.8 N oise ..................................................................................................................................          5-7
       5.3.9 W orking N ear Surface Water .........................................................................................                             5-7

6.     SITE CONTROL MEASURES AND COMMUNICATIONS .....................................................                                                            6-1
       6.1 Work Zones ....................................................................................................................................       6-1
       6.2 Exclusion Zone ..............................................................................................................................         6-1
       6.3 Conu m ination Reduction Zone ..................................................................................................                      6-1
       6.4 Support Zone .................................................................................................................................        6-1
       6.5 Com m unications ............................................................................................................................         6-1

                                                                                                         Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
0:              OLTO                     T                                       i                                                  January2005
                 253 2 19 4
Contents


7. TRAINING AND RECORD-KEEPING REQUIREMENTS .....................................................                                                             7-1
   7.1 HAZW O PER Training-and M edicalSurvefllance ....................................................................                                      7-1
   7.2 Site-Specific Training .....................................................................................................................           7-1
   7.3 Safety Briefings ...............................................................................................................................       7-2
    7.4 job Site Inspections .......................................................................................................................          7-2
    7.5 First Aid and CPR ..........................................................................................................................          7-2
    7.6 Record-K eeping Requirem ents ....................................................................................................                    7-2

8. M ED ICAL SURVEILLAN CE ............................................................................................................. 8-1

9. PERSO NAL PROTECTIVE EQU IPM EN T....................................................................................                                      9-1
   9.1 Level D ............................................................................................................................................   9-2
   9.2 M odified Level D ...........................................................................................................................          9-2
   9.3 Inspection of Personal Protective Equipm ent ..........................................................................                                9-2
   9.4 Monitoring Personal Protective Equipm ent Effectiveness .....................................................                                          9-3

10. DECO NTAM INATIO N ....................................................................................................................                   10-1
    10. I Personnel D econtam ination .......................................................................................................                 10-1
    10.2 Equipm ent D econtam ination ....................................................................................................                    10-1
    10.3 Contam ination Prevention .........................................................................................................                  10-1

 11. A IR MO N ITO RIN G .......................................................................................................................... 11-1

 12. EM ERG EN CY RESPO NSE .............................................................................................................                     12-1
     12.1 Site Em ergency Coordinator ......................................................................................................                  12-5
     12.2 Environmental Incident (Spill) ..................................................................................................                   12-6
     12.3 Explosion ......................................................................................................................................    12-6
     12.4 Personnel Injury ...........................................................................................................................        12-6
     12.5 A dverse W eather ..........................................................................................................................        12-7
     12.6 Em ergency Equipm ent ...............................................................................................................               12-7

 13. M ED ICAL D ATA SH EET ................................................................................................................ 13-1

 14. FIELD TE AM REV IEW .................................................................................................................... 14-1

 15. HEALTH AN D SAFETY PLAN APPRO VAL ............................................................................. 15-1



                                                         LIST OF APPENDICES
 Appendix A               Health and Safety Record Forms
 Appendix B               Standard Operating Procedures
 Appendix C               Activity Hazard Analyses Tables




                                                                                                          EnvironmentalRestoration Projects--HSP
 G                        M Q                                                     ii                                                              January2005
                                                                                                                                                                  32 19 5
                                                                                                                                          Figurest7ables



                                                         LIST OF TABLES
Table                                                                                                                                                 Page

T able 5-1.     C herrcal     D ata T able ..................................................................................... .......................... 5-2

Table 9-1.      Personal Protective Equipment .............................................................................................. 9-1

Table 1 1-1. Real-Time Monitoring Action Levels ................................................................................... 11-1

Table 12-1. Emergency Response Contacts .............................................................................................                   12-1




                                                        LIST OF FIGURES
Figure                                                                                                                                                 Page

Figure 2-1.        McChord AFB Site Location Map ...................................................................................... 2-3

Figure 12-1.       Hospital Route Map ............................................................................................................ 12-3




                                                                                                     EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-HSP
GW                  LTO O            M.                                     iii                                                January2005
            ^ r.
            (.J32196
TablesiFiclures




                       This page intentionally left blank.




                                                        EnvironmentalRestoratfon Projects-HSP
                                        1v                                        January2005
                                                                                                  25 32 19
                                                                      List of Acronyms and Abbreviations



                     LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
    %                         percent

    AFB                       Air Force Base
    AFCEE                     Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence
    AFIA                      activity hazard analysis
    Air Force                 U.S. Air Force
    ALGT                      American Lake Garden Tract
    arm                       atmospheres


    BTEX                      benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes

    CFR                       Code of Federal Regulations
    cis-1,2-DCE               cis-1,2-dichlotoethene
    CPR                       cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    CRL                       Corporate Reference Library
    CRZ                       contamination reduction zone


    DB                        decibel
    1,1-DCE                   1,1-dichloroethene
    DO                        Delivery Order

    Ecology                   Washington State Department of Ecology
    EHS                       Environmental Safety and Health
    EPA                       U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    EZ                        exclusion zone

    OF                         degrees Fahrenheit
    FCR                        Field Change Request
    FOL                        Field Operations Leader
     ft                        feet, foot

     HAZMAT                    hazardous material
     HAZWOPER                  hazardous waste operation and emergency response
     HSP                       Health and Safety Plan
     HST                       Health and Safety Technician

     IRP                       Installation Restoration Program


     LEL                       lower explosive limit
     LTM                       long-term monitoring
     LTO                       long-term operations




                                                                   Environmental RestorationProjects-l-ISP
G                 LTOQ   TP                         v                                        January2005
               253219
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations



            LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Concluded)
     mg/m 3                    milligrams per cubic meter
     nun Hg                    millimeters of mercury

     NFRAP                     No Further Remedial Action Planned
     NPL                       National Priorities I,ist


     OSHA                      Occupational Safety and Health Administration


     PEL                       permissible exposure Emit
     PHSM                      Project Health and Safety Manager
     PPE                       personal protective equipment

     PPM                       parts per million
     PVC                       polyvinyl chloride


     SHSO                       Site Health and Safety Officer
     SOP                        standard operating procedure
     Sz                         support zone


     TCE                        trichloroethene
     TLV                        threshold limit value
     TtFW                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.


     UEL                        upper explosive limit




                                                                    EnvironmentalRestorationProjects-HSP
 G            Lwa                                          A                                 January 2005
                                                                                                  2532199


                                  1. INTRODUCTION

This Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan (HSP) describes the health and safety practices and controls
that will be implemented by all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) employees and its subcontractors
participating in the activities associated with environmental restoration projects at McChord Aix
Force Base (AFB), Pierce County, Washington. The purpose of this plan is to provide a means of
conducting all aspects of project activities, including groundwater sampling and inspection,
sampling, and maintenance of the Area D/Arnerican Lake Garden Tract (ALGT) groundwater
treatment plant, in a safe and effective manner.

Activities performed under this HSP will comply with applicable sections of 29 Code of Federal
Regulations (CFR) 1910.120 and TtFW's Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) programs,
policies, and procedures, which can be referenced in the Corporate Reference Library (CRL). In this
HSP, TtFW procedures are referred to by number to facilitate access on the online CRL. For
example, training requirements for health and safety personnel are listed as "EHS 1-11, Training."

Modifications to the HSP may be made with the approval of the Project Health and Safety Manager
(PHSM) using the Field Change Request (FCR) form found in the CRL. Any proposed changes to
this plan shall be reviewed and approved by TtFW's PHSM, the Air Force Center for
Environmental Excellence (AFCEE), and the AFCEE Delivery Order (DO) Manager.

TtFW, TtFW 's subcontractors, and Ttl`W 's client do not guarantee the health or safety of any
person entering this site. Because of the nature of the sites and the activity occurring thereon, it is
not possible to discover, evaluate, and provide protection for all possible hazards that may be
encountered. Strict adherence to the health and safety guidelines set forth herein will reduce, but not
eliminate, the potential for injury at McChord AFB. The health and safety guidelines in this plan
were prepared specifically for environmental restoration projects and should not be used on any
other site without prior research and evaluation by trained health and safety specialists.




                                                                  EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-HSP
                                                                                            January2005
            2532200
Section 1




                      This page intentionally left blank.




                                                       Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
                                       1-2                                        Januafy 2005
                                                                                                2532201I

                                   2. BACKGROUND

McChord AFB is an active military installation comprising 4,616 acres, located approximately
7 miles south of the city of Tacoma in Pierce County, Washington (Figure 2-1).The majority of
McChord AFB was developed between 1938 and 1941. Primary construction consisted of two
runways and four hangars. The base administration building, hospital, radio transmitter building, Air
Corps barracks, maintenance building, coal-fired heating plant, and six residential buildings were also
completed during this time. McChord Field was formally dedicated on July 3, 1940.

After dedication of the airfield, McChord served primarily as a bomber base and the home of the
17th Bombardment Group and the 89th Reconnaissance Squadron. The base mission greatly
increased at the onset of World War II, when McChord Field became the largest bomber-training
base. The current host unit, the 62nd Air Mobility Command (then designated the 62nd Transport
Group), was assigned to McChord in 1947, and on January 1, 1948, McChord Field was redesignated
McChord AFB.

Until the 1950s, the base experienced little or no growth, but the second major construction phase
began when significant traffic in both personnel and supplies passed through McChord AFB in
support of the United Nations operations in Korea. This construction effort consisted primarily of
the installation of improved weapons systems and fighter operational facilities and lengthening of
the runway to 8,100 feet (ft). In 1960, the runway was lengthened again to 10,100 ft.

During the 1960s, McChord AFB became a major gateway to Southeast Asia. The base became a
Military Airlift Command installation in 1968, when the 62nd Military Airlift Wing assumed
command of the base from the 25th Air Defense Command. 'Me 1970s marked the third
development phase of McChord AFB, when improved navigational equipment was installed, the
central heating plant was converted from coal to natural gas, and other support services were
constructed.

A Federal Facilities Agreement between the U.S. Air Force (Air Force), U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology),
signed August 23,1989, governs the National Priorities Ilst (NPL) sites at McChord AFB. A
consent decree between McChord AFB and Ecology was signed February 27, 1992, to govern 29
non-NPL sites at the base. Air Force decision documents have been prepared for all 29 sites.

Beginning in 1982, the Air Force identified 62 Installation Restoration Program (IRP) sites at
McChord AFB. Three additional sites were added in 1984, 1989, and 1991. In response to potential
risks posed by the sites, McChord AFB has investigated the sites and conducted remedial action,
where necessary. Currently, there is one area listed on the NPL, Site LF-05 within Area D/ALGT.
The Notice of Deletion of the Washrack/Treatment Area from die NPL, which included sites
SD-54 and DP-60, was published in the Federal Register on September 26, 1996. Six sites are
currently on the state's hazardous sites list. Sites to be monitored are shown on Figure 2-1.




                                                                  Environmental Restoration Projects-14SP
                                                 2-1                                         January 2005
            2532202
Section 2




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                                                       Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
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                                                                                                                                          2532203


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                                                                                                     fall,, o',
       McChord AFB Boun ary
                                                                                  V.




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             McGhord AFB
Base-Wide Groundwater Monitoring and
Natural Attenuation Monitoring Program

          Figure 2-1
 McChord AFIB Site Location Map

  Date: 1/2005
                      I
                      I,    ,

            2532204
Section 2




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                                                            Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
 G          Lwa                            2-4                                         January2005
                                                                                                      2532205

3. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

AU employees and workers on this project are expected to maintain vigilance at all times to ensure
that the work is conducted safely and efficiently. To provide an organizational structure that
supports tl-s objective, the following individuals are assigned specific responsibilities and lines of
communication for the duration of this project.

3.1       Delivery Order Manager
Mr. Mark Ingersoll is the designated DO Manager for this project. He is responsible for overall
administration of the project. His duties include project planning, budgeting, communications, and
coordination. He is also responsible for ensuring that adequate personnel and equipment resources
are available to complete the project safely. In addition, he may assist the PHSM in the preparation
and enforcement of the HSP. The DO Manager reports to TtFW 's AFCEE Program Manager.

3.2       Field Operations Leader                                                                 I
Mr. Richard Weingarz is the designated Field Operations Leader (FOL). The FOL or designated
representative is responsible for ensuring that all work is performed in a safe and healthful manner
in accordance with the contract requirements. His other responsibilities include, but are not limited
to, (1) project planning; (2) scheduling; (3) site documentation; (4) regulatory compliance;
(5) personnel assignments; (6) customer and subcontractor relations; (7) enforcement of health and
safety rules and HSP requirements; (8) conduct of routine safety inspections, daily safety meetings,
and incident investigations; and (9) ensuring that site personnel arc adequately rained and qualified
to work at the site.

 The FOL reports directly to the DO Manager or designated representative. During site investigation
 activities, the FOL may serve as the project geologist or engineer.

 3.3      Project Health and Safety Manager
 Mr. Chris Rhodes is TtFW's PHSM. The PHSM has the responsibility and authority to oversee the
 development, revision, and approval of this HSP and to audit the equipment and training of
 involved company and subcontractor employees to implement the plan. 'Me PHSM also is
 responsible for reviewing health and safety issues that may arise during the project, approving Site
 Health and Safety Officer (SHSO) assignments and project responsibilities, coordinating changes in
 personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements with the SHSO, conducting major accident
 investigations, and conducting periodic site audits and inspections. The PHSM or designated
 representative has discretionary authority to shut down this project, granted to him by TtFW's
 Corporate Health and Safety Director. This project may not start until the PHSM has approved this
 HSP.

 3.4      Site Health and Safety Officer
 Mr. Richard Weingarz: is the designated SHSO. The SHSO is responsible for verification and overall
 compliance with this HSP. His duties include, but are not limited to, (1) onsite monitoring to
 determine appropriate levels and use of PPE; (2) site surveillance, hazard identification, and health
 risk analysis; (3) implementing procedures and programs to eliminate risk to site personnel including

                                                                    Environmental RestorationProjects-HSP
 GwLTOQ                                             3-1                                       January2005
Section 3
            2532206

initiating changes to the HSP; (4) implementing site control measures; (5) assisting in conducting and
documenting daily health and safety briefings; (6) maintaining health and safety field log books;
(7) providing surnmaries of field operations and progress to the PHSM; and (8) instructing all site
personnel in the terms and conditions of this HSP.

Ile   SHSO reports directly to the PHSM or his designated representative and the DO Manager.

3.5      Health and Safety Technician
The Health and Safety Technician (HST) assists the SHSO in monitoring compliance with the HSP.
The HST will conduct required air monitoring, evaluate air-monitoring data, calibrate air-monitoring
instruments, and ensure that HSP requirements are followed by all site workers. The HST has stop-
work authority in case of an imminent safety hazard or potentially dangerous situation. After
stopping work, the HST will immediately consult the DO Manager and SHSO. The HST win
implement and enforce this HSP onsite and seek assistance from die SHSO when necessary. The
HST must have successfully completed the requirements for cross-trained health and safety officers
as set forth in CRL procedure EHS 1-1 1, Training.

For short-duration and non-complex field projects (e.g., routine groundwater sampling), the SHSO
will perform the duties of the HST.

3.6      Site Workers
All site workers, including subcontractors and craft labor, have the responsibility to report any
unsafe or potentially hazardous situations to the SHSO, HST, or FOL. Site workers will maintain
knowledge of the information, instructions, and emergency response actions contained in the HSP.
AU site workers will comply with the rules, regulations, and procedures as set forth in the HSP.




                                                                  EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-14SP
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                       4. COMPREHENSIVE WORK PLAN

This section describes the specific work activities that will, or may potentially, be performed -aspart
of environmental restoration projects at McChord AFB. The environmental restoration projects at
McChord AFB have been divided into two distinct projects known as long-term monitoring (LTM)
and long-term operations (LTO). The LTO project is limited to the Area D/ALGT, located
primarily on or near the VVhispering Firs Golf Course in the western portion of the base (see Figure
2-1). The LTM project consists of sites located throughout the remainder of the base and includes
Consent Decree sites SS-34, WP-44, and \W-64; No Further Remedial Action Planned (NFRAP)
sites; and base boundary monitoring (see Figure 2-1). The specific (or potential) work activities
associated with the LTO projects include:

    •      Installing shallow groundwater resource protection wells utilizing hollow-stem auger drilling
           techniques

     •     Installing intermediate/deep groundwater resource protection wells utilizing air-rotary
           drilling techniques

     •     Collecting groundwater samples from resource protection wells

       •   Collecting surface water/sediment samples from various locations of Clover Creek

       •   Decommissioning a portion of the existing monitoring and/or drinking water supply wells
           located throughout die base

       •   Surveying any new resource protection wells and surface water/sediment sampling locations

       •   Performing weekly inspections of the Area D/ALGT treatment plant and associated
           extraction wells

       •   Maintaining the Area D/ALGT treatment system including carbon change-out, collecting
           groundwater samples from extraction wells, and pump/piping repair

 4.1       Installation of Shallow Groundwater Resource Protection Wells
 Shallow (approximately 50 ft below ground surface) resource protection wells associated with the
 LTM and/or LTO projects will be installed utilizing hollow-stem auger drilling techniques. The
 wells may be installed within the base boundary or outside the base boundary in the various
 neighborhoods surrounding the base.

 4.2       Installation of Intermediate Resource Protection Wells
 Intermediate/deep (approximately 100 to 300 ft below ground surface) resource protection wells
 associated with the LTM and/or LTO projects will be installed utilizing air-rotary drilling
 techniques. The wells may be installed within the base boundary or outside the base boundary in the
 various neighborhoods surrounding the base.


                                                                     Environmental RestorationPmjeds-HSP
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              2532208
Section 4


4.3     Groundwater Sampling
Groundwater samples will be collected from various resource protectionwells throughout the base
associated with both the LTM and LTO projects. The wells will be sampled multiple times during
different seasons of the year. The groundwater in the wells will be sampled for theappropriate
contaminants of concern depending on the site associated with the wells. These contaminants
include volatile organic compounds, fuel and fuel-related compounds, pesticides, and inorganic
metal compounds (lead).

4.4     Surface Water/Sediment Sampling
Surface water/sediment samples may be collected from locations within Clover Creek in
conjunction with the LTM project. The surface water/sediment samples will be collected within the
base boundary and/or outside the base in the various neighborhoods surrounding the base.

4.5     Well Decommissioning
Decommissioning of a portion of the existing resource protection and/or drinking water supply
wells located throughout the base may be conducted in conjunction with both the LTM and LTO
projects. The decommissioning method will be determined by the construction details of each well.
An air- or hydraulic-driven perforator may be needed to accomplish well decommissioning.

4.6         Surveying
All new resource protection wells, as well as the surface water/sediment locations, will be surveyed
for location and elevation. This work will involve no intrusive activity.

4.7         Weekly Inspections of Area D/ALGT Treatment Plant
As part of the LTO project, weekly inspections of the groundwater treatment plant will be
conducted. These inspections include recording pumping rates from the extraction wells, recording
totalizer meter readings from the plant and extraction wells, occasionally collecting system effluent
samples, and ensuring proper operation of the treatment plant.


4.8         Maintenance of the Area D/ALGT Treatment System
Periodic maintenance will be conducted of the Area D/ALGT treatment system associated with the
LTO project. The maintenance of the system will include changing out and sampling spent carbon
from the treatment vessels, collecting quarterly groundwater samples from the extraction wells
associated with the treatment system, repairing or recalibrating electrical systems, and performing
any necessary repairs to system pumps and/or piping. Carbon change-out and carbon sampling
activities will include working at heights that will require the use of fall protection devices (see
Appendix C, Activity Hazard Analyses [ARAs], and Standard Operating Procedure [SOP] 1, EHS
3-8, Fall Protection, in Appendix B for details). Extraction well sampling and/or maintenance that
will occur in the well vaults requires implementation of nonpermitted confined space entry
procedures (see Appendix B [SOP 2, EHS 6-1, Confined Space Entry), and the AHAs in Appendix
 C for details).




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 G.W         AFU   LTO     T                        4-2                                        January2005
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                          5. SITE CHARACTERIZATION

This section presents an assessment of the chemical and physical hazards that may be encountered
while performing the tasks specified in Section 4 of this HSP. The intent of this section is to make
site personnel aware of the nature, level, and degree of exposure likely to be encountered as a result
of their participation in this project. Site personnel shall be advised of these conditions before
entering the project site.

5.1       Chemical Contaminants
Ile primary chemical contaminants of concern that could pose an exposure hazard to site personnel
vary by site or area. The known contaminants of concern for each site or area included in the
ongoing environmental restoration projects at McChord AFB are discussed below.

5.1.1 LTO
The LTO project is limited to the Area D/ALGT located on and around the Whispering Firs Golf
Course in the western portion of the base. This site has been investigated for at least 10 years, and
multiple sampling events have been conducted each year. The four contaminants of concern
identified at Area D/ALGT are ttichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dicWoroethene (cis-1,2-DCE),
1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), and vinyl chloride.

5.1.2 LTM
The LTM project encompasses all of the sites currently identified at McChord AFB, with the
exception of die LTO project site, Area D/ALGT. A more detailed description of the sites is found
in the associated Long-Term Monitoring, AR Sites, and Monitored Natural Attenuation Work Plan.
The primary contaminants of concern for each site are listed below.

5.1.2.1    Site SS-34
The primary contaminants of concern at Site SS-34 are fuel compounds, including gasohne and
diesel-range hydrocarbons, as well as fuel-related compounds, and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene,
and xylenes (BTFA.

5.1.2.2    Site WP44
The primary contaminants of concern at Site WP-44 are fuel compounds, including gasoline and
diesel-range hydrocarbons. In addition, limitcd amounts of benzene have been detected in one well
(CW-9).
5.1.2.3   NFRAP Site LF-10
'Me primary contaminant of concern at site LF-10 is vinyl chloride.

5.1.2.4   NFRAP Site LF-13
The primary contaminant of concern at site LF-13 is vinyl chloride.




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Section 5


5.1.2.5     NFRAP Site DP-60
The primary contaminants of concern at Site DP-60 are fuel compounds, including gasoline and
diesel-range hydrocarbons, as well as fuel-related compounds and BTEX.

5.1.2.6     Site WP-64
Occasional detections of pesticides, in the parts-per-billion range, have been reported in the well
located at Site WP-64.

5.1.2.7     Base Boundary Wells
Wells located at the base boundary of McChord AFB are used for compliance monitoring purposes.
No detections of compounds above regulatory limits have been identified in the base boundary
wells.

5.2         Toxicological Properties of Contaminants of Concern
Additional information about the potential chemical contaminants of concern is presented in
Table 5-1 and in the AHAs presented in Appendix C.
                                           Table 5-1. Chemical Data Table
                                                      Flash       Vapor     Boiling
                                     LEL       UEL    Point      Pressure    Point    Specific
   Compound            TLVIPEL                 M       rF)       (mm Hg)      (OF)    Gravity      Reactivity
  Gasoline             300 ppm       1.4       7.6     -45          38        102      -0.72-    Oxidizers
                                                                                        0.76
  Diesel Fuel       10 ppm           0.6        7.5    125    NA              340       0.86     Oxidizers
  JP-5               5 Ppm           0.7         5     100    NA              346       0.86     Oxidizers
  Lead            0.05 Mg/rrP        NA         NA     NA                    3,164               Oxidizers/adds
  Benzene          __5 _PpM          1.2        7.8    12                     176                Oxidizers
  Ethylbenzene      100 ppm          0.8        6.7    55      7              27                 Oxidizers
  Toluene           50 ppm           1.1        7.1    40     21              232                 x      rs
  Xylenes           100 ppm          1.1        7.0    81      9              281                Oxidize        s
  1'1-DCE        1 5 ppm             6.5     1 15.5     -2    500              89                Oxidizers/adds
  Vinyl chloride     1 ppm           3.6     1 33.0   _NL_L3.3 (atm)                             Oxidizers
                    200 ppm                  1-12.8     36    180
  Cis-1,2-DCE                        5.6                                                         CausticlalkaliN
  TCE                50 ppm            8       10.5 1 NA            58                           Caustic/alkali


 The toxicological effects of acute and chronic exposure to the primary contaminants of concern for
 the environmental restoration projects are as follows:

            Gasofine. Acute and chronic exposure to gasoline may result in dermatitis, respiratory
            irtitation, cardiac sensitization, and coma and/or death from respiratory failure. Ingestion of
            vornitus must be avoided because chemical pneumonitis and puhnonary
            edema/hemorrhaging can occur. Symptoms of exposure to gasoline include headache,
            dizziness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and loss of coordination. Because of the duration of
            usage at McChord AFB, the possibility exists that gasoline found at the site may contain


                                                                            Environmental Restoration Pmjects--HSP
 G            AFRLMO             T                         5-2                                         January 2005
                                                                                                         2 53 2 21
                                                                                                     Section 5


              lead. As such, awareness at sites that have gasoline as a contaminant of concern should also
              include lead hazards, which are described below.

      •       DieselFueZ From a toxicological standpoint, the health effects of diesel fuel exposure
              resemble those of kerosene. Excessive inhalation of aerosol or mist can cause respiratory
              tract irritation, headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and loss of coordination. If vomiting
              occurs after ingestion and if oil is aspirated into the lungs, hemorrhaging, and pulmonary
              edema can occur, progressing to renal involvement. Chemical pneumonitis may result.
              Repeated skin contact with diesel fuel can cause dermatitis.

      •       JP-5. From a toxicological standpoint, the health effects of JP-5 exposure resemble those of
              kerosene. Excessive inhalation of aerosol or mist can cause respiratory tract irritation,
              headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and loss of coordination. If vomiting occurs after
              ingestion and if oil is aspirated into the lungs, hemorrhaging and pulmonary edema can
               occur, progressing to renal involvement. Chemical pneumonitis may result. Repeated skin
               contact with JP-5 can cause dermatitis.

      •       Lead.Lead is a potent systemic poison that affects a variety of organ systems, including the
              nervous system, kidneys, reproductive system, blood formation, and gastrointestinal system.
              Generally, lead enters the body through inhalation, but it can be ingested when lead dust or
              unwashed hands contaminate food, drink, or tobacco products. Once in the body, lead
              enters the bloodstream and circulates to various organs. Lead concentrates and remains in
              the bones for many years. The amount of lead the body stores increases as exposure
              continues, with possible cumulative effects. Very high doses of lead can cause brain damage
              (encephalopathy). Lead may aggravate nervous system disorders (e.g., epilepsy,
              neuropathies), kidney diseases, high blood pressure, infertility, and anernia. An acute, short-
              term dose of lead could cause acute encephalopathy, with seizures, coma, and death.
              However, short-term exposures of this magnitude are rare. Kidney damage, as well as
              anernia, can occur from acute exposure. Symptoms of chronic, long-term overexposure
              include loss of appetite, nausea, metallic taste in the mouth, constipation, anxiety, anernia,
              excessive tiredness, weakness, insomnia, headache, nervous irritability, numbness, muscle
              and joint pain, and colic accompanied by severe abdominal pain.

          •    Bentene. Benzene is listed as a human carcinogen. Additional chronic health effects of
               exposure to benzene include dermatitis and liver and kidney damage; it has also been shown
               to be a bone marrow depressant. Acute health effects include irritation to body tissues and
               central nervous system responses. Symptoms of exposure include eye and skin irritation,
               nose and throat irritation, giddiness, headache, nausea, staggered gait, fatigue, anorexia, and
               lassitude. '17hc primary routes of exposure at die site are inhalation of vapors and through
               skin contact with contaminated water.

          •    Elylbentene. Acute and chronic exposure to ethylbenzene can cause nausea, headaches,
               dizziness, and eye damage. Symptoms of exposure to ethylbenzene include headache,
               mucous membrane irritation, skin irritation, and eye irritation. The primary routes of
               exposure at the site are inhalation of vapors and through skin contact with contaminated
               water.


                                                                          Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
G:W                     LM Q                             5-3                                         January2005
              2 53 2 21 2
Section 5


    •    Tolmene. Repeated exposure to toluene may lead to dermatitis, with central nervous system
         effects including head-ache, nausea, and lassitude. Symptoms of exposure include eye
         irritation, skin irritation, respiratory tract irritation, gastrointestinal tract irritation, central
         nervous system depression, derinatitis, lassitude, and headache. The primary routes of
         exposure at the site are inhalation of vapors -and through skin contact with contaminated
         water.

    •    Xylenes. Acute inhalation exposure to xylenes may cause headache, nausea, vorniting,
         dizziness, irritation of the upper respiratory tract, narcosis, and unconsciousness; exposure
         may be fatal. Direct contact with xylenes may lead to skin and eye irritation. Ingestion of
         xylenes may lead to headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, gastrointestinal and kidney
         damage, and low blood pressure. The primary routes of exposure at the site are inhalation of
         vapors and through skin contact with contaminated water.

    •    1, I-DCE. Overexposure can cause disruption of liver and kidney functions; dyspnea
         (breathing difficulty); dizziness; headaches; skin, eye or throat irritation; and pneumontitis.
         This chemical is listed as a potential occupational carcinogen. The primary routes of
         exposure at the site are inhalation of vapors and through skin contact with contaminated
         water.

    •    Vinyl chloride. Overexposure can cause lassitude (weakness/exhaustion), abdominal pains,
         gastrointestinal bleeding, enlargement of the liver, and pallor or cyanosis of extremities. This
         chemical is listed as a potential occupational carcinogen. The primary routes of exposure at
         the site are inhalation of vapors and through skin contact with contaminated water.

    •       cis-1,2-DCE. Overexposure can cause liver damage, respiratory tract irritation, mucous
            membrane irritation, and eye irritation. Symptoms of exposure to cis-1,2-DCE include
            irritability; it can also act as a narcotic at high concentrations. The primary routes of
            exposure at the site are inhalation of vapors and through skin contact with contaminated
            water.

     •      TCE. Overexposure can cause Ever damage, kidney damage, gastrointestinal disturbance,
            skin burns, and irritation to mucous membranes. Symptoms of exposure to TCE include
            nausea, headache, dizziness, eye irritation, and skin rashes. The primary routes of exposure at
            the site are inhalation of vapors and through skin contact with contaminated water.

The established Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limits
(PFI-s) for the contaminants of concern at McChord AFB are based on exposure to the pure form
of the chemicals averaged over an 8-hour work shift. Because the primary contaminants at McChord
AFB are dissolved within groundwater at the site and the highest concentrations observed to date in
existing onsite resource protection wells occur at part-per-billion levels, it is unlikely that personnel
exposure to these contaminants will be significant. If exposures do occur, they are likely to result
from direct skin contactwith contaminated groundwater or from the inhalation of volatilized
vapors. 'nese routes of exposure will be controlled through the use of PPE.




                                                                          Environmental RestorationProjects-l-ISP
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                                                                                                          2 5 32 2 1
                                                                                                    Section 5


      5.3       Physical Hazards
      Several safety hazards are likely to be associated with the planned and potential activities to be
      conducted at McChord AFB, including fall hazards; confined spaces; electrical hazards; underground
      utilities; heavy lifting; noise; slip, trip, and fall hazards; working around mechanical equipment;
      working in and around surface water; and thermal stress from working outside where weather
      conditions are variable and often severe. These hazards and the controls that will be applied to
      manage them are discussed below. A more detailed listing of hazard control strategies can be found
      in Appendix C.

      5.3.1     FaH Protection

      During treatment plant maintenance activities, working at heights greater than 6 ft will be requited
      during carbon change-out and carbon sampling activities. In addition, working at heights greater
      than 6 ft may be required during certain maintenance activities.

      A permanent metal platform surrounds the top of the carbon vessels. The platform has guardrails to
      prevent falls. However, fall protection will be required whenever work is to be performed on any
      piping or equipment greater than 6 ft above the floor of the treatment plant that is not protected by
      railings. Fall protection, when worn by workers, will be anchored to engineered anchor points
      located on the guardrail/ladder system of the carbon vessel. In the event an anchor point is not
      present at the location were work is to be performed, an anchor point will need to be engineered
      and installed.


      To comply with the OSHA standards, a full bod harness with a self-arresting lanyard certified as
      complying with 29 CFR 1926, Subpart M, must be worn. All personnel wearing fall protection
      equipment must comply with the training requirements presented in the TtFW fall protection
      procedure presented in Appendix B (SOP 1, EHS 3-8, Fall Protection).

      5.3.2 Confined Spaces
      The three extraction well vaults associated with the carbon treatment system may be classified as
      noripermitted confined spaces. Entry to the extraction vaults will be limited to the scheduled
      quarterly sampling events and any periodic and/or unscheduled pump/equipment maintenance
      activities.

     Nonpermittcd confined spaces are defined as spaces meeting all of the following criteria:

           •   Is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned
               work

           •   Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit

           •   Is not designed for continuous employee occupancy

     AU confined space entries will be conducted in accordancewith TtFW's confined space entry
     procedure presented in Appendix B (SOP 2, EHS 6-1, Confined Space Entry).



10

                                                                      EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-HSP
     GWC             LTO QPPVk                          5-5                                     January2005
            25 32 2 14
Section 5


Historical air quality data (oxygen/percent lower explosive limit U-,ELI/organic vapors) indicate that
the there is not a hazardous atmosphere present in the well vaults. Because of this, these well vaults
are not considered to be permit-requircd confined spaces.

5.3.3 Lockout(Tagout
When repairing or recalibrating electrical equipment or when working on piping, pumps, and tanks,
a worker may come in contact with an energized active piping system, lockout/tagout procedures
will be followed. The TtFW lockout/tagout procedure is presented in Appendix B (SOP 3, EHS 6-4,
Lockout/Tagout).

5.3.4 Heavy Lifting
Workers will be instructed to use proper lifting techniques when moving heavy loads. These
techniques will include using mechanical lifting devices (forklift, carts, etc) whenever feasible to
move equipment or supplies. When individuals lift exceptionally heavy loads, they will maintain
ergonomically safe lifting postures and request assistance if mechanical lifting devices cannot be
used.

5.3.5 Slip, Trip, and Fall Hazards
Keeping the work area free of debris and other litter will control slip, trip, and fall hazards. Site
workers will wear high-traction, steel-toed safety boots and pay careful attention to surface
conditions to prevent trip and fall injuries. The work area will be inspected before the start of work
each day to identify any hazards that could cause injury. The results of these inspections win be
 communicated to site personnel during the daily tailgate safety meetings.

 5.3.6 Thermal Stress
 Some planned work activities will be conducted outside where temperatures are unpredictable;
 consequently, there is a risk that site workers could develop heat or cold stress illness. The likelihood
 of this occurring is dependent on environmental conditions, the level of work activity, and the
 personal control measures that arc used to manage heat loads (work/rest cycles, use of clothing
 and/or cooling devices, hydration, etc). Appropriate control measures wild be taken to manage these
 thermal stress concerns. The site HST, for example, will monitor ambient temperatures in the work
 area, track thermal work loads, and determine the need for personal protective and administrative
 controls. Workers will be instructed in the recognition and control of thermal stress symptoms and
 in the treatment procedures listed in Appendix B (SOP 5, EHS 4-6, Temperature Extremes).

 5.3.7 Contact with Mechanical Equipment
 Drill rigs (both hollow-stem. and air-rotary) will be used to install new groundwater resource
 protection wells. There is a potential for workers to be struck by these rigs or to be injured by
 contact with exposed gears and pulleys. To control these hazards, barricades and caution tape will be
 used to establish regulated work areas around the site that will maintain a safe separation between
 workers and mechanical equipment. In addition, all exposed gears and pulleys will be guarded to
 eliminate pinch-and-grab hazards. Additionally, the provisions of SOP 6, EHS 6-2, Drill Rigs, will be
 followed (Appendix B)




                                                                     Environmental RestorationPrqects-HSP
  G         5ma                                      5-6                                       January 2005
                                                                                                  253 221 5
                                                                                               Section 5


5.3.8 Noise
The ambient noise levels in the work area could exceed acceptable Hrnits because heavy equipment
might be used. During air-rotary drilling, hearing protection will be required for all workers within
the exclusion zone (see Section 6 regarding work zones). During all other activities, if noise levels
exceed 85 decibels (0), workers will be required to wear bearing protection.

5.3.9 Working Near Surface Water
During surface water/sediment sampling activities, personnel may have to enter Clover Creek
during periods of high water. If the water level at the sampling point exceeds 2.5 ft, sampling
personnel will wear a U.S. Coast Guard life vest.




                                                                  EnvironmentalRestorationProjects--HSP
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Section 5




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                                                             EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-14SP
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     6. SITE CONTROL MEASURES AND COMMUNICATIONS

 6.1    Work Zones
The project site will be divided into an exclusion zone (EZ), a contamination reduction zone (CRZ),
and a support zone (SZ). The EZ is defined as the area where contamination and other site hazards
are either known or are likely to be present. The CRZ is where hazardous substances are removed
from site personnel and their equipment as they exit the EZ. The SZ is a noncontaminated area
where support services, storage of non-hazardous materials, and administrative activities may occur.
There will be no smoking, eating, or drinking within the EZ or CRZ. The zone locations win be
based upon current knowledge of proposed site activities. Thezone configurations may be changed
due to work plan revisions. Should this occur, the work zone figures will be adjusted accordingly and
documented on an FCR form.

 6.2    Exclusion Zone
The EZ will include the immediate vicinity around the drill rigs and excavator. This area will be
identified and isolated so as to preclude interference with operations by outside vehicles and
pedestrians. Isolation protocols may include use of ropes, barricades, temporary fencing, boundary
tape, warning signs, or other distinguishable markers. AU personnel entering the EZ Will use the
buddy system to maintain vigilance over each other. AU personnel will wear the PPE specified in
Section 9 of this HSP. EZ workers will also have copies of their medical HSP clearance and training
records on file at the site.

 6.3    Contamination Reduction Zone
A CRZ will be established between the SZ and the EZ and win be used for EZ entry and egress in
addition to access for heavy equipment and emergency support services. The CRZ will contain a
contamination reduction corridor that includes an area for decontamination of personnel and
portable hand-held equipment, tools, and heavy equipment. All personnel and equipment must pass
through the contamination reduction corridor when exiting the EZ. Personnel and equipment will
be decontaminated as described in Section 10. Decontamination activities to be conducted in the
CRZ will require personal protection as deemed necessary by the SHSC).

6.4    Support Zone
The SZ is located in an uncontaminated area of the site adjacent to the EZ and CRZ. Site access and
the majority of site operations will be controlled from this location. The SZ will contain provisions
for team communications and serve as a staging area for equipment, office facilities, and emergency
response resources. Safety equipment such as emergency eyewash, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, and
air horns will be stored in the SZ and transported to work areas as necessary. No contaminated
personnel or contaminated materials will be allowed in this zone, except appropriately packaged and
decontaminated environmental samples.

6.5    Communications
Communicationsvithin the EZ will be by verbal command, hand signals, radio, or a combination of
all three. All radios used onsite will be approved by the Local Command for compliance with


                                                                EnvironmentalRestorationProjects.-HSP
GW       MLTOQPP&        T                      6-1                                      January2005
            25 32 2 18
Section 6


assigned call numbers, frequencies, and operating wattages. In an emergency, an alert WM be
sounded with an air horn, as described in Section 12.

Telephones and/or radios will be used for offisite communications. The telephone numbers for all
emergency services, including the telephone numbers for the TtFW project personnel, are provided
in Section 12. These telephone numbers will be posted in the Area D/ALGT treatment plant and
site vehicles, and all site personnel will be aware of the location of the closest telephone or will have
direct radio communications to someone with telephone service available.

Successful communication among the field teams and contact among personnel is essential. Visual
or verbal communication between personnel in the SZ and personnel in the EZ will be maintained
at all times. If necessary, verbal communication will be maintained via radio communication, and the
hand signals will be used as applicable.

An air horn will be used to alert site personnel in an emergency. One air horn will be located in each
EZ work area and in each site vehicle. The SHSO or HST will test the effectiveness of the air horn
during initial site activities, and at least monthly thereafter, to ensure that all site personnel can
clearly perceive the alarm above operational noise levels. If operational noise levels prevent site
personnel from detecting the air horn alarm, other means of notification will be implemented.

One long blast on the air horn will be the signal to evacuate the site immediately. The initial
assembly point for all site personnel will be designated at each drilling location. Once all personnel
are accounted for, the Site Emergency Coordinator will assess the situation and outline the actions
to be taken. Two short blasts is the "all clear" signal and win be used to inform personnel that they
can re-entcr the site.

 Communication of evacuation routes and assembly points will occur daily during the tailgate safety
 briefing. Communication of hospital routes and emergency telephone numbers will be effected by
 posting this information in the SZ and in all site vehicles. Hospital route maps will -alsobe
 maintained in all site vehicles, and all personnel will be aware of the location of the nearest means of
 offisite communications.




                                                                      EnvironmentalRestorationPrqiects-HSP
                                                     6-2                                       January2005
                                                                                                   2 53 2 21 9

      7. TRAINING AND RECORD-KEEPING REQUIREMENTS

7.1     HAZWOPER Training and Medical Surveillance
All site personnel directly involved in the site investigation activities and/or those entering the EZ
will have received hazardous waste operation and emergency response (HAZWOPER) training, as
required by 29 CFR 1910.120(c). Details of the required training are presented in SOP 6, EHS 1-11,
Training. The following matrix summarizes the minimum required training:

                  Personnel                                 Requirements
             All site employees                          40-hour HAZWOPER
                                                           8-hour refresher
                                                     3 days on-theob supervision
                                                 Site-specific hazard communication
              Site supervisor                             8-hour supervisory
                SHSO/HST                      First aid/CPR and bloodbome pathogens
                   SHSO                   TtFW Environmental and Safety Supervisor Course
       One worker, inaddition to SHSO         First aid/CPR and bloodborne pathogens

Prior to personnel entering an EZ, documentation of the above-listed training will be kept on file at
the job site. Individuals not having evidence of 40-hour HAZWOPER training, 8-hour refresher
training (when necessary), 8-hour supervisory training (when necessary), 3-day on-the-job
supervision, and medical clearance from a certified occupational physician win not be allowed to
enter an EZ. Individuals insisting on entering an EZ without evidence of appropriate
documentation will be advised of noncompliance and documented in the site logbook. Repeated
violations will be reported to the DO Manager and PHSM.

7.2     Site-Specific Training
The SHSO or HST will provide and document site-specific training during the project site kickoff
meeting and whenever new workers arrive onsite. No workers will be allowed to begin work onsite
until the site-specific training has been completed and documented by the SHSO/HST. This
training will address this HSP, all FCRs, all health and safety issues, and procedures pertinent to site
operations. Further details of this training are presented in SOP 6, EHS 1-1 1, Training. As part of
the site-specific training, the following topics will be covered:

       Project introduction and orientation
       Potential site hazards (chernical, physical, and biological)
       Chemical, physical, and toxicological properties of site contaminants
       Hazard communication for materials brought onto the site and waste materials on site
       Selection, use, and limitations of PPE
       Decontamination and emergency response procedures
       Bloodborne pathogen briefing
       Review of applicable AHAs




                                                                   Environmental RestorationProjects-HSP
GW             LTOQP                              7-1                                        January 2005
             2532220
Section 7


7.3     Safety Briefings
Site workers will attend daily tailgate safety meetings conducted by the SHSO or HST and/or
meetings before the start of new work activities. A copy of the tailgate safety meeting form that will
be used to document these meetings is included in Appendix A. Updates in work practices and
hazards, emergency evacuation routes, and emergency procedures will be addressed at these
meetings.

7.4      Job Site Inspections
Health and safety inspections of the job site will be conducted each week during cont .Lnuous site
activities (sampling rounds, drilling events) by the FOL and every month by the DO Manager or his
designee. Inspection results will be recorded on the Weekly/Monthly Checklist and Action Item
Report found in Appendix A. Any deficiencies noted during these inspections will be promptly
corrected. Copies of the inspection reports will be kept on file at the job site and sent to the PHSM
for review.

If the project continues for an extended period of time, the PHSM may conduct a comprehensive
health and safety program audit of the job site on a quarterly basis. This audit will evaluate the
overall effectiveness of the HSP and assess compliance with applicable OSHA regulations and
TtFW EHS programs, policies, and procedures. Inspection findings will be sent to the DO Manager
for evaluation and correction of any deficiencies.

7.6         First Aid and CPR
At a minimum, the HST and one additional site worker will have received first aid and
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training from a certified instructor and approved by an
organization such as the American Red Cross. Persons trained in first aid and CPR will have
received instruction on bloodbornc pathogens, according to 29 CFR 1910.1030. Managing
bloodborne pathogen hazards will be conducted in accordance with SOP 7, EHS 4-1, Bloodbornc
Pathogens. Site-specific briefings will include information about site-specific bloodborne pathogen
hazards. The SHSO will keep a record of all site personnel having such training.

 The risk of bloodborne pathogen contact is considered remote for this project given the projected
 activities. However, bloodbome pathogen contact during administration of first aid could occur.
 Any TtFW employee involved in an exposure incident will be offered a post-exposure evaluation
 consisting of prophylaxis and hepatitis B vaccination immunization within 24 hours of exposure.

 7.6        Record-Keeping Requirements
 All health and safety record-keeping requirements mandated by 29 CFR 1910.120, 29 CFR 1926, and
 29 CFR 1904 will be followed as described in SOP 8, EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping. These records
 include FCRs, incident/near miss, weekly/monthly safety inspection checklist, daily tailgate safety
 meeting, weekly EHS report, and health and safety field logbooks. Copies of pertinent forms are
 included in Appendix A.




                                                                   Environmental Restoration Projects-11SP
 G               LTOQ                              7-2                                        January2005
                                                                                                    2532221

                          8. MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE

All TtFW site personnel who may be exposed to hazardous substances during this project will
participate in TtFW's medical surveillance program (SOP 9, EHS 4-5, Medical Surveillance). This
program requires a complete pre-employment physical with associated laboratory tests and a drug
screen. TtFW site personnel must pass this examination and have a copy of their medical clearance
on file at the site before being -allowed to enter the EZ. An updated physical is also required for all
personnel participating in this program, on a schedule as determined by the TtFW Corporate
Medical Consultant. Additional physical exams will be made available to program participants who
terminate their employment with TtFW or who are reassigned to a job position that does not require
participation in the program. TtFW subcontractor personnel must also meet the medical surveillance
requirements of SOP 9, EHS 4-5, Medical Surveillance, and show evidence of it before being
allowed onsite. In addition, these subcontractors must certify that they will comply with the drug-
free workplace requirements of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. TtFW's medical surveillance
program complies with 29 CFR 1910.120 (0 and Washington Administrative Code 296-62-3050.




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G              LTOQP      T                       8-1                                        January2005
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Section 8




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                                                            Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
  ,         LWQPP      T                    8-2                                        January 2005
                                                                                                                       2532223

                         9. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

PPE that will protect employees from the hazards and potential hazards they are likely to encounter
as identified in Sections 4 and 5 of this plan will be selected and used. Because of the nature of the
tasks involved and the size of the site, the SHSO will choose PPE on a daily basis depending on the
operation, location, and hazards for each task. The level of protection will be upgraded or
downgraded based on changes in site conditions, and all changes must be approved in advance by
the PHSM. Several factors that may indicate the need to re-evaluate site conditions and PPE
selection include:

             Contaminants other than those previously identified are encountered/handled
             Commencement of a new work phase
             Change in job tasks during a work phase
             Change of season/weather
             Change in work scope that affects the degree of contact with contaminants
             Change of ambient levels of contaminants

The PPE specified in Table 9-1 represents the hazard analysis and PPE selection required by 29 CFR
1910.132. For the purposes of PPE selection, the PHSM and SHSO are considered competent persons.
The signatures in Section 15 of this HSP constitute certification of the hazard assessment. For activities
not covered by Table 9-1, the SHSO will conduct the hazard assessment and select the PPE using the
form provided in Appendix A, and shall certify the assessment by signing the form. Modifications to
initial PPE selection relay be made by the SSHO in consultation with the PHSM.

                                      Table 9-1. Personal Protective Equipment
                                            Eye/
             Task                   Head    Face     Feet   Hands      Body      Hearing                     Respiratory
   DTilling/decom. wells           HH     SG       STB     LWG       cotcov    EP as needed                  Level D/
                                                                                                             Modified
                                                                                                             Level D
   Groundwater sampling            HH         SG         STB        Nit Glove     Cot Cov       EP as needed Level D/
                                                                                                             Modified
                                                                                                             Level D
   Surface water/sedimn-t          HH         SG         PVC        Nit Glove     Cot COW       EP as needed Level D
   sampling                                                                       Poly
   Surveying                       NA         NA         STB        NA            NA            NA                Level D
   Treatment plant                 HH         SG         STB        Nit Glove     Cot Cov       EP as needed      Level D
   inspections
   Treatment plant                 HH         SG         STB        LWG/Nit       Cot Cov       EP as needed      Level D/
   maintenance                                                      glove                                         Modified
                                                                                                                  Level D
      Notes:
      Head Protection:                        Hand Protection:                    Respiratory Protection:
      HH = Hard hat                           LWG = Leather work gloves           Level C=Air-purifying respirator
                                              Nit =Niftile                        Level D= No respiratory protection
      Eye/Face Protection:
      SG = Safety glasses with side shields   Body Protection:                    Hearing Protection:
                                              Cot Cov =Cotton coveralls           EP = Ear plugs
      Foot Protection:                        Poly =Poly-coated Tyvek coveralls   NA =Not applicable
      STB = Leather steel-toed boots
      PVC =Polyvinyl chloride boots

                                                                                     Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
 G:                      LTOOP=                                   9-1                                           January 2005
                2532224
Section 9


The type of protective equipment that will be worn for each specific work activity is listed in
SOP 10, EHS 5-1, Personal Protective Equipment.

Two different levels of PPELevel D and modified Level D-will be available for use during the
planned project activities. The general PPE components that make up these levels are listed in
Table 9-1.

9.1        Level D
If the potential for direct chemical contact is minimal or if workers are going to be outside the EZ
and CRZ, Level D PPE will be prescribed as follows:

           Cotton coveralls, leather work gloves, hard hat, and safety glasses with side shields
           Chemical-resistant boots or leather work boots with steel toe
           Optional disposable boot covers and cherrlical-protcctive gloves
           Hearing protection as required

9.2         Modified Level D
Modified level D PPE may be worn during well drilling, sampling, or maintenance activities if
desired by project personnel and will consist of the following:

      •     Poly-coated Tyvek coveralls

      •     Nitrile gloves and steel-toed polyvinyl chloride (PVC) boots (or leather steel-toed boots with
            latex booties)

      •     Hard hats

      •     Safety glasses with side shields

       •    Hearing protection as required

 9.3        Inspection of Personal Protective Equipment
 Prior to donning protective clothing, each garment will be visually inspected to identify defects, such
 as tears, cracks, holes, and de-laminations that could allow chemicals to penetrate clothing. This
 inspection procedure will involve holding the clothing into the light to illuminate penetration points
 and stretching the fabric along stitched or bonded seams to confirm the structural integrity of the
 garment. The surface of the clothing will also be inspected for any signs of wearing, cracldng, or
 degradation. Any openings or possible penetration points identified during this inspection will be
 sealed and/or masked. Clothing that is contaminated or discolored will be discarded.

 Other protective equipment, such as safety glasses, chemical protective goggles, and face shields, will
 be inspected for structural integrity and cleanliness. Goggles and glasses that are severely scratched
 will be discarded.




                                                                       EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-FiSP
                                                       9-2                                       January2005
                                                                                                    2532225
                                                                                               Section 9


 9.4     Monitoring Personal Protective Equipment Effectiveness
At the end of each shift, the SHSO will examine the inside of a representative sample of chernical
protective garments (Tyvek, gloves, -and boots) before they are discarded or cleaned to identify
evidence of chemical breakthrough. Such evidence would include any discoloration or staining of
the clothing; thinning, blistering, or cracking of the clothing material; and the presence of torn seams
and perforations. The SHSO will also note whether the workers themselves have become
contaminated while wearing the PPE. If, based on this examination, it is apparent that the PPE
designated for the work is not adequately controlling worker exposures, the level of personal
protection will be upgraded at the direction of the PHSM.




                                                                  EnvironmentalRestoration Projects-HSP
QWCEEW        LWQT                                9-3                                       January2005
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Section 9




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                                                       Environmental Restoration Pr4ects-HSP
 G            M Q                      9-4                                        January 2005
                                                                                                    2532227

                              10. DECONTAMINATION

Decontamination of personnel and equipment will be done in the CRZ. Personnel leaving the EZ
will proceed to the decontamination stations prior to entering the SZ or leaving the site.

All equipment, tools, and supplies that have been inside the EZ zone or in contact with
contaminated materials will be decontaminated. Coveralls, gloves, boot covers, and other disposable
PPE will be drummed for disposal if they cannot be adequately cleaned.

AU personnel in the CRZ will wear the same level of PPE as those in the EZ. Scrub brushes, tubs,
water sprayers, and wipe cloths will be set up to manage the decontamination process effectively.

10.1 Personnel Decontamination
Decontamination for site personnel wearing Level D PPE will consist of having workers remove
their hard hats, safety glasses, leather gloves, hearing protection, and outer protective garments prior
to leaving the site and storing the PPE in a dean area for reuse the next day.

Site personnel working in the EZ while wearing Level C PPE will be required to exit the site
through the contamination reduction corridor, where they will have their boots and gloves washed,
rinsed, and removed. They will then remove their Tyvek coveralls and place them in a plastic bag for
disposal.

The HST will ensure that the above-mentioned decontamination procedures are effectively
controlling the spread of contamination in the work area by periodically inspecting the recently
cleaned clothing and equipment for evidence of residual contamination. The work area will also be
examined to detect any sign of contamination outside of the EZ or CRZ. Should it become apparent
that contamination is being dispersed into clean areas of die site, work activities will cease until more
effective decontamination methods can be devised.

All contaminated PPE, clothing, decontamination solutions, and rinse water will be contained in
properly labeled drums and disposed of in accordance with applicable regulations.

10.2 Equipment Decontamination
Monitoring equipment used at the site will be covered with plastic or otherwise used in such a
manner as to prevent direct contact with contamination. When necessary, this equipment will be
decontaminated with a brush and warm water or a degreaser in accordancewith the manufacturer's
rccommendations.

10.3 Contamination Prevention
One of die most important aspects of decontamination is contamination prevention. During the
field activities, the following contamination-avoidance procedures will be in effect:




                                                                  Environmental RestorationPmjecta-HSP
W              LTOOT                              10-1                                      January2005
             2532228
Section 10


Personnel
      Do not handle or touch contaminated materials or liquids.
      Make sure PPE is free from cuts and tears prior to use.
       Fasten all closures on outer clothing, covering with tape if necessary.
       Report and cover any skin injuries.
       Stay upwind of dust or vapors.
       Do not cat, drink, or smoke in the EZ.

Equipment
  • When necessary, cover instruments to be used near hazardous materials with plastic, leaving
     openings for sampling.

     •   Limit contamination that comes in contact with heavy equipment, especially tires or tracks.

     •   Place contaminated tools on a separate plastic liner to avoid contamination of clean
         equipment.

     •   Keep contaminated materials contained and segregated from workers and clean equipment.




                                                                    EnvironmentalRestorationProjects-HSP
 G           LWO                                   10-2                                      January2005
                                                                                                                      2532229

                                       1 1. AIR MONITORING

Ambient air measurements for volatile organic vapors will be collected in the breathing zone of site
workers during drilling and well installation activities. In addition, during confined space entries in
the extraction well vaults, oxygen levels and percent of the LFL may also be monitored. The
purpose of this air monitoring is to ensure that vapors do not pose a significant inhalation hazard to
site personnel, to determine safe environments in confined spaces, and to determine the appropriate
level of PPE should the use of such equipment become necessary. Organic vapor levels win be
measured with a photoionization detector. Oxygen and LEL readings will be conducted using a
combustible gas indicator. The instrument readings will be compared to the actions levels listed in
Table I 1-1.
                             Tablell-1.         Real-TimeMonitoringActionLevels
   Monitoring instrument              Compound                       Action Level                    Site Action
  Photoicnization detector         Volatile Organics      >0.5 Ppm*                           Use colorimetric detector
                                                                                              tube for vinyl chloride.
                                                          >0.5 ppm*, no vinyl chloride        Use calorimetric detector
                                                                                              tube for 1,1-DCE.
                                                          <25 ppm*, no vinyl chloride or      Continue work.
                                                          1,1-DCE
                                                          >25 ppm*                            Suspend work, call PHSM.
  Colorimetric detector tube         Vinyl Chloride       >1 ppm,                             Suspend    work, call PHSM.
                                                          <1 ppm*                             Continue   work.
  Colorimetric detector tube            11.1-13CE         >2.5 ppm*                           Suspend    work, call PHSM.
                                                          < 2.5 ppm*                          Continue   work.
  Combustible Gas Indicator         Percent Oxygen        >19.5% but <22.0%                   Continue work.
                                                          <19.5% or >22.0%                    Suspend work: call PHSM.
                                      Percent LEL         <10% LEL                            Continue work.
                                                          >10% LEL                            Suspend work; call P=HSM
   Sustained for 5 minutes or greater inbreathing zone.


 The SHSO or HST will continuously, as practicable, collect all air measurements in the work area
 while work is ongoing. Air-monitoring results will be recorded in the site logbook and made
 available for review by all site personnel.

 Calibration and maintenance of monitoring equipment will be in compliance with the
 manufacturer's specifications and typically will be performed prior to daily monitoring. Calibration
 records will be kept in the project health and safety files. Daily reports describing sampling activities
 will be drafted and the originals kept in the files with the other health and safety documentation. The
 air-monitoring results will be posted on the bulletin board to communicate to the workers the status
 of the work environment.




                                                                                    Environmental Restoration PrqjectsHSP
                                                              11-1                                             January2005
             2532230
Section 11




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                                                        Environmental Restorabon Projects-HSP
                                       11-2                                       January 2005
                                                                                                            2532231

                            12. EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Because of the hazards onsite and the conditions under which operations are conducted, the
possibility of an emergency situation (personnel injury, fire, or explosion) exists. A copy of the
Emergency Response Plan (this section) -and the map to the hospital (Figure 12-1) will be posted at
the Area D/ALGT treatment plant by the SHSO and kept in an TtFW and subcontractor vehicles at
all times.

The Emergency Response Plan will be rehearsed a minimum of once a year. Tbe rehearsal will
include a staged personnel injury, spill of fuel, or vehicle fire. Prior to initial field activities, a drill will
be coordinated with the site emergency response facilities. At the completion of the emergency
response exercise or actual event, the DO Manager and SHSO will evaluate the effectiveness of the
emergency response procedures. This HSP will be modified to include any changes necessary.

A listing of emergency response contacts for this DO is presented in Table 12-1.

                            Table 12-1.       Emergency Response Contacts
                                                   Ambulance
                              Emergency                   I            911
                                                      Fire
                              Emergency (onbase)::711
                              Emergency (olfbase)         1            911
                                                  Public Safety
                              Public Safety               1            911
                                            Emergency Response Team
                              Onbase                      I             11
                              Offbase                     1            911
                                             McChord AFB Contacts
                              Brenda Zehr                 1      (253) 982-6202
                                               Tetra Tech FW Inc.
                              DO Manager, Mark Ingersoll         (406) 494-3446,
                                                              (303) 887-3972 (Cell)
                              PHSM, Chris Rhodes                 (303) 980-3674
                                                              (303) 748-0852 (Cell)
                              SHSO, Rick Weingarz                (509) 255-9969
                                                              (425) 785-9220 (Cell)




                                                                          EnvironmentalRestoration Projects--HSP
                                                        12-1                                        January 2005
             2532232
Section 12




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                                                            EnvironmentalRestoration Projecft-HSP
 ,             L       T                   12-2                                       January 2005
                                                                                                2532233



                                                          Clare




                                                                                                  LE

                                                                      Jj




                     N




                                                                            McChord AFB
                 N                                                    Environmental Restoration
                                                                              Projects
                                                 I Rctft
             +                          /V one Bmwmbry                        Figure 12-1
                                         '4,V, UwwW Rmd
                                                                           Hospital Route Map
         0 2W 4W 6DD OM Fed             A I Fenoo
                                            RmUmd                                     FOSTER WHEELER
lAwo),cts\mchwdhwpkd be4mpftwjocAv hm               7.2001        Date: 4/2002         EN\ARONmENTAL
              2532234
Section 12




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                                                             EnvironmentalRestorationProjects-HSP
  G-         LTOQ       T                    12-4                                     January2005
                                                                                                      2532235
                                                                                                 Section 12



12.1 Site Emergency Coordinator
TtFW has assigned responsibility for implementation of this Emergency Response Plan to Site
Emergency Coordinators. Ile Site Emergency Coordinator for the project is the FOL.

The Site Emergency Coordinator will contact the emergency response units (fire, police, and
medical) prior to beginning onsite work. He will inform the emergency units about the nature and
duration of work expected on the site, the location of the work, and the type of contaminants and
possible health or safety effects of emergencies involving these contaminants.

The Site Emergency Coordinator will implement this Emergency Response Plan whenever
conditions at the site warrant such action. The coordinator will be responsible for ensuring the
evacuation, emergency treatment, and emergency transport of site personnel as necessary and for
notifying emergency response units, the Air Force, and the appropriate TtFW management staff.

The Site Emergency Coordinator will inspect emergency response equipment on a monthly basis.
After initial inspection, this task may be delegated to the HST. This equipment includes fire
extinguishers, first aid kits, and spill-control equipment. As part of the daily site walk-through, the
Site Emergency Coordinator will look carefully for fire hazards or spill hazards and assess individual
work practices. The emergency response equipment will be kept in a vehicle located at die site.
 Monthly fire extinguisher checks will be documented, either on the fire extinguisher or in the SHSO
 logbook. Fire extinguishers maintained by the Air Force need not be checked.

 An air horn will be used to alert site personnel in an emergency. One air horn will be located in the
 supervisor's vehicle. The SHSO or HST will test the effectiveness of the air horn during initial site
 activities, and at least monthly thereafter, to ensure that all site personnel can dearly perceive the
 alarm above operational noise levels. If operational noise levels prevent site personnel from
 detecting the air horn alarm, other means of notification will be implemented. In an emergency, such
 as a fire or explosion, the Site Emergency Coordinator will immediately:

       •   Establish the safety of all personnel and direct the administration of first aid as appropriate.

       •   Shut down all combustion equipment.

       •   Notify Pierce County emergency response (offbase) or McChord AFB emergency response
           (onbase), giving the exact location of the evacuated area.

       •   Prohibit outside personnel from entering the evacuated area until the fire department arrives.

       •   Provide emergency equipment as appropriate.

       •   Notify the Air Force, the DO Manager, and PHSM.

 One long blast on the air horn will be the signal to inunediately evacuate the site. 'ne initial
 assembly point for all personnel will be determined in the field each day, based on the location and
 type of field activity that is being conducted. At the predetermined assembly point, a head count of
 personnel will be conducted. Once all personnel are accounted for, the Emergency Site Coordinator
 will assess the situation and outline the actions to be taken.


                                                                       EnvironmentalRestorationProjects-HSP
 Gwc         ff   LM          T                       12-5                                      January2005
                2532236
Section 12


Communication of evacuation routes and assembly points will occur initially and as necessary during
the daily tailgate safety meetings. Communication of hospital routes and emergency telephone
numbers will be through the posting of this information in site vehicles. Hospital route maps will
also be maintained in all site vehicles, and all personnel will be aware of the location of the nearest
means of offsite communications.

12.2 Environmental Incident (Spill)
If a hazardous materials spill (such as gasoline or diesel fuel) occurs, the Site Emergency
Coordinator or designee will control the spill and proceed to absorb or containetize the material. In
-addition, the Site Emergency Coordinator may, at his/her discretion, direct the HST (in the proper
level of PPE) to conduct air monitoring to further characterize the nature and extent of the incident.

TtFW personnel will respond to small spills, less than 5 gallons. For spills greater than 5 gallons,
TtFW personnel will inform either the Air Force (onbase) or Pierce County (offbase) hazardous
material (1-IAZMA`I) response team. TtFW personnel will respond as necessary until the HAZMAT
team arrives.

12.3 Explosion
If an explosion occurs, all nonessential personnel will evacuate and help secure the site. It is essential
that the site be evacuated and no one allowed to re-enter, except to save a life, until cleared by the
Site Emergency Coordinator. The Emergency Response Team will determine what actions, if any,
are appropriate.

12.4 Personnel Injury
In the event of serious personnel injury (fatality, patient unconscious, possibility of broken bones,
severe bleeding, burns, blood loss, shock, or trauma), the injury takes precedence over any chemical
contamination. The first responder will immediatelT.

      •   Administer first aid if qualified; if not qualified, immediately seek out a person qualified to
          administer first aid.

      •   Notify the Site Emergency Coordinator of the name of the individual involved, his/her
          location, and the nature of injury.

The Site Emergency Coordinator, upon receipt of notification of the injury, will immediately:

      •   Notify emergency response and give the appropriate patient information and location.

      •   Assist the injured party as deemed appropriate.

      •   Provide a copy of the injured party's medical data sheet to responding medical personnel.

      •   Designate someone to accompany the injured party to the hospital and to provide chemical
          data sheets to the emergency medical team.

      •   Notify the Air Force, the DO Manager, and PHSM.


                                                                      EnvironmentalRestorationPr4acts-HSP
 GW                LM a                              12-6                                      January2005
                                                                                                   2532237
                                                                                              Section 12


     N CompleteTtFW'sIncident/NearNEssReportandlnvestigationforin(AppendixA).

If the Site Emergency Coordinator determines that emergency response is not necessary (minor
injury such as sprain or abrasion; patient is conscious and can be moved), he may direct someone to
transport the patient by vehicle to the hospital. A hospital route map will be located in all site
vehicles. The Site Emergency Coordinator will then fill out the TtFW Incident/Accident Report
found in Appendix A.

12.5 Adverse Weather
Weather conditions in the Puget Sound Lowlands vary greatly. Typical summer conditions are warm
and sunny. During late fall through spring, Pacific storms frequently develop offshore and move
inland, bringing severe winds and rain to the area. In adverse weather, the HST, working with the
SHSO, will determine whether work can continue without sacrificing the health and safety of site
workers. Some of the items to be considered prior to determining whether work should continue
are:

        Extreme cold and wind
        Heavy precipitation
        Limited visibility
        Potential for accidents

 12.6 Emergency Equipment
 TtFW anticipates a field team of two to four persons to be onsite during the field activities and will
 supply and maintain all protective clothing necessary. Basic emergency and first aid equipment is as
 follows for each activity as determined by the SHSO:

         First aid kits for four people
         20-pound ABC fire extinguishers (to be inspected monthly)
         Air horn
         Emergencyl5-niinuteeyewash(AmericanNationalStandardsInstitute2358.1)

 Postings related to the Emergency Response Plan win be placed at the Area D/ALGT treatment
 plant (and any other SZ as determined during field activities) and will be in all vehicles. The
 following information from the Emergency Response Plan will be highlighted and placed in all site
 vehicles:

         Emergency telephone numbers for fire, ambulance, hospital, police
         Name and telephone number of the PHSM, DO Manager, and SHSO
         Location of fire extinguishers and emergency equipment
         Map to the hospital




                                                                    Environmental Restoration Projects-l-ISP
 G         s    LTOQ       T                       12-7                                        January2005
                 2532238
Section 12




                           This page intentionally left blank.




                                                            Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
 O           5     m                       12-8                                        Januaty 2005
                                                                                                        2532239

                                       13. MEDICAL DATA SHEET

This brief Medical Data Sheet will be completed by all onsite personnel and will be maintained in the
SZ by the SHSO during site operations. Completion of this form is required for compliance with
SOP 9, EHS 4-5, Medical Surveillance, requirements. This data sheet will accompany any personnel
when medical assistance is needed or if transport to hospital facilities is required.

Project:
Name:                                                       Home Telephone:
Address:
Age:.            .       Height.            .   Weight:                  Blood Type:
Emergency Contact:
Drug or Other Allergies:
Particular Sensitivities:
Do You Wear Contacts?
Provide a Checklist of Previous Illnesses:
Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals:
What Medications are you Presently Using?
Do You Have Any Medical Restrictions?
Name, Address, and Telephone Number of Personal Physician:




                                                                         Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
GWC                  LTO QPP       T    .                 13-1                                      January 2005
                2532240
Section 13




                          This page intentionally left blank




                                                          Environmental Restoration Projects-HSP
 G           LTOQ                         13-2                                       January2005
                                                                                                            2532241


                                  14. FIELD TEAM REVIEW

Each field team member will sign this section after site-specific training is completed and before
being permitted to work on the site.

I have read and received this Base-Wide Health and Safe_* Plan and mnderstand the informationpresented,I udil
comply ndth lbeprotisionscontainedtherein.

                    Name                                         Name
                    (Print)                                      (Sign)                            Date




                                                                          EnvironmentalRestoration Projects--HSP
 G;W              LTO Q       T    .                   14-1                                         January2005
             2532242
Section 14




                           This page intentionally left blank.

                                                                                                  0




                       I




                                                            Environmental Restoration Prt)jeCtS---HSP
 Gw             LTOQ                       14-2                                        January2005
                                                                                                       2532243

            15. HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN APPROVAL

This Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan has been reviewed and hereby approved. By their signatures,
the following undersigned certify that this Base-Wide Health and Safety Plan meets the requirements
of 29 CFR 1910.120 -and 0 other applicable regulations for the protection of the health and safety
of all persons enterin 9 upon this site.




           Richard Weingarz, Tetra Tech FW, Inc., Site Health and Safety Officer           Date




           Mark Ingersoll, Tetra Tech FW, Inc., Delivery Order Manager                     Date




           Chris Rhodes. Tetra Tech FW, Inc., Project Health and Safety Manager            Date




                                                                          Environmental Restoration Projects-HS13
 GW              LTO                                   15.1                                          January2005
             2532244
Section 15




                       This page intentionally left blank.




                                                       Environmental RestorationProjects-HSP
G              L"                     15-2                                       January2005
                            2532245




                    Appendix A
Health and Safety Record Forms
                                                                                        2532246
                                                                                   Appendix A



                                              Appendix A

This appendix contains the following forms:

    •   Daily Safety Briefing Sign-in Sheet

    •   Personal Protective Equipment Selection

    •   Health and Safety Plan Field Change Request Form

    •   Weekly Health and Safety Report

    •   Weekly/Monthly Checklist and Action Item Report

    •   Incident/Near Miss Report and Investigation




                                                           Environmental RestorationProjects--HSP
 G.WW      O    LTO QPPVkWrAPPTO_W    Ri                                             January2005
                                                                                           2532247
                                             EHS 1-6 ATTACHMENT B

                                           59TETRA TECH FW, INC.
                                        DAILY BRIEFING SIGN-IN SHEET

Date:                                                 Project Name/Location:
ShiftlDepartment:                                     Person Conducting Briefing:
1. AWARENESS (e.g., special EHS concerns, pollution prevention, recent incidents, etc.):




2.         OTHER ISSUES (EHS Plan changes, attendee comments, etc.):




 3.        ATTENDEES (Print Name):
 1.                                                               21.
 2.                                                               22.
 3.                                                               23.
 4.                                                               24.
 5.                                                               25.
 6.                                                               26.
 7.                                                               27.
 8.                                                               28.
 9.                                                               29.
  10.                                                             30.
  II.                                                              31.
  12.                                                              32.
  13.                                                              33.
  14.                                                              34.
  15,                                                              35.
  16.                                                              36.
     17.                                                           37.
     18.                                                           38.
     19.                                                           39.
  20.                                                              40.



  Revision Date 04/02/03
                2532248
                                       EHS 1-6 Attachment B
                            Daily Briefing Sign-In Sheet (Continued)

41.                                               56.

42.                                               57.

43.                                               58.

44.                                               59.

45.                                               60.

46.                                               61.

47.                                               62.

48.                                               63.

49.                                               64.

.50.                                              65.

51.                                                  66.

52.                                                  67.

53.                                                  68.

54.                                                  69.

55.                                                  70.



Give completed documentation to ESO.




 Revision Date 04/02/03

                                                 2
2532249
                                                                          2532250

                              TETRA TECH FW, INC.
               HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN FIELD CHANGE REQUF ST FORM


PROJECT:

TASK OR PHASE:

PROJECT LOCATION:

DESCRIPTION OF CHANGE:




REASON FOR CHANGE:




RECOMMENDED DISPOSITION:




 PM:
                                                       Signature   Date

 SHSO:
                                                       Signature   Date

 PESM:
                                                       Signature   Date


 DISTRIBUTION:           PESM
                         SHSO
                         Quality Assurance Representative
                         PM



 PAGE I of 2




 G:M            LTOMOAPPSE           F   F.   5 V N.
           2532251

                              TETRA TECH FW, INC.
              HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN FIELD CHANGE DOCUMENTATION



Field Change Number:                             Date Effective:


Pen and ink changes to be made in the Health and Safety Plan to alert the reader of this change:




Reason for the change to be incorporated into the Health and Safety Plan:




TEXT OF CHANGE TO BE INCORPORATED-




PAGE 2 of 2



G                LMWPWW.Kkpp
                                                                                                        2532252

                    HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN FIELD CHANGE RECORDS



 Record of Field Changes:

 Initial for attaching any Field Changes to this Health and Safety Plan. Enter the Field Change Number and
 Date Issued. File the completed Field Changes to this Health and Safety Plan at the end as attachments.
 Make PEN AND INK changes to the text to alert the reader to the changes that are required in the Field
 Change. As required, distribute revised text pages to holders of controlled copies of the Health and Safety
 Plan and document on List of Changes/Additions.


   Field
 Change No.      Dafe E ntere'd''           j,
                                                        Synopsis Of Chafilm'                        giiid
                                                                                                -,i i'i




G:W       AF      .hkppE
                LTO                    F.        5 27
          TETRA TECH FVV. INC.                          TETRA TECH FW, INC               2532253
                                         WEEKLY HEALTH AND SAFETY REPORT

 ro ect Name:
Location:
       FORMATION                                                INJURIES AND ILLNESSES
Week Ending                                                     Yes             No
Hours                                                           Describe:
Worked: Craft:                  PS:             Subs:
Check Level of Protection
For the week:             B_                  C_        D_

MAJOR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED THIS WEEK:
(drum handling, sampling, excavation, abatement/T&D, etc.)




 SIGNIFICANT EVENTS THIS WEEK:
 (regulatory visits, equipment malfunctions, process start-up or shutdown):




 FUTURE ISSUES:
 (schedule, manpower allocation, monitoring equipment, other resources needed)




 SITE AUDIT/INSPECTIONS CONDUCTED                                             Yes   No
 (describe outstanding findings and attach results)




 HIPO ACTIVITIES
 Hot W ork ................................... Yes       No         Dates:
 Lockout/Tagout ........................ Yes             No -       Dates:
 Confined Space Entry ............... Yes                No         Dates:
 Soils Analysis Classification .... Yes                  No         Dates:
 Excavation Daily Check List ..... Yes                   No -       Dates:
 Crane On-Site ........................... Yes           No         Dates:
 Critical Lift Plan Performed ..... Yes                  No         Dates:




 G WCWM                 LTO QFW.NA,WSM1,                                                       11M
        2532254




IV


                  JR

        ia




 I 0
       0 0




                              Iva




                  ,Itr
                         41
                         Cd

                         r_
                         ed
                                                                                                               2532255
                                                    EHS 3-3 ATTACHMENT B

                     EHS WEEKLYIMONTHLY CHECKLIST AND ACTION ITEM REPORT


                                                  59 TETRA TECH FW, INC.
                     EHS WEEKLY/MONTHLY CHECKLIST AND ACTION ITEM REPORT


 Project:                                                             Area of Inspection:

 Inspection Type:           El Weekly            0 Monthly

 Inspector:                                                  -        Date:

 Signature:                                                  -        Time:

              REQUIREMENTS                                              OBSERVATIONS                          FINDING
                                                                      (N/A if not applicable)                 YES/NO
Work Conditions
IWalking [Working Surfaces
2Aisles arid Passageways
3Platforms/ Scaffolding
   Ladders
   Stairs
   Exits/Egrcss
   Roadways
 8 ventilation
 9 Lighting
 IONoise Exposure
 11 Ergonomics
Materials
 I Stacking and Storage
 2 Chemicals and Fuel
 3 Compressed Gases
 Equipment
 I Hand / Portable Tools
 2 Mac ne,        o,a, Guarding
 3 Mo                   ipment
  a. Physical inspection of equipment
     Review of daily inspection reports
     Review of equipment deficiency correction
     Jogstrecords


  Revision Date 04/03/03                                                   C 1997, 1998 Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                                 Page I of 5
                            2532256
                                      EHS 3-3 ATTACHMENT B
                    EHS WEEKLY/MONTHLY CHECKLIST AND ACTION ITEM REPORT

            REQUIREMENTS                             OBSERVATIONS                         FINDING
                                                   (N/A if not applicable)                YESINO,

4Lifting Gear Equipment
5Materials Handling Equipment
6Mechanical Power Systems
7Hydraulic Power Systems
8Pneumatic Power Systems
9Electrical Power Systems
10 Valves and Controls

Hazard Controls

1Other Heavy Equipment
2Lock-Out Systems
3Signs and Tags
4Color Coding

5Materials Labeling
6Warning Systems

Emergency Systems
 1Emergency Instructions
2Fire Protection
3Eye Wash and Showers

4First Aid Kits/ Stations

5Emergency Rescue Equipment

Protective Equipment

 IEye Protection

 2Ear Protection

 3Respiratory Protection

 4Head Protection

 5Hand Protection

 6Foot Protection

 7Body Protection

 8Fall Protection




  Revision Date 04/03/03                                C 1997,1998 Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                              Page 2 of 5
                                                                                                                      2532257
                                                      EHS 3-3 ATTACHMENT B
                       EHS WEEKLY/MONTHLY CHECKLIST AND ACTION ITEM REPORT

              REQUIREMENTS                                              OBSERVATIONS                             FINDING
                                                  I                   (NIA if not applicable)                    YES/NO

      rdous Waste Storage Area(s)/Satellite Accumulation Areas'

       ignated, secured area with "Hazardous
    Waste" signage. For SAA area is marked
    'IS'"". (SAA)

  2Containers:
    a. DOT-spec. containers (for wastes to go
       off-site only)
    b. Intact/in good condition (SAA)
     c. Waste compatible with containers (e.g.,
        no evidence of corrosion, softening,
        bulging) (SAA)
     d. Marked "Hazardous Waste"/ visible
        Accumulation Date.
      ForSAA, marked "Hazardous Waste" or
      identi.fy container contents and
      Accumulation date (SAA)
     e. Securely closed and stored to prevent
        rupture/leaking, except when add/remove
        waste. (SAA)
     f. Labeled with EPA Id. No.
     g. For SAA only, Stored "at the point of
        generation" and meets quantity limits.
   3Reactive/ignitable wastes stored at least fifty
     (50) feet from property.
   4Liquid wastes within secondary containment.
   5Incompatible wastes separated by a dike,
     wall, berm or other device.
    6Stored for less than 90 days. (CERCLA
      projects may have storage variance).'
    7Container tracking log accurately reflects
      containers stored. (SAA)
    8Area maintained in an orderly fashion and
      complies with state/EHS plan requirements.
      (SAA)
    Hazardous Waste Tank Storage Area (Daily
    inspection is being conducted and maintained
    on-site)                                     I




101 Fnsjtes with multiple   -storage arenas or Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs), indicate location where deficiencies are noted.
    2 For SAAs, evaluate only rows marked with (SAA).
    ' If stored on-site 75 or more days, TSDF/transporter has been selected (EHS 1-4), pick-up date scheduled and PMJPESM are aware of
    90-day limit.
     Revision Date 04/03/03                                                 C 1997, 1998 Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                                  Page 3 of 5
                           2532258
                                                    EHS 3-3 ATTACHMENT B
                      EHS WEEKLY[MONTHLY CHECKLIST AND ACTION ITEM REPORT

              REQUIREMENTS                                                  OBSERVATIONS                           FINDING
                                                                          (N/A if not applicable)                  YESINO

Waste/Stockpiles - state Regulated Non-
Hazardous Wastes (Refer to PESM
Checklists, if applicable)

TSCA PCB Wastes - must be inspected at
least every 30 days (GMP - weekly) (Refer to
pESM TSCA Checklistfor inspection items)

Point Source Discharges/ Air Emissions

IPermit conditions are being met.
2Monitoring equipment is fully operational.
3Equipment calibrations and maintenance is
  up-to-date.
4Discharge sampling performed at required
  intervals.
5Review monitoring results (Report permit
  exceedences per EHS 1-7)
6DMR and Plant Logs properly completed,
  signed, and submitted (if required).
 7Fugitive Dust - Appropriate BMPs are
   instituted for fugitive dust emissions.

 Stormwater Discharge Activities
 ISWPPP /Soil Plan reflects current activities.
 2Monitoring/sampling performed at required
   intervals.
 3Review monitoring results (Reportpermit
   exceedences per EHS 1-7)
 4BMPs in SWPPP/Soil Plan implemented.
 5Visual observations indicate stormwater
   meets water quality criteria.
 6inspections conducted as required and
   documented. Corrective actions are
   implemented and documented.

  Other Conditions or Work Practices



  2
  3
  4

                                                                 End of Checklist-

      monthly inspections must be sent to PESM and Project Manager.


      Revision Date 04103/03                                                    C 1997, 1998 Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                                      Page 4 of 5
                                                                                                                            2532259
                                                  EHS 3-3 ATTACHMENT B
                   EHS WEEKLY/MONTHLY CHECKLIST AND ACTION ITEM REPORT
 eviewprevious week'slmonth's Action item Report. Carryforwardaction items that have not been implemented Note outstandingaction items
with an (F)in the "Action item - column on this report. Note an (F)in the "Date Completed" column on Previou week's1month's Action Item
Report.


Project:

Area of Inspection:

Inspection Type:           [3 Weekly       0 Monthly

Date of Inspection:

  ACTION ITEM                                              RESPONSIBLE PARTY               SCHEDULE              DATE COMPLETED

  1.                                                                                                                                      1
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.
  6.
  7.


  9.
   10.
   II.
   12.
   13.
   14.
   15.




  Reviewed by:
                    Site Superintendent/ Site Manager                               Date


  cc: Project Manager (monthly only)
      PESM (monthly only)




  Revision Date 04/03/03                                                    0 1997, 1998 Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                                  Page 5 of 5
                                                                                                                 2532260
                                             EHS i -7 ATTACHMENT A
                                                                                                                                 4
                                                                                kRPORATEESQREPORT*,--
                                                 TETRA TECH FW, INC.
                                                                                                    w
                               INCIDENT17VEAR MI§S REPORTA'

                                   TYPEOFINCIJDEjVT,CHECKALLTHAT4rP,Y.                                    A-

El       INJU        Ss        0       VEHICLE DAMAGE            0 PROPERTY DAMAGE                       0     FIRE
0        SPILL/RELEASE         0       PERMITEXCEEDENCE          O HIGHLOSSPOTENTIAL                     13    OTHER
                                                                   (NEAR MISS)

PROJECT                                                       REPORT#:                    DATE OF REPORT:
DATE OF IN            T:                                      MILITARY TIME:                     DAY OF WEEK:
FW SUPE                  DUTY:                                AT SCENE OF INCIDENT: 0 YES                    O NO
LOCATION             IDENT:
WEATHER CONDITIONS:                          ADEQUATE LIGHTING AT SCENE:                    O YES ONO 0 N/A
                   DESCRIBE WHAT HAPPLNfP(STv-0                                                        dry)-
 1. trial was the employee doing, or what was happeningjust before the incident occurred? Describe the activity, as well
 as the equipment, tools, or material in use. Be specific. eg. "climbing a ladder while carrying fools" or "driving
 westbound on Main Street"


 2. What happened? What was the contact or event and how did it occur? eg. "When the ladder slipped on the welfloor,
 employeefell 20feet" or "was distracted by bee, swerved off right side of road and struck the stop sign


                               Q    'AFFECTEDEMPLOYEEINF                                                       4 . "I.
   nclude inj4d pirson; driv&ioperator, or employe e,wfiosetatMiie               dricid6m.,Uselano6er 0gget6,0rovkde!g,,,
                                          iinformaiian for additiona                     -7 L,
 NAME:                                                                 TtFW EMPLOYEE:              O YES 0 NO
 O MALE        0 FEMALE
 HOME ADDRESS:
 SOCIAL SECURITY                                                        HOME PHONE
 JOB CLASSIFICATION:                                                    YEARS IN JOB CLASSIFICATION:
 TIME EMPLOYEE BEGAN WORK:                            AMIPM             DATE OF HIRE (TtFW):            AGE:
 DID INCIDENT RELATE TO ROUTINE TASK FOR JOB CLASSIFICATION:                           0 YES         O NO
                                     ;",IN.T_11"LE                               -,
                                                               11,V FORMATIOX, -1 "V                                  -P" *41t



    NATUREOFINJURYORILLNESS:BodypartaffectedandhowilwasaffecteiLBemorespecifiethan"hurt","pain",
    or "sore". eg. "strained back"

     OBJECT/EQUIPMENT/SUBSTANCE CAUSING HARM:
     FIRST AID PROVIDED:           0    YES 0     NO
     IF YES, WHERE WAS IT GIVEN:              11 ON SITE           0    OFF SITE
     IF YES, WHO PROVIDED FIRST AID:
     WILLTHEINJIJRY/ILLNESSRESLILTIN:CI           RESTRICTEDDUTY              O Lq,-_TTj                                          _T

                                                                                    CORPORATE           RtMhTf
     IF EMPLOYEE DIED, DATE OF DEATH:

                                         MEDICA
     k
     Revision Date 04/11=003
                 2532261
                                        EHS 1-7 ATTACHMENT A
WAS MEDICAL TREATMENT PROVIDED?:                             El   YES         0        NO
IF YES, WAS MEDICAL TREATMENT PROVIDED:                      [I ON SITE       13 DR.'S OFFICE          0 HOSPITAL ER

HOSPITALIZED OVERNIGHT AS IN-PATIENT?                        0 YES       0             NO

NAME OF PERSON(S) PROVIDING TREATMENT:

ADDRESS WHERE TREATMENT WAS PROVIDED:

TYPE OF TREATMENT:
                                              RO        AigEINFORUATIO
                            vmte-Lk'ANDk        -PERtFDAM
VEHICLE/PROPERTY DAMAGED:

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGE:

         ?I          &ll                          wowwvi?
                                                 km
SUBSTANCE SPILLED OR RELEASED:                        FROM WHERE:                             TO WHERE:

ESTIMATED QIUANTITY/DURATION:
CERCLA HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE? YES 0             NO C3        RQ EXCEEDED? YES 0                NO CI SPECIFY RQ:

REPORTABLE TO AGENCY? YES 0         NO 0       SPECIFY:              -            (Place report of telecon in project file)

WRITTEN REPORT? YES 0 NO C3         TIME FRAME:                               (place report in project file)

RESPONSE ACTION TAKEN


TYPE OF PERMIT:                                       PERMIT
DATE OF EXCEEDENCE:                                   DATE FIRST KNOWLEDGE OF EXCEEDENCE:

PERMITTED LEVEL OR CRITERIA (e.g., Water quality):

EXCEEDENCE LEVEL OR CRITERIA:                         EXCEEDENCE DURATION:
REPORTABLE TO AGENCY? YES 0          NO 0      SPECIFY:                            .          (Place telecon in project file)

WRITTEN REPORT?             YES 0    NO C3    TIMEFRAME:                                         lace report in project file)

RESPONSE ACTION TAKEN:


NAME(S) OF TtFW PERSONNEL NOTIFIED:                                                         DATE/TMIE:

CLIENT NOTIFIED:                             DATE/TIME:                      BY WHOM:
AGENCY NOTIFIED:                             DATE/TMffi:                     BY WHOM:                      0   N/A

CONTACT NAME:
                                             _)NSA9a4R1N&REJoQR,,_N                                             z
EMPLOYEE'S NAME: (PRINT)                                             SIGN:
EMPLOYEE'S NAME (PRINT)                                             SIGN:
SUPERVISOR'S NAME: (PRINT)                                          SIGN:
PHONE NUMBER:                                                       DATE:
   NOTE. Supervisortoforward a copy of Incident Report to immediate supervisor,PESM, ESS or ESC, and othei
         Personnelas identified in Table I of this ProcedureASAP. but no later then 24 hours.


Revision Date 04102/2003                          2
                                                                                2532262
                                                  EHS 1-7 ATTACHMENT A
                                                    INCIDtNT'81KE-TCW,, -
                                                                      RPORATE




                                                         --LEJNCI-IjETqT




                                                      JUC
                                         Ot




    Write in street names and, if possible, the
    points of the compass.

    if a sketch appears on a police report or
    insurance form, this need not be
    completed. Attach the other report.




Revision Date 04/02/2003                                 3
                          2532263
                                                       EHSI-7ATTACHMENTA             ORPOHATI,JESlREPCiRIF*
                                                                                                 ,     i-, I    , ,   , 77 -,,,
                                          INVESTIGATIVEREPORT
DATE OF INCIDENT:.                   .                                   DATE OF INVESTIGATION REPORT:

  INCIDENT COST,      ESTIMATED:                                                              ACTUAL: $.
  OSHA RECORDABLE(S):    [3 YES C3 NO                          # RESTRICTED DAYS        DAYS AWAY FROM WORK.

       4-y
  Was the activity addressed in an AHA?   0 YES (Attach a copy)                                      NO
  IMMEDIATE CAUSES - WHAT ACTIONS AND CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTED TO TIHIS EVENT?            (USE NEXT PAGE)




  BASIC     CAUSES - WHAT SPECIFIC PERSONAL OR JOB FACTORS CONTRIBUTED TO TILIS EVENrl    (USE NE)Cr PAGE)




                                                               "'Ac 10Nlp                       470'      "7f                zg
                                     0-tM         a,00     Z    olt
     ,igm                                                                E
  REMEDIAL ACTIONS             - WHAT HAS AND OR SHOULD BE DONETO CONTROL EACH OF THE CAUSES LISTED? INCLUDE MANAGEMENT
                                   PROGRAMS (SEE ATTACHED LIST) FOR CONTROL OF INCIDENTS IF APPLICABLE.
                                                                                       PERSON                  TARGET         COMPLETION
                                         ACTION                                      RESPONSIBLE                DATE             DATE




                       7k q,
                                            I     7,   p
  INVESTIGATOR'S NAME: (PRINT)                                               SIGN:                                          DATE:

  INVESTIGATOR'S NAME: (PRINT)                                               SIGN:                                          DATE:
  INVESTIGATOR'S NAME: (PRINT)                                               SIGN:                                          DATE:


   PROIECT/OFFICE MANAGER (PRINT)                                            SIGN:
   COMMENT :
   PESM or ESC (PRINT)                                                       SIGN:

   COMMENTS:

                 eh dwy nql!-nfiii                                                                                                     m




    Revision Date 04/02/2003                                      4
                                                                                                                               2532264
                                                 EHS 1-7 ATTACHMENT A


                                            UAMAES OF
                 SUBST kNDARD ACTIONS                                                    SUBSTANDARD CONDITIONS
1. OPERATING EQUIPMENT WITHOUT AUTHORITY                               1. GUARDS OR BARRIERS
2. FAILURE TO WARN                                                     2.      PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
3. FAILURE TO SECURE                                                   3.      TOOLS, EQUIPMENT, OR MATERIALS
4' OPERATING AT IMPROPER SPEED                                         4. CONGESTION
S.     MAKING SAFETY DEVICES INOPERABLE                                 5.     WARNING SYSTEM
6.     REMOVING SAFETY DEVICES                                          6.     FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS
7.     USING DEFECTIVE EQUIPMENT                                        7.     POOR HOUSEKEEPING
8.     FAILURE TO USE PPE PROPERLY                                      8.     NOISE EXPOSURE
9.     IMPROPER LOADING                                                 9.     EXPOSURE TO HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
 10,   IMPROPER PLACEMENT                                               10.    EXTREME TEMPERATURE EXPOSURE
 11.   IMPROPER LIFTING                                                 I 1.   ILLUMINATION
 12.   IMPROPER POSITION FOR TASK                                       12.    VENTILATION
 13.   SERVICING EQUIPMENT IN OPERATION                                  13.   VISIBILITY
 14.          INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL/DRUGS
 15.    HORSEPLAY



                       7-                           FXAMPLESOF                     CA"
                            SONALFACTORS                                                          JOB FACTORS
 I .CAPABILITY                                                           1SUPERVISION
 2. KNOWLEDGE                                                            2. ENGINEERING
 3. SKILL                                                                3. PURCHASING
 4. STRESS                                                               4. MAINTENANCE
 5. MOTIVATION                                                           5. TOOLSIEQUIPMENT
                                                                         6. WORK STANDARDS
                                                                         7. WEAR AND TEAR
                                                                         8. ABUSE OR MISUSE
                                                                         9. CHANGE (Conditions, scope, work methods, pers


                                                                              law
                      J;                            TPROGRAMS F0.R'd9NTR0L:-6F-
  I .LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION                                          10.    HEALTH CONTROL
  2. MANAGEMENT TRAINING                                                    11.    PROGRAM AUDITS
  3. PLANNED INSPECTIONS                                                    12.    ENGINEERING CONTROLS
  4. TASK ANALYSIS AND PROCEDURES                                           13.    PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS
  S. TASK OBSERVATION                                                       14.    GROUP MEETINGS
  6. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS                                                 15.    GENERAL PROMOTION
  7. ORGANIZATIONAL RULES                                                   16.    HIRING AND PLACEMENT
  8. ACCIDENTANCIDENT ANALYSIS                                              17.    PURCHASING CONTROLS
       PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT




   Fatalities or hospitalization (admittance) of three or more in viduals requires notification to OSHA within 8 hours. Contact the Director,
   Health and Safety Programs or Director, ESQ Programs to make the notification. If unavailable, the senior operations person on site should
   make the notification.




             Revision Date 04/02/2003                                          5
                          2532265
                                                    EHS 1-7 ATTACHMENT A
                           INCIDENT/NEAR MISS REPORT AND INVESTIGATION INSTRUCTIONS

                                                                          Control Leadership,-and consider the impact of each of th
General: The incident report (pages I and 2) must be                      following:
completed within 24 hours. Do not delay the report if any
information is unknown. It can be provided later by revising              P - People
the Report.                                                               E - Equipment
                                                                          M - Material
Type of Incident: Check all that apply. A High Loss Potential             E - Environment
(Near Miss) incident is one that does not result in loss, but
under slightly different circumstances, could have resulted in            To do an effective job, a visual inspection of the scene is
an OSHA Recordable injury, spill, release, permit exceedence,             usually necessary along with private interviews of affected
fire, or vehicle/property damage in excess of $500. All High              employees and witnesses.
Loss Potential (Near Miss) incidents are to be investigated.
                                                                          Where appropriate, use terms indicating the type of contact,
General Information                                                       e.g., struck by; struck against; fall from elevation; fall on same
                                                                          level; caught in; caught between or under; caught on; contact
Project/Office: If the incident occurs on a delivery order                with; overstress; equipment failure; environmental release;
contract, give the contract/program name, DO# and location.               fire.
If the incident occurs on a C&E field project, give the Office
location managing the project as well as the project/location.            Affected Employee Information

Report No.: Optional numbering field for offices/projects.                TtFW` Employee: Direct hire, whether professional, admin-
                                                                          istrative, or craft; full-time or part-time; permanent or
FW Supervisor: The Tetra Tech Supervisor responsible for                  temporary. If the affected employee is not a TtFW employee,
the work effort involving the incident. Do not give a                     give the name of the employer and business relationship (e.g.,
subcontractor supervisor or craft foreman name. If a Tetra                client, subcontractor) in the description section above.
Tech Supervisor was the Affected Employee, this field should
contain the name of his or her supervisor. The Supervisor is              Hours Worked on Shift Prior to the Incident: Only incluAh
the project supervisor if the incident happens on a project, or           the amount of time the employee worked that shift or day prqw
the administrative supervisor if the incident happens in the              to the incident.
office. E.g., a geologist, acting as an FOL gets injured on a
job site, or in a motor vehicle in the course of project work.             Years with TtFW: For TtFW employees, give the number of
 The FW Supervisor is most likely the Project Manager. If the              years employed with TtFW. If the employee has worked for
 same geologist gets injured lifting a box in his office, the FW           TtFW for less than a year, do not write <1. Give the answer in
 Supervisor is likely the Office Science Lead.                             fraction of year, or specify the number of months, e.g., 0. I or I
                                                                           month.
Location of Incident: The specific location on the project, in
the office, or off-site location.                                          Inoury/111ness Information

Weather Conditions: Temperature, precipitation, approxi-                   Nature of Injury or Illness: If the incident resulted in an
mate wind speed and direction, cloud cover, relative humidity.             injury or illness, give a brief description of the body part
This information may be included in the description section,               affected and type of injury or illness, e.g., fractured thumb, left
and must be given in detail whenever it is a factor in the cause           hand; carpal tunnel syndrome, right hand.
or impact., e.g., spill, release, heat stress, wind blown material.
                                                                           First Aid Provided: First Aid is any treatment that does not
 Describe What Happened: This section must be completed in                 have to be provided by a health care professional, even if it is.
 sufficient detail to adequately describe the events and                   E.g., a laceration that is cleaned and bandaged in a clinic may
 conditions leading up to and resulting from the incident. Try             constitute first aid, if sutures are not given.
 to answer the questions who, what, where, when, and how.
 This information is then used to determine why (cause).                   Will the Injury Result In:. Do not delay the report if this
 Provide details such as work objective, procedure being used,             information is unknown.
 body position, and PPE. Include diagrams or sketches for all
 incidents involving vehicles/equipment and other incidents                Medical Treatment Information
 where they aid in providing detail or perspective. Consider
 attaching photographs. Follow the guidelines in Practical Loss

     Revision Date 04/02/2003                                         6
                                                       EHS 1-7 ATTACHMENT A                                                     2532266
    Was Medical Treatment Provided? Medical treatment is                      20% opacity limit, Best Management Practices (BMP)
    that treatment that must be provided by a licensed medical                implementation per SWPPP).
      actitioner, e.g., sutures, prescription medication, etc.
0   1                                                                         Exceedence Level or Criteria: Specify actual numerical
    Type of Treatment: This information is important in                       discharge/emission limit or narrative criteria which was
    determining OSHA recordability, since some forms of                       exceeded (e.g., 22% opacity, failure of BMPs (silt fencing
    treatment would not constitute a Recordable case (e.g., one-              collapse) per SWPPP)
    time administration of prescriptions, negative diagnostic
    exams).    Attach a copy of the treating professional's                   Exceedence Duration: Specify time fi-ame by date and hours
    statement/work release.                                                   (using military time) during which exceedence occurred.

    Vehicle and Property Damaee Information                                   See "Spill/Release Information" (above) for description of
                                                                              remaining questions.
    Vehicle/Property Damaged: For vehicles, indicate VIN and
    whether it is company owned or ]eased, business trip rental               Persons Preparine Report
    (Avis) or owned by others.
                                                                              Employee's Name: The affected employee described on page
     Description of Damage: Be specific as to the identity Of                 I should review the report and sign here, as well as other
     damaged part, location and extent.                                       employees witnessing or involved in the incident.

     Spill and Air Emissions Information                                      Supervisor's Name: The TtFW Supervisor must review and
                                                                              sign the report indicating agreement. The TtFW Supervisor
     Substance Spilled or Released: For pure substances, list                 and the Investigator (next page) should be the same person.
     materials by common name/cbemical. For wastes, indicate
     waste code.   For mixtures or contaminated media, provide                Investi2ative Report
     contaminant name, CAS No., concentration.
                                                                              Report No.: This is the same as the project/office optional
    RQ Exceeded? Reportable quantity. Contact your ESQ                        report number from page I of the Incident/Near Miss Report.
Aftepresentative for guidance. Specify the RQ for the material,
JW hether you answer yes or no.                                                Date of Investigative Report: This date should be within 72
                                                                               hours of the incident. In cases where the investigation is not
     Reportable to Agency? if yes, specify the federal, state or               completed until a later date, submit the incomplete report
     local agency that must be provided with verbal and/or written             within the 72 hours, and a revised report should be submitted
     notification.                                                             when the missing information is obtained.

     Written Report? Answer yes if the release requires a written              Incident Cost: For all vebicle/equipment or property damage
     report to be filed and note the time frame.                               cases, an estimated or actual loss value must be entered. If an
                                                                               estimated value is entered, the report must be revised when the
     Response Action Taken; Describe the mitigation efforts, as                actual costs are known.
     well as any reports made, beyond initial notification.
                                                                               OSHA Recordables: This section should be completed in
      Permit Exceedence                                                        consultation with the PESM. If it cannot be determined at the
                                                                               time of the report, the PESM should consult with the Director,
      Type of Permit: List name of permit including the agency                 Health and Safety Programs and revise the report when a
      name where applicable (e.g., NPDES, PSAPCA NOC)                          determination is made.

      Date of Exceedence: Specify date exceedence occurred (e.g.,              No. of Restricted Days: This relates to days of restricted
      date discharge in excess of permit limits occurred)                      work activity not restrictions on motion or physical capability.
                                                                               If the employee is capable of doing his normal job the day
      Date First Knowledge of Exceedence: Specify date when                    after the injury and thereafter, there are no restricted days,
      first knew there was an exceedence (i.e., date analytical                even if the physician indicates a physical restriction. It does
      received). This date may be different from the date of the               not include the day of the injury.
      exceedence listed above.
                                                                               No. of Days Away from Work: The number of days after the
Ampermitted Level or Criteria: List numerical discharge or                     day of the injury that the employee was scheduled to work but
w  ernission limit or narrative criteria specified in the permit (e.g.,        could not due to an occupational injury. If the treating
                                                                               physician releases an employee to return to work, but the
      Revision Date 04/02/2003                                            7
                       2532267                      EHS 1-7 ATTACHMENT A
employee chooses not to come to work, do not count those             satisfaction with thoroughness of the investigation and the
days. In this case the PESM should contact the Director,             report, and their concurrence that the action items address the
Health and Safety Programs.                                          identified causes. This constitutes the peer review, and    thAft
                                                                     report, particularly the description, should be clear to read
Cause Analysis                                                       not familiar with the project or incident.

Immediate Causes: Determine the inumediate causes, using             The PESM should add the following statement in the comment
the example on page 4. If one or more of the examples fits the       box: "The causal analysis is appropriate and is supported by
circumstance, use those words in the cause description. This         the facts presented in this report, and the action         plan
facilitates statistical analysis of the incident database for        adequately addresses the immediate and basic causes."
program evaluation/modification.      However, do not confirie
your cause    determination to the guide words.    Explain, e.g.,
Improper Lifting - employee attempted to lift box by bending
at the waist and twisting while lifting. Be sure that the incident
description on page I is sufficiently detailed to support the
causal analysis in this section. An assumption of cause (e.g.,
improper lifting) from the injury (low back pain) is not
acceptable.

Basic Causes: Like the Immediate Causes, use the guide
words in the attachment whenever appropriate wid explain.
For example, improper motivation may be because the correct
way takes more time or effort;'short cutting standard procedure
is tolerated or positively reinforced; or the person thinks there
is no personal benefit to always doing the job correctly.

Investigators should determine if a change in the work
conditions, scope, methods or personnel contributed to the
incident. This may occur due to inadequate assessment of
hazard potential or inadequate application of hazard controls.
If "Change" was contributing, it will most likely be identified
in combination with other basic causes.

Note: The investigator is encouraged to review the Practical
Loss Control Leadership chapters on Causes and Effects of
Loss and AccidenilIncident Investigation before doing the
causal analysis. The investigation team should refer to the
S.C.A.T. Chart available from the PESM when analyzing
causes of high loss potential incidents, especially where
motivation is suspected of being a Basic Cause.

Remedial Actions: Include all actions taken or those that
 should be taken to prevent recurrence.      Be sure that actions
address the causes. For example, training (safety meetings)
may be a necessary response for lack of knowledge, but may
be inadequate for improper motivation. If completion dates
 exceed the 72 hours reporting period, a revised report must be
 submitted when all remedial actions are complete.


 Persons Performing Investigation: The primary investigator
 is the TtFW Supervisor in charge of the work where the
 incident occurred. Others participating in the investigation,
 such as the Project Manager, ESS, QC, site engineer, foreman,
 etc. should also sign the report.

 Management Review: The Project or Office Manager and the
 PESM or office ESC must sign the report indicating their

 Revision Date 04/0212003
                          2532268




                   Appendix B
Standard Operating Procedures
                                                                                                2532269
                                                                                         Appendix B



                                               Appendix B

This appendix contains the following standard operating procedures:

      •       SOP 1-EHS 3-8, Fall Protection

      •       SOP 2-EHS 6-1, Confined Space Entry

      •       SOP 3-EHS 6-4, Lockout/Tagout

      •       SOP 4-EHS 4-6, Temperature Extremes

      •       SOP 5-EHS 6-2, Drill Rigs

      •       SOP (EHS 1 -1 1, Training

      •       SOP 7-EHS 4-1, Bloodbome Pathogens

      •       SOP 8--EHS 1-9, Record Keeping

          •   SOP 9-EHS 4-5, Medical Surveillance

          •   SOP 10-EHS 5-1, Personal Protective Equipment

          •    SOP 1 1EHS    3-15, Underground Utilities




                                                                 Environmental Restoration Projects-l-ISP
  W              5    LTOCPPCIMOW70_AW     I           I                                    January2005
                    253227o




                 SOPI
EHS 3-8, Fall Protection
                                                                                                                         2532271


EHS 3-8:                            Fall Protection (Previously HS3-8)
Purpos                                 Version 03/12198 - Revised        Approved
The purpose of this program is            Date:                                by:W211-
to prevent injuries due to falls        Original 02/01/95
from elevated work surfaces         Issue Date:
and to comply with
Occupational, Safety and             Category: Company Procedures        Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health   Safety
Health Administration (OSHA)                                                      Programs
fall protection standards In 29            Sub Departmental/Discipline   Document procedure
CFIR 1926, Subpart M.                Category:                              Type:
                                      Ka       0     tional Control,     Document Mike McSherry
                                   I     =     TrMag                       Owner.
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                                                Table of Contents
Section

1.0     PURPOSE

2.0     SCOPE

3.0     MAINTENANCE

4.0     DEFINITIONS

       4.1 Competent Person
       4.2 Dangerous Equipment
       4.3 Hole
       4.4 Opening
       4.5 Personal Fall Arrest System
       4.6 Walking[Working Surface

5.0       DISCUSSION

       5.1 Responsibilities
            5.1.1 Line Management
            5.1.2 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
       5.2 General Requirements
       5.3 Hoist Areas
       5.4 Excavations
       5.5 Dangerous Equipment
       5.6 Guardrail Systems
       5.7 Personal Fall Arrest Systems
       5.8 Protection From Failing Objects
       5.9 Other Fall Protection Requirements
       5.10 Training
           5.10.1 General
           5.10.2 Retraining
           5.10.3 Certification of Training
           5.10.4 Previous Training

 6.0      REFERENCES




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1.0         PURPOSE
            The purpose of this program is to prevent injuries due to falls from elevated work
            surfaces and to comply with Occupational, Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
            fall protection standards in 29 CFR 1926, Subpart M.



 2.0        SCOPE
            This program applies to all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and/or TtFW subcontractor
            field operations.



  3.0       MAINTENANCE
            The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for
            updating this procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief
            Executive Officer. Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department
            responsible for updating the procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and
            Compliance.



  4.0        DEFINITIONS


  4.1        Competent Person
             A person possessing the skills, knowledge, experience, and judgement to perform
             assigned tasks or activities satisfactorily.


  4.2        Dangerous Equipment

             Dangerous equipment means equipment which, as a result of form or function, may
             be hazardous to employees who fall onto or into such equipment. Examples provided
             in Subpart M include tanks, degreasing units, machinery, and electrical equipment.


   4.3       Hole
             Hole means a gap or void 2 inches or more in its least dimension, in a floor, roof, or
             other walking/working surface.


      4.4     Opening
             An opening means a gap or void 30 inches or more high and 18 inches or more wide
             through which employees can fall to a lower level.

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4.5      Personal Fall Arrest System

         A personal fall arrest system consists of an anchorage, connectors, body harness,
         and may include a lanyard, deceleration device, lifeline, or suitable combination of
         these. Body belts are not permitted in personal fall arrest systems on TtFW projects.


 4.6     WalkingMorking Surface

         A walking/working surface is any surface, whether horizontal or vertical, on which an
         employee walks or works, including but not limited to floors, roofs, ramps, bridges,
         runways, formwork and concrete reinforcing steel, but not including ladders, vehicles,
         or trailers on which employees must be to perform their job duties.



 5.0     DISCUSSION


 5.1     Responsibilities


 5.1.1   Line Management

         Site Supervisors have the responsibility to ensure that fall protection is provided as
         required by this program and site Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) plans for
         all TtFW operations.


 5.1.2    Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel

          The Project Environmental and Safety Manager (PESM) will audit implementation of
          this program as part field inspection pursuant EHS 3-3, inspections.

          The Environmental and Safety Supervisor (ESS) is responsible for providing fall
          protection training for all site personnel and monitoring compliance with this program.


 5.2      General Requirements

          Employees shall only be allowed to work on walkingtworking surfaces which have the
          strength and integrity to support employees safely. Walking/working surfaces for this
          requirement include the edges of trenches.

          Employees performing work on a walking/working surface with an unprotected side or
          edge which is 6 feet or more above a lower level shall be protected from falling by the
          use of guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems.

          For roof work on low-slope roofs, work on steep roofs, and work near wall openings,
          fall protection provisions as described in 29 CFR 1926.501 lb) shall be utilized.


  5.3     Hoist Areas

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          Employees in a hoist area shall be protected from falling 6 feet or more to lower levels
          by guardrail systems or personal fall arrest systems. If guardrail systems are
          removed to facilitate the hoisting operations and the employee must lean out over the
          edge of the platform to guide the materials being hoisted, then a personal fall arrest
          system shall be used.


 6.4      Excavations

          The edge of an excavation 6 feet or more in depth shall be demarcated by guardrail
          systems, fences, or barricades when the excavation is not readily seen. The
          measures described above or covers shall be used for wells, pits, shafts, or similar
          excavations.

          The Site Supervisor and PESM shall determine when employees must use personal
          fall arrest systems at the edge of an excavation 6 feet or more in depth. The decision
          shall be based on the condition of the soil at the edge of the excavation, i.e., slippery,
          stable, etc., and the nature of the work at the edge of the excavation.


  5.6      Dangerous Equipment

           Each employee working 6 feet or less above dangerous equipment shall be protected
           by guardrail systems or by equipment guards or if working at more than 6 feet by
           guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems or safety net systems.


  5.6      Guardrail Systems

           Guardrail systems must meet the criteria specified in 29 CFR 1926.502(b).


  6.7      Personal Fall Arrest Systems

           Personal fall arrest systems shall meet the criteria specified in 29 CFR 1926.502(d).


   5.8      Protection From Falling Objects

            Toeboards, when used as falling object protection, shall meet the criteria specified in
            29 CFR 1926.5020); shall have a minimum of 3.5 inches from their top edge to the
            level of the walking working surface; and no more than a 0.25 inch clearance from the
            bottom edge to the walkingtworking surface.




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 5.9      Other Fall Protection Requirements

          Whenever a fall hazard of 6 feet or more exists on a TtFW jobsite, 29 CFR 1926,
          Subpart M shall be consulted for applicable requirements. If Subpart M does not
          specifically address the fall hazard, then the Site Supervisor and PESM shall
          determine if fall protection measures are required.


 5.10     Training


 6.1 0.1 General
          All site personnel who might be exposed to fall hazards on a TtFW jobsite shall
          receive training by a competent person. The training shall be conducted at the time
          of the site orientation. The competent person must meet the applicable requirements
          of 29 CFR 1926.503(a)(2). The training shall include enabling the employee to
          recognize the hazards of falling and the procedures to be followed in order to
          minimize fall hazards.


 6.10.2 Retraining

          Retraining shall be conducted when changes occur in the workplace which present a
          new fall hazard, when fall protection systems or equipment is changed, or when it
          appears that the employee has not retained the requisite understanding or skill
          regarding the fall hazards or protective measures.


 6.10.3 Certification of Training

          Certification of training or retraining shall include the name of the employee, the date
          of the training, the content of the training, and the signature of the person who
          conducted the training.

           Training certification shall be maintained as part of the project file.


  5.10.4 Previous Training

           TtFW shall not rely on fall protection training from other TtFW jobsites or other
           employers to meet the training requirements of this program unless the Site
           Supervisor or ESS prepares a new certification record which indicates the date it was
           determined that the prior training was adequate and why it was considered adequate.



  6.0      REFERENCES
           29 CFR 1926, Subpart M, Safety Standards for Fall Protection in the Construction
           Industry
           Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 3-3, Inspections
           OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

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                                                      Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                     NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE

This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
connection with the performance of work for TtFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
appropriate in accordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
or any binding obligation of TIM This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
notice at the sole discretion of TtFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
The current, version of this document ran be found on the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                       CopyrighIC 1995,1998

                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                                      Proprietary Information




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0




                               SOP2
        EHS 6-1, Confined Space Entry




    I
                                                                                                                    2532279


EHS 6-1:                         Confined Space Entry (Previously HS6-2)'
Purpose                             Version 04/0412000. Revised          Approved
When required, this program            Date:                                   by:
provides the requirements to         Original 02101/95
ensure a safe working            Issue Date:
environment within and arou
confined space operations by     Category: Company Procedures            Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health &Safety
evaluating confined space                                                         Programs
hazards, implementing                   Sub Departmental/Discipline      Document Procedure
necessary controls, and           Category:                                 Type:
regulating employee entry into     Keyword Monitoring, Training,         Document Mike McSherry
confined spaces In accordance         Index: Field Activities/Science,     Owner.
with 29 CFR 1910.146,                        Operational Control
Permit-Required Confined
Spaces.
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                                               Table of Contents

Section

1.0        PURPOSE
2.0       SCOPE
3.0        MAINTENANCE
4.0        DEFINITIONS
          4.1 Acceptable Entry Conditions
          4.2 Attendant
          4.3 Confined Space
          4.4 Double Block and Bleed
          4.5 Engulfment
          4.6 Confined Space Entry Permit
          4.7 Entry
          4.8 En" Supervisor
          4.9 Hazardous Atmosphere
          4.1 0 1nerting
          4.11 Isolation
          4.12 Line Breaking
          4.13 Non-permit Required Confined Space
          4.14 Oxygen Deficient
          4.15 Oxygen Enriched
          4,16 Permit Required Confined Space
          4.17 Prohibited Conditions
          4.1 8 Retrieval System

5.0       DISCUSSION
          5.1 Responsibilities
              5.1.1 Authorized Entrants
              5.1.2 Attendants
              5.1.3 Entry Supervisors
              5.1.4 Line Management
          5.2 Procedure
              5.2.1 Hazard Evaluation
              5.2.2 Atmospheric Testing
              5.2.3 Ventilation
              5.2.4 Isolation
              5.2.5 Equipment Staging
              5.2.6 Emergency and Rescue Procedures
              5.2.7 ClienttContractor Coordination
              5.2.8 Pre-Entry Briefing
              5.2.9 Confined Space Operations
               5.2.10 Deviation From Program Requirements
               5.2.11 Identification of Confined Spaces
               5.2.112 Program Review
               5.2.13 Training

 6.0       REFERENCES

 7.0       ATTACHMENTS




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1.0       PURPOSE
          When required, this progra'm provides the requirements to ensure a safe working environment
          within and around confined space operations by evaluating confined space hazards, implementing
          necessary controls, and regulating employee entry into confined spaces in accordance with 29
          CFR 1910.146, Permit-Required Confined Spaces.
          Confined space entries should only be made if there is not a feasible method of performing the
          task from outside of the confined space.



 2.0       SCOPE
           This program applies to all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) employees, operations, and
           subcontractors.



 3.0       MAINTENANCE
           The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for updating this
           procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief Executive Officer.
           Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department responsible for updating the
           procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and Compliance.



  4.0       DEFINITIONS


  41        Acceptable Entry Conditions
            The conditions that must exist in a permit space to allow entry and to ensure that employees
            involved with a permit-required confined space entry can safely enter into and work within the
            space.


  4.2       Attendant
            An individual stationed outside one or more permit spaces who monitors the authorized entrants
            and who performs all attendant's duties assigned in the employers permit space program.


   4.3       Confined Space

             An enclosed area which exhibits the following characteristics:

                       Is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter;

                       Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit; and


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         0          Is not designed for continuous occupancy.


4.4      Double Block and Bleed
         The closure of a line, duct, or pipe by closing and locking or tagging two in-line valves and by
         opening and locking or tagging a drain or vent valve in the line between the two closed valves.


4.5      Engulfment
         The surrounding and effective capture of a person by a liquid or finely divided solid substance that
         can be aspirated to cause death by filling or plugging the respiratory system or that can exert
         enough force on the body to cause death by strangulation, constriction, or crushing.


4.6      Confined Space Entry Permit
         The completed document which specifies the hazards, controls, and procedures for a confined
         space entry.


4.7       Entry
         The action by which a person passes through an opening into a confined space. Entry is
         considered to have occurred as soon as any part of the entrant's body breaks the plane of an
         opening into the space.


4.8       Entry Supervisor
          The person responsible for determining if acceptable entry conditions are present at a permit
          space where entry is planned, for authorizing entry and overseeing entry operations, and for
          terminating entry as required by this section.


4.9       Hazardous Atmosphere
          An atmosphere which meets one or more of the following criteria:
          0         Flammable gas, vapor, or mist in excess of 10 percent of the lower explosive limit; or

          0         An airborne concentration of a dust at a concentration that meets or exceeds its lower
                    explosive limit (rule of thumb - visibility obscured at a distance of 5 feet); or
          0         Atmospheric concentration of any substance which could result in employee exposure in
                    excess of its recommended exposure limit, i.e., Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL),
                    Threshold Limit Value (TLV), or manufacturers limit; or

          0         Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH).


4.10         Inerting
          The displacement of the atmosphere in a permit space by a noncombustible gas to such an extent
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           that the resulting atmosphere is noncombustible.


4.11       Isolation
           A pre-entry requirement which assures that the confined space has been completely taken out of
           service and insures that accidental introduction of hazardous substances into the confined space
           may not take place. Isolation may include blinding, double blocking with bleed valves, capping,
           and/or lockout/tagout.


 4.12       Line Breaking
            The intentional opening of a pipe, line, or duct that is or has been carrying flammable, corrosive,
            or toxic material, an inert gas, or any fluid at a volume, pressure, or temperature capable of
            causing injury.


 4.13       Non-permit Required Confined Space
            A confined space that does not contain or, with respect to atmospheric hazards, have the potential
            to contain any hazard capable of causing death or serious physical harm.


  4.114      Oxygen Deficient
             An atmosphere containing less than 19.5 percent oxygen by volume.


  4.11 5     Oxygen Enriched
             An atmosphere containing 22.0 percent or more oxygen by volume. (Note: The 22% upper limit is
             an NFPA 306k, Certification of Hot Work, Consensus Standard.)


  4.16       Permit Required Confined Space
             A confined space which has one or more of the following characteristics:

                       Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere;

                       Contains a material that has the potential for engulfment of the entrant; or

                       Has an internal configuration that could trap or asphyxiate an entrant.




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4.17     Prohibited Conditions
         Any condition in a permit space that is not allowed by the permit during the period when entry is
         authorized.


4.18     Retrieval System

         The equipment used for non-entry rescue of persons from permit spaces.



6.0       DISCUSSION


6.1       Responsibilities


5.11.1    Authorized Entrants

          Entrants are responsible for the following:

          9         Inspection of operability and integrity of all respiratory apparatus, safety equipment, and
                    personal protective equipment (PPE) to be usedtwom;

          0         Knowing hazards, mode of exposure, signs and symptoms, and consequences of
                    hazardous exposure;
          0         Communicating with the attendant as necessary to enable the attendant to monitor
                    entrant status and to enable the attendant to alert entrants of the need to evacuate the
                    space;
          0         Notifying the attendant of undetected / unnoticed hazards which could cause harm or
                    injury to team personnel, warning signs and symptoms of exposure, and prohibited
                    conditions;
          0         Wearing the designated respiratory apparatus, safety equipment, and PPE in accordance
                    with EHS 5-2, Respiratory Protection and EHS 5-1, Personal Protective Equipment;

          0          Knowing the emergency procedures; and

           a         Exiting from the permit space when evacuation is ordered, warning signs or symptoms of
                     exposure are noted, a prohibited condition is noted, or an alarm is activated.


 5.1.2     Attendants

           Attendants are required to assume the following duties and responsibilities:

                     Inspection of operability and integrity of all respiratory apparatus, safety equipment, and
                     PPE to be used/work in accordance with EHS 5-2, Respiratory Protection and EHS 5-1.
                     Personal Protective Equipment;

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                   Know the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the mode,
                   signs or symptoms, and consequences of the exposure;

                    Be aware of possible behavioral effects of hazard exposure in authorized entrants;

                    Communicate with authorized entrants as necessary to monitor entrant status and to alert
                    entrants of the need to evacuate the space;

                    Leave their position only after being physically replaced by another attendant. If required
                    to leave their post and no replacement is available, they must evacuate all personnel from
                    within the confined space before leaving;

                    Monitor activities inside and outside the space to determine if it is safe for entrants to
                    remain in the space and order the authorized entrants to evacuate the permit space
                    immediately if a prohibited condition is noted, if an authorized entrant shows behavioral
                    effects of a hazard exposure, ifa saturation develops outside the confined space that may
                    endanger the entrants, or if the attendant cannot effectively and safely perform his or her
                    required duties;

                     Summon rescue and emergency services;

                     Warn unauthorized persons that they must stay away from the permit space, advise them
                     to exit immediately if they enter the permit space, and inform the entry supervisor if they
                     enter the space;

                     Perform non-entry rescues;

                     Perform no duties that interfere with the attendant's primary duty to monitor and protect
                     the authorized entrants;

                      Remain in constant communication with the entrant at all times; and

                      Perform atmospheric monitoring per the confined space permit under the direction of the
                      entry supervisor, if trained to perform the monitoring.


  5.1.3    Entry Supervisors

            Entry supervisors have the following responsibilities:

                      Knows the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the mode,
                      signs or symptoms, and consequences of the exposures;

                      Verifies by checking that the appropriate entries have been made on the permit, that all
                      tests specified by the permit have been conducted and that all procedures and equipment
                      specified by the permit are in place before endorsing the permit and allowing entry to
                      begin;

                      Verifies that rescues services are available and that the means for summoning them are
                      operable;

                      Removes unauthorized individual who enter or who attempt to enter the permit space
                      during entry operations;

                      Determines, whenever responsibility for a permit space entry operation is transferred and

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                    at intervals dictated by the hazards and operations performed within the space, that entry
                    operations remain consistent with terms of the entry permit and that acceptable entry
                    conditions are maintained;

                    Ensures full compliance with TtFW and customer permit requirements;

                    Ensures that all confined space pre-entry precautions have been taken;

                    Ensures that atmosphere/personnel monitoring is performed at adequate frequencies to
                    protect the safety and well being of the entry personnel;

                    Ensures that emergency procedures and individual assignments are clearly defined, and
                    to coordinate rescue procedures if necessary; and

                    Terminates the entry and cancels the permit.

          The entry supervisor may also serve as attendant.


5.1.4     Line Management

          The Project Manager (PM) has the responsibility for.

                    Ensuring implementation of the confined space entry program

                    Ensuring that only trained, qualified, and medically fit personnel participate in confined
                    space entry operations; and

                     Ensuring that adequate, appropriate, and properly maintained equipment required to
                     safely enter a confined space and successfully complete the task.


5.2       Procedure
          The following sections provide the requirements for pre-entry activities, pre-entry briefings,
          confined space operations, and program review requirements. Complete implementation of these
          requirements is necessary to ensure the health and safety of personnel during confined space
          operations.
           No entries shall be made into confined spaces with:

                     IDLH atmospheres;
                     LEL readings in excess of 10% or a combustible dust atmosphere in excess of the LEL;
                     or

                     An oxygen content of less than 19.5% or greater than 22.0%.


 5.2.1     Hazard Evaluation
           Prior to the initiation of a confined space entry, a hazard evaluation of the space shall be
           conducted by the entry supervisor to determine what chemical and physical hazards are present.
           This review shall be documented on the entry permit and include, but not be limited to the
           following:

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         0          Potential for oxygen deficient or enriched atmosphere;

          0         Presence of a flammable atmosphere;

          0         Presence of toxic air contaminants;

          0         Presence of physical hazards;

          0         Sources of hazardous energy that must be de-energized to effectively isolate the confined
                    space;

          0         Other permits, such as hot-work or lockout/tagout, required to control hazards; and

          a         Acceptable entry conditions.

          Various sources of information for hazard identification that may be used include blueprints,
          as-builts, client employee knowledge, past entry information, air monitoring data, and physical
          inspection. For each hazard identified, an effective means of control shall be documented on the
          confined space entry permit.


 5.2.2       Atmospheric Testing

             The atmosphere of the confined space shall be tested to determine the initial concentrations of
             the following:

             0       Oxygen content;

                     Flammable or combustible gases or vapors; and

                     Toxic air contaminants,

             Testing for the initial concentrations shall be conducted in the order given and documented on the
             entry permit. LEL, oxygen, and toxicity readings must be taken at least every 15 minutes. If
             isolation of the space is unfeasible because the space is large or part of a continuous system, the
             monitoring shall be continuous. Frequency for periodic monitoring during the confined space
             entry shall be specified and documented on the permit.


 5.2.3       Ventilation

             Mechanical ventilation shall be initiated where necessary to prevent exposure of employees to
             hazardous atmospheres. The ventilation shall meet the following requirements:

              0      It shall be continuous;

              0      It shall be directed into the immediate area authorized entrants shall work in;

              0      The air supply shall be from a clean source and shall not increase the hazards in the
                     area; and

              0      Employees shall not enter the space until the ventilation clears the hazardous
                     atmosphere.


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         When ventilation practices cannot be used, a supplied air respirator must be utilized. Exceptions
         may be made by the Project Environmental and Safety Manager (PESM).

         Ventilation equipment must be bonded and grounded prior to operation. Ventilator exhausts must
         be directed down wind from personnel and/or areas that contain buildings, equipment, etc.


6.2.4     Isolation
          All permitted spaces shall be removed from service and completely protected against the release
          of energy and material into the space. Means used to isolate the space include but are not limited
          to the following:

          0          Lockout/tagout in accordance with EHS 6-4;

          a          Disconnection of mechanical linkages and hazards;

          0          Blanking, blinding, or misaligning piping; or

          0          Double blocking and bleeding.


6.2.5      Equipment Staging
           The following equipment shall be available as necessary and inspected prior to use:

                     Testing and monitoring equipment,

                     Ventilation equipment

                     Communications equipment;

                      Personal protective equipment;

                      Lighting equipment (caged, waterproof, and low voltage);

                      Barriers and shields;

                      Ingress and egress equipment;

                      Rescue and emergency equipment; and

                      Any other equipment required to make safe entry into the space.

           In spaces where the potential for flammable or combustible atmospheres exists, equipment shall
           be non-sparking and intrinsically safe. Electrical systems shall be GFCI protected.




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6.2.6     Emergency and Rescue P rocedures

          Based upon the location, hazards, and configuration of the confined space, the entry supervisor
          shall ensure that the following items are addressed:

          a         Rescue and emergency services to be used and means of summoning;

          0         Means of rescuing entrants;

          a         Rescue and emergency to be used at the site;

          0          Duties of personnel during emergencies; and

                     Prevention of unauthorized entry during rescues.


 5.2.7    Client/Contractor Coordination
          To ensure safe and efficient operations when TtFW personnel and client or subcontractor
          employees will make entry together into the same confined space, the following shall be
          completed by the entry supervisor.

                     Inform TtFW contractors of existing confined spaces;

                     Provide TtFW contractors with a copy of this program;

                     Inform the contractor of known hazards in the space;

                     Provide a list of controls implemented previously;

                     Coordinate the entry of the personnel; and

                     Debrief the contractor regarding this program and any hazards encountered.

              When TtFW personnel are required to perform confined space entry in support of client work, the
              entry supervisor shall complete the following in addition to the above requirements:

                      Obtain any available information on the space from the client;

                      Coordinate the entry operations with client personnel; and

                      Inform the client of entry hazards encountered.


  5.2.8       Pre-Entry Briefing
              Prior to initiating a confined space entry, the entry supervisor shall conduct a safety briefing with
              the authorized entrants, attendants, and other relevant personnel. The briefing shall cover the
              following at a minimum:
                      Hazard Communication (including the signs, symptoms, and modalities of chemical over
                      exposure) in accordance with EHS 4-2, Hazard Communications;

                      Physical hazards present;
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         0          All hazard controls;
         &          Acceptable entry conditions;

         0          Emergency procedures;

         0          Rescue procedures;
          0         Duties of entrants and attendants during routine and emergency operations;

                    Frequency and Types of air monitoring

          0         Communications system and backup to be used;

          0         Review of work to be accomplished during entry;
          0         Decontamination procedures (if necessary);

          0         PPE disposal; and
          0         Potential emergencies that may occur outside the confined space.
          Attachment A or an equivalent checklist shall be used to document pre-entry briefing.
          At the end of the briefing, all personnel shall be given opportunity to ask questions and review the
          permit. After review, each authorized entrant and attendant shall print and sign his/her name on
          the permit. The completed permit shall be posted at the entry site and serve as a roster for
          monitoring entry and exit of personnel from the space.


5.2.9        Confined Space Operations
             The following practices shall be adhered to during actual confined space entries:
                     All confined spaces will be treated as permit-required confined spaces unless the PESM
                     specifically provides an exemption in the EHS Plan, or by a field change request to the
                     Plan. Prior to entry, a properly executed permit shall be in place and signed by the Entry
                     Supervisor, Attendant, and each Entrant. Attachment B, or an equivalent form that is
                     approved for use by the PESM, shall be used.
                     The Entry Supervisor shall certify that all equipment is in place and operable, acceptable
                     entry conditions are present, all personnel have been fully briefed and all personnel have
                     signed the permit prior to initiating entry.
                     The work area outside the space shall be barricaded to prevent unauthorized personnel
                     from interrupting the attendants or entering the space. Unauthorized personnel shall be
                     asked to leave the barricaded area. If unauthorized personnel refuse to leave the area,
                     operations shall be terminated.
                     Atmospheric monitoring for oxygen, LEL, and toxic air contaminants shall be conducted at
                     the frequency noted on the permit. Results shall be logged on the permit.

                     No confined space shall be entered without:


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                -   A full body harness;

                -   A6'lanyardattachedtotheharness"D"ring;and

                -   A lifeline attached to the lanyard with the opposite end secured outside the confined
                    space. The lanyard and lifeline must have double locking rings.

         Note: Wristlets may be used in lieu of a full body harness if the body harness is infeasible or
         creates a greater hazard.
                    Top entries with a fall potential greater than 5 feet shall be made with fall protection. Fall
                    protection shall meet the criteria specified in 29 CFR 1926.502(d).


                    At least one attendant is required for permit-required entries, The attendant shall maintain
                    visual or voice communications with entrants at all times. Attendants shall not leave their
                    post unless formally relieved by another authorized attendant. The replacement shall be
                    fully briefed'by the entry supervisor on all information covered in the pre-entry briefing.
                    Entry supervisors may also serve as attendants.

                     When any confined space is entered where the noise level or respirator used prevents
                     voice communication, visual contact between the standby and workers must be
                     maintained.

                     Metal ladders, hand tools or other instruments which may spark or cause a source of
                     ignition, are not to be used within confined spaces where any detectable amounts of
                     LEL's are present.
                     No burning, grinding, chipping, or other operation which produces heat, sparks, or ignition
                     sources are to be performed without a hot work permit.

                      One attendant shall be dressed in the same PPE as the authorized entrants, except for
                      respiratory protection. Attendant supplied air shall be from a different source than that of
                      authorized entrants.

                      The entry supervisor shall terminate operations when the work is completed, an
                      unacceptable entry condition is detected, or another emergency inside or outside the
                      space is detected. Authorized entrants shall immediately evacuate upon notification of
                      the termination.
                      Attendants may monitor multiple sites only if they are able to maintain continuous visual or
                      voice communications with entrants. Ifcontinuous communications cannot be maintained,
                      additional attendants shall be used.
                      Attendants shall perform non-entry rescues in emergencies using rescue equipment
                      staged at the site.

                      Upon completion of work and exit of the entrants, the permit shall be canceled by the
                      entry supervisor and forwarded to the ESS. Permits shall be maintained as a part of the
                      project file.


   5.2.10 Deviation From Program Requirements

            a         Any deviation from this procedure requires the approval of the PESM.

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                   Approval for entry into permit-required confined spaces with air purifying respirators will
                   be given if:
                   The composition of the hazardous substance(s) in the confined space is well defined;

                   The hazardous substances) have good warning properties;

                   Short-term exposure to the hazardous substance(s) in excess of the recommended
                   exposure limit will not result in serious Physical harm;

                   The efficiency of the cartridge versus the hazardous substances) is known;

                   Forced air ventilation is utilized;

                    Reliable monitoring methods are available; and

                    Monitoring shows airborne concentrations to be less than the recommended exposure
                    level for the contaminants.


5.2.11    Identification of Confined Spaces
          A survey of the sites shall be performed prior to the start of work and documented to identify
          permit-required confined spaces. All permit-required confined spaces shall be identified with a
          sign. The sign shall contain the following wording of equivalent:

                               DANGER - PERMIT REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE

                                                   DO NOT ENTER


 5.2.12 Program Review
          The effectiveness of program implementation shall be reviewed by the PESM during site EHS
          inspections pursuant to EHS 3-3, Inspections, using the canceled permits and relevant incident
          information. The program will be modified, as necessary, on the basis of the PESM program
          reviews.


 5.2.13 Training
          Authorized entrants, attendants, and entry supervisors shall be trained in accordance with 29 CFR
          1910.146 (g) including the following topics as appropriate:

           0         The contents of this procedure;

           a         Their respective duties;

           0         CPR /First Aid (attendants and entry supervisors if they are serving as rescue personnel);

           0         Hazards commonly found in confined spaces;

           0         Lockout1tagout procedures;


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         0         isolation practices;
         0         Ventilation of confined spaces;
         0          Supplied air respiratory protection and SCBAs;

         0          Self rescue;
          0         Methods of communication;

          &         Atmospheric monitoring; and

          0          Rescues.
          Training shall establish employee proficiency in the skills required for confined space entry and
          the understanding and knowledge for the safe performance of all duties required by this
          procedure. Training records shall be maintained in accordance with EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping.




 6.0         REFERENCES

             29 CFR 1910.146, Permit-Required Confined Spaces
             29 CFR 1926.502(d), Fall Protection.
             Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping
             Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 3-3, Inspections 9
             Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 4-2, Hazard Communication
             Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 5-1, Personal Protective Equipment
              M
              Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 5-2, Respiratory Protection
              Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 6-4, Lockoutfragout a
              OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration)




   7.0        A.TTACHMENTS

                                                    ist
              Attachment B - Confined Space Entry Permit




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                                         EHS 6-1 ATTACHMENT A
                                     PRE-ENTRY BRIEFING CHECKLIST


                            Click the icon below to launch or download.

                                                       WILVI
                                              EHS 6-1 ARArhmPntjkdoc

  Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




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                                            EHS 6-1 ATTACHMENT B
                                         CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT


                               Click the icon below to launch or download.
                                                             CS-Z,

                                                    EHS 6-1 Attachment B.doc

   Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                      NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE
 This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
 connection with the performance of work for TIFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
 appropriate in accordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
 or any binding obligation of TtFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
 notice at the sole discretion of TIFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
 The current version of this document can be found an the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                    CopyrightO 1995, 1998. 2000
                                                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                      Proprietary Information




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                 SOP3
EHS 6-4, Lockout/Tagout
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EHS 6-4:                           Lockoub`Tgout (Previously HS6-5).
Purpose
The purpose of this program is
                                     Version 01/0512000- Revised
                                      Date:
                                                                        Approve
                                                                              by.
                                                                                    W2,
to establish the minimum             Original 02/01195
requirements and procedures
for performing lockout/tagout on   Issue Date:
machines and equipment in           Category: Company Procedures        Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health &Safety
accordance with 29 CFR                                                           Programs
 1910.147, Control of Hazardous           Sub Departmental/Discipline   Document Procedure
 Energy (Lockout/Tagout).           Category:                              Type:
                                     Keyword Operational Control,       Document Mike McSherry
                                        Index: Training,                  Owner.
                                               Communication, EHS
                                               Compliance/Waste
                                               Management, Field
                                               Activities/Science
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                                              Table of Contents
Section

 1.0      PURPOSE

 2.0      SCOPE

 3.0      MAINTENANCE

 4.0      DEFINITIONS

          4.1 Affected Employee
          4.2 Authorized Employee
          4.3 Energized
          4.4 Energy Isolating Device
          4.5 Energy Source
          4.6 Lockout
          4.7 Lockout Device
          4.8 Supervisor Lock

  5.0     DISCUSSION

          5.1 Responsibilities
                5.1.1 Authorized Employees
                5.1.2 Line Management
                5.1.3 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
          5.2 General Requirements
          5.3 Testing/Positioning
          5.4 Group Lockouts
          5.5 Tagout
          5.6 Equipment-Specific Lockoutrragout Procedures
          5.7 Shift Changes
          5.8 Failure to Clear Locks
          5.9 Subcontractors
          5.10 Periodic Inspections
          5. 1 1 Training

  6.0     REFERENCES

  7.0     ATTACHMENTS




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1.0       PURPOSE

          The purpose of this program is to establish the minimum requirements and procedures for
          performing lockout/tagout on machines and equipment in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.147,
          Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout).



2.0       SCOPE

          This program applies to all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) operations, except as follows:

                     Work on cord and plug connected electrical equipment where the plug is under the control
                     of the employee performing the work;

                     Hot tap operations; and

                     Work involving minor changes and adjustments to equipment during routine operations
                     (such as small tooling adjustments).



 3.0       MAINTENANCE
           The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for updating this
           procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief Executive Officer.
           Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department responsible for updating the
           procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and Compliance.



 4.0        DEFINITIONS


 4.1        Affected Employee

            An employee whose job requires them to operate or use a machine or equipment on which
            servicing, maintenance, or other work is performed under lockout/tagout or whose job requires
            them to work in an area in which equipment is locked out.


  4.2       Authorized Employee

            A person who locks out or implements a lockout/tagout system procedure on machines or
            equipment. Authorized and affected employees may be the same person when the authorized
            employee's duties also include performing work on a machine or equipment upon which
            lockout/tagout is implemented.


  4.3       Energized


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         Connected to an energy source or containing residual or stored energy.


4.4      Energy Isolating Device
         (Isolation Points) - A mechanical device that may be used to physically prevent the transmission,
         flow, or release of energy, including but not limited to the following:

         0          electrical circuit breakers;
         0          slide gate;
         0          disconnect switches;
         0          piping flanges;
         0          control switches; and
         0          other similar devices.


4.5       Energy Source
         Any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, potential, or other
         energy.


4.6       Lockout
          The placement of a lockout device and tag on a lockout device ensuring that the energy isolation
          device and equipment cannot be operated until the device is removed.


4.7       Lockout Device
          A device that physically controls the configuration of an energy isolation point. Lockout devices
          include but are not limited to the following:

                     locks
                     chains
                     valve covers
                     circuit breaker hasps
                     blind flanges
                     slip blinds, and
                     multiple lock hasps


 4.8       S upervisor Lock
           A lock installed by an authorized supervisor for the purpose of maintaining control of a machine or
           piece of equipment for a period greater than one work shift.



 5.0       DISCUSSION

 5.1       Responsibilities



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5.11.1    Authorized Employees

          Authorized employees shall lockout and tag all energy isolation devices which are required to be
          locked out by this procedure. The employee shall complete all permits and tags in accordance
          with instructions and shall remove their locks and tags and return them at the end of their shift or
          the end of the procedure.


5.1.2      Line Management

           Supervisors shall ensure proper implementation of the lockout/tagout procedure including
           approval of permits and maintenance of personal locks and a log of lock assignments. In group
           lockout procedures the supervisor shall lock and tag all the appropriate energy isolation devices
           and deposit his/ her key in the lockbox.


 5.1.3      Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel

            The Environmental and Safety Supervisor (ESS) is responsible for providing the training required
            in this procedure to supervisors and craft employees, and conducting periodic inspections to
            ensure this procedure is effectively implemented. The ESS shall also implement lockout/tagout
            procedures as required.


  5.2       General Requirements
            Following are the steps to be followed in preparing for, applying, and releasing a machine or piece
            of equipment from lockout. These steps shall be completed, in order, using the corresponding
            permit included as Attachment A. While work is being performed under the lockout, a copy of the
            completed permit shall be posted at the equipment controls or work area as appropriate.

            1.        Complete the general information in Section A of the permit

            2.         Identify Isolation Points
                      The first step required to isolate a piece of equipment is to identify the sources of
                      hazardous energy present. To identify the sources, the authorized employee shall
                      complete the following steps:

                                Survey the equipment and related schematics, blueprints, or as-builts, if available,
                                for hazardous energy sources;

                                Identify the isolation points and device positions for controlling each source of
                                hazardous energy; and

                                Identify the isolation method to be used on each source.

                       The above information shall be documented in Section B of the Lockout/Tagout Permit as
                       each point is identified.

             3.        Notifications
                       Prior to applying a lockout, the authorized employee shall notify affected employees of the
                       equipment to be locked out and sign Section C of the LockoutfTagout Permit on the

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                    "Notifier"line.

         4.         Equipment Shutdown
                    Shut down the equipment or place into the desired configuration using normal operating
                    procedures. The authorized employee shall sign Section C of the Lockout/Tagout Permit
                    on the "Shutdown by" line.

          5.        Equipment Isolation

                    To apply a lockout to a piece of equipment, complete the following steps:

                             Place each energy isolation device into a position that will prevent the
                             transmission of hazardous energy; and

                             The authorized employee shall lockout devices to each isolation point and control
                             the key for each lock at all times. Only one key is permitted per lock.

                    Complete Section D of the permit as each device is placed and sign the "Isolator' line in
                    Section C.

                    Notes:

                             Any lockout device not containing an integral locking mechanism must be used in
                             conjunction with a keyed lock.

                             Any energy isolation point not capable of being locked out must be controlled
                             physically through such means as removal of handles and disconnecting.

          6.         Release of Stored Energy
                     After the equipment has been locked and tagged as required in Section D all remaining
                     stored energy must be released. Methods for the release of stored energy include, but
                     are not limited to the following:

                              Discharge and grounding of capacitors,

                              Bleeding pressure from vessels and lines, and

                              Releasing mechanical sources of energy to engage blocks.

                     If stored energy has the potential to re-accumulate; therefore, verification of isolation shall
                     continue until work is complete. After releasing stored energy complete Section E of the
                     permit.

           7.        Lockout/Tagout Verification

                     After completing the lockout of the desired piece of equipment the effectiveness of the
                     lockout must be verified by the authorized employee by attempting to operate the
                     machine. After attempting to operate the machine, sign Section C of the permit on the
                     'Verifier" line.

           8.        Performance of Work
                     After verifying and receiving the supervisors approval signature, work may be performed
                     on the equipment which was locked/tagged.

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         9.        Lockout/Tagout Removal
                   After work has been completed the following steps shall be followed to release equipment
                   from lockout tagout:
                    9         The area affected by the lockout shall be inspected to ensure that releasing the
                              machine does not present a hazard to people and property,

                    a         Lockout devices and tags shall be removed,

                    0          Isolation devices returned to their operating positions,

                     0        The equipment started, and

                     &         Affected employees shall be notified of the release.

                     Section F of the permit shall be completed as the equipment is returned to service.


 5.3       Testing/Positioning
           When necessary to interrupt lockout/tagout for testing or repositioning, the steps contained in
           Section 5.2 shall be followed.


  6.4      Group Lockouts
           When multiple people are scheduled to work on a system, the following group lockout procedure
           should be implemented as follows:
                        The Site Supervisor shall place their lock on the energy isolation device(s) using a
                        multilock hasp.

                        Authorized employees shall place their individual locks on the multilock hasp.

                        When the group has completed their work, the supervisor shall verity all employee locks
                        have been removed before the supervisor removes his/her lock.




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5.5      Tagout

         The use of tags without locks is prohibited, except in those cases where it is physically impossible
         to attach a locking device to an isolation point. When it is necessary to use tags without locks the
         following shall be completed.

         0          The isolation point shall be placed in the correct position to prevent the flow of energy;

         0          The device shall be physically disconnected;

         0          A tag shall be placed on the disconnected device; and

         a          Employees shall be warned not to tamper with the tag or isolation point.


6.6       Equipment-Specific Lockoutrragout Procedures

         As TtFW does not normally perform lockouts of machinery on a repetitive basis the 1_01TO permit
         contained in Attachment A is designed for initial and one-of-a-kind lockouts. Should it become
         necessary to repetitively lockout the same piece of equipment, specific procedures and permits
         for the equipment shall be developed.

          Information contained in the equipment-specific procedure and permit should be the same as the
          information in the Attachment A permit. The procedures shall be generated by trained and
          knowledgeable project personnel and be reviewed and approved by the Project Environmental
          and Safety Manager (PESM).

          Equipment-specific procedures are not required when all of the following conditions are present:

          0         The machine has no potential for stored energy or the reaccumulation of energy after
                    shutdown; and

          a         The equipment has a single, readily identifiable, and isolated source of energy; and

          a         Isolation and lockout of the source will completely deenergize and deactivate the
                    equipment; and

          0         The machine is locked out and isolated from that energy source during servicing and
                    maintenance; and

          a         A single lockout device will achieve a locked-out condition; and

          0         The servicing or maintenance does not create a hazard to other employees.


5.7       Shift Changes

          When necessary to maintain the status of a locked out machine or device past the end of the shift
          when the lockout was initially installed the following procedures shall be adhered to:

                    The incoming authorized employee shall place their lock hasp on the lockout point and
                    complete a new permit.


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                   The outgoing employees shall remove their lock(s) after the new lock(s) are applied.

                    If multiple shifts are not used, the initial locks may be left in place until the following day or
                    until the equipment is released from lockout/tagout.

                    The new shift supervisor shall sign the permit before work is begun on the new shift. The
                    last supervisor whose name is on the lockout1tagout tags permit is responsible for all
                    activities related to the work activity.


 5.8      Failure to Clear Locks
          If a person should fail to clear a lockout and their lock remains in place, the supervisor will attempt
          to contact the person who applied the lock and resolve the issue.

          Ifthe person cannot be contacted, the supervisor will investigate the situation and determine that
          removal of the lock will not create a hazard in the work zone. The supervisor will then verify that
          the work zone is clear, and blocking devices have been removed and the system has been
          restored to the normal configuration. The supervisor will then cut the lock off and restore energy
          to the system.
           A written incident and investigation report per EHS 1-7, Incident Reporting and Investigating, shall
           be prepared by the supervisor stating the reason for cutting the lock, why the lock was not
           removed, and the procedure used to ensure the safety of personnel in the area. The individual
           whose lock was cut off must be notified ASAP.


  5.9      Subcontractors
           The supervisor shall be familiar with the nature of any subcontractor work on-site that may involve
           hazardous energy and assure that they follow work practices that are at least as strict as this
           procedure.
           For any lockout/tagout requirements, the supervisor shall review and approve all subcontractor
           work set up, apply his locks to the scheme, and sign the appropriate lockout/tagout procedure
           checklist.


  5.110     Periodic Inspections
            Periodic inspections pursuant to EHS 3-3, Inspections, shall be completed during the monthly
            inspections by the ESS, PESM or other qualified personnel to ensure that the lockout tagout
            program is being effectively implemented. As a minimum the following shall be done:

            a         Existing lockouts will be reviewed for effectiveness;

            &         Permits for each existing lockouts shall be reviewed for adequacy;

            0         Incident reports and past permits shall be reviewed to determine if deficiencies in the
                      program exist;

            0         Corrections to the system will be made as warranted; and

            a         Results will be logged in the health and safety logbook.


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5.1 I    Training
         Following are the training requirements for various personnel involved with or affected by
         lockout/tagout.
                   Authorized Employees shall receive training in the following prior to being allowed to use
                   lockout/tagout procedures:
                   Recognition of hazardous energy sources;
                   Types and magnitudes of energies available at the site;
                   Methods and means needed for energy isolation and control; and
                   The requirements of this procedure and 29 CFR 1910.147.

                    Affected Employees shall be instructed in the following:
                    Purpose of the lockout tagout program;
                    Use and requirements of this procedure and 29 GFR 1910.147;
                    Prohibitions of restarting or tampering with equipment that has been locked out; and
                    Prohibitions of tampering with locks and tags installed on equipment.
          Personnel not employed by TtFW shall be briefed in the requirements of this program during
          site-specific orientations, when applicable.
          Training records shall be maintained in accordance with EHS1-9, Recordkeeping.



 6.0      REFERENCES

          29 CFR 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout).
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 1-7, Incident Reporting and
          Investigation 9
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS -9, Recordkeeping
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 3-3, Inspections M
          OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration)



 7.0      ATTACHMENTS
          Attachment A - Lockout Tagout Permit




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                                               EHS 6-4 ATTACHMENT A
                                              LOCKOUT TAGOUT PERMIT


                             Click the icon below to download and complete.
                                                          rwgn


                                                EHS 6-4 Attachment A.doc

    Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




                                                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                       NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE
  This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
  connection with the performance of work for TIFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
  appropriate in accordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
  or any binding obligation of TIFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without Prior
  notice at the sole discretion of TtFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
  The current version of this document can be found on the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                         CopyrightV 1995, 2000
                                                         Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                        Proprietary Information




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le




                                SOP4
         EHS 4-6, Temperature Extremes




     I
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EHS 4-6:                            'Temperature Extremes (Previously H84-6)
Purpose                                Version 03/17198 - Revised         Approved
The purpose of this program IS           Date:                                  by:W4
to prevent heat and cold stress         Original 02/01/95
related Injuries and illnesses at   Issue Date:
field operations.                    Category: Company Procedures         Sections: ESQ - Environmental Heafth &Safety
                                                                                   Programs
                                           Sub Departmental/Discipline    Document Procedure
                                     Category:                               Type:
                                      Keyword EHS ComplianceMaste         Document Mike McSherry
                                         Index: Management,                 Owner
                                                Monitoring, Operational
                                                Control, Training
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                                               Table of Contents
Section

1.0     PURPOSE

2.0     SCOPE

3.0     MAINTENANCE

4.0     DEFINITIONS

       4.1 Adjusted Temperature
       4.2 Deep Frostbite
       4.3 Frostbite
       4.4 Frostnip or Incipient Frostbite
       4.5 Heat Cramp
       4.6 Heat Exhaustion
       4.7 Heat Rash
       4.8 Heat Stroke
       4.9 Hyperthermia
       4.10 Hypothermia
       4.11 Superficial Frostbite
       4.12 Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT)
       4.13 Wind-Chill Factor or Equivalent Chill Temperature (ECT)
       4.14 Work/Rest Regimen

5.0    DISCUSSION

       5.1 Responsibilities
           5.1.1 Field Personnel
           5.1.2 Line Management
           5.1.3 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
      5.2 General Program Requirements
      5.3 Heat Stress
          5.3.1 Selection of Chemical Protective Clothing
           5.3.2 Hydration
           5.3.3 Cool Rest Areas
           5.3.4 Other Prevention Program Elements
           5.3.5 Training
      5.4 Cold Stress
           5.4.1 Personal Protective Equipment
           5.4.2 Engineering Controls
           5.4.3 Warm Rest Areas
           5.4.4 Work/Warm-up Schedule
           5.4.5 Training

6.0    REFERENCES

7.0    ATTACHMENTS




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 1.0      PURPOSE

          The purpose of this program is to prevent heat and cold stress related injuries and
          illnesses at field operations.



 2.0      SCOPE

          This program applies to all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and subcontractor field
          personnel that may be exposed to heat or cold stress during the performance of their
          field work assignments.



  3.0      MAINTENANCE

           The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for
           updating this procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFWs President and Chief
           Executive Officer. Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department
           responsible for updating the procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and
           Compliance.



  4.0      DEFINITIONS


  4.1      Adjusted Temperature

           The dry bulb temperature adjusted to account for solar radiation, to be used as a heat
           stress indicator for personnel in impermeable protective clothing.


   4.2      Deep Frostbite

           The tissue beneath the skin is solid to the touch; it may involve a full thickness freeze
           to the bone. This is an extreme emergency and can result in permanent tissue loss.


   4.3      Frostbite

            Freezing of body tissue.


   4.4      Frostnip or Incipient Frostbite

            A cold related injury that progresses slowly and is painless while developing. The
            victim is usually unaware that he/she has frost nip. The skin first becomes reddened,
            then changes to white; no freezing of tissue occurs.


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 4.5     Heat Cramp

         Painful muscle spasms usually occurring on the arms, legs, and abdomen; caused by
         excessive loss of body electrolytes from profuse sweating.


 4.6     Heat Exhaustion

         A form of shock that occurs when the body loses large amounts of water and
         electrolytes from excessive perspiration after exposure to heat and physical activity;
         also                    called                    heat                   prostration.


 4.7     Heat Rash

          Profuse tiny raised red vesicles (blister-like) on affected areas of the skin which cause
          a prickling sensation during heat exposure.


 4.8      Heat Stroke

          A life-threatening condition caused by rapidly rising body core temperature that
          occurs when the body's temperature regulating mechanisms are overwhelmed.
          Sweating stops and the skin is dry and hot


 4.9      Hyperthermia

          A rise in body core temperature above 99.6 C.


  4.10    Hypothermia

          Decreased body core temperature from prolonged exposure to freezing or
          near-freezing temperatures. This is the most life-threatening cold injury and affects
          the entire body with possible localized severe cooling.


 4.11     Superficial Frostbite

          Frostbite which affects the skin and tissue just beneath the skin. The skin is firm and
          waxy, tissue beneath is soft and numb. The skin turns purple and may tingle and
          bum during warming.


 4.12     Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT)

          Method used to measure the environmental factors (e.g., temperature, relative
          humidity) which impacts the body's physiological responses to heat.




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 4.13      Wind-Chill Factor or Equivalent Chill Temperature (ECT)

           An index describing the effect of the cooling power of moving air on exposed flesh.
           The effect of wind velocity at a certain temperature is expressed as the equivalent
           cooling effect of a lower temperature with still air.



 4.14      Work/Rest Regimen

           The ratio of time spent working to time spent resting in an area designed to relieve
           heat related conditions. This ratio is expressed in one hour periods. Example: A
           work/rest regimen of 75% work, 25% rest corresponds to 45 minutes work, 15
           minutes rest each hour.



  6.0      DISCUSSION


  5.1      Responsibilities


  6.1.1     Field Personnel

            All field personnel will be trained in heat and cold stress prevention and treatment.
            Field personnel will monitor themselves and their workmates for symptoms of heat
            and cold stress and will inform the Environmental and Safety Supervisor (ESS) or
            their supervisor immediately should symptoms become apparent.


  5.1.2     Line Management

            Site Supervisors have the responsibility to:

            •   Provide resources and facilities necessary to prevent health effects from
                temperature extremes

            •   Enforce work rules related to such prevention

            •   Ensure implementation of the requirements of this program as specified in the
                Site Environmental, Safety and Health (EHS) plans.


   5.1.3    Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel

            The Project Environmental and Safety Manager (PESM) will make the initial
            determination of heat and cold stress prevention requirements as part of the site EHS
            Plan (see EHS 3-2, EHS Plans) and oversee the implementation of this program on a
            project basis for all TtFW field programs.

            The ESS will assist with implementation of heat and cold stress prevention programs.
            The ESS will, in most cases, be the person responsible for monitoring heat and cold
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          stress on the job, determining work/rest and work/warm-up schedules where used,
          and will implement emergency response or corrective action, if needed. The ESS will
          train site personnel on the effects of temperature extremes and the site prevention
          program, and will maintain records related to this program.


 5.2      General Program Requirements

          Adverse weather conditions must be considered when planning site operations.
          Excessively hot or cold working environments can produce a number of different
          injuries. Critical to the ability to care for those injuries is a basic understanding of the
          way in which the body maintains its temperature and how it physiologically adjusts to
          extremes of heat and cold. Attachment A provides information on the body's
          physiological responses to heat and cold stress.

          Proper care of victims who are suffering from the effects of heat or cold exposure Will
          help to minimize injuries and speed recovery. On the other hand, improper treatment
          of these emergencies can result.in serious injury, disability, or death.

          The most effective first aid for any injury is prevention. When acceptable monitoring
          and prevention programs are followed, there should be no victims.


 5.3      Heat Stress
          A heat stress prevention program will be implemented when ambient temperatures
          exceed 70'F for personnel wearing impermeable clothing and for other personnel
          when the WBGT index exceeds the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values.


  5.3.1   Selection of Chemical Protective Clothing
          The PESM will review site data and working conditions and select the personal
          protective equipment ensemble that best protects the employees from site hazards.
          The risk of heat related illness will be fully considered in balancing the risks and
          benefits of the PPE. Where contact with a waste material is unlikely; contact is not
          expected to result in a serious dermal hazard; and significant absorption of the
          contaminants is not likely to occur, then impermeable clothing should not be required.
          In this Case, the risk of heat related illness may grossly outweigh the benefits provided
          by such equipment. Even when chemical protective clothing is needed, the PESM
          should consider the probable exposure scenarios and select protective equipment
          accordingly. For example, if dermal exposure is likely to be localized, strong
          consideration should be given to using gloves, boots, gauntlets, leggings, aprons,
          bibs, face shields, etc., in lieu of full body coveralls and respirators.


  5.3.2    Hydration

           TtFW will supply coot (50 -59 F) potable water or other suitable drinks (e.g., sport
           electrolyte replacements) for fluid replacement. Employees involved in the heat
           stress prevention program will be trained and encouraged to drink at a rate of
           approximately 8 oz. every 20 minutes. Individual cups will be used and kept in closed
           containers or dispensers.



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 5.3.3    Cool Rest Areas
          Shaded rest areas will be provided. On large rernediation projects, air conditioned
          rest areas should be provided for workers exposed to heat stress conditions.


  5.3.4 Other Prevention Program Elements
          The PESM, ESS and the Project Manager will incorporate other elements into the
          heat stress prevention program as necessary. The selected elements will be
          described in the EHS plans. Engineering controls are preferred. Where their use is
          not feasible, the program must incorporate administrative/work practice controls,
          personal protective equipment, or a combination. Examples of other prevention
          program elements include:

                  Engineering Controls

            Engineering controls may include:
           -Air       conditioned cabs for heavy equipment and vehicles (Such controls may
                  eliminate the need for other program elements);

            -Fans       or blowers; and
            -Cold     water for drenching personnel in impermeable clothing. This can be
                provided through a garden hose, a garden sprayer filled with ice water, a clean
                drum full of water for "hard hat dipping" or containers of ice water and clean
                towels in the rest area to hasten cool down.

                  Administrative and Work Practice Controls

            Administrative controls include:
            -Adjusting        work schedules to do the bulk of the work during the cooler parts of the
                day;

             -Acclimatizing        workers; and
             -Implementing    worktrest regimens (See Attachment B for Work/Rest Regimen
                 Procedures).

             0Personal Protective Equipment

              Personal cooling devices which may be useful include:

             -     Ice vests;

             -     Circulating water vests; and

              -    Vortex tubes.
              Where ice vests and circulating water vests are used, rest periods of approximately
              15 minutes should be taken when ice packs or batteries need to be changed.

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         Continuous work over long periods of time with these devices may present an
         increased musculoskeletal injury risk due to the extra weight. Since the duration of
         the cooling effectiveness of these devices will vary with heat and work loads, users
         must be instructed to leave the area to replenish ice or batteries at the first sign of
         loss of cooling.

               Monitoring

         A program of environmental and physiological monitoring must be established in
         order to use work/rest regimens. The monitoring procedures are described in
         Attachment B.


 5.3.5 Training

         All site personnel must receive training on the following topics:

          •    Health effects of hot environments and symptoms of heat related illness;

          •    Personal risk factors;

          •    Effect of personal protective equipment on heat stress conditions;

          •    Preventive measures;

          •    Fluid replacement;

               Elements of the site Heat Stress Prevention Program; and

               First aid and emergency response.

          Records shall be maintained in accordance with EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping.


 5.4      Cold Stress

          At certain times of the year, workers may be exposed to the hazards of working in
          cold environments.      Potential hazards in cold environments include frostbite,
          trenchfoot or immersion foot, and hypothermia as well as slippery surfaces, brittle
          equipment, poor judgement and taking shortcuts. The current ACGIH threshold limit
          values (TLVs) for cold stress will be used as a guideline. TtFW will implement the
          following cold stress prevention program elements when there is a potential for cold
          related injuries.


 6.4.1    Personal Protective Equipment

          The following personal protective equipment will be provided as necessary to TtFW
          employees when conditions indicate a potential for cold-related injury.
          Subcontractors will be expected to supply appropriate equipment to their employees.

          •    Hard hat liners,

          •    Gloves or glove liners,


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          •Rain        gear or water impermeable coveralls and gloves for potentially wet
                 operations,

          •Fleeced boot liners where rubber steel-toe boots are used, and

          •Winter coveralls.


  6.4.2   Engineering Controls
          A variety of engineering controls shall be evaluated to minimize cold stress. These
          include:
          •General or spot heating should be used to increase temperature at the
            workplace.

           •If      fine work is to be performed with bare hands in a cold environment, special
                  provisions should be made to keep the workers hands warm. Warm air jets,
                  radiant heaters, or contact warm plates can be used.

           •The work area should be shielded from winds and drafts that may affect the wind
             chill factor.
           •The air velocity in refrigerated rooms should be minimized as much as possible,
             and should not exceed 1m/sec in the work zone.

            •At temperatures below freezing, metal handles of tools and control bars should
              be covered with thermal insulating material.

            •Unprotected metal chair sets should not be used as they conduct heat away from
               the body.
            •When necessary, equipment and processes should be substituted, isolated,
              relocated, or redesigned to reduce cold stress at the worksite.

            •Power tools, hoists, cranes, or lifting aids should be used to reduce metabolic
               workload.

            •Heated warming shelters such as tents and cabins should be made available if
              work is performed continuously in an equivalent chill temperature of 20OF or
               below.
            •The ESS may implement a work-rest schedule to reduce exposure to cold stress.

             •Scheduled rest breaks should be enforced.

             •Personnel exposed to the cold should be provided the opportunity for frequent
                intake of warm, sweet, caffeine-free, nonalcoholic liquids or soup.

             •Work should be moved to warmer areas whenever possible.

             •Extra workers should be assigned to highly demanding tasks.

             •Workers should be allowed to pace themselves, taking breaks when needed.


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                Workers shall be trained in the prevention, symptoms, and emergency response
                to cold stress.

          •      Utilize the "buddy system" to monitor cold stress symptoms among the workers.

          •      Allow new employees time to adjust or "acclimate" to cold conditions.

          •      Minimize the need to sit or stand in one place for long periods of time.
                 Minimize the amount of work time spent in a cold environment.

                 Allow for the weight and bulkiness of protective clothing when estimating work
                 performance goals and tasks.


 5.4.3 Warm Rest Areas

          TtFW will make warm rest areas, e.g., heated trailers, available for rest breaks in cold
          weather. Employees will be permitted and encouraged to use the heated trailers
          whenever they experience symptoms of cold stress.


 5.4.4    WorklWarm-up Schedule

          The worktwarm-up schedule found in the ACGIH TLVs for cold stress will be followed.
          In addition, TtFW will make warm-up periods available to employees who need to
          change into dry clothing to prevent immersion foot or hypothermia.


 5.4.6    Training

          All TtFW employees and subcontractors will be trained in:

           •     The effects of cold stress, including frostbite, immersion foot and hypothermia;

           •     Personal risk factors;

           •     Recognition of the symptoms;

           •     Methods employees can use to protect themselves; and

           •     First aid procedures and recognition of medical emergencies.

              Records shall be maintained in accordance with EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping.



  6.0         REFERENCES

           ACGIH (American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists)
           Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping La
           Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 3-2, Environmental,
           Healty & Safety Plan(s)
           Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene. Third Edition, 1988.
           National Safety Council
           NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

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              NIOSH/OSHA/EPA/USCG/EPA
              Occupational Exposure to Hot Environments, Revised Criteria 1986.
lb            Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site
              Activities. October 1985.
              Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological
              Exposure Indices, 1994-95.




       7.0      ATTACHMENTS

                Attachment A - Heat and Cold Stress Information
                Attachment B - Work/Rest Regimens and Monitoring




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                                ATTACHMENT A (Page I of 6)
                           HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION



                                         Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                          HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION

HEAT STRESS

Hot weather can Cause physical discomfort, loss of efficiency, and personal injury. The
human body strives to maintain a constant core temperature of 98.6o. If this temperature is
to be maintained, heat loss must equal heat production. This balance is maintained by
variations in the blood flow to the outer part of the body. When the core temperature rises,
blood vessels beneath the skin dilate, and the blood brings increased heat to the skin, where
it is dissipated by radiation and convection. This works only as long as the skin temperature
is lower than the temperature of the outside environment. Heat loss by radiation convection is
impossible when the temperature of the outside air approaches or exceeds the temperature of
the skin. The body will now rely on dissipation through evaporation of sweat. But the sweat
mechanism also has limits. The normal adult can sweat only about one liter per hour and can
sweat at that rate for only a few hours at a time. In addition, sweating only works ifthe relative
air humidity is low. Sweat evaporation ceases entirely when the relative humidity reaches 75
percent.

Of particular concern in heat stress monitoring is the use of personal protective clothing which
decreases natural body ventilation and greatly increases the temperature and humidity to the
skin. If precautions are not taken, heat stress will progress into a heat-related injury.
Heat-related injuries fall into three major categories: heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat
stroke.


Heat Cramps

        Symptoms
        Heat cramps are the least common and least severe of heat injuries. Heat cramps
        occur when the electrolytic balance in the blood between water, calcium, and sodium
        (salt) is altered. Low blood salt level, from profuse sweating and inadequate salt
        consumption, is the usual cause.

        Symptoms of heat cramps include:

        •      Severe muscle cramps and pain, especially of the upper legs, calves, and
               abdomen, and occasionally in the arms

         •     Faintness and dizziness

               Possible nausea and vomiting
        Treatment
        Emergency care will include:

               Remove victim from the hot environment


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                                  ATTACHMENT A (Page 2 of 6)
                             HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION

        •Dilute one teaspoon of salt in one quart of water or use a commercial product
           with a low glucose content; allow victim to sip this solution at the rate of one-half
            glassful every 15 minutes

         •To      relieve pain, gently stretch the involved muscle group; gently message cramps
               as long as it does not increase the pain or discomfort

         The victim should avoid exertion of any kind for 12 hours. A victim of heat cramps is
         prone to recurrence.

 Heat Exhaustion
 Symptoms
 Heat exhaustion is the most common heat injury and usually occurs in an individual who is
 involved with heavy physical exertion in a hot, humid environment, and is wearing protective
 clothing. Heat exhaustion is a mild state of physical shock caused by the pooling of blood in
 the vessels just below the skin, causing blood to flow away from the major organs of the body.
 Due to prolonged and profuse sweating, the body also loses large amounts of salt and water.

 The symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

          •     Profuse sweating
          •     Pale, cool, sweaty skin
          •     Headache and extreme weakness, fatigue
          •     Nausea and possible vomiting
          •     Dizziness and faintness
          •     Collapse and possible brief unconsciousness
           •    Body core temperature normal, may even be slightly below normal
  Treatment
  Emergency care will include:
           •     Remove victim from the hot environment and out of the exclusion zone
           •     Lie victim down with feet slightly raised
           •     Remove as much clothing as reasonable (especially personal protective clothing);
                 loosen what cannot be removed
           •     Apply cold, wet compresses to the skin; fanning will also aid in cooling
           •     If the victim is fully alert, allow him/her to drink water or the same solution, at the
                 same rate, that was used for the emergency care of heat cramps
           •     If the victim vomits, do not give fluids by mouth, transport him/her to a hospital
                  immediately (dehydration is the most critical problem in heat exhaustion victim;
                  intravenous fluids will have to be given)
           •     Take oral temperature every 10 minutes, if the victim's temperature is above 101
                  or shows a steady increase, transport to a hospital immediately and start
                  sponging him/her off with cool water




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                                ATTACHMENT A (Page 3 of 6)
                           HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION
Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a true life-threatening emergency having a mortality rate of 20 to 70 percent.
This condition results when the heat regulating mechanisms of the body break down and fail
to cool the body sufficiently. The body temperature rises to between 105 and 110 F; no
sweating occurs in about 50 percent of the victims. Because no cooling takes place, the body
stores increasingly more heat, and eventually brain cells are damaged, causing permanent
disability or death. About 4,000 Americans die of heat stroke annually.

There are two basic kinds of heat stroke: classic heat stroke and exertional heat stroke.
Classic heat stroke, in which people lose the ability to sweat, generally effects the elderly or
chronically ill. Exertional heat stroke, in which victims retain the ability to sweat, is
accompanied by physical exertion and muscle stress. Exertional heat stroke is the type that
will be most commonly encountered on a field operation requiring strenuous physical activity.

The symptoms of heat stroke include:

         •     Oral temperature of 105 F or higher
         •     Hot, reddish skin, skin is usually dry
         •     Headache
         •     Dry mouth
         •     Shortness of breath
         •     Nausea or vomiting
         •     Increasing dizziness and weakness
         •     Mental confusion and anxiety; victims may show unusual irritability, aggression,
               combative agitation, or hysterical behavior
         •     Convulsions, sudden collapse and possible unconsciousness; all heat stroke
               victims having varying levels of consciousness, ranging from disorientation to
               coma
Treatment
Emergency care will include:

         0   Remove the victim from the hot environment and from the exclusion zone
             Call for trained emergency medical personnel immediately
       •     Remove as much clothing as reasonable (especially personal protective clothing);
             cut clothing with bandage scissors, if necessary, being careful not to injure victim
       •     Pour cool water over the victim, avoiding his nose and mouth
             Fan the victim
        •    Place cold packs under the arms and against neck and ankles
        •    Wrap victim in a wet blanket
        •    Continue a combination of these methods until the oral temperature falls below
             103 F (take measures to prevent chilling, if necessary, i.e., use slower cooling if
             the victim starts shivering
        •    Elevate the head and shoulders slightly during cooling
        •    Never give the victim anything to drink unless fully conscious and vomiting is
             unlikely
        •    Because heat stroke involves the entire body, a number of complications may
             result:
        •    Brain swelling, convulsions, coma, kidney failure, liver failure, high blood pressure
             and heart failure.
 Therefore, always transport the victim to a hospital even if the body core temperature has

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lowered to near normal.




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                                ATTACHMENT A (Page 4 of 6)
                           HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION

The two most reliable and distinct differences between heat stroke and heat exhaustion are:

        Heat Stroke

        •     Skin flushed (red); may be dry; hot to touch
        •     Oral temperature above 1060F.
        Heat Exhaustion
        •     Skin pale; wet or clammy; cool to touch
        •     Oral temperature usually normal.

Cold Stress

Hypothermia is a drop in the core body temperature below 98.6 F. The first symptoms of
hypothermia are uncontrollable shivering and the sensation of cold; this is followed by a
slowed and sometimes irregular heart beat, a weakened pulse and a drop in blood pressure.
Vague or slow slurred speech, memory lapses, apathy, incoherence and drowsiness can
occur. Other symptoms may include cool skin, slow, irregular breathing, apparent exhaustion,
and fatigue after rest.

Prevention
Hypothermia is caused by prolonged exposure to a cold environment, whether air, water, or
snow and ice. Adequate dry clothing with appropriate insulating capacity must be provided to
workers to prevent hypothermia, especially if work is performed in air temperatures below 40
F. Wind chill is a critical factor. Work at a slow but steady pace. The job should be a "no
swealt"operation.
Unless there are unusual or extenuating circumstances, cold injury to other then the
extremities (hands, feet, and head) is not likely to occur without the development of the initial
signs of hypothermia. Older workers or workers with circulatory problems require special
precautionary protection against hypothermia. The use of extra insulating clothing and/or a
reduction in the duration of the exposure period are among the special precautions which
should be considered for these workers. The precautionary actions to be taken will depend
upon the physical condition of the worker and should be determined with the advice of a
physician with knowledge of the cold stress factors and the medical condition of the worker.

Treatment

First aid for mild hypothermia will be performed as follows:

1. End the exposure - get the victim out of the cold and wet.

2.   Replace wet clothing with dry or add insulation to clothing.

3.   Offer warm, non-alcoholic fluids.

4.   Increase exercise.

5.   Seek shelter from wind, wet and cold.



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                                ATTACHMENT A (Page 5 of 6)
                            HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION

CAUTION: If the victim remains cold for a number of hours, chemical changes may have
taken place which, on rewarming, may cause major medical problems for the victim and
which could result in death. Severely hypothermic victims are best warmed in the hospital
under controlled conditions. If a severely hypothermic ViJiiim cannot be transported to a
 hospital within a few hours, rewarming should begin in the field.

 Symptoms
 Frostbite can occur either before or after the onset of hypothermia when body tissue (usually
 an extremity) is exposed to freezing temperatures. Frostbite occurs when the fluids
 surrounding tissue cells freezes. The danger of frostbite increases with increased wind chill
 and/or reduced temperatures below 32 F. Frostbite can also occur if tissues are in prolonged
 contact with a frozen material or object. Skin contact with frozen metal, for example, can
 result in frostbite in a short period of time, even in a warm environment.

 There are three degrees of frostbite:
         • First degree - freezing without blistering or peeling, "frostnip"
         • Second degree - freezing with blistering and/or peeling, and
         • Third degree - freezing resulting in the death of skin tissue and possibly the death
             of underlying tissues as well
 Symptoms of frostbite include the following:
       • The skin changes color to white or grayish-yellow, progresses to reddish-violet,
           and finally turns black as the tissue dies
       • Pain may be felt at first, but subsides
       • Blisters may appear, and
       • The affected area is cold and numb

  Prevention
  Frostbite can be prevented by wearing sufficient protection to prevent skin from coming into
  prolonged contact with a freezing environment. The following steps can be taken:

  1. Wear sufficient clothing. Mittens are better than gloves. Face masks and wool stocking
     caps are better than hats. Wind and waterproof hoods protect the face and neck.

  2.   Clothing should be loose enough to prevent constriction of blood vessels. Boots must be
       roomy enough to permit movement of the toes with no feeling of tightness.

  3.   Do not contact conductive metals or contact gasoline or other solvents with bare skin as
       rapid evaporation of solvents may quickly lead to frozen tissues in a cold environment.

  4.   Exercise the toes and fingers to maintain circulation.

   5. Observe the condition of your partners' face, hands and ears frequently for signs of
      frostbite.

   6. Avoid smoking and drinking alcoholic beverages.




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                                 ATTACHMENT A (Page 6 of 6)
                            HEAT AND COLD STRESS INFORMATION


Treatment

First aid for superficial (first degree) frostbite is as follows:

1. Place a warm body part next to the frozen area, applying firm, steady pressure.

2.   DO NOT RUB THE AREA. Rubbing may cause further damage to already injured skin.

3.   Protect the area from further freezing.

First aid for deep frostbite (second and third degree) is as follows:

1. KEEPTHEFROZENPARTFROZEN!

2.   Prevent further injury: avoid rubbing and further freezing of unaffected tissue.

3.   If the part has thawed, the part should NOT be allowed to refreeze or bear weight. A
     victim with thawed feet should be carried out.

4.   Give the victim plenty of fluids and evacuate to medical assistance as soon as possible.

symptoms
This condition may be        caused by long, continuous exposure to cold without freezing,
combined with persistent     dampness or actual immersion in water. Edema (swelling), tingling,
itching, and severe pain     occur, and may be followed by blistering, death of skin tissue, and
ulceration. When other       areas of the body are affected besides the feet, the condition is
known as chilblains.

 Prevention
 Trenchfoot and chilblains can be prevented by keeping the body as dry as possible at all
 times. Waterproof boots should be worn when required, but provisions must be made for
 preventing excessive perspiration to accumulate inside the boots. Socks should be changed
 at least twice daily and the boots wiped dry inside with each change of socks. The feet should
 also be wiped dry and foot powder applied.

 Treatment
 Affected body parts should not be rubbed or massaged, but bathed in water using plain white
 soap. Dry thoroughly and elevate the body part, allowing the body part to be exposed at room
 temperatures. If the feet are affected, do not walk during treatment.




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                                  ATTACHMENT B (Page I of 5)

                             WORK/REST REGIMENS AND MONITORING



                                      Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                          HEAT STRESS
                         WORK/REST REGIMES AND MONITORING

 Introduction
 Establishing a worktrest regimen that allows work to be completed in a timely manner while
 providing adequate rest time to prevent heat stress requires involvement of the ESS, FOL,
 and individuals involved. In many cases, particularly when wearing normal field type clothing
 (i.e., level D), awareness and communication are the key elements to a successful program.
 Allowing rest periods on an "as needed" basis while ensuring vigilance for initial symptoms of
 heat stress, encourages this success.
 There are times when this approach is not appropriate. When heat stress contributing
 protective clothing (e.g., respirators, impermeable coveralls) are worn for extended periods, or
 when "as needed" work/rest regimens adversely impact either the individuals exposed to the
 heat source or work completion, a more formal work/rest regimen will be established.

  Formal work/rest regimens are based either on 1) monitoring ambient conditions (e.g., with a
  WBGT), estimating work loads and establishing work/rest times, 2) monitoring physiological
  conditions and adjusting work/rest periods, or 3) using personnel heat stress monitors.

  The WBGT, physiological monitors, and personnel heat stress monitors will be used in
  accordance with manufacturers instructions. Personnel heat stress monitors will be approved
  for use by the PESM.

  H.        WBGT Based Work/Rest Regimens

  A.    Work/Rest Regimens
  When required, the WBGT will be used in conjunction with the work load to determine the
  appropriate work/rest regimen for personnel wearing regular work clothing or semipermeable
  disposal coveralls (uncoated Tyvek). Light work examples include sitting or standing or
  performing light hand or arm work. Moderate work includes walking about with moderate
  lifting and pushing. Heavy work corresponds to pick and shovel-type work.

   The work/rest regimen using the WBGT procedure will be used as a guideline. Table B-1
   outlines the work/rest regimen guidelines based upon WBGT temperature and work load.
   Table B-2 identifies the correction factors. The WBGT temperature will be determined in
   accordance with Section B of this attachment.




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                                 ATTACHMENT B (Page 2 of 5)

                           WORK/REST REGIMENS AND MONITORING

             Table B-1. Examples of Permissible Heat Exposure Threshold Limit Values.
                        (Values are given in 'F WGBT)*


                                                          Work Load
 Work - Rest Regimen               Light                  Moderate                    Heavy
Continuous work                     86                      80                         77
75% Work -                           87                       82                       78
25% Rest, each hour
50% Work -                           89                       85                        82
50% Rest, each hour
25% Work -                           90                       88                        86
75% Rest, each hour

                   * Notes on Table B-1

     1) These values are for fully acclimatized workers wearing light weight pants and
        shirts. For     conditions other than this use this table with the correction factors
        from Table B-2.

     2) These values assume that workers drink frequently and have properly increased
        salting of food prior to exposure.

     3) These values are guidelines. Actual levels may be modified based on individual
        physiological response and actual work and rest conditions.

   4) These values assume that the rest location is cool enough to alleviate heat load
conditions.




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                                     ATTACHMENT B (Page 3 of 5)

                               WORKIREST REGIMENS AND MONITORING

             Table B-2. Correction Factors for Table B-1 in 'F*

              Clothing Type                                         WBGT Correction
        Summer work uniform                                                  0
        Cotton overalls                                                    -3.5
        Winter work uniform                                                  -7
        Water barrier, permeable-                                           -11
                Condition                                            WBGT Correction
 Unacclinnatized worker, moderate work                                      4.5
 load
 *To use this table, identify the most restrictive applicable clothing type and whether
 unacclimatized workers are involved. Add the two. Modify Table B-I temperatures by this
 amount. For example, the Table B-1 TLV for continuous work, light workload is 86oF. If
 cotton overalls (-3.5) are work and acclimatized workers are acclimatized (no additional
 change) the modified limit is 82.5oF.



  B. WBGT Determination
  if the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (VrBGT) is used to determine if field conditions are
  conducive to heat stress illnesses, the Y,/BGT is determined through the following equations:

         Outdoors with solar load:                           (1)
                       WBGT=0.7 NWB+0.2GT+O. I DB
        Indoorsoroutdoorswithnosolarload:                    (2)
                       WBGT=0.7 NWB+0.3GT
               Where:
                    VVGBT = Wet Bulb Globe Temperature
                       Index
                       NW8 = Natural Wet-Bulb Temperature
                       DB   = Dry-Bulb Temperature
                       GT = Globe Thermometer
                       Temperature




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                                   ATTACHMENT B (Page 4 of 5)

                              WORK/REST REGIMENS AND MONITORING



The factors involved in the above equations can be measured in the following manner:

•      Through the use of a direct-reading heat stress monitor capable of measuring all of the
       individual factors associated with the WBGT equation, For example, the Reuter-Strokes
       Wibet No. RSS-214 heat stress monitor.


•      By measuring the individual factors manually using the following type of equipment

        Natural Wet-Bulb Temperature Thermometer
        Dry-Bulb Temperature Thermometer
        Globe Temperature Thermometer
        Stand

Ill.      Adjusted Temperature Based Work/Rest Regimens
When wearing impermeable protective clothing, the use of worktrest regimens based on
WBGT is not recommended. The WBGT index is designed to account for the effects of
evaporative cooling. Vapor barrier clothing impedes the evaporation of sweat and renders the
WBGT an inappropriate physiological model. The most important environmental conditions
related to heat stress for workers wearing impermeable protective clothing have been
suggested to be the ambient dry bulb temperature and the radiant solar heat. These factors
are combined into an index called the adjusted temperature using the following formula:

             V adjusted = ambient dry bulb temperature + (13 x % sunshine)

where % sunshine is an estimate of the amount of time the sun is covered by clouds thick
enough to produce a shadow. The thermometer bulb should be shielded from radiant heat
when taking measurements.
The adjusted temperature values are then used to determine the initial work/rest regimen and
physiological monitoring frequency. Table B-3 gives the work period and monitoring
frequency. Initially, rest periods will be at least 15 minutes. Physiological monitoring that is
normally recommended is pulse rate and body temperature. Procedures for each are
described below. Initially, both should be done. Pulse rate monitoring may be discontinued
with the approval of the PESM if temperature monitoring proves to be effective.




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                                    ATTACHMENT B (Page 5 of 5)

                             WORKIREST REGIMENS AND MONITORING



A.   Pulse Rate Monitoring
Take the pulse immediately at the start of the rest period (PI). Take the pulse again 2 1/2 to
3 minutes into the rest period (P2). If any of the following conditions exist, shorten the next
work period by a third:
                        P1 > I 10 beats per minute(bpm)

                        P2 > 90 bpm

                         P1 - P2 < 10 bpm.
 Pulse rates can be taken with an electronic pulse meter, or manually with a stopwatch for 30
 seconds.

  B.      Oral Temperature
  Take the oral temperature immediately at the start of the rest period. If the oral temperature
  exceeds 99.5o shorten the next work period by a third. Do not return the worker to hot work
  in semipermeable or impermeable clothing until the oral temperature is less than 99.5oF.

  Oral temperatures may be taken with disposable oral thermometers or infrared ear drum
  scanners, such as the Thermoscan. Note: If a Thermoscan unit is purchased, the Pro Model
  should be selected. The home model available through drugstores cannot be recalibrated.

  C.       Removal from Exposure
  If an individual requires a shortening of the work period on more than two consecutive
  monitoring periods, or repeatedly over a few days, they should be removed from exposure to
  hot environments wearing semipermeable impermeable protective clothing until examined
  and cleared for such work by the consulting physician.

   Table B-3. Initial Work Period and Physiological Monitoring Frequency'

              ADJU           TEMPERATURES                                SCHEDULE

                              orabove                                    I minutes
                             0- 90OF                                     30 minutes
                             0- 87.50F                                   60 minutes
                             0 - 82.50F                                  90 minutes
                                                                         120 minutes
       Schedule is for fit and acclimatized workers in impermeable protective clothing.




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                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                     NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE

This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. JIFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
connection with the performance of work for TtFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
appropriate in accordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
or any binding obligation of TtFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
notice at the sole discretion of TtFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
The current version of this document can be found on the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                       CopyrightV 1995, 11998

                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                                      Proprietary Information




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            SOP5
EHS 6-2, Drill Rigs
                                                                                                                     2532334


EHS 6-2:                         Drill Rigs (Previously HS6-3)
Purpos                              Version 03119/98 - Revised        Approved
The purpose of this program is        Date:                                 by:
to establish drilling safety         Original 02/01/95
guidelines.                      Issue Date:
                                  Category: Company Procedures        Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health &Safety
                                                                               Programs
                                        Sub Departmental/Discipline   Document procedure
                                  Category:                              Type:
                                   Keyword EHS Compliancefflaste      Document Mike McSherry
                                      Index: Management, Field          Owner:
                                             Activities/Science.
                                             Operational Control,
                                             Training
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                                                Table of Contents
Section

1.0       PURPOSE

2.0       SCOPE

3.0       MAINTENANCE

4.0       DEFINITIONS

          4.1    Annular Space
          4,2    Auger Rig
          4.3    Cable Tool Drilling
          4.4    Cathead
          4.5    Cribbing
          4.6    Cuttings
          4.7    Derrick
          4.8    Mud
          4.9    Rotary Drilling
          4.10   Sheave

5.0       DISCUSSION

          5.1    Responsibilities
                 5.1.1 All TtFW Employees and Subcontractor Personnel
                 5.1.2 Line Management
        5.2      Housekeeping
        5.3      Maintenance
        5.4      Hand Tools
        5.5      Clearing the Work Area
        5.6      Start-up
        5.7      Safety During Drilling Operations
        5.8      Safe Use of Wire Line Hoists, Wire Rope and Hoisting Hardware
        5.9      Safe Use of Cathead and Rope Hoists
        5.10     Safe Use of Augers
        5.11     Safety During Rotary and Core Drilling
        5.12     Engines and Pumps
        5.13     Safety During Travel
        5.14     Off-Road Movement
        5.15     Tires, Batteries and Fuel
        5.16      Drill Rig Utilization and Alterations

6.0       REFERENCES




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 1.0      PURPOSE
          The purpose of this program is to establish drilling safety guidelines.



  2.0      SCOPE
           The requirements of this program apply to all drillers and drilling subcontractors
           working on Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) projects.             This program contains
           requirements for drilling, servicing and related operations performed in support of
           monitoring well installation and geological exploration, and addresses hazards
           associated with assembling and disassembling rigs, rotary and auger drilling, and
           grouting.



  3.0      MAINTENANCE
           The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for
           updating this procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief
           Executive Officer. Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department
           responsible for updating the procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and
           Compliance.



   4.0      DEFINITIONS


   4.1      Annular Space
            The space surrounding the pipe suspended in the wellbore. The outer wall of the
            annular space may be an open hole or it may be larger pipe.


   4.2       Auger Rig
             Drilling method in which a hole is drilled by rotating a corkscrew type hollow stem
             steel drill.


    4.3      Cable Tool Drilling

             Drilling method in which hole is drilled by advancing a drive barrel and/or hand tool.
             As the hole is advanced a steel casing is driven by a cable to prevent collapse.


    4.4      Cathead
             A spool-shaped extension of the draw works shaft used to lift heavy equipment and to
             make up or break out drill pipe.
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 4.5     Cribbing

         Logs, 2 X 4s or other non-compressible material used to support an object above the
         ground/floor.


 4.6     Cuttings

         Soil or other particles obtained during drilling operations. Cuttings are brought to the
         surface by circulating mud-laden fluid in rotary drilling or by hollow stem auger drilling.
         They are bailed out in cable tool drilling.


 4.7     Derrick

         Any one of a large number of types of load-bearing structures. In drilling work, the
         standard derrick has four legs standing at the corners of the substructure and
         reaching to the crown block. The substructure is an assembly of heavy beams used
         to elevate the derrick above the ground and provide space to install blowout
         preventers, casing heads, etc. The standard derrick has largely been replaced by the
         mast for drilling. The mast is lowered and raised without disassembly.


 4.8      Mud

         The liquid that is circulated through the wellbore during rotary drilling and workover
         operations. In addition to its function of bringing cuttings to the surface, mud also
         cools and lubricates the bit and drill string, protects against blowouts by containing
         subsurface pressures, and deposits a mud cake on the wall of the borehole to
         prevent loss of fluids to the formations. Although it originally was a suspension of
         earth solids, especially clays, in water, the mud used in modern drilling operations is a
         somewhat more complex three-phase mixture of liquids, reactive solids, and inert
         solids. The liquid phase may be fresh water, diesel oil, or crude oil and may contain
         one                       or                     more                       conditioners.


 4.9      Rotary Drilling

          The drilling method by which a hole is drilled by a rotating bit to which a downward
          force (drill collars) is applied. The bit is fastened to and rotated by the drill stem,
          which also provides a passage for the circulating fluid.


 4.10     Sheave

          A wheel or disc with a grooved rim, especially one used as a pulley.



 6.0      DISCUSSION


 6.1      Responsibilities
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                                                    1

 SAA      All TtFW Employees and Subcontractor Personnel

          All TtFW personnel are responsible for understanding and complying with the
          requirements of this program. They should bring all perceived, potential or actual
          unsafe site conditions to the attention of the Environmental and Safety Supervisor
          (ESS) during site safety meetings. Drillers are required to have their own drilling
          safety plan on-site which shall reference and comply with this procedure.


  5.1.2   Line Management
          The Project Manager (PM)          is responsible for selecting a qualified drilling
           subcontractor for the project and has overall responsibility for the health and safety
           of all TtFW and subcontractor employees on the job site. The PM shall include this
           procedure and other appropriate health and safety requirements in all drilling
           specifications.


  5.2      Housekeeping
           The drilling safety supervisor shall understand and fulfill the responsibility for proper
           maintenance and good "housekeeping" on and around the drill rig.                   These
           requirements include, but are not limited to:

            •       Provide suitable storage locations for all tools, materials and supplies so that
                    tools, materials and supplies can be conveniently and safely handled without
                    hitting or failing on a member of the drill crew or a visitor.

            •       Avoid storing or transporting tools, materials or supplies within or on the mast
                    (derrick) of the drill rig.

            •       Neatly stack pipe, drill rods, casing augers and similar drilling tools on racks or
                    sills to prevent spreading, rolling or sliding.

            •       Place penetration or other driving hammers at a safe location on the ground or
                    secure them to prevent movement when not in use.

            •       Keep work areas, platforms, walkways, scaffolding and other access ways free of
                    materials, debris, and obstructions and substances such as ice, grease or oil that
                    could cause a surface to become slick or otherwise hazardous.

            •       Keep all controls, control linkages, warning and operation lights and lenses free of
                    oil, grease and/or ice.

                •    Do not store gasoline in any portable container other than a non-sparking,
                     approved container with a flame arrester in the fill spout and having the word
                     ..gasoline" easily visible. A hazard communication label shall also be placed on all
                     gasoline cans. (See EHS 4-2, Hazard Communications, and EHS 3-7, Hazardous
                     Material Storage and Transportation.)




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 5.3     Maintenance
         Proper maintenance will make drilling operations safer. Maintenance should be
         performed safely. These requirement include, but are not limited to:

         •       Keep drill rigs and associated equipment in good condition.

         •       Wear safety glasses when performing maintenance on a drill rig or on drilling
                 tools.
         •       Shut down the drill rig engine to make repairs or adjustments to a drill rig or to
                 lubricate fittings (except repairs or adjustments that can only be made with the
                 engine running). Take precautions to prevent accidental starting of an engine
                 during maintenance by locking, removing or tagging the ignition key (see EHS 6-4
                 Lockout/Tagout Procedure).

         •       Always block the wheels or lower the leveling jacks or both and set hand brakes
                 before working under a drill rig.

          •      When possible and appropriate, release all pressure on the hydraulic systems,
                 the drilling fluid system and the air pressure systems of the drill rig prior to
                 performing maintenance. In other words, reduce the drill rig and operating
                 systems to a "zero energy state" before performing maintenance. Use extreme
                 caution when opening drain plugs and radiator caps and other pressurized plugs
                 and caps.
          •      Do not touch an engine or the exhaust system of an engine following its operation
                 until the engine and exhaust system have had adequate time to cool.

                 Never weld or cut on or near a fuel tank.

             •   Do not use gasoline or other volatile or flammable liquids as a cleaning agent on
                 or around a drill rig.
             •    Follow the manufacturers recommendations for applying the proper quantity and
                  quality of lubricants, hydraulic oils and/or coolants.

             •    Replace all caps, filler plugs, protective guards or panels and high pressure hose
                  clamps and chains or cables that have been removed for maintenance before
                  returning the drill rig to service.

             •    Check the deadman switch daily. Ensure that its location is known to all drill rig
                  crew                                                                 personnel.


  5.4         Hand Tools
             There are almost an infinite number of hand tools that can be used on or around a
             drill rig and in repair shops and more than an equal number of instructions for proper
             use. "Use the tool for its intended purpose" is the most important rule. The following
             are a few specific and some general suggestions which apply to safe use of hand
             tools that are often used on and around drill rigs.


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          •            When a tool becomes damaged, either repair it before using it again or discard it.

          0            When using a hammer wear safety glasses and require all others around you to
                       wear safety glasses.

          •            When using a chisel wear safety glasses and require all others around you to
                       wear safety glasses.

          •             Keep all tools cleaned and neatly stored when not in use.

              •         Use wrenches on nuts - do not use pliers on nuts.

                        Use screwdrivers with blades that fit the screw slot.

              •         When using a wrench on a tight nut - first use some penetrating oil, use the
                        largest wrench available that fits the nut, when possible pull on the wrench handle
                        rather than pushing, and apply force to the wrench with both hands when possible
                        and with both feet firmly placed. Don't push or pull with one or both feet on the
                        drill rig or the side of a mud pit or some other blocking-off device. Always
                        assume that you may lose your footing - check the place where you may fall for
                        sharp objects.
              •         Keep all pipe wrenches clean and in good repair. The jaws of pipe wrenches
                        should be wire brushed frequently to prevent an accumulation of dirt and grease
                        which would otherwise build up and cause wrenches to slip.

                  •      Never use pipe wrenches in place of a rod holding device.

                  •      Replace hook and heel jaws when they become visibly worn.

                  •      When breaking tool joints on the ground or on a drilling platform, position your
                         hands so that your fingers will not be smashed between the wrench handle and
                         the ground or the platform, should the wrench slip or the joint suddenly let go.


   5.5            Clearing the Work Area

                  Prior to drilling, perform adequate site clearing and leveling to accommodate the drill
                  rig and supplies and provide a safe working area. Drilling shall not be commenced
                  when tree limbs, unstable ground or site obstructions cause unsafe tool handling
                  conditions.


    5.6               Start-up
                          Instruct all visitors to "stand clear' of the drill rig immediately prior to and during
                          starting of any an engine.

                          Make sure all gear boxes are in neutral, all hoist levers are disengaged, all
                          hydraulic levers are in the correct non-actuating positions and the cathead rope is
                          not on the cathead before starting a drill rig engine.

                          Start all engines according to the manufacturer's manual.



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 5.7     Safety During Drilling Operations

              Safety requires the attention and cooperation of every worker and site visitor.

         •    Do not drive the drill rig from hole to hole with the mast (derrick) in the raised
              position.

         •    Before raising the mast (derrick), look up to check for overhead obstructions.

         •    Maintain a minimum of 15 ft clearance from all overhead electric lines. See Army
              Corps of Engineers, EM 385-1-1, Section 11.E for additional guidance on
              operations adjacent to overhead lines.

         •    Before raising the mast (derrick), all drill rig personnel (with the exception of the
              operator) and visitors shall be cleared from the areas immediately to the rear and
              the sides of the mast. All drill rig personnel and visitors shall be informed that the
              mast is being raised prior to raising it.

          •    Before the mast (derrick) of a drill rig is raised and drilling is commenced, the drill
               rig must first be leveled and stabilized with leveling jacks and/or solid cribbing.
               The drill rig shall be re-leveled if it settles after initial set up. Lower the mast
               (derrick) only when the leveling jacks are down and do not raise the leveling jack
               pads until the mast (derrick) is lowered completely.

          •    Before starting drilling operations, secure and/or lock the mast (derrick) if
               required according to the drill manufacturers recommendations.

          •    The operator of a drill rig shall only operate a drill rig from the position of the
               controls. If the operator of the drill rig must leave the area of the controls, the
               operator shall shift the transmission controlling the rotary drive into neutral and
               place the feed control lever in neutral. The operator shall shut down the drill
               engine before leaving the vicinity of the drill rig.

          •    Throwing or dropping tools shall not be permitted. All tools shall be carefully
               passed by hand between personnel or a hoist line shall be used.

               Do not consume alcoholic beverages or other depressants or chemical stimulants
               prior to starting work on a drill rig or while on the job.

          •    When encountering a "hot spot' during drilling operations involving volatiles,
               vacate the immediate area and allow the borehole to vent Resume work after
               monitoring instruments indicate an atmosphere in compliance with the
               site-specific EHS Plan.

          •    If it is necessary to drill within an enclosed area, make certain that exhaust gases
               are vented out of the area. Exhaust gases can be toxic and some cannot be
               detected by smell.

          •    Clean mud and grease from your boots before mounting a drill platform and use
               hand holds and railings. Watch for slippery ground when dismounting from the
               platform.

          •    During freezing weather, do not touch any metal parts of the drill rig with exposed

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                  flesh. Freezing of moist skin to metal can occur almost instantaneously.

         •        All air and water lines and pumps should be drained when not in use if freezing
                  weather is expected.
          •       All unattended boreholes must be adequately covered or otherwise protected to
                  prevent drill rig personnel, site visitors or animals from stepping or falling into the
                  hole. All open boreholes shall be covered, protected or backfilled adequately and
                  according to local or state regulations on completion of the drilling project.

          •       "Horsing around" within the vicinity of the drill rig and tool and supply storage
                  areas is not allowed, even when the drill rig is shut down.

          •       When using a ladder on a drill rig, face the ladder and grasp either the side rails
                  or the rungs with both hands while ascending or descending. Do not attempt to
                  use one or both hands to carry a tool while on a ladder. Use a hoist line and a
                  tool "bucket' or a safety hook to raise or lower hand tools.

              •    Use elevated derrick platforms with the following precautions:

                   -        When working on a derrick platform, use a safety harness and a lifeline. The
                            safety harness shall be at least four inches (100 mm) wide and shall fit snugly
                            but comfortably. The lifeline, when attached to the derrick, shall be less than
                            six feet (2 m) long. The safety harness and lifeline shall be strong enough to
                            withstand the dynamic force of a 250 pound (1 15 kg) weight (contained within
                            the belt) falling six feet (2 m).

                   -        When climbing to a derrick platform that is higher than 20 feet (6 m), use a
                            safety climbing device.
                    -       When a rig worker is on a derrick platform, fasten the lifeline to the derrick
                            just above the derrick platform and to a structural member that is not
                            attached to the platform or to other lines or cables supporting the platform.

                    -       When a rig worker first arrives at a derrick platform, inspect the platform for
                            broken members, loose connections and loose tools or other loose materials.

                       -    Attach tools securely to the platform with safety lines. Do not attach a tool to
                            a line attached to your waist or any other part of your body.

                       -    When you are working on a derrick platform, do not guide drill rods or pipe
                            into racks or other supports by taking hold of a moving hoist line or a traveling
                            block.
                       -     Do not leave loose tools and similar items on the derrick platform or on
                             structural members of the derrick.

                       -     A derrick platform over four feet (1.2 m) above ground surface shall be
                             equipped with toe boards and safety railings that are in good condition.

                        -    Workers on the ground or the drilling floor shall avoid working under rig
                             workers on elevated platforms, whenever possible.

                        Terminate drilling operations during an electrical storm and move the entire crew
                        away from the drill rig.


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 5.8      Safe Use of Wire Line Hoists, Wire Rope and Hoisting Hardware

          •    The use of wire line hoists, wire rope and hoisting hardware shall be as stipulated
               by 29 CFR 1910, 29 CFR 1926, and the American Iron Steel Institute Wire Rope
               Users Manual.

          •    Visually inspect all wire ropes and fittings during use and thoroughly inspect them
               at least once a week for: abrasion, broken wires, wear, reduction in rope
               diameter, reduction in wire diameter, fatigue, corrosion, damage from heat,
               improper reeving, jamming, crushing, bird caging, kinking, core protrusion and
               damage to lifting hardware. Replace wire ropes when inspection indicates
               excessive damage according to the Wire Rope Users Manual. Thoroughly
               inspect all wire ropes which have not been used for a period of a month or more
               before returning them to service.

          •    End fittings and connections consist of spliced eyes and various manufactured
               devices. Install all manufactured end fittings and connections according to the
               manufacturers instructions and follow the manufacturers load specifications.

          •    If a ball-bearing type hoisting swivel is used to hoist drill rods, inspect and
               lubricate the swivel daily to assure that the swivel freely rotates under load.

          •    If a rod slipping device is used to hoist drill rods, do not drill through or rotate drill
               rods through the slipping device, do not hoist more than 1 foot (0.3 m) of the drill
               rod column above the top of the mast (derrick), do not hoist a rod column with
               loose tool joints and do not make up, tighten or loosen tool joints while the rod
               column is being supported by a rod slipping device. If drill rods should slip back
               into the borehole, do not attempt to break the fall of the rods with your hands or
               by tensioning the slipping device.

          •    Most sheaves on exploration drill rigs are stationary with a single part line. Never
               increase the number of parts of line without first consulting with the manufacturer
               of the drill rig.

          •    Wire ropes must be properly matched with each sheave - if the rope is too large,
               the sheave will pinch the wire rope - if the rope is too small, it will groove the
               sheave. Once the sheave is grooved, it will severely pinch and damage larger
               sized wire ropes.

          •    The following procedures and precautions must be understood and implemented
               for safe use of wire ropes and rigging hardware:

               -    Use tool handling hoists only for vertical lifting of tools (except when angle
                    hole drilling). Do not use tool handling hoists to pull objects away from the
                    drill rig; however, drills may be moved using the main hoist if the wire rope is
                    spooled through proper sheaves according to the manufacturers
                    recommendations.

               -    When stuck tools or similar loads cannot be raised with a hoist, disconnect
                    the hoist line and connect the stuck tools directly to the feed mechanism of
                    the drill. Do not use hydraulic leveling jacks for added pull to the hoist line or
                    the feed mechanism of the drill.


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               -When     attempting to pull out a mired down vehicle or drill rig carrier, only use
                  a winch on the front or rear of the vehicle and stay as far away as possible
                  from the wire rope. Do not attempt to use tool hoists to pull out a mired down
                  vehicie or drill rig carrier.

               -Minimize         shock loading of a wire rope - apply loads smoothly and steadily.

               -Avoid         sudden loading in cold weather.

               -Never          use frozen ropes.

               -Protect         wire rope from sharp corners or edges.

                -Replace         faulty guides and rollers.

                -Replace         damaged safety latches on safety hooks before using.

                -Know     the safe working load of the equipment and tackle being used. Never
                    exceed this limit.

                -Inspect        and test clutches and brakes of hoists periodically.

                -Know     and do not exceed the rated capacity of hooks, rings, links, swivels,
                    shackles and other lifting aids.

                 -Always        wear gloves when handling wire ropes.

                 -Do         not guide wire rope on hoist drums with your hands.

                 -Following      the installation of a new wire rope, first lift a light load to allow the
                      wire rope to adjust.
                 -Never     carry out any hoisting operations when the weather conditions are such
                     that hazards to personnel, the public, or property are created.

                 -Never         leave a load suspended in the air when the hoist is unattended.

                 -Keep     your hands away from hoists, wire rope, hoisting hooks, sheaves and
                     pinch points as slack is being taken up and when the load is being hoisted.

                 -Never         hoist the load over the head, body or feet of any personnel

                 -Never         use a hoist line to "ride" up the mast (derrick) of a drill rig.

                 -Replacement        wire ropes should conform to the drill rig manufacturers
                     specifications.


    6.9      Safe Use of Cathead and Rope Hoists

             The following safety procedures shall be employed when using a cathead hoist:

                  Keep the cathead clean and free of rust and oil and/or grease. Clean the cathead
                  with a wire brush if it becomes rusty.


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          •    Check the cathead periodically, when the engine is not running, for rope wear
               grooves. Replace the cathead if a rope groove forms to a depth greater than 1/8
               inch (3 mm).

          •    Always use a clean, dry, sound rope. A wet or oily rope may "grab" the cathead
               and cause drill tools or other items to be rapidly hoisted to the top of the mast.
               Should the rope "grab" the cathead or otherwise become tangled in the drum,
               release the rope and sound an appropriate alarm for all personnel to rapidly back
               away and stay clear. The operator shall also back away and stay clear. If the
               rope "grabs" the cathead, and tools are hoisted to the sheaves at the top of the
               mast, the rope will often break, releasing the tools. If the rope does not break,
               stay clear of the drill rig until the operator cautiously returns to turn off the drill rig
               engine and appropriate action is taken to release the tools. The operator shall
               keep careful watch on the suspended tools and shall quickly back away after
               turning off the engine.

          •    The rope shall always be protected from contact with all chemicals. Chemicals
               can cause deterioration of the rope that may not be visibly detectable.

          •    Never wrap the rope from the cathead (or any other rope, wire rope or cable on
               the drill rig) around a hand, wrist, arm, foot, ankle, leg or any other part of your
               body.

               Always maintain a minimum of 18 inches of clearance between the operating
               hand and the cathead drum when driving samplers, casing or other tools with the
               cathead and rope methods. Be aware that the rope advances toward the cathead
               with each hammer blow as the sampler or other drilling tool advances into the
               ground.

          •    Never operate a cathead (or perform any other task around a drill rig) with loose
               unbuttoned or otherwise unfastened clothing or when wearing gloves with large
               cuffs or loose straps or lacings.

          0    Do not use a rope that is any longer than necessary. A rope that is too long can
               form a ground loop or otherwise become entangled with the operators legs.

          •    Do not use more rope wraps than are required to hoist a load.

          •    Do not leave a cathead unattended with the rope wrapped on the drum.

               Position all other hoist lines to prevent contact with the operating cathead rope.

          •    When using the cathead and rope for driving or back-driving, make sure that all
               threaded connections are tight and stay as far away as possible from the hammer
               impact point.

          •    The cathead operator must be able to operate the cathead standing on a level
               surface with good, firm footing conditions without distraction or disturbance.


 5.10     Safe Use of Augers

          The following general procedures shall be used when starting a boring with a
          continuous flight or hollow-stem augers:


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                  Prepare to start an auger boring with the drill rig level, the clutch or hydraulic
                  rotation control disengaged, the transmission in low gear and the engine running
                  at low RPM.

                  Apply an adequate amount of down pressure prior to rotation to seat the auger
                  head below the ground surface.

                  Look at the auger head while slowly engaging the clutch or rotation control and
                  starting rotation. Stay clear of the auger.
                  Slowly rotate the auger and auger head while continuing to apply down pressure.
                  Keep one hand on the clutch or the rotation control at all times until the auger has
                  penetrated about one foot or more below ground surface.

                   If the auger head slides out of alignment, disengage the clutch or hydraulic
                   rotation control and repeat the hole starting process.

                   An auger guide can facilitate the starting of a straight hole through hard ground or
                   pavement.

                   The operator and tool handler shall establish a system of responsibility for the
                   various activities required for auger drilling, such as connecting and disconnecting
                   auger sections, and inserting and removing the auger fork. The operator must
                   assure that the tool handler is well away from the auger column and that the
                   auger fork is removed before startingrotation.

                   Only use the manufacturers recommended method of securing the auger to the
                   power coupling. Do not touch the coupling or the auger with your hands, a
                   wrench or any other tools during rotation.

                   Whenever possible, use tool hoists to handle auger sections.

             •      Never place hands or fingers under the bottom of an auger section when hoisting
                    the auger over other auger sections or other hard surfaces such as the drill rig
                    platform.

             •      Never allow feet to get'under the auger section that is being hoisted.

             •      When rotating augers, stay clear of the rotating auger and other rotating
                    components of the drill rig. Never reach behind or around a rotating auger for any
                    reason whatsoever.

             •      Use a long-handled shovel to move auger cuttings away from the auger. Never
                    use your hands or feet to move cuttings away from the auger.

             •      Do not attempt to remove earth from rotating augers. Augers should be cleaned
                    only when the drill rig is in neutral and the augers are stopped from rotating.


    5.1111       Safety During Rotary and Core Drilling

                    Rotary drilling tools shall be safety checked prior to drilling:

                    -    Lubricate and check water swivels and hoisting plugs for "frozen" bearings
                         before use. Use only approved lubrication fluids.


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               -       Checkdrillrodchuckjawsperiodicallyandreplacewhennecessary.

               -       Check the capacities of hoists and sheaves against the anticipated weight to
                       the drill rod string plus other expected hoisting loads.

               Special precautions for safe rotary or core drilling involve chucking, joint break,
               hoisting and lowering of drill rods:

               -       Only the operator of the drill rig shall brake or set a manual chuck so that
                       rotation of the chuck will not occur prior to removing the wrench from the
                       chuck.

               -       Do not brake drill rods during lowering into the hole with drill rod chuckjaws.

               -       Do not hold or lower drill rods into the hole with pipe wrenches.

               -       If a string of drill rods are accidentally or inadvertently released into the hole,
                       do not attempt to grab the failing rods with your hands or a wrench.

               -       In the event of a plugged bit or other circulation blockage, relieve or bleed
                       down the high pressure in the piping and hose between the pump and the
                       obstruction before breaking the first tool joint.

               -       When drill rods are hoisted from the hole, they shall be cleaned for safe
                       handling with a rubber or other suitable rod wiper. Do not use your hands to
                       clean drilling fluids from drill rods.

               -       Ifwork must progress over a portable drilling fluid (mud) pit, do not attempt to
                       stand on narrow sides or cross members. The mud pit shall be equipped
                       with rough surfaced, fitted cover panels of adequate strength to hold drill rig
                       personnel.
               -       Do not lean unsecured drill rods against the mast. Either provide some
                       method of securing the upper ends of the drill rod sections for safe vertical
                       storage          or         lay         the             rods          down.


  5.12     Engines and Pumps

           •       The following engine and pump stop devices are as follows:

                   -    For an internal-combustion engine: an ignition or grounding switch.

                   -   For a diesel engine: a quick-closing valve or equivalent device which will shut
                       off the air to the air-intake manifold of the engine and prevent entry of
                       gas-laden air, or a means of releasing the engine compression which will not
                       produce an open flame or spark.

                   -    For an electric motor: a suitable switch in the motor circuit, or a switch or stop
                        button in the control circuit, approved for the location in which it is installed.

           •       Mud pumps shall be equipped with a pressure relieving device set to release
                   within the limits of the safe working pressure of the pump. Such devices include
                   direct spring-loaded safety valves, shear-pin safety valves, and rupture disks.


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         •    There shall be no valve between the pump and its pressure-relieving device. The
              point of discharge from a pressure-relieving device shall be located where
              employees are not endangered by the discharge of fluids.

         •     Each pump shall be equipped with bleeder valves.

          •    All personnel involved in the operation of the rig shall know the exact location of
               each stop device.




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 5A3     Safety During Travel

               The individual who transports a drill rig on and off a drilling site shall:

               -        Be properly licensed and shall only operate the vehicle according to federal,
                        state and local regulations.

               -        Know the traveling height (overhead clearance), width, length and weight of
                        the drill rig with carrier and know the highway and bridge load, width and
                        overhead limits, making sure these limits are not exceeded and allowing an
                        adequate margin of safety.

               -        Never move a drill rig unless the vehicle brakes are in sound working order.

               -        Allow for mast overhang when cornering or approaching other vehicles or
                        structures.

               -        Be aware that the canopies of service stations and motels are often too low
                        for a drill rig mast to clear with the mast in the travel position.

               -        Watch for low hanging electrical lines, particularly at the entrances to drilling
                        sites or restaurants, motels or other commercial sites.

               -        Never travel on a street, road, highway with the mast (derrick) of the drill rig in
                        the raised or partially raised position.

               -         Remove all ignition keys when a drill rig is left unattended.


 5.14     Off-Road Movement

               The following safety precautions relating to off-road movement shall be followed:

                   -     Before moving a drill rig, first walk the route of travel, inspecting for
                         depressions, stumps, gullies, ruts and similar obstacles.

                   -     Always check the brakes of a drill rig carrier before traveling, particularly on
                         rough, uneven or hilly ground.

                   -     Check the complete drive train of a carrier at least weekly for loose or
                         damaged bolts, nuts, studs, shafts and mountings.

                   -     Discharge all passengers before moving a drill rig on rough or hilly terrain.

                   -     Engage the front axle (for 4 x 4, 6 x 6, etc. vehicles or carriers) when traveling
                         off highway on hilly terrain.

                   -     Use caution when traveling a side-hill. Conservatively evaluate side-hill
                         capability of drill rigs, because the arbitrary addition of drilling tools may raise
                         the center of gravity. When possible, travel directly uphill or downhill.
                         Increase tire pressures before traveling in hilly terrain (do not exceed rated
                         tire pressure).


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              -Attempt    to cross obstacles such as small logs and small erosion channels or
                  ditches squarely, not at an angle.
              -Use     the assistance of someone on the ground as a guide when lateral or
                  overhead clearance is close.

               -After    the drill rig has been moved to a new drilling site, set all brakes and/or
                   locks and block wheels.
               -Never      travel off-road with the mast (derrick) of the drill rig in the raised or
                   partially raised position.


  5.16    TiresBatteriesandFuel
          •Tires on the drill rig must be checked daily for safety and during extended travel
             for loss of air and they must be maintained and/or repaired in a safe manner. If
             tires are deflated to reduce ground pressure for movement on soft ground, the
             tires should be reinflated to normal pressures before movement on firm or hilly
              ground or on streets, roads and highways. Under inflated tires are not as stable
              on firm ground as properly inflated tires. Air pressures shall be maintained for
              travel on streets, roads and highways according to the manufacturers
              recommendations. During air pressure checks, inspect for:

                -       Missing or loose wheel lugs

                -       Objects wedged between duals or embedded in the tire casing

                -       Damaged or poorly fitting rims or rim flanges

                -       Abnormal or uneven wear and cuts, breaks or tears in the casing.

            •The repair of truck and off-highway tires shall only be made with required special
              tools following the recommendations of a tire manufacturers repair manual. If
              they are split rim tires, repairs shall be performed using an appropriate tire cage
              device.
            •Batteries contain strong acid. Use extreme caution when servicing batteries.

                    -   Batteries shall only be serviced in a ventilated area while wearing safety
                        glasses.
                    -   When a battery is removed from a vehicle or service unit, disconnect the
                        battery ground clamp first.

                    -   When installing a battery, connect the battery ground clamp last.

                    -    When charging a battery with a battery charger, turn off the power source to
                         the battery before either connecting or disconnecting charger leads to the
                         battery posts. Loosen cell caps prior to charging to permit the escape of gas.

                    -    Spilled battery acid can burn your skin and damage your eyes. Spilled battery
                         acid shall be immediately flushed off your skin with lots of water. Should
                         battery acid get into someone's eyes, flush immediately with large amounts of

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                    water and see a medical physician at once.
               -    To avoid battery explosions, keep the cells filled with electrolyte, use a
                    flashlight (not an open flame) to check electrolyte levels, and avoid creating
                    sparks around the battery by shorting across a battery terminal. Keep lighted
                    smoking materials and flames away from batteries.

               Special precautions must be taken for handling fuel and refueling the drill rig or
               carrier.
               -    Only use the type and quality of fuel recommended by the engine
                    manufacturer.
               -    Refuel in a well-ventilated area.
               -    Do not fill fuel tanks while the engine is running.        Turn off all electrical
                    switches.
               -    Do not spill fuel on hot surfaces. Clean any spillage before starting an
                    engine.
               -    Wipe up spilled fuel with cotton rags or cloths - do not use wool or metallic
                    cloth.
               -    Keep open lights, lighted smoking materials and flames or sparking
                    equipment well away from the fueling area.
               -    Turn off heaters in carrier cabs when refueling the carrier or the drill rig.
               -    To allow for expansion of the fuel during temperature changes, do not fill
                    portable fuel containers completely full.
               -    Keep the fuel nozzle in contact with the tank being filled to prevent static
                    sparks from igniting the fuel.
               -     Do not transport portable fuel containers in the vehicle or carrier cab with
                     personnel.
               -    Fuel containers and hoses shall remain in contact with a metal surface during
                    travel to prevent the buildup of static charge.


 5.16     DriliRigUtilizationandAlterations
          •    Do not attempt to exceed manufacturers ratings of speed, force, torque,
               pressure, flow, etc. Only use the drill rig and tools for the purposes which they are
               intended and designed.
          •    Alterations to a drill rig or drilling tools shall only be made by qualified personnel
               and only after consultation with the manufacturer.



 6.0      REFERENCES
          29 CFR 1910
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          29 CFR 1926
          American Iron Steel Institute, Wire Rope Users Manual
          Drilling Safety Guide. 3008 Millwood Avenue, Columbia, S.C. 29205.
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 2-1, Emergency
          Preparedness D
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 3-7, Hazardous Material
          Storage and
          Transportation
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 4-2, Hazard
          Communication D
           Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 6-4, LockouttTagout
           National Drilling Federation
           OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)
           USACOE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), EM 385-1 -1. 1 1.E, Operations Adjacent to
           Overhead Lines. Safety and Health Requirements Manual.




                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                      NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE

 This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
 connection with the performance of work for TIFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
 appropriate in accordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
 or any binding obligation of T1FW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
 notice at the sole discretion of TIFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
 The current version of this document can be found on the TIFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                        CopyrighiC 1995,1998

                                                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                                       Proprietary Information




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            SOP6
EHS 1-11, Training




                        I
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EHS 1-1 1:                         Training (Previously HSI-10 & RC-3)
Purpose                               Vers      04/0312001 - Revised      Approved
The purpose of this program is          Date:                                   by*      c
to ensure that Tetra Tech FW,          Original 02/01/95
Inc. (TIFW) and subcontract        Issue Date:
employees have the necessary
 environmental, health and            tegory:     mpany Procedures        Sections: ESO - Environmental Health &Safety
 safety (EHS) training to safely                                                   Programs
 perform their assigned tasks             Sub Departmental/Discipline     Document procedure
 and to meet regulatory training    Category:                                Type:
 requirements.                       Keyword Field                        Document Mike McSherry
                                        Index: Activities/Environmental     Owner:
                                               H&S, Training, EHS
                                               Compliance/Waste
                                               Management,
                                               Operational Control
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                                               Table of Contents
Section

 1.0       PURPOSE

 2.0       SCOPE

 3.0       MAINTENANCE

 4.0       DEFINITIONS

          4.1 Competent Person
          4.2 Qualified Person
          4.3 Hazardous Material
          4.4 Hazardous Waste Site
          4.5 Hazmat Employee

  5.0     DISCUSSION

          5.1 Responsibilities
             5.1A Line Management
             5.1.2 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
             5.1.3 Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality Programs
          5.2 HAZWOPER Training
             5.2.1 Initial HAZWOPER Training, 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(3)
             5.2.2 8-Hour Annual Hazardous Waste Worker Refresher Training, 29CFR 1910.120 (e)(3)
             5.2.3 8-Hour Supervisory Training, 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(4)
             5.2.4 24-Hour On-The-Job Supervision, 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(3) and (4)
             5.2.5 Site-Specific Training for Workers
          5.3 Radiation Worker Training
          5.4 UXO Training
          5.5 First Aid/Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training
          5.6 Environmental and Safety Supervisor Training
          5.7 DOT Training, 49 CFR 172, Subpart G
          5.8 Waste Management Training, 40 CFR 264.16 or 265.16
          5.9 OSHA Regulations With Other Annual Refresher Requirements
          5.10 Competent and Qualified Person Requirements
          5.1 1 Proficiency Assessment
          5.12 Course Evaluations
          5.13 Recordkeeping
              5.13.1 Course Documentation
              5.13,2 Course Certificates
              5.13.3 On-The-Job Training
              5.13.4 ESS Approval

  6.0      REFERENCES

   7.0     ATTACHMENTS




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             I




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  1.0    PURPOSE

         The purpose of this program is to ensure that Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and subcontract
         employees have the necessary environmental, health and safety (EHS) training to safely perform
         their assigned tasks and to meet regulatory training requirements.



  2.0    SCOPE

         This program addresses the training requirements mandated by the Occupational Safety and
         Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of
         Transportation (DOT), and internal TtFW requirements. Individual state and local requirements
         may be more stringent than federal requirements. It is important, therefore, to consult applicable
         state and local regulations.



  3.0    MAINTENANCE

         The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for updating this
         procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief Executive Officer.
         Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department responsible for updating the
         procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and Compliance.



  4.0     DEFINITIONS


  4.1     Competent Person

         A competent person is one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the
         surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees,
         and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.


  4.2     Qualified Person

          A qualified person is one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional
          standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully
          demonstrated his or her ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the
          work, or the project.


  4.3     Hazardous Material

          Any material, equipment, or substance or waste that transportation authorities have deemed
          capable of posing risks in transport, or are listed in the regulations, their appendices or in a
          hazardous material table or the list of dangerous goods.



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  4.4         Hazardous Waste Site
              OSHA, in its Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response standard, defines
              hazardous waste site activities as covering the following operations, unless the employer can
              demonstrate that the operation does not involve the potential for employee exposure or the
              reasonable possibility for employee exposure to safety or health hazards:

              •           Cleanup operations, required by a governmental body, involving hazardous substances, that
                          are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, including, but not limited to the
                          following, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA:s) National Priority Site List
                          (NPL), state priority site lists, sites recommended for the EPA NPL, Emergency Community
                           Response Action, underground storage tanks, initial site investigations conducted before the
                           presence or absence of hazardous substances has been ascertained

              •           Corrective actions involving cleanup operations at sites covered by the Resource
                          Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as amended (42 USC 6901 et seq.)

                          Voluntary cleanup operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other
                              governmental bodies

                  •       Operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal
                          facilities regulated by 40 CFR Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under
                          agreement with EPA to implement RCRA regulations

                  •        Emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of,
                           hazardous substances without regard to the location of the hazard


    4.5           Hazmat Employee
                  A person who directly affects hazardous materials transportation safety through any of the
                  following activities:

                  •        Determines proper shipping names
                  •        Selects packaging for hazardous materials
                  •        Packages, marks, and labels hazardous materials
                  •        Completes shipping papers for hazardous materials
                  •        Loads or unloads hazardous materials
                  •        Operates a vehicle carrying hazardous materials
                  •        Oversees employees and activities listed above



     5.0              DISCUSSION


        5.1           Responsibilities


        6.1.1 Line Management

                      Line managers are responsible for:
                      0     Providing the resources necessary for the implementation of the training program


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          •       Making personnel available for scheduled training courses

          •       Ensuring that new employees have or receive required training prior to job assignment


  51.2 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel

          Manager, EHS Services have responsibility for.

                  Developing and publishing training schedules to meet the training needs of operations within
                  their area of responsibilities.

          •       Implementation of the EHS training program, including the approval of candidates for the
                      Environmental and Safety Supervisor (ESS) course, and ensuring that evaluation of ESS
                      personnel is conducted.

          •       Conducting in-house training and/or ensuring that qualified EHS personnel are assigned to
                  perform the training.

          Project Environmental and Safety Managers (PESMs) have responsibility for:

          •       Ensuring that special training requirements for projects are identified and that the training is
                  conducted. Special training requirements would include regulatory required training for
                  specific tasks such as lead or asbestos abatement, wastewater treatment operations, state
                  and local agency requirements, federal agency requirements, such as DOD and DOE, ACOE
                  requirements, and contractual requirements.

              •   Ensuring that appropriate outlines and training materials, as necessary, are developed for
                  site-specific training.

              •   Ensuring that training is properly documented in accordance with EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping.

              ESSs are responsible for:

              0   Ensuring that personnel have the required training and appropriate documentation before
                  being allowed to work on site.

              0   Ensuring that site-specific training is conducted per the site EHS plan.

                  Ensuring that site personnel have the necessary training to safely use the personal protective
                  equipment (PPE) selected for the project site.


   5.1.3 Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality Programs

              Director, ESO Programs has the following responsibilities for the TtFW training program:

                   Development and approval of course materials for all in-house training programs.

              •    Maintaining master records and documentation for EHS training courses.

              •    Ensuring that this'procedure addresses basic EHS and EMS-related training requirements.
                   Project-specific EHS training requirements are specified in EHS Plan(s) per EHS Procedure
                   EHS 3-2, EHS Plans.


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  5.2    HAZWOPER Training


  5.2.1 Initial HAZWOPER Training, 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(3)

         All TtFW personnel performing work at hazardous waste sites shall meet the initial training criteria
         under 29 CFR 1910.120(e). At a minimum, all TtFW personnel performing work at hazardous
         waste sites shall attend an initial training course for hazardous waste site operations. The initial
         course shall include, but not be limited to, the recommended topics in 29 CFR 1910.120,
         Appendix E, General Hazardous Waste, Training Operations, A.2.

          Where state requirements for hazardous waste worker training are more stringent, the ESS shall
          ensure that site workers have training which meets the additional state requirements.


   5.2.2 B-Hour Annual Hazardous Waste Worker Refresher Training, 29CFR 1910.120 (e)(3)

          Hazardous waste workers are required to attend an 8-hour annual refresher course. The course
          shall include, but not be limited to, the recommended topics in 29 CFR 1910.120, Appendix E,
          General Hazardous Waste Operations Training, A.2.
          This course should be completed each calendar year as close as reasonably possible to the
          anniversary of the initial training or the previous year's refresher course, but no later than 30 days
          after the anniversary of initial training or the last refresher course. If training has not been
          completed within 30 days of the anniversary of the previous training, and personnel need to enter
          an exclusion zone, then an explanatory record shall be placed in the employee's training file which
          explains why the training has not been conducted and which specifies that the training shall be
          completed within 60 days of the anniversary date. No extensions shall be permitted after 60 days
          and individuals shall not be permitted in the exclusion zones of hazardous waste sites.

           Note that some clients and states have more restrictive policies regarding the time frame for
           completion of the 8-hour refresher course.
           If an individual has not attended refresher training for more than two years, or it has been more
           than two years since initial training, then the individual shall be required to demonstrate knowledge
           of the information for the initial training through a written test. After three years, from initial
           training or the last refresher course the individual shall be required to attend 40-hour initial
           HAZWOPER training again.


    6.2.3 8-Hour Supervisory Training, 29 CFFt 1910A20(e)(4)

            On-site personnel who directly manage and/or supervise personnel engaged in hazardous waste
            operations (e.g., Project Managers, Field Operations Leads, Construction Superintendents, Craft
            Supervisors, and Health and Safety personnel) are required to attend eight hours of specialized
            training at the time of job assignment. This course shall include eight hours of training on topics
            such as the TIFW EHS program and procedures, health and safety training requirements, PPE,
            emergency preparedness programs/procedures, and health hazard monitoring procedures and
            techniques.
            Supervisor training, will constitute refresher training if the training includes the required topics for
            refresher training, Section 5.2.2.



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  5.2.4 24-Hour On-The-Job Supervision, 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(3) and (4)

          TtFW personnel who have attended initial 40-hour HAZWOPER training are required to have 24
          hours of supervised on-the-job experience by an individual who has completed the supervisory
          training and is an experienced hazardous waste worker. Site-specific orientation training shall be
          considered to constitute a, component of this training. Personnel shall work under direct field
          supervision until the on-the-job training has been completed and documented.


  5.2.5 Site-Specific Training for Workers

          Prior to beginning work at each project, TtFW and subcontractor employees shall receive
          site-specific training, conducted by the site ESS or their designee. The topics covered shall
          include those addressed in the site-specific EHS plans; hazard communication for chemicals
          on-site; PPE required; when it is required to be used; and how to use the PPE, if necessary; and
          the necessary and/or applicable topics contained in 29 CFR 1910.120, Appendix E, Hazardous
          Waste Operations, A.3. and 29 CFR 1910.20 through 1910.28 for construction activities.

          The ESS shall develop an outline for the site-specific training for each project.


  5.3     Radiation Worker Training

          Where potential exposure to radiation hazards exist, the Corporate Health Physicist shall
          determine the content and level of training required to address the potential site hazards, and
          meet project and/or regulatory requirements in accordance with EHS 4-3, Radioactive and Mixed
          Waste Programs. These requirements shall be specified in the site-specific EHS plans.


  5.4      LJX0 Training

          Training requirements for personnel performing LIXO-related activities are specified in the UXO
          operations section of this program manual, Section 7. Additional requirements as necessary shall
          be specified in site-specific EHS plans by the TtFW LlX0 Manager or designee.


   5.6     First Aid/Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training

          At least two members of each site team shall be certified in first aid and cardiopulmonary
          resuscitation when working on any field project. One certified individual must be a TtFW`
          employee. The other certified individual may be a client or subcontractor employee. The certified
          members must be working in close enough proximity to other team members so that they can
          administer CPR or first aid in a timely manner. Courses must be taught by a certified instructor
          and approved by an organization such as the American Red Cross.


   5.6     Environmental and Safety Supervisor Training

           ESS training is designed to ensure that full-time ESS's are capable of performing their
           responsibilities and to enable TtFW employees in disciplines other than industrial hygiene or
           safety to serve as an ESS on selected projects (cross-training).

           ESS cross-training candidates shall: 1) possess a background in a biological, physical, or safety
           science, engineering or construction; 2) have 400 hours of field experience on the type(s) of
           operations for which they are being cross-trained; and 3) have six months experience with TtFW.

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          Exceptions to the above requirements may be granted at the discretion of the Manager, EHS
          Services.

          Full-time EHS personnel who are assigned ESS responsibilities will attend the ESS training
          course at the discretion of the Manager, EHS Services.

          The ESS course shall consist of a minimum of 32 hours classroom training and additional time as
          necessary, but no less than 8 hours, to complete the field certification.

          The ESS training will include, at a minimum the following topics:

               ESS responsibilities and authorities,
               Safety briefings and development of EHS plans,
                EHS forms and documentation,
                EPA, DOT, OSHA and applicable state standards and TtFW EHS procedures,
                Health hazards (chemical and physical) recognition,
                Hazard communication,
                PPE selection and use,
                Decontamination of personnel and equipment,
                Instrumentation calibration, use, and limitations,
                Decision-making exercises,
                Safety hazards,
                Emergency procedures and response,
                Pollution Prevention, and
                Waste Management.

           The content of the course will be reviewed and updated at least annually by Director, ESQ
           Programs.


    5.7     DOT Training, 49 CFR 172, Subpart G and IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations Training

            DOT and IATA training is required for any TtFW employee or subcontractor who functions as a
            "hazmat employee." New employees who perform a hazmat function must be trained within 90
            days of employment. Until such training has occurred, the employee must perform work under
            the direct supervision of a DOVIATA trained and knowledgeable employee.

            Subcontractors must provide certification of training at the start of the project, but no later than
            prior to performing a hazmat function. The Project Manager is responsible for ensuring the
            project files contain the subcontractors' certification of training.

            The TtFW program requires that DOT/IATA refresher training occur every two years (Note: Where
            subcontractors are performing shipper's responsibilities for non-air shipments, DOT requires
            training every three years).
            The DOVIATA training course will consist of a minimum of 4 hours training. The course shall
            include, but not be limited to, the requirements specified in 49 CFR 172.704, General
            Awareness/Familiarization Training, applicable function-specific training (e.g., packing, marking,

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          labeling, etc.) and safety training. The safety training will be met through the HAZWOPER 8-hour
          refresher training. Additional function-specific training may be conducted on a project-specific
          basis. The training course will also provide general awareness of IATA dangerous goods
          regulations, air shipment requirements, and TtFW policies associated with transportation of
          hazardous materials.

         Training at an external course will satisfy the DOT training requirement. Certificate of completion
         must be forwarded to the Director, ESQ Programs for inclusion in the Corporate records.


  5.8    Waste Management Training, 40 CFR 264.16 or 265.16

         Waste Management training is required for all TtFW employees who characterize, handle,
         manage, package, mark/label, inspect, and coordinate off-site transportation and disposal of
         hazardous wastes, including state-regulated hazardous waste.       This training is strongly
         recommended for personnel who perform similar functions for non-hazardous, special and PCB
         wastes. Subcontractors who perform on-site hazardous waste management activities must have
         documented 40 CFR 264.16 or 265.16 training.

          New employees who manage or otherwise handle hazardous waste must be trained within six
          months of employment. Until such training has occurred, the employee must perform work under
          the direct supervision of a trained, knowledgeable employee.

          Refresher training is required on an annual basis.

          The waste management training course will consist of a minimum of 4 hours training. The training
          course will include instruction in hazardous waste management, including general requirements
          for contingency plan and emergency response in accordance with 40 CFR 265.16. The training
          course will also include instruction of waste characterization, land disposal restriction (LDR)
          compliance, and off-site transportation and disposal as well as TtFW policies associated with
          these topics. The course will include discussions regarding hazardous waste as well as PCBs,
          state-regulated, and non-hazardous wastes. Additional waste management training may be
          conducted on a project-specific basis to supplement this 4-hour training course.

          Training at an external course will satisfy 40 CFR 264.16 or 265.16 requirements. Certificate of
          completion must be forwarded to the Director, ESQ Programs for inclusion in the Corporate
          Records.


  6.9     OSHA Regulations With Other Annual Refresher Requirements

          OSHA has numerous annual refresher training requirements not associated with HAZWOPER.
          The TtFW HAZWOPER 8-hour refresher course will include hearing conservation, fire
          extinguisher, hazard communication, and records access refresher training. Office ESC and
          project ESSs will ensure that these topics are covered with employees who do not attend the
          TtFW refresher course.

          Additional requirements for OSHA refresher training are identified in Attachment A - Health and
          Safety Training Requirements. These requirements are to be addressed, as needed, through
          office or project-based training.


  5.10 CompetentandQualifiedPersonRequirements

          OSHA uses the term competent or qualified person in over 150 instances within 29 CFR 191 0 and
          1926.
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         Project Managers have the responsibility for ensuring that personnel assigned to the project meet
         the competent and qualified persons requirements identified in EHS plans. Project Managers
         should consult with EHS personnel as necessary to determine requirements.

          Attachment A includes a list of competent and qualified person requirements for activities
          common to TtFW operations, and guidelines on determining the qualifications of competent
          persons.


   5.11 I Proficiency Assessment
          All TtFW courses shall utilize written assessment and/or skill demonstration. For courses of 8
          hours or longer, written tests shall include at least 50 questions. If a written test in conjunction
          with a skills demonstration is used for the courses of 8 hours or longer, a minimum of 25
          questions will be used. Proficiency testing for other training will be at the discretion of the
          instructor, but it must include a written test or a skills demonstration. The means of proficiency
          testing shall be documented.


   5.12 Course Evaluations

           Course evaluations shall be completed for TtFW training courses. Copies or a summary of the
           evaluation shall be forwarded to Director, ESQ Programs for each course.

           Attachment B or an equivalent should be used for course evaluations.


    6.13 Recordikeeping


    5.13.1 Course Documentation

            The documentation for each TtFW training course shall include a course sign-in sheet for each
            day of the course which indicates the date of the presentation, the length of the course, the
            topics covered, the names and signatures of the attendees, and the name(s) of the course
            instructors). Attachment C or an equivalent should be used for all TtFW EHS training courses
            including site-specific training.
             Copies of the training documentation for each course (except for project-specific training)
             including handouts, agenda, sign-in sheets, listing of audiovisuals, and tests will be maintained
             by Director, ESO Programs in accordance with TtFW Procedure EHS 1-9. RecordkeeR!M For
             non-TtFW training courses, a copy of the certificate of completion will be maintained.


    5.13.2 Course Certificates

             Each student successfully completing a TtFW course shall be issued a certificate which includes:

             • Attendee's name
             • Course title and date(s)
             • Statement that the student has successfully completed the course
             •    Identification of specific regulatory requirement for which certification was provided, if

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                    applicable
          • Corporation name
          •   Location of the training
           • Signature and title of instructors

           Original certificates will be forwarded to the attendee.        Copies will be maintained in each
           employee's training file in accordance with EHS 1-9.


  5.13.3 On-The-Job Training

           On-the-job training shall be documented using the form included as Attachment D.

           Copies of this form shall be forwarded to Director, ESQ Programs for inclusion in each employee'
           s training file.


  6.13.4 ESS Approval
           All TtFW personnel who are assigned ESS responsibilities shall be approved by a Manager, EHS
           Services or their designee. The approval shall identify the ESS-related classroom training that
           the individual has attended, the nature and extent of the field evaluation(s), and the scope of
           EHS activities that the individual is capable of performing/supervising.

           The Mgnggg[.                  may provide for variance from the ESS training requirements based
           upon prior training, experience, or the scope of a particular project. Manager, EHS Services
           shall document all variances from the ESS training requirements of this procedure.

           Attachment E is an approval form which shall be used for each approval or update to an
           approval.




   6.0    REFERENCES

          See Attachment A



   7.0    A.TTACHMENTS

           Attachment      A - TtFW EHS Training and Competent Person Requirements
           Attachment      B - TtFW Training Course Evaluation Sheet
           Attachment      C - TtFW EHS Training Course Sign-in Sheet
           Attachment      D - TtFW Record of On-The-Job Supervised Training
           Attachment      E - TtFW ESS Certification




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                                           EHS 1-1 I ATTACHMENT A


                                               Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                            EHS TRAINING AND COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS
                                           EHS TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
           REQUIREMENT                             REFERENCE                               COMMENT(S)
   Accident Prevention Signs          11910.145(c)                           Initially
   Air Sampling Training              11910.146(h)(2)                        4nitially
   Are Welding Equipment Operation    11910.254(a) & (d)                      nitially
   and Maintenance                    11910.252(a), (b), (c), &
                                      JANSI 6.1 - 1966
   BATT Training                       San Francisco Bay Area Required        nitially/Annually
                                      tining                                 1'
   Chemical Hygiene Plan               1910.1450(f)                          lnitially and as determined by
                                                                             mployer
   Confined Space Entry - Rescue        1910.146(g)                            nitially/Annually
   Personnel                            1910.146(k)(1)(iii)                  1'
   Confined Space Entry - Entry         1910.146(g)                            nitially
   Supervisor, Entrant, and Standby
   Attendant
   Contamination Control                1910.120(k)                           4nitially
   Control of Hazardous Energy          1910.147(c)(7)                        nitially/lvlodifications
   CPR                                  1910.151 (b)                           nitially/Annually
                                        1910.146(k)(1)(iv)                    1'
    DOT/lATA                            49 CFR 172, Subpart G                 Rnitially/Every 2 4 years
    Fire Prevention Plans               1910.38(b)(4)                         nitially/Modification
    Fire Extinguisher Training          1910.157(g) fire fighters only         nitially/Annually
                                        1910.252(a)(2)(iii)(B)                1'
    First Aid

    Forklift Training
                                        1910.15 1lb)
                                        1910.146(k)(1)(iv)
                                        1910.178(l)
                                                                               r very Three Years

                                                                               Vnitially/Annually in California
    Ground Fault Protection
    Implementation
    Hazard Communication
                                        1926.404(b)

                                        1910.1200(h)(2)
                                                                               rompetent Person Requirement

                                                                                nitially/when hazards change
                                        172.704(a)(3)(ii)                      1'
    HAZWOPER - 24 Hr OJT                1910.120(e)(3)(i)                       7ield experience with supervision
    HAZWOPER - 8 Hr                     1910.120(e)(4)                          Specialized training
    Manager/Supervisor
    HAZWOPER - Haz Waste Site            1910.120(e)(7)                            Training required for expected
    Emergency Response                                                             employee responses to anticipated
                                                                                   emergencies




                                             EHS I -II ATTACHMENT A


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                                                Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                           EHS TRAINING AND COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS
                                       EHS TRAINING REQUIREMENTS (Cont'd)
          REQUIREMENT                              REFERENCE                                 COMMENT(S)
  HAZWOPER - 40 Hour                   1910.120(e)(3)(i)                        Off site/Before work
  Hearing Conservation                 1910.95(k)                               Initially/Annually
  Hot TVork Supervisor                 1910.252(a)(2)(iv)                       Initially
  Power Operated Hand Tools            1926.302(e)                              Initially
  Powered Platforms                    1910.66(i)(1)                            Initially
  PPE                                  1910.132(d)                               nitially, retraining per OSHA
                                                                                 tandard
  Process Safety Management            1910.1 19(g)                              nitially and Every Three Years; and
                                       1910.1190)(3)                             ipon Modification
                                       1910.119(i)(2)
  Records Access                       1910.20(g)                               nitially/Annually
  Resistance Welding Equipment         1910.255(a) & (d)                        nitially
  Operation and Maintenance
  Respiratory Protection               1910.134                                 Initially/When respiratory protection
                                                                                  quirements clian e
  Respirator Fit Test                  Annual fit testing is not a regulatory   Initially/Annually
                                       requirement, but a standard industry
                                       practice
  Servicing Rim Wheels                  1910.177(c)                               itially
  Stairways and Ladders                 1926.1060(a) & (b)                      Initially and as needed
  Vertical Standards                    191 0.I 001 -Asbestos                   initially/Annually
                                        1910.1018 - Arsenic
                                        1910.1025 - Lead
                                        1910.1027 - Cadmium
                                        1910.1028 - Benzene
                                        1910.1030 - Bloodbome
                                        1910.1048 - Formaldehyde
   Waste Management Training           10 CFR 264.16 and 265.16                 [Annually
                                             EHS 1 -II ATTACHMENT A


                                                  Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                           EHS TRAINING AND COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS
                                        COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS
            REQUIREMENT                          REFERENCE                                  COMMENT(S)
   Approval of PPE or o er controls 1910.1000(e)                                 Qualified Person Requirement
   to maintain exposures below PELs
   Buildup roofing safety monitoring 1926.502(p)(7)                              Competent Person Requirement
   system
   Crane/Derrick Inspections          1926.550 (a)(5)                            Competent Person Requirements
                                      1926.550 9(g)(5)(iv)
                                      1926.550 (g)(5)(vi)
   Cranes (2 or more used to    the   1910.179 (n)(3)(ix)                        Qualified Person Requirement
   same load)
   Cutting or welding on flammable    1926.354(a)                                Competent Person Requirement
   surface
   Emp        Training for La     and 1926.1060                                  Competent Person Requirement

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  Stairw
  Exam ning Damaged Excav ions               926.652                               umpetent      Person Requirements
  Protection
     cava ion Competent Person                                                        ompetent Person Requirement
  Trainin
     cavation Inspections                     92            )& (h)(3)                 ompetent Person Requirement
                                             1926.651(k)
   Excavat on     ornpe       Person         1926.                                    ompetent Person Requirement
   Trainin                                  I
   Explosives an      asting Agents          1910.109(c)(5)(viii)                                Person Requirement
                                             1910.109 (d)(2)(iii)(b)
                                            11910.109(g)(5)(Vii)
   Fall Protect on                          11926, Subpart M                                                  quircment
   Groun       au I                          F   6.404(b)                                         Person Requirement

                             Preliminary     1910.120 (c) 2)                           us        Person Requirement

                            emolit on        1926.850                                  ompe nt P.   Ppmjirpment
                                             1926.1          16)                       ompe  t P,nn Rennirement
                            ion               92 .                                     omp ent Person Requirement
                                             1926.859(g)
                                                   550 (g)(4)(i)(A)                     ualified Person Requirement
    Pre-demolitionEnaineerinpSurveysII926.850(a)                                                     Person Requirement
                                          EMS i-11                      MENT


                                                         Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                             EHS TRAINING AND COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS
                                     COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS (Contd)

            REQUIREMENT                              REFER                             COMMENT(S)

     Asbestos                              1926.1101                           orapetent Person Requirement

     Blasting Operations                   1926.900                                petent Person Requirement

     Cadmium                               1926.1127                               petent Person Requirement

     Ladder Inspections                 11926.1053                                 petent Person Requirement

     Lead                                  1926.62                             omp          Person Requirement

     Rigging Inspections                   1926.251                                         Person Requirement

      Scaffolding                          1926.451(a)                         0 pe         Person Requir

      Slings                               1910.184(d) & (e)                   0     etent person      signation for
                                                                                   se inspect ons

      Soil Classification for              1926.652 (a)(1)(ii)                  0 petent     erson        iremen]
      Excavations                          1926.652, Appendix A



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  Structural Ramps in             1926.51 (c)(1)(i)              Competent Person Requirement
  Excavations

  Use of Air Monitoring           1910.1044, APPB                Qualified Person Requirement
  Equipment                       1910.1045, APPB
                                  1910.1047, APPB
                                  1926.55 (b)

  Variance Procedure


                               Guidelines for Competent Persons Qualifications

  OSHA defines the "Competent Person" as 'one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable
  hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to
  employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them".

  In construction operations, there is general requirement for the employer to "provide for frequent and
  regular inspections of the job sites, materials, and equipment to be made by the competent persons
  designated by the employers".

                                                   I
                                           EHS I -11 ATTACHMENT A


                                               Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                          EHS TRAINING AND COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS
                                   COMPETENT PERSON REQUIREMENTS Cont'd)

  This definition, combined with duties and responsibilities, indicate four important factors associated with
  Competent Persons:
  they must be designated,
  their major role is to perform inspections,
  they must be capable of recognizing hazards, and
  they must have authority to promptly correct hazards.

  In addition to these general   requirements, specific OSHA standards place more detailed responsibilities
  on the competent persons.        Some of these standards are listed on the attached tables. Examples
  include the duties under the   Asbestos, Lead, Excavation and Scaffold standards. Responsibilities under
  such standards may be to       specify and approve equipment, work methods or hazard controls and to
  conduct employee training.

  Except in the case of the Asbestos standard, OSHA does not specify training requirements for the
  Competent Person. Even in the case of Asbestos, the Agency recognizes that attendance at the
  training course does not in and of itself fulfill the 'competency' requirement. In fact, it is recognized that
  under some of the standards, the Competent Person duties may be filled by more than one person,
  depending on the skills and knowledge needed. For instance, the Competent Person designated for
  scaffold erection, may not be the same as the individual designated for scaffold inspection before each
  work shift. Also, different individuals may be designated competent persons depending on the type of
  scaffold used.

  EHS 1-11 requires that the Project Manager, with the assistance of EHS personnel, ensure that
  personnel assigned to the project meet the competent and qualified persons requirements identified in
  EHS Plans. Since the qualifications of the Competent Persons are performance as opposed to
  specification based, it is up to the PM to determine what the qualifications of the designated persons
  need to be. This will depend on the hazards and complexity of the job, and the knowledge, experience

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  and authority of the person. The Competent Persons should also be aware of the technical
  requirements of the OSHA standard they are being designated under. For example, the Competent
  Person for excavations may need to be capable of performing soils analysis required by the rule, and of
  selecting slope or bench angles consistent with the soil type.

  Generally, the competent person will be the ESS or the superintendent, provided they have the
  capabilities in the given area. However, in certain cases, a craft employee may be best, as in the
  requirement for daily crane inspections. Generally, the PM should use the following checklist to
  evaluate the qualifications of the designated CP:

   Understands duties and responsibilities
   Has training
   Has knowledge and skill to assume the task
   Is familiar with standards
   Is given authority to function on the job
   Is provided with and reviews applicable standards and procedures
   Is provided with necessary equipment/materials

   When an individual has the basic knowledge and skills to do the job, but needs a higher level familiarity
   with OSHA standards, training can be arranged on a project basis through the PESM.

   Revision Date 04/04/00




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                                         EHS 1-1i ATTACHMENT B
                                   TRAINING COURSE EVALUATION SHEET


                            Click the icon below to launch or download.


                                                   Int,
                                          EHS 1-11 Attachment B.doc

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                                          EHS 141 ATTACHMENT C
                                      EHS Training Course Sign-in Sheet.


                            Click the icon below to launch or download.



                                                   EHS 1-11 Ali Ed=

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                                     EHS I -1I ATTACHMENT D
                            RECORD OF ON-THE-JOB SUPERVISED TRAINING


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                                              EHS 1-11 Attachmeni D.doc

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                                                EHS I-1i ATTACHMENT E
                                                  ESS CERTIFICATION


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                                                             In
                                                    EHS 1-11 Attachment E.doc

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                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                      NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE

 This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
 connection with the performance of work for TtFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
 appropriate in accordance with the Ouality Rule. This document Is not to be construed as an employment contract
 or any binding obligation of TtFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
 notice at the sole discretion of TtFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
 The current version of this document can be found on the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                              CopyrightV 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001

                                                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                                       Proprietary Information




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                       SOP7
EHS 4-1, Bloodborne Pathogens
                                                                                                                       2532376


EHS 4-1:                         Bloodborne Pathogens (Previously HS4-1)
Purpose                             Version 0110512000 - Revised        Approved
The purpose of this program is        Date:                                   by:
to define the requirements for       Original 02101195
working with potential           Issue Date:
bloodborne pathogens and to
provide a written Exposure       Category: Company Procedures           Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health &Safety
Control Plan (ECP) to minimize                                                   Programs
or eliminate an employee's               Sub Deparlmental/Discipline    Document Procedure
 potential exposure to            Category:                                Type:
 bloodborne pathogens. The         Keyword Training, Operational        Document Mike McSherry
 ECP has been prepared to             Index: Control, Monitoring, EHS     Owner:
 comply with the Occupational                Compliance/Waste
 Safety and Health                           Management
 Administration (OSHA)
 regulation for Bloodbome
 Pathogens, 29 Code of Federal
 Regulations (CFR) 1910.1030.
              2532377
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                                               Table of Contents
Section

 1.0      PURPOSE

 2.0      SCOPE

 3.0      MAINTENANCE

 4.0       DEFINITIONS
          4.1 Blood
          4.2 Bloodborne Pathogens
          4.3 Contaminated
          4.4 Contaminated Laundry
          4.5 Contaminated Sharps
          4.6 Decontamination
          4.7 Engineering Controls
          4.8 Exposure Incident
          4.9 Handwashing Facilities
          4.10 HBV
          4.11 HIV
          4.12 Licensed Healthcare Professional
          4.13 Occupational Exposure
          4.14 Other Potentially Infectious Materials
          4.15 Parenteral
          4.16 Personal Protective Equipment
          4.17 Qualified Personnel
          4.18 Regulated Waste
          4.19 Sharp
          4.20 Source Individual
          4.21 Sterilize
          4.22 Universal Precautions
          4.23 Work Practice Controls

  5.0    DISCUSSION
        5.1 Responsibilities
             5.1.1 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
             5.1.2 Medical Providers
         5.2 General Requirements
         6.3 Exposure Determination
         5.4 Universal Precautions
            5.4.1 Engineering and Work Practice Controls
             5.4.2 Personal Protective Equipment
        5.5 Housekeeping and Labeling
        5.6 Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Vaccination
        5.7 Post-Exposure Follow-Up
        5.8 Employee Information and Training
        5.9 Recordkeeping

 6.0 REFERENCES

  7.0 ATTACHMENTS



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1.0       PURPOSE

          The purpose of this program is to define the requirements for working with potential bloodborne
          pathogens and to provide a written Exposure Control Plan (ECP) to minimize or eliminate an
          employee's potential exposure to bloodborne pathogens. The ECP has been prepared to comply
          with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulation for Bloodborne
          Pathogens, 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.1030.



2.0        SCOPE

           The program applies to all Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) employees who may have occupational
           exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.



 3.0       MAINTENANCE

           The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for updating this
           procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief Executive Officer.
           Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department responsible for updating the
           procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and Compliance.



 4.0       DEFINITIONS


 4.1       Blood

            Human blood, human blood components, and products made from human blood.


 4.2        Bloodborne Pathogens

            Pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans.
            These pathogens include, but are not limited to the following:

                      Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)
                      Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)


  4.3       Contaminated

            The presence, or the reasonably anticipated presence, of blood or other potentially infectious
            materials on an item or surface.


  4.4       Contaminated Laundry


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         Laundry that has been soiled with blood or other potentially infectious materials, or may contain
         sharps.


4.5      Contaminated Sharps

         Any contaminated object that can penetrate the skin including, but not limited to: needles,
         scalpels, broken glass, broken capillary tubes, and exposed ends of dental wires.


4.6      Decontamination

         The use of physical or chemical means to remove, inactivate, or destroy bloodborne pathogens on
         a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles
         and the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.


4.7       Engineering Controls

          Controls that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace.


4.8       Exposure Incident

          A specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, nonintact skin, or parenteral contact with blood
          or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employee's duties.


4.9       Handwashing Facilities

          A facility providing an adequate supply of running potable water, soap and single use towels or hot
          air drying machines.


4.10      HBV

          Hepatitis B Virus.


4.11      HIV

          Human Immunodeficiency Virus.


4.12      Licensed Healthcare Professional

          A person legally permitted to independently perform HBV vaccination and post exposure
          evaluation and follow-up.




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4.13      Occupational Exposure
          Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other
          potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee's duties.


4.14      Other Potentially Infectious Materials

          All human body fluids, tissue, organs, or HIV/HBV-containing cultures or solutions.


 4A5       Parenteral
           Piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needlesticks, human
           bites, cuts, and abrasions.


 4.16      Personal Protective Equipment

           Specialized clothing worn by an employee for protection against a hazard.


 4.17      Qualified Personnel
           TtFW personnel currently certified in Basic First Aid, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), or
           similar certification assigned to conduct tasks involving potential exposure to bloodborne
           pathogens or other potentially infectious materials.


  4.18      Regulated Waste
            Liquid or semiliquid blood or other potentially infectious material; contaminated items that would
            release blood or other potentially infectious materials in a liquid or semiliquid state if compressed;
            items that are caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are capable of
            releasing these materials during handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and
            microbiological wastes containing blood or other potentially infectious materials.


  4.19      Sharp
            A sharp object contaminated with infectious material, (e.g., needles, broken glass) or anything that
            can pierce, puncture, or cut your skin.


   4.20      Source Individual
             Any living or dead individual whose blood or other potentially infectious materials may be a source
             of occupational exposure to the employee. This includes trauma victims.




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4.21      Sterilize
          The use of a physical or chemical procedure to destroy all microbial life, including highly resistant
          bacterial endospores.


4.22      Universal Precautions

          An approach to infection control in which all human blood and certain human body fluids are
          treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.


4.23      Work Practice Controls

          Controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in which a task is
          performed.



5.0       DISCUSSION


5.1       Responsibilities


6.11.11   Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel

          The Environmental and Safety Supervisor (ESS) or Environmental and Safety Coordinator (ESC)
          shall assist local operations management width the implementation of this program including
          provision for employee information and training.


 5.1.2     Medical Providers
           The TtFW local medical provider (LMP) and Corporate Medical Consultant (CIVIC) shall provide
           for administration of the HBV vaccine and post-exposure follow-up provisions of this program.


 5.2       General Requirements
           The TtFW Bloodborne Pathogen Program consists of identifying job classifications or tasks where
           potential occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens may exist, and ensuring that an
           adequate ECP is implemented. The following sections describe the overall ECP for TtFW
           business operations. This plan may need to be supplemented with additional information in the
           site-specific EHS plans if the site job classifications or tasks are not adequately addressed by the
           ECP. Additionally, the ECP shall be reviewed and updated annually and whenever necessary to
           reflect new or modified tasks and procedures.




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          The primary elements of the ECP are:

          0         Exposure Determination;
          0         Control Methods, including use of universal precautions, engineering and work practice
                    controls, personal protective equipment, and proper housekeeping and labeling;
          0         Hepatitis B (HBV) Vaccination;
          0         Post-Exposure Follow-Up;
                    Employee Information and Training; and
                    Recordkeeping.


 6.3      Exposure Determination

          The TtFW job classifications and tasks which may result in occupational exposure are:

           First Aid and CPR Qualified Individuals - Tasks for this job classification include administration of
           first aid to individuals where exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials could
           result. Only TtFW personnel currently certified in first aid and CPR, regardless of job
           classification or duties, shall perform first aid or CPR.

           InvestigationlRemediationPersonnelat Infectious Waste Sites - Tasks for this job classification
           include air, soil and water sampling, waste handling and removal operations, and other duties at a
           site where direct contact with infectious waste occurs.

           Other Job Classifications - Tasks for this job classification would include all tasks performed
           where there is an anticipated or actual exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials.
           If applicable, a specific exposure determination by job classification and task shall be completed
           and included in the site-specific EHS plans.


  5.4         Universal Precautions

              Universal precautions, whereby human blood and certain human bodily fluids are treated as if
              known to be infectious, shall be used to prevent direct physical contact. These precautions
              include the use of barriers, isolation, personal protective equipment (PPE), and first aid kits
              containing a mouth to mouth (artificial respiration) face shield when necessary. The most recent
              recommendations issued by the Center for Disease Control regarding universal precautions will
              be used as guidance.


  6.4.1       Engineering and Work Practice Controls

              Engineering and work practice controls shall be used to eliminate or minimize employee
              exposure. The policy of TtFW is to use these controls rather than PPE. PPE will be used only if
              engineering and work practice controls do not adequately control or eliminate occupational
              exposure.
              Engineering controls used shall be examined on a monthly basis and maintained or replaced as
              necessary. Examples include the use of a sharps disposal container or specially marked bags for
              contaminated first aid materials.

              Work practice controls, including handwashing, personal hygiene, and avoidance of sharps shall
              be implemented. The following work practice controls will be implemented as necessary at work
              sites where potential occupational exposure exists:


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                    Handwashing facilities shall be present on each job site. If provision of handwashing
                    facilities is not feasible, then antiseptic handcleansers or toweletts must be used, followed
                    by soap and running water as soon as possible.

                    Employees shall wash hands immediately, or as soon as possible after removal of gloves
                    or contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

                    Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics, and handling contact lenses are prohibited
                    in areas of potential exposure.

                    Equipment that may have been contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious
                    materials shall be examined and decontaminated, if feasible. If the equipment cannot be
                    decontaminated it shall be labeled as a biohazard. Information regarding the biohazard
                    shall be communicated to all handling, shipping, and service personnel.


6.4.2     Personal Protective Equipment

          TtFW employees shall use, as directed, appropriate company-provided PPE. Appropriate PPE is
          that which does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to reach the employees
          clothes or body under normal conditions and duration of use.

          PPE shall be provided, maintained, and properly disposed of at each work site where potential
          exposure exists. PPE shall be accessible at each work site and include hypo-allergenic gloves or
          other alternatives as necessary.

          Potentially contaminated PPE shall be removed prior to exiting the work area. It shall be placed in
          a regulated container for disposal.
          Appropriate gloves (e.g., latex and/or puncture resistant gloves) shall be worn when contact with
          blood or other potentially infectious materials is expected and when handling or touching
          contaminated items or surfaces,
          Disposable gloves shall not be reused and shall be replaced if torn or punctured, or the ability to
          function as a barrier is compromised.
           Surgical masks, in combination with eye protection (e.g., goggles or glasses with side shields) or
           face shield, shall be worn when splashes may result in eye, nose, or mouth contamination.


5.5        Housekeeping and Labeling

           All equipment and environmental surfaces shall be cleaned and decontaminated after contact with
           blood or other potentially infectious materials.

           Regulated waste shall be placed in containers that are closeable, constructed to prevent leaks,
           labeled with a biohazard label, and sealed prior to moving.

           All contaminated laundry shall be disposed of as regulated waste or sent to a facility capable of
           handling infectious waste. Complete information regarding the nature of the waste and potential
           hazards shall be disclosed to the laundry facility.

           All regulated waste containers shall be labeled with the 'Biohazard' legend.


 5.6       Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Vaccination
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         All vaccinations shall be administered by the LMP or CMC using qualified personnel and
         procedures recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service.

          The HBV vaccine and vaccination series shall be made available to all investigation/remediation
          workers at infectious waste sites, and other job classifications where contact with bloodborne
          pathogens or other infectious material is expected due to the routine nature of the job duties. The
          vaccination shall be made available after training and within 10 days of initial assignment to duties
          involving potential exposure unless the employee has already received the complete vaccination
          series, antibody testing demonstrates immunity, or medical reasons preclude it. This requirement
          will be specified in the site-specific EHS plan.

          The HBV vaccine and vaccination series shall be made available to first aid and CPR qualified
          workers on a post-exposure basis only.

           If declined, the HBV vaccine shall be made available as soon as possible, but in no event later
           than 24 hours following provision of first aid involving the presence of blood or other infectious
           materials regardless of whether an "exposure incident' has occurred. If an exposure incident has
           occurred, all required post exposure follow-up procedures shall be implemented. Additionally, any
           first aid incident must be reported to the ESS or ESC before the end of the work shift.

           If any employee declines participation in the HBV vaccination series made available, they must
           acknowledge the declination on the TtFW Employee HBV Vaccine Declination Form (Attachment
           A). If an employee who has previously declined the vaccine, later requests the vaccine, the
           vaccine shall be provided at that time.


 5.7       Post-Exposure Follow-Up
           All TIFW employees included in the scope of this program are entitled to a confidential
           post-exposure evaluation and follow-up, following an "exposure incident." This includes
           prophylaxis, including a HBV vaccination within 24 hours of possible exposure.

           All medical evaluations and procedures will be performed by or under the supervision of the LMP
           or CMC by a licensed health care professional in accordance with the recommendations of the
           U.S. Public Health Service. All laboratory tests shall be conducted by an accredited laboratory.

           The post-exposure evaluation and follow-up shall consist of the following:

                      Documentation of route of exposure and circumstances under which it occurred.

                      Identification testing, and documentation of source individual if feasible and not prohibited
                      by law. Testing of the source individual is not necessary if the individual is known to be
                      infected with HBV/HIV. Results of source individual testing shall be made available to the
                      exposed employee. The exposed employee will be informed of applicable disclosure
                      laws.
                      Collection and testing of blood. The exposed employee's blood will be collected as soon
                      as possible after consent. If the employee consents to testing of blood, but does not give
                      consent for HIV testing, the blood shall be held for 90 days. The employee may elect HIV
                      testing during this time frame.

                      Post exposure prophylaxis when necessary.

                      Counseling.

                      Evaluation of reported illness.
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         The LMP or CMC shall be provided with the following by the ESS or ESC:

                   A copy of this program and the OSHA regulation, 29 CFR 1910.1030.

                    Description of employee's duties related to the incidents.

                   Documentation of route of exposure and circumstances under which the exposure
                   occurred.

                    Results of source individual testing, ifavailable.

                    All appropriate medical records, including vaccination status (The CIVIC maintains this
                    information for TtFW).

         The written opinion of the ILIVIP or CIVIC shall be provided to the TtFW employee within 15 working
         days of the evaluation. The opinion shall be limited to the following:

                    Whether the employee should or has received the HBV vaccination.

                    That the employee has been informed of the results.

                    That the employee has been told of any medical conditions resulting from exposure that
                    require further treatment

         All TtFW employee medical records shall be kept in accordance with the TtFW Medical
         Surveillance Program, EHS 4-5.


5.8       Employee Information and Training

         Training shall be provided initially and annually thereafter to employees covered by the scope of
         this program. This includes qualified first aid personnel and site investigation/remediation
         personnel working at infectious waste sites, who have the potential for occupational exposure.
         Training will include the following:

          0         An accessible copy of 29 CIFIR 11910.103 and an explanation of its contents;

          0         A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of bloodbome diseases;

          0         An explanation of the modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens;

          0         An explanation of the employers exposure-control plan and the means by which the
                    employee can obtain a copy of the written plan;

          0         An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and other activities that
                    my involve exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials;

                    An explanation of the use and limitations of methods that will prevent or reduce exposure
                    including appropriate engineering controls, work practices, and personal protective
                    equipment;

                    Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination, and
                    disposal of personal protective equipment;


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                    An explanation of the basis for selection of personal protective equipment;

                    Information on the HBV vaccine, including information on its efficacy, safety, method of
                    administration, and the benefits of being vaccinated, and that the vaccine and vaccination
                    will be offered free of charge;

                    Information on the appropriate actions to take and persons to contact in an emergency
                    involving blood or other potentially infectious materials;

                    An explanation of the procedure to follow if an exposure incident occurs, including the
                    method of reporting the incident and the medical follow-up that will be made available;

                     Information of the post-exposure evaluation and follow-up that the employer is required to
                     provide for the employee following an exposure incident;

                     An explanation of the signs and labels and/or color coding required by 29 CIFIR 1910.1030
                     (g)(1);
                     An opportunity for interactive questions and answers with the person conducting the
                     training session.

           Note: Training may also be provided as site-specific training.


 5.9       Recordkeeping
           Medical records for affected employees shall include the following:

           0         Name, social security number, employee number;
           0         HBV vaccination status;
           0         Copies of all medical examinations, testing, and followups;
           0         Physician's written opinion; and
                     Copy of information provided to the physician.
           Medical records are kept confidential and are not disclosed to anyone without written consent of
           theemployee. Recordsaremaintainedfordurationofemploymentplus3Oyears.

           Training records shall include the following:

                      Date of training session;
                      Contents or summary of training session;
                      Names and qualifications of trainees; and

            Records shall be maintained for three years from the date of training in accordance with
            Recordkeeping EHS 1-9. Availability of all records is in accordance with standard TtFW policy.



  6.0       REFERENCES
            Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 1-9,         Recorckeeping
            Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 4-5,         Medical Surveillance
            OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and               Health Administration) 29 CFR
            1910.1030, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, General         Industry.
            United States Department of Labor, Office of Information USDL:       92-436, Mon., July 6, 1992.

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7.0      ATTACHMENTS

         Aftachment A - Employee HBV Vaccine Employee Declination Form




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                                     EHS 4-1 ATTACHMENT A
                        EMPLOYEE HBV VACCINE EMPLOYEE DECLINATION FORM


                             Click the icon below to download and complete.

                                                        BENZ I
                                                          aLi
                                               EHS 4-1 Attachment A.doc

    Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




                                                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                      NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE
  This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. ITIFW) and isto be used only for the duration and
  connection with the performance of work for TIFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
  appropriate inaccordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
  or any binding obligation of TtFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
  notice at the sole discretion of TIM. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
  The current version of this document ran be found on the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                        CopyrightO 1995, 2000
                                                        Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                       Proprietary Information




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                SOP8
EHS 1-9, Recordkeeping
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EHS 1-9:                             Recordkeeping (Previously HSI-8 & RC-7)
Purpose
The purpose of the
environmental, health and
                                        Version 03/12/98 - Revised
                                          Date:
                                         Original 02/01/95
                                                                            Approved
                                                                                  by:   WIC
safely (EHS) recordkeeping           Issue Date:
program Is to ensure that all
primary EHS records are               Category: Company Procedures          Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health &Safety
maintained in a consistent                                                            Programs
manner that meet applicable                 Sub Departmental/Discipline     Document Procedure
laws and regulations, company         Category:                                 Type:
objectives, and contract               Keyword Field                        Document Mike McSherry
 requirements, and to have an             Index: Activities/Environmenial     Owner:
 easily retrievable record of EHS                H&S, Field
 project activities. This program                Activities/Environmental
 also describes the types of                     H&S, EHS
 centralized and project EHS                     CompliancefWaste
 records maintained by Tetra                     Management, EHS
 Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW).                           Compliance/Pennits,
                                    I            Field Activities/Science
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                                              Table of Contents
Section

i.0     PURPOSE

2.0     SCOPE

3.0     MAINTENANCE

4.0     DEFINITIONS

       4.1 Employee EHS Training and Certification Records
       4.2 Employee Medical Records
       4.3 Project EHS Records
       4.4 Incident Records
       4.5 EHS Training Program Documentation

5.0       DISCUSSION

        5.1 Responsibilities
            5.1.1 EHS Personnel
            5.1.2 Director, ESQ Programs
        5.2 Employee EHS Training and Certification Records
        5.3 Employee Medical Record
        5.4 Project EHS Records
        5.5 Injury and Illness Records
        5.6 EHS Training Program Record
        5.7 Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records
        5.8 Storage and Archiving of EHS Records
        5.9 Training

6.0       REFERENCES




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1.0         PURPOSE
            The purpose of the environmental, health and safety (EHS) recordkeeping program is
            to ensure that all primary EHS records are maintained in a consistent manner that
            meet applicable laws and regulations, company objectives, and contract
            requirements, and to have an easily retrievable record of EHS project activities. This
            program also describes the types of centralized and project EHS records maintained
            by Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW).



  2.0       SCOPE
            This program applies to all TtFW office and project locations which generate, receive,
            or store EHS records.



  3.0        MAINTENANCE
             The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for
             updating this procedure. Approval authority rests with TtFW's President and Chief
             Executive Officer. Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department
             responsible for updating the procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and
             Compliance.



   4.0       DEFINITIONS

   4.1       Employee EHS Training and Certification Records
             Documentation of employee EHS training and medical certificates that are maintained
             in a central location by the Director, ESQ Programs.


      4.2     Employee Medical Records
              Documentation of any medical testing or evaluation of an employee's health status,
              e.g. laboratory results, x-rays, audiograms, pulmonary function test results, biological
              monitoring or bioassay results, and physician evaluation reports that are maintained
              in a central location by the Corporate Medical Consultant (CIVIC).


      4.3     Project EHS Records
              Project EHS records include site-specific training records, and certificates, log books,
              periodic reports and summaries, employee exposure records, pertinent sampling
              results, meeting records, documentation of disciplinary actions related to EHS, and all
              required environmental compliance decisions, approvals, permits, plans and
              correspondence, that are maintained. as part of the project records.
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 4.4      Incident Records
          Documentation of all incident and investigation reports including injuries and illnesses,
          spills and releases, permit exceedences, OSHA logs, and employees first report of
          injury that are required by EHS 1-7, Incident Reporting and Investigation.


 4.6      EHS Training Program Documentation

          Training records including training course curriculum, attendance rosters, and course
          materials such as copies of overheads, handouts, and performance tests that are
          maintained in a central location by the Director, ESQ Programs.



 6.0      DISCUSSION


  5.1     Responsibilities


  6.11A    EHS Personnel
           The ESQ Regional Manager is responsible for ensuring that accurate incident records
           are kept for each office and project, for reporting this information to the Director,
           Health and Safety Programs each month, and for providing oversight of office/project
           recordkeeping activities.
           Office Environmental and Safety Coordinators (ESC) and Environmental and Safety
           Supervisors (ESS) are responsible for managing the incident records for each
           office/project, for coordinating with the Director, ESO Programs to ensure that
           employee EHS training and certification records are complete and up-to-date, and for
           ensuring that complete and accurate officelproject EHS records are generated and
           maintained. The ESS is also responsible for forwarding project EHS records to the
           responsible person for project close-out.



  6.1.2    Director, ESQ Programs
           Director, ESQ Programs is responsible for managing employee EHS training and
           certification records, employee medical records, and EHS training program
           documentation.


   5.2     Employee EHS Training and Certification Records

           The Employee EHS Training and Certification Records will contain the records listed
           below.
            0    Medical Qualification - The TtFW Certification for Hazardous Waste Work and
                 Respirator Use per the TtFW Medical Surveillance Program, EHS 4-5.


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         0Training    Records - Training records consist of documentation that an employee
               has completed required EHS training in accordance with EHS 1-1 1, Training.

         Documentation of EHS training which is specific to one site or project, and is not
         intended to qualify an employee to conduct similar tasks at other work locations will
         only be kept in the project EHS records.


 6.3      Employee Medical Record

          The employee medical record will contain records as defined in EHS 4-5, Medical
          Surveillance. The employee medical records will be maintained by the CIVIC in a
          centralized location. Original hard-copy records where possible, will be kept, by
          employee name. The CIVIC will ensure that confidentiality is maintained, records are
          maintained in a safe and secure facility, and TtFW and its employee can access the
          medical records in a timely manner.



  5.4     Project EHS Records

          Project EHS records are part of the overall project records and will be maintained in
          accordance with PO-8, Document Control. Project EHS records will be maintained
          for each TtFW project where employee EHS information is generated or required and
          where environmental or health and safety laws and regulations require maintenance
          of such documents.

          The Project EHS record will contain the following information as applicable.

                EHS Correspondence - Any EHS correspondence including memorandum,
                letters, incident reports, internal or external audit or inspection reports, faxes,
                written phone conversation summaries, and similar documentation.

           •    Project EHS Plans - Signed copies of the project EHS plan as required by EHS
                3-2, EHS Plans, along with any associated field change requests or addenda.

           •    Project Health and Safety Log Books - Original project health and safety log
                books (or copies of the log books if the originals must be maintained in another
                file or delivered to the client).

           •    Weekly EHS Report - Original weekly EHS reports for projects where weekly EHS
                reports are required by the Project Environmental and Safety Manager (PESM).

           •    Exposure Sampling and Monitoring Records - A complete copy of documentation
                related to personal exposure sampling (air sampling/calibration data sheet,
                laboratory report, calculation sheets, and sampling report if generated) and any
                other real time (including OVA, HNu, CGI, etc.), detector tube, noise dosimeter,
                or other sampling or monitoring performed.

           •    EHS Compliance Documentation - All documents required by environmental or
                safety and health laws and regulations and the TtFW EHS program. These
                documents may include, but not limited to, decision documents, permits,
                approvals, agency correspondence, monitoring and waste analysis data,
                manifests,/shipping      papers,    reports,   notifications, training records,
                certifications/licenses, and the OSHA 200 log.

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         •      See EHS 4-3, Radioactive and Mixed Waste Program, for guidance on the
                maintenance of radiation exposure data.

         •      Close-out EFIS Report - Any close-out EHS report generated for a project.

         •      Other Pertinent Information - Other information generated or available which may
                contain information concerning potential employee exposure to physical or
                chemical agents. This information would include wipe sampling results or
                Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) if not already included in the Project EHS
                plan, final report, or elsewhere.

         Other pertinent records would include fit-test results conducted at the site, confined
         space or hot work permits, trench or excavation inspection forms, site safety briefing
         records, subcontractor safety submittals, worker medical data sheets, and
         site-specific training records for hazard communication, confined space, or materials
         handling.


 5.5     Injury and Illness Records

         •      TtFW Incident and Investigation Reports - The use, maintenance, and
                procedures for completion of the TtFW Incident and Investigation Reports are
                covered in the EHS 1-7 Incident Reporting and Investigation Program.

         •       OSHA 200 - An OSHA 200 will be maintained for each TtFW office and for each
                 field project location where work will be performed for three months duration or
                 longer. For field project locations where work will be performed for less than 3
                 months, the home office of the affected employee (or the home office of the
                 department manager for field pool employees) will be responsible for entering the
                 injury or illness on the office OSHA 200.
             The OSHA 200 will be completed in the detail provided on the form and instructions
             given on the back side of the form. Bureau of Labor Statistics guidelines shall be
             used to determine OSHA recordability. All entries will be made as soon as
             practicable, but no later than six working days after receiving information that a
             recordable injury or illness has occurred.
             The OSHA 200 summary, totals and certification will be completed by January 15
             each year by the Director, Health and Safety Programs. The OSHA 200 will be
             posted in the workplace (office or active field location) from February 1 to March 1 of
             each year. If no injuries or illness were recorded during the year, zeros will be
             entered on the totals line, and the form posted as required. The OSHA 200 will be
             retained in each office and active field location for five years following posting.

             Original copies of the OSHA 200 log are available through the Director, Health and
             Safety Programs and the local OSHA Area office.

                 OSHA 101 - The TtFW Incident Report is an acceptable alternative record to the
                 OSHA 101.


  5.6        EHS Training Program Record



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          EHS Training Program records will be maintained in a centralized file. This file will be
          maintained by Director, ESQ Programs and will be retrievable by training date and
          type of training.

          Personnel arranging for or providing EHS training are responsible for sending copies
          of training course documentation to the Director, ESQ Programs per EHS 1-11,
          Training.


 5.7      Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records

          Access to employee exposure and medical records shall meet the requirements of 29
          CFR 1910.20 or other applicable state standards. Requirements of this section will
          not supersede any existing legal or ethical obligations regarding medical record
          confidentiality, duty to disclose information, or related patient/employee relationship.

          Potential employee exposure records and medical records will be provided to an
          employee or authorized representative within `15 days after a request for access has
          been made. The Director, Health and Safety must be notified of any request for
          access. Request should be made in writing and dated. Normally, the records will be
          reproduced and sent to the authorized requester by the CMC and/or the holder of the
          project EHS record.


  5.8      Storage and Archiving of EHS Records

           Procedures for storing and archiving EHS records are defined in PO-8, Document
           Control.


  6.9      Training

           OSHA requires that employees be provided with certain information regarding access
           to employee exposure and medical records per 29 CFR 1910.20(g). The ESC or
           ESS shall inform new employees during orientation of: 1) the existence, location, and
           availability of any records covered by 29 CFR 1910.20(g); 2) the person(s)
           responsible for maintaining and providing access to records; and 3) each employee's
           rights of access to these records. This information shall be in accordance with the
           requirements of this program. The Director, Health and Safety shall provide this
           information to all TtFVV employees each year.

            There are no formal training requirements associated with the other aspects of this
            program.



   6.0      REFERENCES

             29 CFR 1910.120, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records
            Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 1-7, Incident Reporting
            and Investigation B
            Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 1-1 1, Training EJ
            Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 3-2, Procedures -
            Environmental, Healty & Safety Plan(s) 9
            Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 4-3, Radioactive and

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          Mixed Waste Programs D
          Environmental, Health & Safety - Programs Procedure EHS 4-5, Medical Surveillance
          D
          OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration)
          Project Inititation/Operations Procedure PO-8, Document Control




                                                      Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                     NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE

This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
connection with the performance of work for TIFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
appropriate in accordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
or any binding obligation of TtFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
notice at the sole discretion of TIFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
The current version of this document can be found on the T1FW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                       CopyrightQ 1995,1998

                                                       Tetra Tech FW, Inc.

                                                     Proprietary Information




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1




                           SOP 9
    EHS 4-5, Medical Surveillance




                    I
                                                                                                                    2532399


EHS 4-5:                            Medical Surveillance (Previously HS4-5)
Purpos
The purpose of this program Is
to ensure that the Tetra Tech
                                      Version 04/04/2000 - Revised
                                        Date:
                                                                        Approved
                                                                              by:
                                                                                    W C-
FW, Inc. (TtFW) medical                 Original 02/01/95
surveillance program addresses      Issue Date:
the needs of TtFW personnel.         Category: Company Procedures       Sections: ESQ - Environmental Health   Safety
that employee medical records                                                     Programs
are up-to-date and property               Sub Deparimental/Discipline   Document procedure
 maintained, that all Local         Category:                               Type:
 Medical Providers (LMP)             Keyword Monitoring, Operational    Document Mike McSherry
 participating in the TtFW              Index: Control, Training          Owner:
 medical surveillance program
 utilize the same minimum
 testing criteria in examining
 employees, and that the TlFW
 medical surveillance program
 meets the requirements of
 applicable regulations Including
 OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120,
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                                               Table of Contents
Section

 1.0      PURPOSE

 2.0      SCOPE

 3.0      MAINTENANCE

 4.0      DEFINITIONS

 5.0      DISCUSSION

          5.1 Responsibilities
              5.1.1 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
              5.1.2 Corporate Medical Consultant
          5.2 Corporate Medical Consultant Selection and Review
          5.3 Information Provided To The CIVIC
          5.4 Scheduling Of Medical Surveillance Examinations
          5.5 Corporate Medical Consultant Procedures
          5.6 LMP Procedures
          5.7 Baseline Physical Examination Protocol
          5.8 Annual Periodic Physical Examination Protocol
          5.9 Termination/Reassignment Physical Examination Protocol
          5.10 Biological Monitoring
          5.11 Injury Or Illness Examinations
          5.12 Return To Work Examinations
          5.13 Release of Medical Records

 6.0      REFERENCES

 7.0      ATTACHMENTS




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1.0       PURPOSE

          The purpose of this program is to ensure that the Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) medical
          surveillance program addresses the needs of TtFW personnel, that employee medical records are
          up-to-date and properly maintained, that all Local Medical Providers (LMP) participating in the
          TtFW medical surveillance program utilize the same minimum testing criteria in examining
          employees, and that the TtFW medical surveillance program meets the requirements of
          applicable regulations including OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120.



 2.0      SCOPE

          This program applies to medical examinations and biological monitoring provided to TtFW
          personnel included in the TIFW medical surveillance program.



 3.0       MAINTENANCE

           The Director, Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Programs is responsible for updating this
           procedure. Approval authority rests with TIFW's President and Chief Executive Officer.
           Suggestions for revision shall be submitted to both the department responsible for updating the
           procedure and the Executive Director, Administration and Compliance.



 4.0       DEFINITIONS

           None.



  5.0      DISCUSSION


  5A        Responsibilities


  5.1.1     Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel

            The Director, Health and Safety (DHS) manages and administers the overall TtFW Medical
            Surveillance Program. DHS is responsible for selection of the Corporate Medical Consultant
            (CIVIC) and oversees the technical and quality assurance functions of the CIVIC.

            The ESQ Regional Manager and Project Environmental and Safety Manager (PESM) assist in
            implementation of the program at TtFW offices and projects. The PESM assists the
            Environmental and Safety Supervisor (ESS) in defining additional medical surveillance
            parameters or biological monitoring for projects.

            The ESS is responsible for ensuring that personnel working on a project have the required
            medical surveillance examinations and have documentation of a qualified physician's opinion
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         approving the worker for hazardous waste site work, asbestos work, and respirator qualification,
         as necessary.


5.1.2     Corporate Medical Consultant

          The CIVIC will be Board Certified in Occupational Medicine and will:

          0         Provide consultation to DHS regarding all aspects of the TtFW medical surveillance
                    program;

          a         Manage the day-to-day operation of the program;

          a         Qualify LMP%;

          0         Review the work of the LMPs and perform selected clinic audits;

          a         Provide input to project specific medical surveillance parameters;

          0         Provide periodic status reports of the TtFW Medical Surveillance program to DHS;

          0         Review and approve the fitness for duty for each TtFW employee and maintain all
                    employee medical records; and

          0          Notify TtFW DHS of all requests for medical information.


5.2       Corporate Medical Consultant Selection and Review
          A CIVIC is selected by DHS in consultation with the PESM. The selection criteria is based on
          qualifications and cost. The CMC shall be Board Certified in Occupational Medicine and show the
          ability to implement and comply with established TtFVV medical surveillance protocols and
          procedures.
          The CMC shall develop, maintain, and implement an acceptable quality assurance/quality control
          program for both the CMC duties and the LMP duties in the TtFW program. DFIS conducts
          periodic reviews of the CMC for compliance with the quality assurance and quality control
          program. DHS will also review and consider feedback from project or office managers,
          Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) personnel, contracts personnel, LMPs, and others when
          conducting reviews of the CMC.


 5.3       Information Provided To The CMC
           DHS ensures that the CIVIC receives the following documentation required by the Occupational
           Safety and Health Administration (OSHA):

           0         Copies of OSHA 29 CFR 191 0.120 and other applicable regulations;

           0         Copies of applicable EHS plans for the hazardous waste sites or other work locations, as
                     requested;

           9         A copy of TtFWs medical surveillance program protocols and procedures; and

           0         Copies of personal exposure monitoring data or appropriate employee exposure data, as

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                   requested.
         The PESM shall ensure that the CIVIC receives project-specific medical surveillance requirements
         in advance of examination scheduling.


6.4      Scheduling of Medical Surveillance Examinations
          EHS personnel and Human Resources Department personnel are authorized to initiate medical
          surveillance examinations for TtFW personnel. The CMC should be contacted directly and
          provided with the following information: the employee name, social security number, office or
          project location, phone number, preferred timeframe for the examination, type of examination
          required (pre-employment, baseline, periodiciannual, or termination) and other special testing
          required. The CIVIC will then schedule the examination directly with the employee and the LMP
          and provide fax confirmation of the examination appointment to the employee. The office
          Environmental, Health and Safety Coordinator (ESC) or ESS will ensure that the employee is
          provided with the necessary paperwork package to be completed by the employee prior to the
          scheduled examination.


 5.5      Corporate Medical Consultant Procedures
          When requested by the DHS or PESM, the CIVIC will qualify and recommend additional LMP for
          new offices or project locations. The PESM will review the information provided by the CIVIC, and
          approve or disapprove the addition of the LMP. The CIVIC will maintain a current listing of all
          LMPs and will consult with the DHS before making changes to this listing.
          The CIVIC shall provide detailed guidance to the LMPs regarding testing protocols, logistics, billing
          procedures, and quality assurance requirements. The CMC is responsible for ensuring that the
          LMPs follow the detailed guidance and performing quality assurance/quality control audits of the
          LMPs.
          The CMC will obtain and furnish each TtFW employee a written opinion which includes the
          following:
                     An opinion as to whether the employee has any detectable medical conditions which
                     would place the employee at increased risk of material impairment of the employee's
                     health from work in hazardous waste operations or emergency response, or from
                     respirator use;
                     The recommended limitations upon the employee's assigned work;
           0         The results of the medical examination and tests; and
           0         A statement that the employee has been informed by the physician of the results of the
                     medical examination and any medical conditions which require further examination or
                     treatment.
           The CIVIC will complete the Certification for Hazardous Waste and Respirator Use (Attachment A)
           following each hazardous waste examination and provide a copy to the DHS.
           The CIVIC shall maintain an accurate record of all medical surveillance examinations performed
           for TtFW employees. The CIVIC will also serve as the provider of long-term retention services for
           all TtFW employee medical records. All records shall be cataloged and maintained in secure,
           access controlled storage for the term of the contract. All employee medical records will be
           turned over to DHS or other designated medical facility on request.
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5.6      LMP Procedures
         The LMP will provide complete medical examinations of TtFW employees using the attached
         TtFW forms and in accordance with applicable federal, state, or local regulations and the detailed
         CIVIC guidance.
         The LMP shall adhere to TtFW minimum medical surveillance protocols as described in Sections
         5.7 - 5.10 of this document. The LMP recommends to the CMC or DHS any revisions or additions
         that may be necessary in the protocol or CIVIC guidance.

         The LMP shall request and review any necessary employee information from the CIVIC including
         EHS plans, employee duty descriptions, possible physical and/or chemical exposure information,
         and other relevant data.
         The LMP will provide complete documentation of employee medical examinations to the CMC in a
         timely manner in accordance with the CIVIC detailed guidance.

         The LMP will release the medical examination results and corresponding documentation to the
         CIVIC.


5.7       Baseline Physical Examination Protocol

         All employees who are expected to participate in on-site activities where they are potentially
         exposed to health or safety hazards and/or will wear respiratory protection shall be required to
         complete a baseline physical examination. The contents of the baseline physical examination are
         outlined as follows:
          A.        A completed medical, occupational, and smoking history questionnaire (Attachment B)
                    with an emphasis on the following systems: nervous, skin, lung, blood forming,
                    cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, as well as ears, nose, and throat. The
                    examinee is required to fast for 8 hours, abstain from alcohol for three days before this
                    examination, and avoid high noise exposure for 14 hours before the examination.

          B.        A complete physical exam, including the following, at a minimum:

                     I.      Height, weight, temperature, pulse, respiration, and blood pressure
                     2.      Head, nose, and throat
                     3.      Eyes (Snellen)
                     4.      Ears (with audiometric testing in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.95)
                     5.      Chest (heart and lungs)
                     6.      Peripheral vascular system
                     7.      Abdomen (liver, spleen, kidney)
                     B.      Musculoskeletal system
                     9.      Genitourinary system
                     10.     Nervous system

           C.        Completed tests, including at least the following, at a minimum:

                     1.      Complete blood counts and chemistries including the following:
                             a.     White blood cell, differential cell, and platelet counts
                             b.     Hemoglobin and/or hematocrit
                             C.     Albumin, globulin, total protein, and total bilirubin
                             cl.    Serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)                      and     serum

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                                   glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT)
                           e.      Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH)
                           f.      Alkaline phosphatase and Gamma Glutamine Trans Peptidase (GGTP)
                           9.      Calcium
                           h.      Phosphorous
                           i.      Uric acid
                           j.      Creatinine
                           k.      Urea nitrogen
                            1.     Cholesterol and triglycerides
                            M.     Glucose

                    2.     Urinalysis (clean catch), including the following:
                           a.       Color and character
                           b.       Specific gravity
                           C.       pH
                           d.       Protein
                           e.       Acetone
                           f.       Glucose
                           9.       Microscopic examination
                    3.      Chest x-ray (14-by 17-inch PA and lateral performed for the baseline exam).

                    4.      Pulmonary function test to include, at a minimum, the following:
                            a.     Forced Vital Capacity (FVC)
                            b.     Forced Expiratory Volume, one second (FEVII 0)
                            C.     The FEV10 FVC ratio
                            d.     A minimum of three good tracings

                     5.     12-lead resting EKG

          Attachment B is a copy of the medical questionnaire and examination forms.


 5.8      Annual Periodic Physical Examination Protocol

           Employees shall be provided an annual/periodic physical examination within 30 days of the
           anniversary of their previous physical examination. Employees who wear a respirator less than 30
           days/year or employees who are only involved in site visits, but not actual site work, may be on a
           2-year periodicity for physical examinations as directed by the CMC. The contents of the annual
           medical examination are the same as the baseline except as follows:

                     Chest X-ray to be performed every five years unless the physician determines that
                     increased periodicity is necessary.

                     12-lead resting EKG. The EKG will be performed according to the following schedule:
                     every three years for those under the age of 40, every two years for those 40 to 50 years
                     of age, and annually for those more than 50 years of age.

           Appropriate sections of Attachment B will be completed as part of the exam.


  6.9      Termination/Reassignment Physical Examination Protocol

           Physical examinations are made available to employees who participated in the medical
           surveillance program when they terminate employment with TtFW or upon reassignment to a job
           position which does not require participation in the program except as follows:

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                         Last             Hazardous Waste Site               Termination/Reassignment
                       Physical              Activity Since Last               Examination Decision
                    Examination                  Examination
               Within past six months   No field work                  Examination not offered unless required by
                                                                       project specifications or other OSHA
                                                                       standards
               Within past six months   Field work                     M[C will determine if examination is
                                                                         dicated unless required by project
                                                                       Specification or other OSHA standards. The
                                                                       Jecision will be based upon the nature of the
                                                                       Drevious site(s)' contaminants and job site
                                                                       activities, documented exposure levels,
                                                                       md/or the results of the previous medical
                                                                       aexamination


             The CIVIC will provide documentation for each employee's medical file for which a
             termination/reassignment examination was waived. The documentation shall include the rationale
             for waiving the examination.

             When medical examinations are performed, the content shall be the same as for the
             annual/periodic examination except that the CIVIC shall determined when a chest X-ray is
             indicated if it has been less than five years since the last chest X-ray.

             Employees who do not wish to avail themselves of the terminationlreassignment examination will
             be requested to complete and sign the Medical Examination Refusal form included as Attachment
             D. If the employee does not take the examination and does not sign the refusal form, then
             TtFW's efforts to make the examination available shall be documented in the project and
             employee's medical file.
             Project specifications may require exit examinations when personnel leave the project or when a
             project ends. Project requirements will take precedent over the TtFW program requirements. If
             the CIVIC feels that the exit examination can be waived, then the client should be notified for
             concurrence and appropriate contract modifications made as necessary.


    6.10      Biological Monitoring

             Additional medical surveillance parameters and biological monitoring may be performed as
             appropriate based on the potential for exposures to specific chemicals during site activities. The
             PESM or ESS, in conjunction with the CIVIC, will determine the need for additional medical
             surveillance and biological monitoring on a project-specific basis.


    5.11      Injury Or Illness Examinations

             Any employee who is injured, becomes ill, or develops signs or symptoms due to possible
             overexposure involving hazardous substances or health hazards from an emergency response or
             hazardous waste operation will be provided consultation and/or examination as directed by the
             CIVIC and PESM.


    5.12      Return To Work Examinations


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         Return to work clearance shall be obtained from the LMP for all occupational and nonoccupational
         injuries and illnesses which resulted in or involved:

                    Hospitalization

                    Five (5) lost workdays - days away from work

                    Unconsciousness

                    Seizures
          Return to work clearances shall also be required when indicated by the LMP, CIVIC, PESM, or the
          Human Resources Department.


 5.13      Release of Medical Records
           Employees who wish to obtain copies of medical records should notify the Director, Health and
           Safety Programs, complete the Employee Release of Medical Records (Attachment E), and
           forward to the Director, Health and Safety Programs.



 6.0       REFERENCES
           29 CFR 1910.20, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.
           29 CFR 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure.
           29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response.
           OSHA (U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration)




  7.0       ATTACHMENTS
            Attachment A - Certification for Hazardous Waste and Respirator Use
            Attachment B - Medical HistorV Questionnaire
            Attachment C - Reserved
            Attachment D - Medical Examination Refusal Form
            Attachment E - Employee Release of Medical Records




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                                    EHS 4-5 ATTACHMENT A
                   CERTIFICATION FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE AND RESPIRATOR USE


                            Click the icon below to launch or download.


                                                   In
                                          EHS 4-5 Attachment Adoc

   Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




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                                        EHS4-6A ACHMENTB
                                    MEDICAL HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE


                            Click the icon below to launch or download.

                                                       KIM%
                                                        Liu
                                               EHS 4-5 Attachment B.PCH

   Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




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                                           EHS 4-5 ATTACHMENT C
                                                   Reserved


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  Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




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                                        EHS 4-5 ATTACHMENT D
                                  MEDICAL EXAMINATION REFUSAL FORM


                             Click the icon below to launch or download.


                                                   C',
                                           EHS 4-5 Attachment D.doc

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                                        EHS 4-5 ATTACHMENT E
                                 EMPLOYEE RELEASE OF MEDICAL RECORDS

                               Click the icon below to launch or download.


                                                        In
                                               EHS 4-5 Attachment E.doc,
  Select the "Detach" button in the pop-up window to save a copy to a disk or hard drive.




                                                      Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                     NOTICE OF OWNERSHIP AND CONDITIONS OF USE
This document is the property of Tetra Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW) and is to be used only for the duration and
connection with the performance of work for TtFW. Written deviations to this document may be authorized when
appropriate inaccordance with the Quality Rule. This document is not to be construed as an employment contract
or any binding obligation of TtFW. This document may be modified or rescinded at any time with or without prior
notice at the sole discretion of TtFW. Hard copies of this document may not contain the most current information.
The current version of this document can be found on the TtFW online Corporate Reference Library.
                                                   CopyrightO 1995,1998, 2000
                                                      Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
                                                     Proprietary Information




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0




                                   SOP 10
    EHS 5-1, Personal Protective Equipment
                                                                                                                     25 3 2 41 4

EHS 5-1:                          Personal Protective Equipment (Previously HS5-1)
Purpose                             Version 06/30/2000 - Revised      Approved
The purpose of this program is       Date:
lo ensure that personal                                                     by:
protective equipment (PPE) is         Original 01/01/95
selected in accordance with 29    Issue Date:
CFR 1910.132, properly used        Category: Company Procedures       Sections: ESO - Environmental Health &Safety
and maintained, and that Tetra                                                 Programs
Tech FW, Inc. (TtFW)                    Sub Departmental/Discipline   Document Procedure
 personnel are properly trained   Category:                               Type:
 in the inspection, use and        Keyword Monitoring, Operational    Document Mike McSherry
 maintenance of PPE.                  Index: Control, Training          Owner:
               253 2 41 5
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                                               Table of Contents
Section

 1.0      PURPOSE

 2.0      SCOPE

 3.0      MAINTENANCE

 4.0      DEFINITION

          4.1 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

 5.0      DISCUSSION

          5.1 Responsibilities
              5. 1.1 All TtFW Personnel
              5.1.2 Line Management
              5.1.3 Environmental, Health and Safety Personnel
          5.2 Intended Use
          5.3 Hazard Assessment and Selection
          5.4 PPE Requirements
          5.5 Work Clothing
          5.6 Inspection
          5.7 Cleaning, Maintenance, and Disposal
          5.8 Medical Evaluation
          5.9 Training
              5.9.1 Initial Training
              5.9.2 Site-Specific Orientation
              5.9.3 Retraining
          5.10 Documentation

 6.0      REFERENCES

  7.0     ATTACHMENTS




Tetra Tech FW, Inc.
Proprietary Information                                                                                        Page 2
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ESO - Environmental Health &Safety Programs Procedure: EHS 5-1: Personal Protective Equipment (Previously HS6-1) -




11.0      PURPOSE
          The purpose of this program is to ensure that personal protective equipment (PPE) is selected in
          accordance with 29 CFR 1910.132, properly used and maintained, and that Tetra Tech FW, Inc.