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					                                                                                                                    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY 2011-2012 CATALOG Edition 1.0
                                                              MAIN CAMPUS (Los Angeles)
                                                              12215 Victory Boulevard
                                                              North Hollywood, CA 91606
                                                              (818) 299-5500

                                                              BRANCH CAMPUS (Orange County)
  2011-12 CATALOG                                             1477 S. Manchester Avenue
                                                              Anaheim, CA 92802
                                                              (714) 782-1700
                                                                  ORANGE COUNTY Learning Site
                                                                  (Classroom Expansion)
                                                                  2411 West La Palma Avenue
                                                                  Anaheim, CA 92801
                                                                  (714) 782-1717


                                                              BRANCH CAMPUS (Ontario)
                                                              2855 East Guasti Road
                                                              Ontario, CA 91761 (909) 218-3256

            CALIFORNIA Edition                                                                                           09012011




                           www.westcoastuniversity.edu


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION | 151 Innovation Drive Irvine,CA 92617-3040 | Phone (949) 783-4800 | Fax (949) 783-4801
                            Publishing Date: August 26 of 2011
                                         1st Edition
                        Effective August 28, 2011 – August 27, 2012




WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                    2011-12 CATALOG              Page 2 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 3 of 155
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP
West Coast University is owned and operated by West Coast University, Inc., a California Corporation
located at 151 Innovation Drive, Irvine, CA 92617-3040.




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                      2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 4 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 5 of 155
FROM THE PRESIDENT

Welcome to West Coast University!

This is an exciting place to be, as you’ll learn by getting to know our students, alumni, staff and faculty.
We are engaged in a life-changing process: pursuing higher education as a means to achieve
professional goals.

We are justifiably proud of the accomplishments of our graduates, who are serving in a variety of
satisfying careers across a broad geographical area. Our faculty and staff are committed to helping our
students achieve their educational and professional aspirations. Toward that end, West Coast University
provides high quality learning opportunities, in a variety of modalities, blending the theoretical with real-
world experience.

Our campuses are aesthetically-pleasing, our facilities are among the best to be found anywhere, our
programs are innovative and academically-challenging, and our people superbly qualified. That
combination results in a unique professional education experience that is second to none.

The road you have set out upon is not an easy one, but the rewards for reaching the destination are
incalculable.

Best wishes in your endeavors!

Regards,



Barry T. Ryan, J.D., Ph.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer, WEST COAST UNIVERSITY




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 6 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 7 of 155
                                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP....................................................................................................................................4
FROM THE PRESIDENT ..............................................................................................................................................6
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2011-12 ............................................................................................................................... 11
CALIFORNIA REGULATORY DISCLOSURES ......................................................................................................... 12
   CALIFORNIA STATE APPROVAL DISCLOSURE STATEMENT .................................................................................................. 12
   ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ................................................................................................................................................. 12
   NOTICE CONCERNING TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS AND CREDENTIALS EARNED AT WEST COAST UNIVERSITY ...................... 13
UNIVERSITY MISSION .............................................................................................................................................. 14
   UNIVERSITY VALUES.................................................................................................................................................... 14
   OBJECTIVES ................................................................................................................................................................ 15
   INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES ............................................................................................................................ 15
   UNIVERSITY HISTORY .................................................................................................................................................. 15
   FACILITIES DESCRIPTION .............................................................................................................................................. 16
   ACCREDITATION .......................................................................................................................................................... 17
   APPROVALS ................................................................................................................................................................ 18
   CLASS SCHEDULE INFORMATION .................................................................................................................................... 18
   BUSINESS HOURS ......................................................................................................................................................... 18
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS POLICIES AND DISCLOSURES ........................................................................ 19
   UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE .......................................................................... 19
   ADMISSIONS CRITERIA ................................................................................................................................................. 19
   PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ............................................................ 19
   STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION............................................................................................................................ 19
   REHABILITATION ACT AND AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ............................................................................. 19
   PROGRAMS PREPARING GRADUATES FOR A FIELD REQUIRING LICENSURE ............................................................................ 20
   PROGRAM CHANGES/POLICY GUIDELINES ....................................................................................................................... 20
   NOTICE TO APPLICANTS WITH MISDEMEANOR AND FELONY CONVICTIONS ........................................................................... 20
   BACKGROUND CHECK POLICIES ..................................................................................................................................... 20
   STATE AND NATIONAL BOARD EXAMINATIONS / LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................... 21
   INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 21
   ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) INSTRUCTION .................................................................................................... 22
   TRANSFER ADMISSIONS – CREDIT FOR PREVIOUS EDUCATION ............................................................................................ 22
   INTERNATIONAL TRANSFER CREDIT................................................................................................................................ 23
   ONLINE/BLENDED COURSE REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................................... 23
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................. 27
   ACADEMIC FREEDOM STATEMENT FOR STUDENTS ............................................................................................................ 27
   ACADEMIC HONOR CODE .............................................................................................................................................. 27
   PLAGIARISM DETECTION WEBSITE ................................................................................................................................. 28
   ACADEMIC PROGRAM MEASUREMENT ............................................................................................................................ 29
   CHALLENGE CREDIT..................................................................................................................................................... 30
   ADD/DROP PERIOD ...................................................................................................................................................... 31
   COURSE OVERLOAD POLICY .......................................................................................................................................... 31
   ATTENDANCE POLICY................................................................................................................................................... 32
   TARDINESS/EARLY DEPARTURE: .................................................................................................................................... 33
   CLINICAL ROTATIONS AND PRACTICA ............................................................................................................................. 33
   CLINICAL WORK FAIR PRACTICE STANDARDS .................................................................................................................. 33
   CLINICAL AND PROGRAM HEALTH AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS......................................................................................... 33
   CONSORTIUM AGREEMENT ............................................................................................................................................ 34
   GRADING .................................................................................................................................................................... 35
   FINAL COURSE GRADE APPEAL...................................................................................................................................... 36
   DEAN’S LIST ............................................................................................................................................................... 37
   GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ........................................................................................ 37
   INSTITUTIONAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY .................................................................................................................... 38
   WITHDRAWAL FROM A CLASS ........................................................................................................................................ 39
   WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY ............................................................................................................................ 39

      WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                                       2011-12 CATALOG                                                     Page 8 of 155
   EXCEPTION POLICY ...................................................................................................................................................... 39
   SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ............................................................................ 40
   CALCULATING THE RATE OF PROGRESS TOWARD COMPLETION OF THE PROGRAM ................................................................. 40
   UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC AND FINANCIAL AID WARNING............................................................................................ 40
   ACADEMIC DISMISSAL .................................................................................................................................................. 41
   UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC DISMISSAL APPEAL POLICY ................................................................................................. 41
   REINSTATEMENT PROCESS FOR STUDENTS WITH APPROVED APPEALS .................................................................................. 41
   UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC AND FINANCIAL AID PROBATION ......................................................................................... 42
   REINSTATEMENT PROCESS FOR STUDENTS WITH NO APPEAL OR DENIED APPEALS................................................................. 42
   CLASS REPEATS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ........................................................................................................... 42
   MAXIMUM PROGRAM COMPLETION TIMEFRAME FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ............................................................... 43
   TERMINATION POLICY .................................................................................................................................................. 43
   TRANSFERS TO A NEW PROGRAM ................................................................................................................................... 43
   TRANSFERS TO A NEW CAMPUS ..................................................................................................................................... 44
STUDENT POLICIES AND INFORMATION .............................................................................................................. 45
   ACCEPTABLE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES .......................................................................................... 45
   COMPLAINT/GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE ............................................................................................................................. 47
   CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE ............................................................................................................................................ 48
   DRESS CODE ............................................................................................................................................................... 48
   DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION ...................................................................................................................... 48
   ETHICS REPORTING HOTLINE ......................................................................................................................................... 49
   NO WEAPONS POLICY .................................................................................................................................................. 49
   SECURITY ................................................................................................................................................................... 49
   SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY ...................................................................................................................................... 50
   STUDENT/EMPLOYEE FRATERNIZATION........................................................................................................................... 50
   STUDENT RECORDS ...................................................................................................................................................... 50
   FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT OF 1974, AS AMENDED .......................................................................... 50
STUDENT SERVICES ................................................................................................................................................. 53
   ADVISING AND TUTORIAL ASSISTANCE ........................................................................................................................... 53
   CAREER SERVICES ....................................................................................................................................................... 53
   DISABILITY SERVICES................................................................................................................................................... 53
   HOUSING .................................................................................................................................................................... 54
   LIBRARY .................................................................................................................................................................... 54
   PARKING .................................................................................................................................................................... 55
   TEXTBOOKS ................................................................................................................................................................ 55
FINANCIAL POLICIES AND INFORMATION ........................................................................................................... 56
   FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ............................................................................................................................................... 56
   FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................... 56
   FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS ........................................................................................................................................... 56
   VETERANS EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS ............................................................................................................................... 59
   TUITION PAYMENT ....................................................................................................................................................... 60
   FINANCIAL SUSPENSION ................................................................................................................................................ 60
   COLLECTION EXPENSES ................................................................................................................................................ 60
   RETURNED CHECKS ..................................................................................................................................................... 60
   CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY ............................................................................................................................. 60
   PRO-RATA REFUND POLICY .......................................................................................................................................... 61
   RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS POLICY .............................................................................................................................. 61
   FEDERAL REFUND REQUIREMENTS VS. STATE REFUND REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................... 62
   UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES (EFFECTIVE WITH TERMS AFTER JULY 1, 2011) ............................................................ 63
   GRADUATE TUITION AND FEES (EFFECTIVE WITH TERMS AFTER JULY 1, 2011) ..................................................................... 63
PROGRAMS BY CAMPUS LOCATION ...................................................................................................................... 66
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY ........................................................................................................... 68
GENERAL EDUCATION............................................................................................................................................. 68
DENTAL HYGIENE .................................................................................................................................................... 69
   BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN DENTAL HYGIENE ....................................................................................................... 69


      WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                                       2011-12 CATALOG                                                     Page 9 of 155
COLLEGE OF NURSING ............................................................................................................................................ 75
   BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN) ..................................................................................................................... 75
   BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING ................................................................................................................... 79
   LVN TO BSN TRACK ................................................................................................................................................... 82
   RN TO BSN TRACK ..................................................................................................................................................... 85
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS POLICIES AND DISCLOSURES .................................................................................... 88
   UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE DEGREE .................................................................................... 88
   BLENDED FORMAT OF GRADUATE PROGRAMS.................................................................................................................. 88
   SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR GRADUATE PROGRAMS...................................................................................... 88
   ACADEMIC DISMISSAL .................................................................................................................................................. 89
   GRADUATE ACADEMIC DISMISSAL APPEAL POLICY .......................................................................................................... 89
   REINSTATEMENT PROCESS FOR STUDENTS WITH APPROVED APPEALS .................................................................................. 89
   GRADUATE ACADEMIC AND FINANCIAL AID PROBATION ................................................................................................... 90
   GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ................................................................................................. 91
GRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY ........................................................................................................................ 92
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (MSN).............................................................................................................. 92
   MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING WITH EDUCATION TRACK ............................................................................................... 95
   NURSE EDUCATOR CERTIFICATE (POST- MASTER’S) ......................................................................................................... 96
   RN TO MSN TRACK..................................................................................................................................................... 97
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................................... 99
   MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT .......................................................................................... 99
COURSE NUMBERING............................................................................................................................................. 102
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 103
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, ADMINISTRATION AND PERSONNEL ............................................................................ 124
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY FACULTY BY LOCATION ........................................................................................... 127
WCU | LOS ANGELES CAMPUS............................................................................................................................. 127
   NURSING .................................................................................................................................................................. 127
   HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................................................................... 131
   GENERAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................................ 132
WCU | ORANGE COUNTY CAMPUS...................................................................................................................... 134
   DENTAL HYGIENE ...................................................................................................................................................... 134
   NURSING .................................................................................................................................................................. 138
   GENERAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................................ 143
WCU | ONTARIO CAMPUS ..................................................................................................................................... 145
   NURSING .................................................................................................................................................................. 145
   GENERAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................................ 151
NOTES ....................................................................................................................................................................... 153
ADDENDA AND ERRATA ........................................................................................................................................ 154
   TEXAS ADDENDUM .................................................................................................................................................... 154
   NOTICE .................................................................................................................................................................... 154

West Coast University makes every effort to ensure accuracy of the information contained in this catalog.
There are policies, rules, procedures, and regulations that change and may alter the information during
this catalog period. The University reserves the right to change policies, regulations, fees, and course of
instruction upon direction of the West Coast University Administration and its Chief Executive Officer.
The most current and complete information on any changes is available from the campus Executive
Director. All information in the content of this University catalog is current and correct and is so certified
as true by Barry T. Ryan, President and Chief Executive Officer.


      WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                                       2011-12 CATALOG                                                   Page 10 of 155
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2011-12 1
(ug) Undergraduate Dates
(g) Graduate Dates
AUGUST 2011 term: Sunday August 28, 2011 to Saturday November 5, 2011
     First Day of Class                 Last Day of Class                    Holidays                    Term Break
                                                                                                  (ug) Tuesday November 1
(ug)Monday August 29             (ug)Monday October 31                Labor Day                   to Sunday November 6
(g)Sunday August 28              (g)Saturday November 5               Monday September 5          (g) N/A(not applicable for
                                                                                                  Graduate Students)
NOVEMBER 2011 term: Sunday November 6, 2011 to Saturday January 28, 2012
     First Day of Class                 Last Day of Class                    Holidays                     Term Break
                                                                                                  Thanksgiving Break
                                                                                                  Tuesday November 22 to
                                                                      Martin Luther King          Sunday November 27
(ug)Monday November 7            (ug)Monday January 23, 2012
                                                                             Day
(g)Sunday November 6             (g)Saturday January 28, 2012                                     Winter Break
                                                                      Monday January 16
                                                                                                  Monday December 19 to
                                                                                                  Sunday January 1
JANUARY 2012 term: Sunday January 29, 2012 to Saturday April 7, 2012
     First Day of Class                 Last Day of Class                    Holidays                    Term Break
                                                                                                  (ug) Tuesday April 3 to
(ug)Monday January 30            (ug)Monday April 2                   President’s Day             Sunday April 8
(g)Sunday January 29             (g)Saturday April 7                  Monday February 20          (g) N/A(not applicable for
                                                                                                  Graduate Students)
APRIL 2012 term: Sunday April 8, 2012 to Saturday June 16, 2012
     First Day of Class                 Last Day of Class                    Holidays                    Term Break
                                                                                                  (ug) Tuesday June 12 to
(ug)Monday April 9               (ug)Monday June 11                   Memorial Day                Sunday June 16
(g)Sunday April 8                (g)Saturday June 16                  Monday May 28               (g) N/A(not applicable for
                                                                                                  Graduate Students)
JUNE 2012 term: Sunday June 17, 2012 to Saturday August 25, 2012
     First Day of Class                 Last Day of Class                    Holidays                    Term Break
                                                                                                  (ug) Tuesday August 21 to
(ug)Monday June 18               (ug)Monday August 20                 Independence Day            Sunday August 26
(g)Sunday June 17                (g)Saturday June 25                  Thursday July 4             (g) N/A(not applicable for
                                                                                                  Graduate Students)




1
    West Coast University operates on a Semester System. Each Semester is composed of two 10 week terms.
    Undergraduate (ug) classes typically begin the first Monday of the Term and end on the last Monday of the Term.
    Graduate (g) classes start on the first Sunday of the Term and end on the last Saturday of the Term.
    Nursing Student Clinic Schedule: Nursing students on clinical rotations follow the holiday schedule of the clinical site.
    Therefore, students on clinical rotation may be required to attend the clinical site during University holidays and breaks,
    including Thanksgiving and Christmas.
    Dental Hygiene Clinic Schedule: Dental Hygiene students enrolled in preclinical or clinical courses are to follow the
    schedule as presented by the course director. Therefore, students with clinic sessions will be required to see patients during
    final examination week, but not during University holidays and breaks.


      WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 11 of 155
CALIFORNIA REGULATORY DISCLOSURES
California State Approval Disclosure Statement
West Coast University is a private institution approved to operate as an accredited institution by the
California Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education under California Education Code Section
94890(a)(1).

Any questions a student may have regarding this catalog that have not been satisfactorily answered by the
institution may be directed to the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education at P.O. Box 980818, West
Sacramento, CA 95798-0818, www.bppe.ca.gov, 1-916-574-7720 (voice) or 1-916-574-8646 (fax).

As a prospective student, you are encouraged to review this catalog prior to signing an enrollment
agreement. You are also encouraged to review the School Performance Fact Sheet, which must be
provided to you prior to signing an enrollment agreement.

A student or any member of the public may file a complaint about this institution with the Bureau for
Private Postsecondary Education by calling 1-888-370-7589 or by completing a complaint form, which
can be obtained on the Bureau’s Internet Web site at www.bppe.ca.gov


Academic Programs
See Page 66 for Programs by Location


     UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

     Dental Hygiene (Orange County Campus Only)                            Bachelor of Science Degree
     Nursing, BSN                                                          Bachelor of Science Degree
     Nursing, RN to BSN                                                    Bachelor of Science Degree
     Nursing, LVN to BSN                                                   Bachelor of Science Degree


     GRADUATE PROGRAMS
     Health Care Management                                                Master of Science Degree
     Nursing, MSN                                                          Master of Science Degree
     Nursing, RN to MSN                                                    Master of Science Degree
     Nurse Educator Certificate                                            Post-graduate Certificate 1




1
    May also be taken as an education track in conjunction with the Master of Science in Nursing or RN to MSN program.

       WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 12 of 155
NOTICE CONCERNING TRANSFERABILITY                            OF     CREDITS      AND     CREDENTIALS
EARNED AT WEST COAST UNIVERSITY
The transferability of credits earned at West Coast University is at the complete discretion of an
institution to which students seek to transfer. Acceptance of the degree earned at West Coast University is
also at the complete discretion of the accepting institution. If the credits or degree that is earned at this
institution are not accepted at the institution to which transfer is sought, the accepting institution may
require the student to repeat some or all coursework at their institution. For this reason, students should
make certain that attendance at this institution meets their educational goals, regardless of transferability
credit. Students are advised to contact an institution to which they may seek to transfer after attending
West Coast University to determine if West Coast University credits, degrees, diplomas or certificates
will transfer.

West Coast University has no articulation agreements

The following disclosure is a requirement of the California Private Postsecondary Education Act of 2009.

West Coast University does NOT have a pending petition in bankruptcy, is NOT operating as a debtor in
possession, has NOT filed a petition within the preceding five years, NOR has had a petition in
bankruptcy filed against it within the preceding five years that resulted in reorganization under Chapter 11
of the United States Bankruptcy Code (11 U.S.C. Sec. 1101 et seq.).




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 13 of 155
UNIVERSITY MISSION
At West Coast University, we embrace a student-centric learning partnership that leads to professional
success. We deliver transformational education within a culture of integrity and personal accountability.
We design market-responsive programs through collaboration between faculty and industry
professionals. We continuously pursue more effective and innovative ways through which students
develop the competencies and confidence required in a complex and changing world.




UNIVERSITY VALUES

   Academic Integrity and We are committed to a culture where ethical conduct governs our
     Intellectual Honesty interactions.

      A Culture of Mutual We believe each member of the University community can significantly
                   Respect contribute to the fulfillment of our mission.

         Student Learning We are committed to continuous assessment, evaluation and improvement
                          of student learning.

    The Communities We We take very seriously our responsibility to make a positive impact on the
                 Serve communities that surround us geographically and professionally.

A Student-Centric Culture We believe it is our institutional responsibility to identify, understand, and
                          respond to student needs.

               Agility and We respond quickly to the needs of our students, faculty, and associates.
           Responsiveness

Innovation and Creativity We are committed to bringing innovation and creativity to the development
                          and delivery of instruction, and in identifying solutions to complex and
                          challenging problems.

                  Diversity We encourage diversity of thought, ethnicity, culture and experience
                            recognizing that through multiple and often differing perspectives offered in
                            a collegial setting, the best ideas emerge.

          Efficient Use of Through our stewardship, we develop solutions that make the best use of
                Resources investments in time and other resources.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 14 of 155
Objectives
•   To provide degree programs in fields of study that lead to professional success.
•   To provide academic and support services to enhance student success.
•   To provide a caring environment that is supportive and concerned with each student’s success.
•   To provide curricula, facilities, equipment and qualified faculty to prepare students for employment in
    an ever-changing job market.
•   To offer innovative and alternative modes of educational delivery to meet the needs of students’
    personal and professional schedules.
•   To assist in meeting the employment needs of related professions.

Institutional Learning Outcomes
Upon Graduating from a degree program offered by West Coast University, students will be able to:
1. Develop intellectual and practical problem solving skills through information assessment and critical
   thinking.
2. Demonstrate effective written communication skills.
3. Demonstrate effective oral communication skills.
4. Achieve the stated programmatic learning outcomes of one’s discipline.
5. Demonstrate computer proficiency and information literacy.
6. Describe ethical standards and legal guidelines associated with one’s chosen career field.
7. Explain why knowledge of and respect for the societal contributions of diverse cultures and
   perspectives is an important quality in one’s discipline.

UNIVERSITY HISTORY
West Coast University (WCU) was originally chartered in 1909 as an ophthalmology school. In 1953, the
University added evening-only programs. The success of this approach led the University to expand and
diversify its programs to include offerings in health science. Associate degrees in science and master’s
degree programs were introduced in the late 1960’s and 1970’s. In 1981, the University reorganized into
three distinct colleges; the College of Business and Management, the College of Engineering, and the
College of Letters and Sciences.

In May of 1997, the Los Angeles campus of the University was reorganized under new management and
was accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS), which is
recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). The new leadership was
committed to refocusing the Institution’s program offerings to high-demand health care related programs
that would be beneficial to working adults. These programs include Nursing, Dental Hygiene, and Health
Care Management.

The branch campus in Orange County opened for classes in September of 2007. Also in September of
2007, the University launched its first online classes to provide greater flexibility for its students. An
additional branch campus in Ontario, California, began offering classes in November of 2008. In 2009
the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree received Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
(CCNE) accreditation.

In June 2010, the University achieved an additional milestone. The University was approved to offer
Master’s degree programs in Nursing and Health Care Management by ACICS. CCNE recognized this
substantive change and has scheduled a review of the Master’s program for November 2011. In October
of 2010, the Orange County campus BS in Dental Hygiene program received accreditation though the
Commission on Dental Accreditation (COA). In addition, in 2010 West Coast University applied for
Eligibility from the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 15 of 155
Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). WCU’s application was reviewed and WASC determined
that West Coast University is eligible to proceed with its application for Candidacy for Accreditation. A
determination of Eligibility is not a formal status with the Accrediting Commission, nor does it ensure
eventual accreditation; it is a preliminary finding that the institution is potentially accreditable and can
proceed within four years of its Eligibility determination to be reviewed for Candidacy status with the
Accrediting Commission. WCU submitted its comprehensive Self-Study for (regional) accreditation with
WASC in June of 2011 and anticipates a site visit in September. The Commission will determine WCU’s
accreditation status at its meeting in February, 2012. Questions about Eligibility may be directed to the
institution or to WASC at www.wascsenior.org or at 510-748-9001.

In 2011 West Coast University plans to open a campus in Dallas, Texas. The Dallas campus received a
conditional Certificate of Authorization from THECB in January 2011 to grant, Bachelor’s and Master’s
degrees. Its Dallas facility was inspected by Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) on February 23, 2011.
Conditional approval was granted by the TWC on April 29, 2011.


Facilities Description
At West Coast University, the campuses and classroom facilities include courtyards, study nooks and
gathering spaces that encourage connections between students, faculty and associates. The classrooms at
each campus integrate advanced technology wherever possible, including permanently mounted
projectors, projection screens, interactive whiteboards and technologies that capture, print and transmit
images and text. Spaces are also provided at each campus to support student needs including meeting
rooms, food service areas, and computer stations with wireless connectivity. Each campus also provides a
library and master's-prepared librarian, along with administrative functions and staff including
admissions, registrar, student services, career services and financial aid.



                           WEST COAST UNIVERSITY
         Los Angeles       12215 Victory Boulevard
                           North Hollywood, CA 91606

                           The campus is located near and easily accessible from Highway 170
                           (Hollywood Freeway). The campus has a total of 49,000 sq. ft. that consists of
                           9 Classrooms, 4 Lab Rooms, 2 Study Rooms, and 2 Student Lounges. In the
                           Computer Labs, there are a total of 297 computers, and throughout the campus
                           are “Internet Bars”, or computer stations, with a total of 30 computers.


                           WEST COAST UNIVERSITY
    Orange County          1477 S. Manchester Avenue
                           Anaheim, CA 92802

                           The campus is located near and easily accessible from Interstate 5 (Santa Ana
                           Freeway). This campus includes a Dental Hygiene simulation laboratory and a
                           Dental Patient Clinic. This facility has a total of 34,084 sq. ft. that consists of
                           6 Classrooms, 2 Lab Rooms, 3 Dental Hygiene Labs, 2 Study Rooms and a
                           Student Lounge. In the Computer Labs, there are a total of 85 computers, and
                           throughout the campus are “Internet Bars”, or computer stations, with a total of
                           6 computers. The Orange County campus also utilizes additional classroom
                           space at a Learning Site located at La Palma Avenue .


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 16 of 155
       Orange County The Orange County Learning Site campus is located near and easily accessible
          Learning Site from Interstate 5 (Santa Ana Freeway). It is less than 5 miles from the Orange
    2411 W. La Palma Ave. County Manchester campus. This campus includes a Nursing simulation
       Anaheim, CA 92801 laboratories and offices for the Nursing faculty and Administration. This
                          facility has a total of 20,000 sq. ft. that consists of 5 Classrooms, 2 Lab
                          Rooms, 4 Nursing Simulation Labs, 4 Study Rooms and 3 Student Lounges.
                          In the Computer Labs, there are a total of 90 computers and throughout the
                          campus are “Internet Bars”, or computer stations, with a total of 22 computers.


                           WEST COAST UNIVERSITY
             Ontario       2855 East Guasti Road
                           Ontario, CA 91761

                           The campus is located near and easily accessible from Interstate 10 (San
                           Bernardino Freeway). The campus has a total of 51,888 sq. ft. that consists of
                           15 Classrooms, 4 Lab Rooms, 4 Study Rooms and 3 Student Lounges. In the
                           Computer Labs, there are a total of 247 computers and throughout the campus
                           are “Internet Bars”, or computer stations, with a total of 27 computers.

Accreditation
West Coast University is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools
(ACICS) to award Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees. The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges
and Schools is listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States Department of
Education and is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

       Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools
       750 First Street, NE, Suite 980
       Washington, DC 20002-4223
       (202) 336-6780
       www.acics.org

The Baccalaureate Degree Program in Nursing is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing
Education (CCNE).

       Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
       One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530
       Washington, DC 20036
       (202) 887-6791
       www.aacn.nche.edu/CCNE/reports/accprog.asp

The Dental Hygiene program offered at the Orange County campus is accredited by the Commission on
Dental Accreditation (CODA).

       Commission on Dental Accreditation
       211 East Chicago Avenue
       Chicago, IL 60611-2678
       800-621-8099 or (312) 440-4653
       http://ada.org/100.aspx

   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                     Page 17 of 155
Approvals
The nursing pre-licensure (LVN to BSN and BSN) programs offered at West Coast University, are
approved in California through the Board of Registered Nursing located at:

        Board of Registered Nursing
        1747 North Market Boulevard, Suite 150
        Sacramento, CA 95834
        (916) 322-3350
        http://www.rn.ca.gov


Class Schedule Information
West Coast University’s schedule of classes is designed to meet the needs of the student population.
Class schedules are set in 20-week semesters consisting of two 10-week terms generally comprised of 9
weeks of instruction. Classes are typically scheduled during the hours of 7:00 am to 11:00 pm Monday
through Friday and 7:00 am to 6:00 pm on Saturdays and Sundays. Typically, students attend classes two
to four days per week; however, some courses (most notably in the nursing programs) may require
additional days of instruction per week. Nursing clinical rotations may be scheduled any day of the week,
including Saturdays and Sundays, 24 hours a day. The Dental Hygiene core curriculum requires students
to attend classes, labs, and clinic sessions up to five days per week. After program completion and in
preparation for clinical board examinations, Dental Hygiene students will be allowed to attend Saturday
clinic sessions.

Business Hours
The campus administrative offices normal hours of operation are Monday through Thursday, 8:00 am to
8:00 pm and Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Online courses and related technical support are available and
accessible to enrolled students seven days a week, 24 hours a day.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 18 of 155
Undergraduate Admissions Policies and Disclosures
University Admissions Requirements for Undergraduate Degree
Admissions Criteria
Students must apply for admission to their program of study to be officially accepted for a specific
starting date. The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants if the admissions
requirements are not successfully met.

An undergraduate student applying for admission into West Coast University must:
1. Participate in a qualitative admissions interview arranged by a University admissions representative;
2. Submit a completed application for admission;
3. Submit documentation of high school graduation or its equivalent;
4. Meet any program specific entrance requirements as noted in the next section;
5. Complete an enrollment agreement (must be signed by a parent or guardian if the applicant is under
   18 years of age);
6. Agree to take and successfully complete a four module Computer Proficiency Requirement by the
   end of the first semester.

Program Specific Admissions Requirements for Undergraduate Programs
In addition to the Admissions Requirements listed above, please see the program description section of
this catalog for additional information.

Statement of Non-Discrimination
The University faculty and staff are committed to actively pursuing equality for West Coast University
students of all ages, diverse cultures, disabilities, and lifestyles through the implementation of the
University’s mission and objectives. The University incorporates the ethnic and academic pluralism
which is represented within our community into its educational process.

West Coast University is dedicated to respecting, integrating, and celebrating students’ diverse cultures
into all aspects of campus life. The University maintains a professional and safe environment where
students are free to express and share their unique backgrounds and experiences.

West Coast University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin,
sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or status, marital, parental, familial, veteran, or military service
status, age, or disability. The University complies with all local, state, and federal laws barring
discrimination. Accordingly, equal opportunity for employment and admission shall be extended to all
persons. All inquiries or complaints regarding these laws and regulations should be directed to the
appropriate University official who will provide students with procedures available in resolving
complaints relating to alleged unlawful discriminatory actions.

Rehabilitation Act and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA),
and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008. West Coast University abides by the policy that “no student
with a disability” shall be excluded from participation in programs and services offered by the University
“when reasonable accommodations may be provided.” A student is eligible for reasonable
accommodations and/or auxiliary aids and services if the student has a disability and the Disability
Services Coordinator has met with the student, consulted with the University Director of Student and

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 19 of 155
Alumni Affairs, and determined that the functional limitations of the disability can be reasonably
accommodated.

West Coast University is committed to providing reasonable accommodations including auxiliary aids
and or services to qualified individuals with a disability, unless providing such accommodations would
result in undue burden or fundamentally alter the nature of the relevant program, benefit or service
provided by the University. To request auxiliary aids or service, Students should contact the Student
Services Office at the respective campus.           Students should submit requests with supporting
documentation at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes or as soon as practical.
See also the “Disability Services” in the Student Services section of this catalog.

Programs Preparing Graduates for a Field Requiring Licensure
Under California law, West Coast University must take reasonable steps to ensure the student is eligible
for licensure if he or she has chosen a program that prepares them for a field where licensure is required.
There are numerous eligibility requirements for licensure, depending on the field. Students are urged to
carefully read the requirements and conduct further research. If the student identifies concerns regarding
his or her ability to meet licensure requirements, he or she is encouraged to discuss the concerns with an
Admissions Representative and the appropriate academic program administrator. If the student decides to
continue in a program of study given the understanding that he or she may not be able to achieve
licensure, the student will be asked to sign a release to that effect.

Program Changes/Policy Guidelines
West Coast University has the right, at its discretion, to make reasonable changes in program content,
class schedules, materials and equipment, as it deems necessary in the interest of improving the students'
educational experience. West Coast University reserves the right to make changes in organizational
structure, policy and procedures as circumstances dictate. When size and curriculum permit, classes may
be combined to provide meaningful instruction and training or team teaching may be facilitated to
contribute to the level of interaction among students. When ongoing federal, state, accreditation, or
professional changes occur that affect students currently in attendance, West Coast University will make
the appropriate changes and notify the students accordingly.

Notice to Applicants with Misdemeanor and Felony Convictions
Employment in most health care positions requires a background check. The University does not believe
that students should make a substantial investment of time, money, and potential debt if the ability to
secure employment in the field of study is unlikely. For this reason WCU does not accept admissions
applications from prospective students with felony convictions. Students in the Nursing and Dental
Hygiene programs with misdemeanor convictions may not be able to be placed for their clinical course
work or become licensed. Prospective students are required to disclose information relating to any
felony or misdemeanor conviction to their admissions representative.

Background Check Policies
All applicants to programs at West Coast University which lead to licensure must submit to a University-
defined background check as part of the admissions process to their degree programs and again prior to
any clinical coursework required for the completion of the degree. The background check results must be
such that they do not interfere with a student’s ability to be placed in clinical settings for their various
clinical practica, and eligibility for licensure. Additional requirements may be made by the clinical site to
which a student is assigned.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 20 of 155
When a background check discloses a conviction on a felony or misdemeanor, an outstanding arrest for a
felony or misdemeanor, or other concern that would lead to denial of admission or drop from the
program, the affected student or applicant may appeal the decision to the program chair/dean of the
program to which the student has applied. Should a student or applicant be dissatisfied with the decision
of the program chair/dean, the student or applicant may appeal in writing to the University Administration
Appeals Committee, specifying why the original decision should be reconsidered. The University
Appeals Committee’s decision is final.

State and National Board Examinations / Licensure Requirements
Costs related to state and national licensing and/or certification and registration examinations or processes are
the student’s responsibility. West Coast University will provide students with information regarding test dates,
locations, and fees whenever possible. Students should be aware that all test fees, unless stated on the
enrollment agreement, are in addition to the tuition paid to the University. Students who choose to participate
in state and national licensing and/or certification or registration examinations are responsible for paying the
sponsoring organizations.

Since passing state and national board examinations are pre-requisite to students obtaining licensure in many
fields, West Coast University places a high priority on preparing students to successfully pass these exams.
Students are urged to take state or national board examinations as soon after program completion as possible to
improve performance on the test. For further program-specific state and board examination requirements, see
the programs specific information in this catalog.

International Admissions
West Coast University is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant students in its
undergraduate programs. No international students will be admitted into the Master’s level programs or
any Undergraduate program offered in a blended format.

International students must meet the same entrance requirements for the program they wish to enter that
are applicable to domestic students. However, prior to accepting the international student for admission,
the student must be eligible to apply for a student visa (F-1) or must be resident in the United States in a
temporary residency status that does not require a change of status in order to attend school.

Prior to admission an international student must:

    1. Be officially enrolled or accepted by the University.
    2. Provide evidence of financial support.
    3. Provide proof of English proficiency. English proficiency can be established by providing
       documentation of one of the following:
       • Graduation from an American/International high school program where the curriculum is
           given in English.
       • Graduation from a high school in the United States as an exchange student.
       • Graduation from a high school in a country where English is the official language.
       • A passing score on the entrance exam required for admission to the program.
    4. Have a SEVIS issued I-20 Form for attendance at the school. The SEVIS I-20 shall not be issued
       until all the preceding requirements have been met. International students who are in the United
       States and already have a student visa will be processed as a transfer in the SEVIS system.
    5. Other individuals already in the United States under a temporary status, which requires a change
       of status, must file an I-539 (Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status) and pay the
       required fee to the United States Bureau of Customs and Immigration Services prior to admission.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 21 of 155
The international student must provide the institution with a copy of student visa or approved Change of
Status Form and I-94 entry/departure form. No international student shall start classes prior to providing
these documents for the admissions file. Approval of a change of status may take 60 to 120 days.

International students may only be enrolled on a full-time residential basis. An international student may
take no more than one online class per semester. The graduate programs are closed to the enrollment of
international students. Once an international student has enrolled all changes in enrollment status,
address, or program of study must be reported on an on-going basis and for each academic term.

English as a Second Language (ESL) Instruction
West Coast University does not offer English as a Second Language, Intensive English or English
Language Lerner instruction at any of its campuses. Students must be able to read, write, speak,
understand and communicate effectively in English. A passing score on the admissions test is considered
to be evidence that an applicant is able to read, write, speak, understand and communicate effectively in
English.

Transfer Admissions – Credit for Previous Education
Students who request to transfer credits into the University from previously attended institution(s) must
submit a sealed transcript from the originating institution. Veterans are required to provide copies of
transcripts for all prior postsecondary educational courses successfully completed so that they may be
reviewed for potential transfer credits. When a veteran is determined to have completed courses that may
qualify for transfer credit, an official transcript will be requested unless already provided.

Deadlines for submittal of transcripts vary by program. Unless noted in the program specific
requirements, sealed transcripts must be received prior to the first day of the first semester in which the
student commences his or her education at the University. The deadline for requesting Dental Hygiene
transfer credit is the application deadline as noted above. Only official transcripts will be accepted for
final transfer credit evaluation. If official transcripts are not received within the appropriate time frame,
credit may be awarded in exceptional circumstances at the Dean’s discretion. In addition to transcripts,
copies of course descriptions, school catalogs, and course syllabi may also be required for evaluation
purposes.

Decisions regarding transfer credit are made at the campus to which the student is applying by the
associated Academic Dean or Chair of the Program to which the student is seeking transfer credit to be
applied. The Dean or Chair will review transcripts from previous institutions to determine what credit, if
any, will be granted. If approved, the student will be notified of the credit granted. The Veterans’
Administration will also be notified of the credit granted to veteran students. Students are expected to
attend all classes in their program of study until their transfer credit request has been evaluated and
approved.
Credits will be considered for transfer if ALL of the following criteria are met:

1. The course(s) is/are judged comparable in content and credits to West Coast University courses;
2. A grade of 2.0 or better was achieved for undergraduate credits; a grade of 3.0 or better was achieved
   for graduate credits.
3. The course recency requirements are met. Each academic program has its own recency requirements
   for transfer credit. See program specific requirements below.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 22 of 155
Although satisfaction of the aforementioned criteria is essential for the consideration of transfer credit, the
University does not guarantee acceptance of transfer credit. Decisions regarding transfer credits
approved by the applicable academic administrator are considered final.

International Transfer Credit
Prospective students with foreign degrees or credits they wish to transfer to West Coast University are
expected to submit an original copy of an NACES or AICE approved transcript evaluation, along with
official transcripts, send directly to the Admissions department for consideration in the admissions
process. Examples of acceptable evaluation services include:

    •   International Consultants of Delaware (www.icdeval.com)
    •   World Education Services (http://www.wes.org/)
    •   International Education Research Foundation (www.ierf.org)

It is the prospective student’s responsibility to ensure that the foreign evaluation is received by
Admissions before consideration of the application for admission to West Coast University will occur.

Undergraduate Residency Requirement
Residency is defined as coursework completed at West Coast University, either on ground or online (does
not include transfer or challenge credit). A minimum of 25% of credit units for any given program of
study offered by West Coast University must be completed in residence. For example, if a student is
enrolled in a program offered at West Coast University in which there are 126 credit units required for
graduation, the student must complete 32 credit units in residence.

Exceptions to this policy may exist as required of specific academic programs. See program page for
further information.

Online/blended Course Requirements
West Coast University provides facilities for its online courses through interactive classroom activities.
Chat rooms and threaded discussions provide opportunities for productive class interaction, and to
connect with faculty members for help and guidance. Chat rooms are open for discussion with peers (at
any time) or faculty (during office hours). Online courses also engage students with interactive learning
exercises and animated activities. Online courses also provide an audio visual advantage. Students are
able to see and hear each lesson from any computer with access to the Internet that meets the hardware
and software specifications as noted below. Because West Coast University is aware that students may
have multiple ways of learning, the sights and sounds associated with online courses add a valuable
dimension to the educational experience. Moreover, animations, graphs, charts, and slide presentations
are regularly integrated into the courses.

In addition, several of the academic program curricula include blended courses. Blended courses
combine traditional or face-to-face classroom instruction with an online delivery of instruction. Program
specific information on this format of instruction is provided in the program descriptions, where
applicable. Students enrolled in online or blended courses are required to participate in online course
activities as outlined in each course’s syllabus.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 23 of 155
 Online Course Calendar 1

SEPTEMBER 2011 term: Monday, August 29, 2011 to Sunday, November 6, 2011
 Sign-Up Deadlines Dates             Training Week                Class Start Date          Class End Date
First-Time Students:
                                  Monday August 22, 2011
      Thursday August 18, 2011
                                           -to-               Monday August 29, 2011     Monday October 31, 2011
Continuing Students:
                                  Friday August 26, 2011
      Thursday August 25, 2011

NOVEMBER 2011 term: Monday, November 7, 2011 to Sunday, January 29, 2012
 Sign-Up Deadline Dates              Training Week                Class Start Date          Class End Date
First-Time Students:
                                 Monday October 31, 2011
    Thursday October 27, 2011
                                           -to-               Monday November 7, 2011    Monday January 23, 2012
Continuing Students:
                                 Friday November 4, 2011
   Thursday November 3, 2011

FEBRUARY 2012 term: Monday, January 30, 2012 to Sunday April 8, 2012

 Sign-Up Deadline Dates              Training Week                Class Start Date          Class End Date
First-Time Students:
                                 Monday January 23, 2012
    Thursday January 19, 2012
                                           -to-               Monday January 30, 2012    Monday April 2, 2012
Continuing Students:
                                 Friday January 27, 2012
    Thursday January 26, 2012

APRIL 2012 term: Monday, April 9, 2012 to Sunday, June 17, 2012
 Sign-Up Deadline Dates              Training Week                Class Start Date          Class End Date
First-Time Students:
                                   Monday April 2, 2012
      Thursday March 29, 2012
                                           -to-               Monday April 9, 2012       Monday June 11, 2012
Continuing Students:
                                   Friday April 6, 2012
        Thursday April 5, 2012

JUNE 2011 term: Monday, June 18, 2012 to Sunday, August 26, 2012

 Sign-Up Deadline Dates              Training Week                Class Start Date          Class End Date
First-Time Students:
                                   Monday June 11, 2012
        Thursday June 7, 2012
                                           -to-               Monday June 18, 2012       Monday August 20, 2012
Continuing Students:
                                   Friday June 15, 2012
       Thursday June 14, 2012




 1
  West Coast University Online terms are 9 weeks of Instruction.
   First-Time Students: First-Time online students are those who have never completed an online course at West
 Coast University. First-Time online students have an earlier Sign-Up Deadline Date.
   Continuing Students: Continuing online students are those who have previously completed a full-online course
 at West Coast University.

     WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 24 of 155
Students who are taking online and/or blended courses must:
1. Complete the online New Student Orientation Tutorial or the online New Blended Student Tutorial,
   which includes exercises for students to test accessibility and become familiar with navigation in all
   areas of online or blended courses;
2. Meet the specific computer requirements with acceptable hardware and software configuration and
   internet access as follows:


System Requirements

                 Windows Users                                                Mac Users

    •   Window XP, Vista, or 7                              •   Mac OS X or higher (in classic mode)
    •   28.8 kbps modem (56k recommended)                   •   28.9 kbps modem (56k recommended)
    •   Soundcard & Speakers                                •   Soundcard & Speakers
    •   Internet Explorer 8.0                               •   Safari 4.0


Screen Resolution: The recommended setting for screen resolutions is 1024 x 768 pixels



Browser Requirements

Browsers listed below have been validated with the eCollege online course platform.

                                      Windows Users                                 Mac Users

                                •   Microsoft Internet Explorer 8.0       •    Safari 4.0
Recommended Versions
                                •   Mozilla Firefox 3.5                   •    Mozilla Firefox 3.5


                                                                          •    Safari 3.0
Supported Versions              •   Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0
                                                                          •    Safari 5.0


                                                      •    Mozilla Firefox 3.0
Supported Versions
                                                      •    Google Chrome 5.0




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 25 of 155
Features Requirements
These commonly used plug-ins may be required depending on the course. Students will be able to access
courses without them; however, some features may not be available.



                                          Windows Users                                 Mac Users

                                   •    256 MB RAM                            •   256 MB RAM
                                   •    20 MB free disk space                 •   Mac OS X 10.4 and 10.5
                                   •    Sun’ Java 2 SDK (Kava 1.5 or          •   G4, G5 or Intel Processor
ClassLive
                                        Java 1.6)                             •   Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.5
                                   •    Microsoft JVM (Windows XP             •   MacOS Classic Java (MRJ
                                        SP1 only)                                 2.2.5)



                                   •    56K kbps or higher modem*
                                                                                  (Mac ClassLive Audio)
                                   •    Windows Media Encoder 7.1
                                                                              •   Soundcard with Speakers
ClassLive Audio                    •    Soundcard with Speakers and
                                                                                  and Microphone or Headset
                                        Microphone or Headset*
                                                                              •   Windows Media Player**
                                   •    Windows Media Player 9**



                                                            •     Real Player 8 Basic Player
                                                            •     Macromedia Flash Player
Supported Browser Plug-                                     •     Macromedia Shockwave Player
ins
                                                            •     Windows Media Player
                                                            •     Quicktime Player


Assistive Technology               •    JAWS 10.0                             •   N/A


                               Your instructor may choose to include a CoursePack (for example, a collection of
                               readings, articles, video clips). Because actual CoursePack content varies, you may
Third-party coursePacks
                               or may not have additional system requirements. Check with your instructor or with
                               the third-party CoursePack provider for specific requirements.

*Instructor-only requirements for Audio Encoding
** Required for students only if instructor is using Live Audio




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                              2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 26 of 155
Academic Policies and Procedures
Academic Freedom Statement for Students
West Coast University supports academic freedom, cultural diversity, and the intellectual exploration of
our student population. Students will be evaluated on classroom and practical performance and abilities
and not on ethnicity, political ideology, religious affiliation or other personally held belief systems. The
University supports student academic freedom within the realm of student learning outcomes. We
espouse freedom of expression as appropriate in classroom, clinical settings and all additional West Coast
University related activities and events.

Academic Honor Code
Academic honesty, integrity, and ethical behavior are required of all members of the West Coast
University community. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner reflecting the ideals,
values, and educational aims of the University at all times. Academic integrity and honorable behavior
are essential parts of the professionalism that will be required well beyond graduation. They are the
foundation for ethical behavior in the workplace to which West Coast University students aspire.

The general public, as well as professional organizations and accrediting bodies, hold individuals in the
health care industry to a high standard and expect the University to monitor the professional behavior of
faculty, associates and students. As current or future professionals, students at West Coast University
have a responsibility to follow this model and guide their actions to serve in the best interest of their
fellow students, faculty and health care professionals and those they will care for as patients by
maintaining the highest degree of personal and professional integrity. Students need to remain cognizant
of the fact that they are representative of their profession in and out of the academic environment.
Therefore, allegations of misconduct will be taken very seriously.

Academic integrity requires that work for which students receive credit be entirely the result of their own
effort. Acting honorably in an academic setting requires more than simple honesty. Academic dishonesty
takes place whenever a student undermines the academic integrity of the institution or attempts to gain an
unfair advantage over others. The following list includes some examples of Honor Code violations; the
list is not intended to be exhaustive.

1. Cheating
   • Using unauthorized materials such as books, notes, cell phones, PDA accessories or crib sheets to
      answer examination questions
   • Taking advantage of information considered unauthorized by one’s instructor regarding
      examination questions
   • Copying another student’s homework, written assignments, examination answers, electronic
      media, or other data
   • Assisting someone else to cheat, or knowingly allowing someone else to cheat
   • Failure to report cheating to an academic official of the University

2. Plagiarism
   • Representing the ideas, expressions, or materials of another without providing the author with due
       credit
   • Paraphrasing or condensing ideas from another person’s work without proper citation
   • Failing to document direct quotations and paraphrases with proper citation




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 27 of 155
3. Other forms of academic dishonesty
   • Fraud, deception, and the alteration of grades or official records
   • Changing examination solutions after the fact, inventing, changing or falsifying laboratory data or
      research
   • Purchasing or in some other manner obtaining and then submitting written assignments,
      homework, or examinations
   • Reproducing or duplicating images, designs, or Web pages without giving credit to the developer,
      artist, or designer
   • Submitting work created for another course without instructor approval
   • Misrepresenting oneself or one’s circumstance to gain an unfair advantage
   • Collaborating with another person(s) without instructor approval
   • Selling or providing term papers, course work, study guide or assignments to other students

There are four possible consequences to the student for violating West Coast University’s Honor Code:
   1. Failure of the assignment
   2. Failure of the course
   3. Expulsion from the University
   4. Rescinding a certificate or degree

All violations of the Honor Code will be reported to the University’s administration to investigate.
Individual reports will also be evaluated in the context of potential patterns of dishonesty. The faculty, in
conjunction with administration, will make a determination of the effect on student status and/or course
grades resulting from substantiated reports of honor code violations.

Academic dishonesty is a corrosive force in the academic life of a university. It jeopardizes the quality of
education and depreciates the genuine achievements of others. It is the responsibility of all members of
the campus community to actively deter it. Apathy or ignoring the presence of academic dishonesty is not
acceptable. If students, faculty or staff members do not confront academic honesty, it will reinforce,
perpetuate, and enlarge the scope of such misconduct. Further, ignorance of the University’s Honor Code
is not a valid excuse for engaging in prohibited conduct. All University community members are
responsible for knowing, and living by, the Honor Code. Furthermore, all members of the University
community, including students, faculty, and staff share the responsibility and authority to challenge and
make known acts of apparent academic dishonesty.

A student is prohibited from withdrawing from a course in which an “F” grade is received due to a
violation of the Honor Code.

Plagiarism Detection Website
West Coast University is committed to helping students learn about what is and is not plagiarism. As
such, it uses a plagiarism detection web-service to help students monitor themselves. Students can submit
their work to this web-service in an effort to determine if the academic work is considered to be authentic
or not.

Furthermore, in its commitment to academic honesty and accurate assessment of student work, West
Coast University reserves the right to submit student assignments to the website to check for similarities
between student submissions and the internet, various research databases, and the website’s database of
previous student submissions.

In some instances, students may be required to electronically submit their work to the instructor or to the
website, and by taking WCU courses, students agree that all assignments are subject to plagiarism

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 28 of 155
detection processes and academic honesty policies. Assignments submitted to the website by the student
or instructor will become part of the service’s database and will be used for plagiarism prevention and
detection. Student papers, however, will remain the intellectual property of the authors.

Academic Program Measurement
Credit Hours
The federal regulations define a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning
outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established
equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than—

    1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class
       student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of
       credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work
       over a different amount of time; or
    2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other
       academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships,
       practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

To comply with the federal definition, courses offered at West Coast University have an expectation of
two hours of work outside of class for each hour of lecture.

West Coast University measures its academic programs in Semester Credit hours.
   1. Semester credit hours are defined as follows:
           a. For lecture classes, one semester credit is equal to 15 clock hours of instruction.
           b. For laboratory classes, one semester credit is equal to 30 clock hours of instruction.
           c. For Clinical/Practicum classes, one semester credit is equal to 45 clock hours. Labs in
              the Nursing are considered clinical for credit hour calculations as calculated by the
              California Board of Registered Nursing.
   2. Clock hours are defined as follows:
           a. A clock hour is a minimum of 50 minutes in which lectures, demonstrations, and similar
              class activities are conducted.

Definition of a Credit Hour in an Online Class
Calculation of credit hours in an online or blended format course is based on the consideration of the
following activities:

    1.  The time spent in live instruction. Live instruction may be
           a. synchronous or instructor-led online time, or
           b. residential learning in the classroom (blended coursework)
    2. The number of screens viewed in the course of online instruction. The average time spent on a
       “screen” is generally calculated as being between 3-5 minutes per screen.
    3. The run-time for required media asset assignments calculated on a 1:1 ratio to seat time. Run
       time may be factored to account for expected multiple viewings of the asset for review and re-
       enforcement of the material. Assets may include
           a. self playing videos or animation, or
           b. audio podcasts and recordings


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 29 of 155
    4. Links to external learning assets – calculated as an average of the time required to consume
       content such as by
           a. reading an article
           b. watching a self-paced instructional video,
           c. playing an instructional game
           d. or completing a simulation
    5. Assignments – The instructor expectation of time spent in online instructional assignments and
       activities such as:
           a. postings to group discussion sites/bulletin boards.
           b. online group project work
           c. use of class social media sites for group discussion/participation
           d. student-teacher interaction

Challenge Credit
West Coast University has a policy of allowing students to “challenge” a course in some programs of
study for which they have earned prior credit for but for which credit was not transferred upon
matriculation. The challenge credit option is not available for core courses in the Dental Hygiene
program.

Challenge may be especially relevant for students whose prior academic experience with a particular
course or subject area exceeds the University’s recency requirements, but who believe they are still
current in the subject matter. To challenge a course, a student must submit a Challenge Exam Application
Form to the Director of Student Services at the campus they are attending.

Students will only be allowed to take a challenge examination if they meet the general and program-
specific criteria. If the request to challenge a course is approved, and the student passes the appropriate
examination, credits earned for class challenged will be valid for 12 months from the time the exam is
taken. Once a student matriculates, the course requirement is removed from the student’s program of
study and posted to the transcript, becoming a permanent part of the student’s academic record. If the
challenge examination is not successfully passed, the course requirement will remain in the student’s
program of study.

The student must declare which courses he/she would like to challenge and must gain approval from the
program’s academic administration. Each program has its own unique requirements and deadlines for
submitting an application to take a challenge examination. For further information pertaining to each
program’s challenge exam requirements, see the program-specific information elsewhere in the catalog.

Students may not apply for a challenge exam for courses in which they are currently enrolled or have
previously taken at West Coast University. A course may be challenged only one time. Each program
has established its own passing grade requirements for challenge exams, and no more than twelve (12)
semester credits may be earned through challenge examinations

Credits earned through challenge examinations do not count towards the in-residence requirements or
towards a student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA). In addition, a student’s financial aid may be
affected if challenge credit is received; therefore students considering challenging a course should consult
with their campus Financial Aid officer on the impact of doing so.

A non-refundable fee of $100 will be charged per exam ($500 for all nursing clinical course challenge
exams). The fee must be paid prior to the exam and is not included as part of the student’s financial aid
package.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 30 of 155
The University’s decision on a student’s eligibility to take a specific challenge exam is final and may not
be appealed. If a student achieves credit by successfully challenging a course and passing the challenge
exam, no guarantee is made that the student will advance his or her degree completion date. Degree
acceleration will be based on programmatic space availability.

Nursing Challenge Exam Additional Requirements
Additional Nursing-specific requirements include the following:

    1. Students must be accepted into the nursing program in order to challenge a nursing course.
    2. Students may not challenge a nursing course where there is evidence that a similar nursing course
       has been taken in the past for which the grade received was below a C.
    3. Students who want to attempt a challenge examination for a clinical course must first: 1) transfer
       in credit for the related theory course or 2) pass the theory course challenge test prior to
       attempting the clinical challenge examination.
    4. Students must satisfactorily meet all prerequisites of any courses prior to taking the challenge
       examination.
    5. Students who attempt and did not pass a lower level nursing course with a clinical component
       may not challenge a higher level nursing course with a clinical component.
    6. Challenge examinations for pre-licensure courses include HESI, ATI or other similar
       standardized computer examinations. The grade necessary to pass is outlined in the associated
       course syllabus.
           a. Students should acquaint themselves with the syllabus requirements for any course they
               wish to challenge.
           b. Nursing students must complete any NURS designated challenge examinations within the
               first two terms of entering the first nursing (core) course.
           c. Students must first successfully pass the challenged course prior to being allowed to
               enroll in a course that has this course as a pre/co-requisite.
           d. Students, who are unable to successfully challenge the requested course by the start date
               of that course, must enroll in the course.
           e. Students who wish to challenge a course must submit their application at least 4 weeks
               prior to the time when they would like to take the exam.
    7. Additional information may be required prior to scheduling a challenge examination for clinical
       courses, such as immunization status, health records, background check, drug screening, fire &
       BLS cards (i.e.-Clinical packet information).

Add/Drop Period
The Add/Drop period occurs within the first week (7 days) of a 10-week term. During this period,
students may add or drop classes but may not withdraw from the University without penalty. Dropped
courses occurring within this period will not appear on students’ transcripts nor will these dropped
courses be included in evaluating student maximum allowable time frame specific to satisfactory
academic progress. New students may be admitted during this period provided they attend at least one
scheduled class during the Add/Drop period. Students will not be admitted after the Add/Drop period
without approval from the campus Executive Director and the applicable academic dean. Tuition
adjustments will not be made after the first week of the term.

Course Overload Policy
Students who would like to add one or more classes to their existing class schedule, must receive prior
written approval from their Program Dean. The Program Dean may deny requests from students
perceived to be academically “at risk” due to their prior grades. The Dean may also deny requests due to


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 31 of 155
exceeded seat capacity of the chosen class or classes, or for other curricular limitations, such as the
absence of prerequisite course work.

For eligible students, once class availability has been confirmed, the Program Dean will provide an Add
or Overload Request form requesting the student’s signature. Student must submit completed Add or
Overload forms to the Financial Aid Office and be counseled on the financial ramifications of adding the
class or classes. After the Financial Aid counseling has occurred, the Financial Aid Officer will sign the
Add or Overload Request form.

To complete the process, students will sign the form, acknowledging that an advisement and counseling
meeting occurred, and submit to his or her Program Dean’s Office for review.

Attendance Policy
West Coast University emphasizes the need for all students to attend classes on a regular and consistent
basis. In addition to the research that demonstrates that regular class attendance enhances student
success, consistent attendance and punctuality helps students develop good habits and behaviors
necessary to compete in a highly challenging job market.

To maintain satisfactory attendance in all courses except NURS clinical courses and DHYG courses,
students may not be absent for more than 30% of a theory/lab course. These percentages are calculated
on the basis of the clock hours identified previously in the catalog. For example, 30% of a three credit
lecture course is 13.5 hours. Absences in excess of 30% of any theory/lab course will result in a grade of
“F” and the student will be required to repeat the course. Nursing students may not be absent for more
than 20% of a clinical course. Dental Hygiene students may not be absent for more than 20% of any
course. Absences in excess of 20% in these courses will result in a grade of F for the course.

If a student is absent from the University for more than 14 consecutive calendar days, excluding holidays
and scheduled breaks, and no contact has been made during that period, the student will be withdrawn
from the University.

Students taking online courses or blended courses must submit at least one gradable activity per class
every ‘class week.’ A ‘class-week’ for full online courses starts on a Monday of any given week and ends
on the following Sunday at 11:59 PM PST. For Dental Hygiene blended courses, the ‘class week’
corresponds to the week between the on-campus meeting times (i.e., if on-campus portion meets on
Tuesdays, the coordinating online portion begins that same Tuesday and ends the following Monday at
11:59 PM PST).
A gradable activity includes, but is not limited to, the posting of a threaded discussion question, electronic
submission of any course assignment to the ‘drop box’, electronic submission of a test / exam (if
applicable), or any other course related activity that is graded.
For Master’s level blended courses, each in-residence meeting time equates to 10% of the total class time
(20% of these Master’s level courses will be held in-residence total).
Students who are required to participate in military duties and are therefore required to be absent from
their scheduled classes will not be penalized. The student must provide the appropriate academic
administrator with written documentation verifying the required military leave and length of time
requested; however, depending on the length of required military leave, a student may need to request a
leave of absence.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 32 of 155
Tardiness/Early Departure:
Students who arrive for class after the scheduled start time are considered tardy; students who depart from
class before the scheduled completion time are considered to have “departed early.” Faculty members are
asked to track student tardiness and early departures. Upon the second instance of tardiness/early
departure, faculty members are advised to discuss the issue with the student. On the event of the third
tardy and/or early departure, the student will receive one absence. Excessive tardiness and/or early
departures can lead to sanctions, including dismissal from the University.

Clinical Rotations and Practica
Clinical and practicum experience required in some programs enable students to work with patients in
order to apply the competencies and practices learned in the classroom in a real world setting. Students
participating in clinical training work under the direct supervision of University faculty. See program
specific requirements for clinical placement in the program specific admissions requirements.

Clinical Work Fair Practice Standards
When clinical rotations are required for the student’s degree program, it is an essential and invaluable
portion of students’ education. Clinical rotations are a natural and logical extension of their education,
and are consistent with the University mission as an effort to ensure graduates are prepared for their
professional careers. As such, the following policy ensures that students get the maximum educational
value and from their clinical rotations.
1. West Coast University’s students are not to be paid for any of the activities they perform during their
   clinical rotations.
2. Clinical Affiliate sites are not to reduce their personnel as a result of the acceptance to host West
   Coast University clinical students.
3. A clinical instructor is to be present at all times during the procedures in which students are actively
   involved in a clinical setting.
4. Students are allowed to procure gainful employment outside of their scheduled clinical rotation
   session hours.

Clinical and Program Health and Safety Requirements
West Coast University students enrolled in programs involving clinical and lab work are required to
complete health and safety requirements according to individual program and clinical site requirements.
Because many West Coast University students are involved in direct patient care in health care careers,
they may be exposed to conditions of high risk and therefore must be protected. Patients must also be
protected against potential health risks from students. Individual programs may have clinical
requirements that must be met. See the program specific clinical requirements.
The designated academic administrator for each program will be responsible for tracking and maintaining
clinical health and safety requirements and ensuring that students meet the specific program requirements.
Documents submitted by the student as proof that these requirements have been met shall be forwarded to
the Registrar’s office for placement in the student’s file.
All students must meet the requirements for the facility at which they perform clinical/practicum
fieldwork. If students do not meet these requirements, they may become ineligible to participate in the
specific program of study and unable to complete the program.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 33 of 155
Consortium Agreement
To provide additional flexibility for West Coast University students, each campus has entered into a
Consortium Agreement, whereby students enrolled at one campus (their “home” campus) may take
courses at another campus (the “host” campus), if the courses are offered and available. A student who
wishes to enroll in courses offered at another campus must do the following:
•   Notify his/her campus registrar of his/her intent so that he/she can be registered in the course at the
    appropriate campus and attendance and grades can be tracked;
•   Continue to seek services, such as counseling, career services and financial aid, at his/her home
    campus;
•   Complete a minimum of 35% of credits for either an associate or bachelor degree program at his/her
    home campus;
•   Comply with the policies and regulations for whichever campus they are attending.
•   Space must be available in the host campus course for which the student wishes to enroll.
This policy applies to full courses (10 weeks in length) that a student wishes to enroll in at another West
Coast University campus, and does not allow for students to attend and receive credit for individual
classes held within a term at other campuses.

For students in the Undergraduate entry-level Dental Hygiene program, this policy does not apply. All
Dental Hygiene courses must be taken at the Orange County campus.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 34 of 155
Grading
The progress and quality of students' work is measured by a standard 4.0 scale as follows:

                                  Numerical Grade Conversion Scale
                                                                     Treatment for Satisfactory Academic
                                                                                  Progress
                              WCU               Nursing            Included
   Grade       Points
                            Standard          (NURS courses)          in                       Successfully
                                                                              Attempted?
                                                                    CGPA                       Completed?

     A          4.0          90-100              91-100               Y             Y               Y
     B          3.0           80-89               84-90               Y             Y               Y
     C          2.0           70-79              76-83                Y             Y              Y
                                                                                               Y, but N in
     D          1.0           60-69              64-75                Y             Y
                                                                                                 NURS
     F          0.0      59 and below      63 and below               Y             Y               N
     AU         0.0      Audit             Audit                      N             N               N
                                           Credit for Nursing
                                           Advanced
     CR         0.0      Credit            Standing Credit, or        N             Y               Y
                                           75% or higher on
                                           Challenge Exam
      I         0.0      Incomplete        Incomplete                 N             Y               N
     TC         0.0      Transfer Credit   Transfer Credit            N             Y               Y
     W          0.0      Withdrawal        Withdrawal                 N             Y               N
 Note: AU, CR, I, TC, and W are used on the Academic Record but have no point values and are not computed
 in the Cumulative Grade Point Average.

The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is computed only for courses taken at West Coast
University. The CGPA is determined by dividing the total grade points by the total semester credits
completed at West Coast University. Courses with the NURS and DHYG prefix fall under the Nursing
and Dental Hygiene numerical grading scale. The University does not offer remedial classes. Audited
(AU) courses award no credit and receive a grade of “AU”, which is not included in the CGPA or rate of
progress calculation.

Nursing Program Grade Requirements
Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all NURS courses, using the scale outlined in the
“Grading” section of this catalog. Courses in which a “C” or better is not achieved must be repeated.

Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements
Student must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all DHYG courses using the scale outlined in the
“Grading” section of this catalog. Due to the didactic and clinical practice requirements for licensure,
progression in the Dental Hygiene program from one term to the next is imperative to student success and
for patient safety; therefore, Dental Hygiene students that do not earn a minimum grade of “C” in each
DHYG course in each term will be dismissed from the program. Students dismissed from the Dental
Hygiene program for failure to achieve the minimum grade may appeal their dismissal on the basis of
mitigating circumstances. Students who successfully appeal may reenter on a space available basis.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 35 of 155
Incompletes (I)
An "incomplete" grade cannot be assigned as a final grade, and therefore, has no effect on cumulative
grade point average or maximum time to complete. However, at the end of a term, students may, with the
faculty member's approval, be granted a maximum extension of 14 calendar days to complete required
class work, assignments, and/or tests. The extension cannot be used to make up accrued absences from
class. Consideration will be given only with documentation of extenuating circumstances and in cases of
unanticipated events, such as illness, accidents, or similar circumstances. If students do not complete the
required class work, assignments and/or tests within the extension period, they will receive a failing grade
of ‘F’ or ‘zero’ for the class work, assignments and/or tests. The 'F' or 'zero' will be averaged in with the
student’s other grades to determine a grade for the class, at which point GPA and maximum time to
completion will be affected. If the course for which an incomplete grade is received is a prerequisite to
another course, the student cannot begin the subsequent course until the incomplete grade has been
resolved and replaced with a normal letter grade.

Final Course Grade Appeal
Students who wish to do so, must appeal a failing grade or evaluative comment within two business days
of notification of failure or within two days of the Wednesday of the 10th week of the session, whichever
comes first. Students appealing a non-failing grade have until the end of the first week of the subsequent
term to lodge an appeal.

The Grade Appeals Process and related forms are available in the Office of Student Services. The process
steps for a grade appeal are as follows:

    1. Consult with the faculty member who issued the grade for reconsideration of the grade or the
       record, utilizing the grade appeals form. Note that appeals of non-failing grades will be addressed
       within 21 business days. Appeals of failing grades will be addressed within two (2) business days
       of receipt.

    2. If, after consultation with the faculty member, the student wishes to further appeal the grade, or if
       the faculty member is either unavailable or does not respond within the time frames outlined in
       step one, the student should request in writing to the dean/chair of his/her academic program,
       within two business days, an investigation of the grade. The program dean/chair may investigate
       the matter personally or refer it to a designee. The investigation will be conducted within 21
       business days of student request. At the conclusion of the investigation, the program dean/chair
       shall issue a finding in writing that either concurs with the faculty member regarding the grade or
       in some instances requires the faculty member to revise the grade based on demonstrable
       evidence that the initial grade was in error.


    3. If a student feels that his/her grade appeal has not been handled appropriately, or that the grade
       assigned was based on instructor bias or unfair treatment, the student may employ the Student
       Complaint/Grievance Procedure outlined in the University Catalog.


    4. The student shall be given a written summary of the conclusion of the appeal (using the Grade
       Appeals form). If the student believes the summary to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation
       of the privacy or other rights of the student, the student may insert a written statement in the
       record.

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 36 of 155
A successful grade appeal does not guarantee the ability to advance to the next course in sequence in the
subsequent term.
Dean’s List
Undergraduate students who successfully complete a minimum of six credit hours of instruction in a 10-
week term and achieve a grade point average of at least 3.75 are eligible for the Dean’s List. The Dean’s
List is compiled at the completion of each term and eligible students will receive a letter recognizing their
academic achievements.

Graduation Requirements for Undergraduate Students
West Coast University awards a degree to students who successfully complete the prescribed program
credits. In order to be eligible for graduation, students must complete the program with a minimum
cumulative grade point average of 2.0. In addition, some programs may require successful completion of
an exit exam. Students should consult the graduation requirements of the specific program they are in by
discussing their progress with appropriate program administrators as they approach graduation.

Honors at Graduation for Undergraduate Programs
The University recognizes outstanding achievement of degree recipients at graduation. Those students
who have maintained an exceptional grade point average will be considered for honors recognition.

To be eligible for honors at graduation, the student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average
based on the 4-point scale as follows:
        3.50 – 3.69 Cum laude
        3.70 – 3.89 Magna cum laude
        3.90 – 4.00 Summa cum laude

Commencement Exercises
West Coast University Commencement Exercises are held once a year to honor the candidates who have
completed the requirements for graduation from the program they have been enrolled in. Graduates who
choose to participate in the ceremony are required to purchase their cap and gown.

Valedictorian Criteria Recommendations
The title of valedictorian has long been used to designate a graduating student who has achieved the
highest academic excellence. For each commencement ceremony, the Academic Dean (in collaboration
with Program Deans/Chairs and Campus Directors) will determine who will be selected as valedictorian
for each graduating class. One valedictorian per commencement per campus will be selected. A
valedictorian will be invited to speak at Commencement Exercises.

The following criteria will be used, in descending order, to select campus valedictorians. The candidate:
    1. Must have completed all graduation requirements.
    2. Must have graduated with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.75.
    3. Must have the highest cumulative grade point average earned at the campus for that particular
       class.
    4. Must have remained in good standing for the duration of his/her West Coast University career,
       free from any formal student conduct actions.

If multiple candidates meet all of the criteria outlined above, the following additional criteria will be
considered:


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 37 of 155
    5. The candidate completing the greatest number of credits in residence at WCU will be given
       priority.
    6. The candidate with the highest grade point average on credits transferred into West Coast
       University will be given priority.
    7. The candidate with the highest scores on challenge examinations will be given priority.
    8. The candidate who has represented the University in an exemplary manner will be given priority.
       Examples include but are not limited to:
           a. Positions and participation in student leadership,
           b. Volunteer time over and above minimum University requirements,
           c. Special recognitions while an active student,
           d. Other awards, honors or recognition given by external organizations while the candidate
                 is a student.
The final selection will be made by a committee led by the Academic Dean with input of Program Deans
and the campus Executive Director.

Institutional Leave of Absence Policy
Occasionally, extenuating circumstances arise that require students to interrupt their program of study.
Depending on the situation or length of time, students may be granted a leave of absence (LOA) of up to
one 20-week semester. Students who find it necessary to take an LOA must submit a written request and
obtain a preliminary approval in writing from the appropriate academic administrator and a final approval
in writing from the campus Executive Director. The request must outline the extenuating circumstances
and duration of the LOA. If a student does not return from an LOA within the specified timeframe and no
prior arrangements have been made, he/she will be withdrawn from the University. The withdrawal date
for a student who does not return from an approved LOA is the date on which the student fails to return,
as determined by the institution’s signed documentation.

Samples of extenuating circumstances that generally receive a favorable response include:
   • Military Duty
   • Prolonged illness with appropriate physician’s confirmation and notice
   • Death in the immediate family
   • Maternity leave

Effect of Leave of Absence on Student Financial Aid
An institutional leave of absence is not considered an official leave of absence under federal Title IV
regulations. As a result, when a student takes an institutional leave of absence, the student will be
considered ineligible for Title IV purposes. As a result, a return to title IV calculation will be done and
the student will be reported to his lender as less than half time enrolled. The time on a leave of absence
will be counted against the six month grace period for entering repayment on the federal financial aid
loans. The student will enter repayment, if the student does not return from leave within six months.

Effect of Leave of Absence on Satisfactory Academic Progress
 For purposes of satisfactory academic progress, if a student begins a leave of absence after the add/drop
deadline or before completion of the course, the student will be considered withdrawn from the course for
satisfactory academic progress purposes. The course from which the student took leave will be
considered as attempted and not completed.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 38 of 155
Withdrawal from a Class
If a student wishes to withdraw from a class in session after the Add/Drop period has ended, he or she
must submit a written request to the Academic Dean or appropriate academic administrator for his or her
program. In order to receive a "W" on the student transcript record, the withdrawal request must be
submitted prior to the end of the fifth week of the scheduled course. If the request to withdraw is
submitted after the end of the fifth week of the scheduled course, the student will receive an "F". A "W"
does not count toward the cumulative grade point average (CGPA). A grade of “F” will be calculated
toward a student’s CGPA. However, both “W” and “F” grades count toward the maximum allowable
timeframe for program completion. It is highly likely that a student's financial aid eligibility may be
affected if the student withdraws from one or more classes, and so students are urged to discuss the
possibility of withdrawing from a course with their campus financial aid advisor.

Withdrawal from the University
Students who wish to withdraw from their program should contact the appropriate academic
administrator. The student’s withdrawal date is the last date of academic attendance as determined by the
institution based on its attendance records. Both refunds and final grade determinations are based on the
withdrawal date and last date of official class attendance. All requests for withdrawal should be
submitted in writing.

Re-Entry following Withdrawal
If a student who has withdrawn from the University reapplies for admission and is accepted, the student
must reenter under the admissions, academic, and administrative policies of the catalog at the time of
readmission and is subject to the prevailing tuition and fee rates at that time. The student must be current
on any outstanding prior balance or make satisfactory arrangements to repay at the time of re-application
in order to be considered for readmission. Students wishing to reenter may be required to appeal for
readmission. This appeal must be reviewed by the applicable academic administrator and/or other
administrative staff as deemed appropriate by WCU. See also program specific requirements for re-entry.

Re-Entry to the Nursing Programs, following Withdrawal
Students who have been dismissed from a West Coast University’s nursing programs for academic or
student conduct reasons will not be readmitted to any West Coast University campus. Due to the program
requirements for clinical practice, if a student withdraws from the program and wishes to reenter at a
subsequent time, all nursing coursework must be repeated, unless the last successfully completed nursing
course was completed less than one year prior to the date of reentry. Any re-entry consideration will be
made on the basis of availability of space.

Re-Entry to the Dental Hygiene Program, following Withdrawal
Students who have been dismissed from the West Coast University Dental Hygiene program for academic
or student conduct reasons will not be readmitted. Due to the didactic and clinical practice requirements
for licensure, if a student withdraws and wishes to re-enter at a subsequent time, the student must reapply
following all current application requirements and receive acceptance status. All dental hygiene
coursework must be repeated. The tuition and fees for those who reenter the program will be those which
are published in the catalog at that time.

Exception Policy
Exceptions to academic policies are occasionally allowed for compelling reasons. Exceptions to academic
policies are granted only when circumstances exceed a student's control. Ignorance or forgetting details
of policy do not warrant an exception or waiver of policy. A petition for an exception should be
presented in writing to the Dean’s office. The party responsible in responding to such petition will review

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 39 of 155
and forward to the Provost only if recommending an exception. The Provost will review the petition
contact the petitioner and/or parties involved for additional information or verification (if necessary) and
deliver a decision. The decision made by the Provost is final. All exceptions will require documentation
including the signature of the Provost or Designee. By virtue of the request, the requester authorizes the
university to examine any pertinent record or contact any party from whom information is needed to make
an informed decision.

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Undergraduate Programs
As of July 1, 2011, Federal regulations for Satisfactory Academic Progress changed. This policy reflects
the new requirements and will be applied for all semesters beginning after July 1, 2011.
Students' academic progress will be measured at the end of each semester.             In order to maintain
satisfactory progress, students must:
1. Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 2.0 (on a standard 4.0 scale)
     at the end of each semester.
2. Progress at a satisfactory rate toward completion of their program. At the end of the evaluation
     period, the student must have successfully completed at least 66.67% of all coursework that the
     student has attempted in the program. A description of the calculation is given below.
3. Complete the program within a maximum timeframe of 150% of the published length of the program
     as calculated in credits attempted. For example: A student enrolled in a 120 semester credit program
     would have to complete the program in a maximum timeframe of 180 credits attempted (150% of
     120).
NOTE: Students in the core Nursing and Dental Hygiene program, see Nursing Program Grade
Requirements and Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements section of the catalog for additional
satisfactory academic progress requirements.

Calculating the Rate of Progress Toward Completion of the Program
The rate of progress toward completion of the program is calculated by dividing the cumulative number
of credit hours the student has successfully completed in the program by the cumulative number of credit
hours attempted by the student in the program. For example: A student who has attempted courses worth
36 credits, but has successfully completed only 24 credits would have a rate of progress calculated by
dividing 36 by 24 or 66.67% (24/36).

The cumulative number of credit hours attempted in the program includes transfer and
proficiency/challenge exam credits received, credits for courses from which a student has withdrawn,
credits for which a student has received an incomplete, and every repeated course. The cumulative
number of credit hours attempted in a program does not include remedial courses, audited courses or
courses taken that are pre-requisite to the program.

Transfer and proficiency/challenge exam credits are counted as both attempted and successfully
completed. Credits for courses from which a student has withdrawn or received an incomplete are
counted as attempted and not successfully completed. Transfer credits, proficiency/challenge exam
credits, audit credits, withdrawals and incompletes are not calculated in the student’s GPA.

Undergraduate Academic and Financial Aid Warning
Students will be placed on academic warning when their cumulative grade point average (CGPA) falls
below 2.0 or they fail to complete at least 66.67% of all coursework taken in the program at the end of
any semester in which coursework was taken. A student will be notified of warning status in writing. The
warning period will last the duration of one semester, during which time the student will be given the
opportunity to raise his or her CGPA to a minimum of 2.0 and/or meet the 66.67% completion

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 40 of 155
requirement. During the semester on warning, the student remains eligible for Federal Student Financial
Aid. If, at the end of the semester on warning, a student raises his or her CGPA and rate of progress to or
above the minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress, the student will then be removed from
warning and returned to regular status.

Academic Dismissal
If at the end of the semester on academic and financial aid warning the student fails to meet the minimum
CGPA or rate of progress requirements, the student will be dismissed from the University, but may appeal
the dismissal.

Undergraduate Academic Dismissal Appeal Policy
A student who has been academically dismissed for failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress
according to the standards for their program may appeal the decision on the basis of the death of a
relative, an injury or illness of the student, or other special circumstances. The procedures for an appeal
are as follows:
1. Appeals must be in writing and must be submitted to the academic dean or appropriate academic
   administrator who will forward it to the designated members of the Appeals Committee.
      a. The appealing student’s written appeal must explain the type of circumstances that
          contributed to the failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress and what the student has
          done to eliminate those potential problems in the future.
      b. Documentation of the circumstances should be submitted with the appeal. Failure to
          document the circumstances may result in a denial.
2. The denial of an appeal by the Appeals Committee is final and may not be further appealed.

Reinstatement Process for Students with Approved Appeals
When the Appeals Committee approves a student’s satisfactory academic progress appeal, the committee
may make one of the following decisions:
       1. Give the student one additional semester in which to raise the student’s GPA and rate of
          progress at least as high as the required criteria. Should a student who has been given one
          additional semester fail to return to satisfactory academic progress at the end of the additional
          semester, the student will be dismissed with no right to appeal.

            NOTE: This option is not available for students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene program. See
            Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements section of the catalog.

        2. Create an academic plan in consultation with the Dean or Chair of the student’s academic
           program that will enable the student to return to satisfactory academic progress status. For
           students in the core Dental Hygiene program the requirements of the Academic Plan must
           meet the requirements of the Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements section of the
           catalog. The following requirements apply to Academic Plans for students in all other
           programs.
               a. The plan must be of definite duration that may not extend beyond the number of
                   semesters remaining in the student’s maximum time frame for the program.
               b. The student must be able to achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA by the end of
                   the academic plan period.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 41 of 155
                c. Upon completion of the academic plan the student must still be able to complete the
                   program within the maximum time frame.
                d. The academic plan must detail courses to be taken, minimum grades expected and the
                   GPA and rate of completion criteria for each semester for the plan.
                e. The academic plan may also provide expectations related to attendance, remediation,
                   conduct, and other measures intended to lead to academic success.
                f. Should a student allowed to continue on an academic plan fail to meet any condition
                   of the academic plan, the student will be dismissed with no right to appeal.

Students given an additional semester(s) to return to satisfactory academic progress, or who are allowed
to continue under an academic plan are placed on probation for the designated period.

Undergraduate Academic and Financial Aid Probation
Students placed on academic probation must achieve at least a term GPA of 2.0 and successfully
complete the credits attempted during the probationary period or be academically dismissed; higher
standards may be required under the academic plan as noted above. During the probationary period, the
student will remain eligible for Federal Student Financial Aid, unless the student has been reinstated
following the denial of an appeal or is auditing courses in the core Dental Hygiene program. If during or
at the end of any probationary period, a student raises his or her CGPA and rate of progress to or above
the minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress, the student will then be removed from
probation and returned to regular status, and be eligible for financial aid. However, if at the end of the
probationary period the student fails to meet the minimum CGPA or Academic Plan requirements, or rate
of progress requirements, the student will be academically dismissed from the University.

Reinstatement Process for Students with No Appeal or Denied Appeals.
A student who has been academically dismissed for not making satisfactory progress may request
reinstatement after a semester on dismissal. In order to qualify for reinstatement, the student must
provide documentation that the issues that led to dismissal have been resolved, evidence of remediation,
or both to the program Dean or Chair. Decisions regarding reinstatement to the University will consider
factors such as grades, attendance, account balance, conduct, and the student’s commitment to complete
the degree program within the maximum timeframe allowed per the University’s policy on Satisfactory
Academic Progress. Dismissed students who are reinstated will sign a new enrollment agreement, will be
charged tuition consistent with the existing published rate at the time they are reinstated, and will be
subject to the current policies in effect at the time of their reinstatement. Students who are reinstated
under these circumstances will return on probationary status but will not be eligible to receive Federal
Student Financial Aid until the semester following the semester in which the student’s cumulative GPA is
2.0 or higher and the student’s rate of progress in at or above 66.67%. At this point, the student will be
removed from probationary status and return to regular status and become eligible for financial aid.

Class Repeats for Undergraduate Students
Students who receive a failing grade in any course must repeat that specific course. Nursing students will
be given only one repeat attempt per course (with the exception of NURS 220), and only two courses
within the pre-licensure Nursing programs may be repeated. Dental Hygiene students may repeat no
more than two general education courses. Students who do not meet the requirements of a course and
therefore must repeat the course may do so one time. Furthermore, no courses within the Dental Hygiene
core curriculum (DHYG courses) may be repeated (see Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements
section of the catalog). Dental Hygiene students who are academically dismissed during the core program
and successfully appeal to reenter, are required to (1) audit all courses prior to and during the term


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 42 of 155
course(s) of which the student earned a grade less than “C” and (2) repeat all course(s) in which the
student did not meet the grade requirement.
When the student repeats a class for which they initially earned a failing grade and receives a passing
grade, that grade will replace the failing grade and the new grade will be used to calculate the final
cumulative grade point average (CGPA). All attempted coursework will be reflected on the official
transcript. All credits resulting from repeated courses are included in determining student’s satisfactory
academic progress standing for rate of progress.

Nursing students will be given only one repeat attempt per course (with the exception of NURS 220), and
only two courses within the pre-licensure Nursing programs may be repeated. Dental Hygiene students
may repeat no more than two General Education courses. Furthermore, no courses within the Dental
Hygiene core curriculum (DHYG courses) may be repeated (see Dental Hygiene Program Grade
Requirements section of the catalog). Dental Hygiene students who are academically dismissed during
the core program and successfully appeal to reenter, are required to (1) audit all courses prior to and
during the term course(s) for which the student earned a grade less than “C” and (2) repeat all course(s) in
which the student did not meet the grade requirement.

Maximum Program Completion Timeframe for Undergraduate Students
Students are expected to complete their program within the defined maximum program completion time,
which may not exceed 150 percent of the normal time frame. West Coast University measures program
length based on semester credit units; therefore, a student is not allowed to attempt more than 150 percent
of the number of semester credit units in their degree program of study. The requirements for rate of
progress are to ensure that students are progressing at a rate at which they will complete their programs
within the maximum allowable time frame. For example, in a 60 semester unit program, a student may
not attempt more 90 semester units (150 percent) in order to successfully complete the program. All
courses attempted and given a letter grade, including “D”, “F”, “I”, or “W” will be included as credits
attempted and successfully completed in assessing student progress against the maximum allowable time
frame.

In addition, if at any point a student cannot mathematically complete his/her program within the
maximum time frame, the student will be found to not be making satisfactory progress.

Termination Policy
A student is subject to termination from their program and the University for the following reasons:
• Failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress;
• Failure to comply with the University’s attendance policy;
• Failure to comply with the University’s student conduct policy;
• Failure to meet financial obligations to the University;
• Violation of any of the conditions as set forth and agreed upon in the Enrollment Agreement.

Transfers to a New Program
Students who have begun the coursework of one academic program and wish to transfer to another
program must seek permission from the Academic Dean or the appropriate academic administrator and
meet all admissions requirements for the program to which they seek to transfer. Students are required to
meet with the Director of Financial Services before a program transfer may be granted.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 43 of 155
Impact of Program Transfers or Additional Degrees on Satisfactory Academic Progress for
Undergraduate Students
Should a student be approved to transfer from one program of study to another or should a student wish to
obtain an additional degree, attempted and completed coursework within the University will be treated as
completed credits within the new program only if the courses pertain to the new program of study as
outlined in the catalog. In such cases, these attempted and completed credits will be considered in
determining satisfactory academic progress from both a cumulative grade point average calculation and
maximum allowable time frame perspective.

Transfers to a New Campus
Students who have begun the coursework of one academic program may transfer to another campus at the
discretion of the executive director at the new campus and must meet the following requirements:

    •   Space and appropriate courses must be available at the new campus to which the student wishes
        to transfer,
    •   The student must be making satisfactory academic progress,
    •   The student must meet the University’s attendance standards,
    •   The student must be in good financial standing with the current campus, and
    •   The student cannot have any violations of the student code of conduct.

Students requesting transfer to a new campus are required to meet with the Director of Financial Services
at their current campus before a program transfer may be granted. All grades for all course attempts at
both old and new campuses will be used to calculate the transferred student’s cumulative grade point
average and rate of progress for satisfactory academic progress.

NOTE: The Dental Hygiene program is approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation to be
offered at the Orange County campus, so all courses in the Dental Hygiene Program, including general
education must be taken at the Orange County campus.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 44 of 155
Student Policies and Information
Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources
New information technology resources have become important educational, research, service, and
administrative tools. West Coast University provides and maintains these resources to advance and
strengthen activities that support its mission. It encourages communication and collaboration without fear
that the products of this collaboration will be misrepresented, stolen or destroyed. The entire West Coast
University community shares information technology resources, and each user is responsible for
refraining from acts that waste resources, prevent others from using them, or misuse these resources.
Users of information technology resources are governed by University regulations and relevant laws and
contractual obligations, and should maintain the highest standards of ethical and professional conduct.
Users accept the privilege of using information technology resources with the understanding that they are
to be used only to facilitate West Coast University’s mission of teaching, learning, research, and
community/professional service, and for administrative activities in support of the mission. Other uses are
prohibited, including those outlined.
All files and documents of any kind saved on the hard drive of any computer owned by the institution,
and all software and applications on the shelf or installed on the hard drive of any computer owned by the
institution are considered to be the sole property of West Coast University and therefore not the property
of any individual user of the computer. Likewise, all files, documents, software or applications saved on
electronic media purchased by the institution are considered to be the property of the university.

The institution advises students that West Coast University is entitled to access and monitor its
information technology resources without prior notice, knowledge or permission, for bona fide school
purposes including, but not limited to, resolving an urgent circumstance, obtaining valuable institution-
related information, complying with a court order, warrant, subpoena or other legal discovery request for
information, assessing compliance with West Coast University policies or any applicable law, preserving
property or information that may be lost or destroyed, attending to maintenance concerns or addressing
safety or security concerns. Therefore, students are advised that they have no privacy interest or
expectation of privacy in information stored on or transmitted over the University’s information
technology resources, and that access and monitoring is a reasonable means of advancing institutional
purposes.

Specifically, West Coast University characterizes the following activities as unethical, unacceptable and
cause for disciplinary or legal action:
1. Obtaining or attempting to obtain unauthorized access to information technology resources
2. Sharing passwords or any other access information with other persons, or otherwise granting access to
    information technology resources to other persons without express authorization to do so
3. Violating or infringing the rights of any person, or being abusive, profane or defamatory
4. Destroying, altering, disfiguring, dismantling, disabling, preventing rightful access to or in any other
    way interfering with the integrity or security of information technology resources without express
    authorization to do so
5. Using WCU's information technology resources for personal, commercial, political, recreational or
    other purposes unrelated to the user's responsibilities and/or duties for furtherance of WCU's mission
    without express authorization to do so
6. Using, duplicating or transmitting copyrighted material, by copying, e-mail, peer-to-peer file sharing,
    or any other method of duplication or transmission, without first obtaining the owner's permission and



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 45 of 155
   in such a way as may constitute infringement of a copyright (see the University Copyright
   Infringement Policy, available from your Academic Dean).
7. Using material in a manner that exceeds the scope of a license or violates other contracts
8. Using information technology resources to impersonate others, to display images of others without
   their permission, to disrupt the orderly operation of the university or the pursuit of institutional
   purposes
9. Violating, or encouraging others to violate, West Coast University policies or applicable state or
   federal law, including but not limited to transmitting or knowingly receiving chain letters, child
   pornography, or obscene material (as defined by applicable law)

Transfer of certain technology across national boundaries is prohibited or otherwise regulated by the U.S.
government, including the transfer of such technology by transmission to third parties located in other
countries. This restriction includes the transmission of messages containing files and programs such as
encryption programs and technical drawings sent by electronic mail. Before sending such information
outside the United States, students should verify with the administration whether sending such
information is prohibited by law and/or whether an export license is required and, if so, whether such
license is available, and also that the information is labeled appropriately for export licensing purposes.
Students who have questions about whether a given use is permitted should contact the university’s
administration.
Any person who, without a good faith basis to do so, falsely reports or accuses another of unacceptable
conduct that violates this policy is subject to disciplinary action. Students who engage in activities that
violate this policy are subject to disciplinary action pursuant to the Academic Policies, Conduct section of
the University Catalog, which provides for a full range of sanctions up to and including termination and
may also be subject to prosecution under criminal laws and/or action under civil laws. Notwithstanding
imposition of any of the foregoing sanctions, a person who engages in conduct prohibited by this policy,
or who is suspected of having engaged in such conduct, may have his or her privilege of access to
information technology resources restricted or revoked during or following an investigation.
Allegations of conduct that is believed to violate this policy are to be reported to the appropriate Dean
when the alleged misconduct is by a student. Allegations should be made in writing and with as much
specificity as possible. To protect the fairness of the proceedings that may follow, the individual filing the
charge should not disseminate copies of the allegations to any other persons.
Students should notify relevant third parties of the restrictions outlined in this policy and that use of the
institutions information technology resources and messages transmitted or received using these resources
are subject to access and monitoring by the university. Use of the university’s information technology
resources by third parties will be governed by this.
Students should protect their work product by creating back up files on disk. The university provides
reasonable security against intrusion and damage to files stored on its information technology resources.
However, the university is not responsible for unauthorized access by other students, nor does it guarantee
protection against media failure, fires, floods or other destructive forces. Also, West Coast University
does not guarantee the availability of backups to restore files deleted through user error or media failure.
Students agree to return in a timely manner all materials and resources borrowed or checked out from
West Coast University.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 46 of 155
Complaint/Grievance Procedure
Students with complaints/grievances relating to classroom or other matters are encouraged to do the
following:

    1. Discuss the issue with their instructor. Every attempt should be made by both the student and
       faculty member to resolve the matter at this level.
    2. If it is not resolved at the instructor level, unresolved complaints/grievances should be submitted
       in writing to the Academic Dean or appropriate academic administrator for the program of
       enrollment.

Investigations of complaints or grievances will be directed by the campus Executive Director or his/her
designee. A thorough review of the grievance and faculty response, as well as any additional information
will be conducted. A written response will be provided to the student within 10 days of receiving the
grievance.

If dissatisfied with the response or solution, a student should follow the steps below:

Level 1:    Contact the Executive Director of his/her respective campus. If dissatisfied with the response
            or solution, go to the next level.
Level 2:    Contact the Vice President of Operations. If dissatisfied with the response or solution, go to
            the next level.
Level 3:    Contact the Provost of West Coast University. Decisions made by the Provost are considered
            final.

If a student does not feel that the University has adequately addressed a complaint or concern, the student
may consider contacting:

                                                              Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges
Bureau for Private Postsecondary
                                                              and Schools (ACICS)
Education
                                                              750 First Street, NE Suite 980
P.O. Box 980818                                  And/Or
                                                              Washington, DC 20002
West Sacramento, CA 95798
                                                              (202) 336-6780
1-800-952-5210
                                                              www.acics.org
www.bppe.ca.gov


If a Nursing or Dental Hygiene student does not feel that the University has adequately addressed a
complaint or concern, the student may consider contacting the following respective agencies:

California Board of Registered Nursing                        Commission on Dental Accreditation
(BRN)                                                         211 East Chicago Avenue
1747 North Market Boulevard, Suite 150                        Chicago, IL 60611-2678
Sacramento, CA 95834                                Or        (312) 440-2500
(916) 322-3350                                                www.ada.org
www.rn.ca.gov




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 47 of 155
Conduct and Discipline
Students enrolling at West Coast University assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner
compatible with the University’s function as an educational institution of higher learning. The University
expects its students to conduct themselves as responsible individuals, considerate and respectful of the
rights and interests of others. The University’s mission reflects an intention to partner with students in
their preparation for a professional career, and part of the education experience for students pertains to the
kind of behavior that is acceptable in professional settings. Honesty, integrity, and respect for others is an
integral expectation of student conduct. If in the judgment of the administrative officers of the
University, a student’s conduct does not conform to the above-level stated standards, the University will
follow a course of action deemed appropriate up to and including dismissal from a course and potentially
suspension or dismissal from the University.

Specific behaviors that are unacceptable within the classroom setting include the use of cell phones or any
technology that is not intended for the express benefit of the learning experience and approved by the
faculty. Disruptive behavior, including conversations unsanctioned by the faculty, or other methods of
communication or distracting from the primary mission of the faculty member are unacceptable.

Dress Code
Students are expected to maintain a neat and clean appearance during class time, as they will in their
future career roles and positions. Students are expected to wear University approved uniforms when they
are in a clinical setting. Individual programs may enforce a stricter dress code policy. Please refer to the
respective Student Handbook or consult with program administration for any specific program
requirements.

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention
The possession or use of drugs or alcohol is strictly forbidden on University premises or during any
University-sponsored activities conducted off-campus. Faculty and student peers have an obligation to
act on concerns regarding alcohol or drug abuse or dependency when encountered within the West Coast
academic community. Students who need counseling assistance for drug or alcohol dependency should
contact the Executive Director, Academic Dean or Student Services Manager for referrals. All referrals
will be kept confidential. Information on drug abuse prevention is available from the Student Services
Department for students or Human Resources for employees.

West Coast University adheres to the following prohibitions regarding drugs and alcohol:
  1.      Students may not possess or be under the influence of alcohol while in clinical or classroom
          settings.
  2.      Students may not be under the influence of drugs, i.e. controlled substances, or prescription
          drugs, when there is the possibility that such use may impair the student's ability to safely
          perform patient care or impair the learning process in a classroom setting.
  3.      Students may not be involved in the illegal possession, distribution, sale, use or purchase of a
          controlled substance.
  4.      Faculty are obligated to take immediate action if a student involved in a University program is
          suspected, based on inappropriate conduct, physical symptoms, or other indicators, of being under
          the influence of drugs or alcohol.




       WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                      2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 48 of 155
  The following guidelines describe the actions that may be taken when students are suspected of
  violating drug or alcohol policies:

  1.      Faculty or peers who suspect a student of alcohol or drug use/dependency (based on a pattern of
          behavior consistent with impairment) will document specific behaviors or confirmed evidence of
          such impairment. This will be submitted in writing to the Academic Dean who will determine the
          action to be taken. If the Academic Dean and involved faculty believe the evidence is compelling
          and indicates violation of drug and alcohol policies, the student will be requested to attend a
          conference whereby the concerns and related evidence will be addressed. The Academic Dean
          and involved faculty will decide what type of follow-up is indicated, based on the outcome of this
          conference.
  2.      If reasonable suspicion of alcohol or drug use occurs in the classroom or clinical setting, the
          student will be immediately removed from that setting. The faculty member will discuss the
          concerns with the student. If reasonable suspicion still exists, the Academic Dean of the
          University program (or Executive Director in his/her absence) will be informed and will
          determine what actions need to be taken. Screening for drugs or alcohol will be required. The
          student will have to give consent for such testing, and authorization for results to be made
          available to the University. All testing costs will be the responsibility of the student.

Ethics Reporting Hotline
If a student witnesses violations of these or any other University policy, the University asks that the
violation be reported immediately. Students who feel uncomfortable talking to the campus Executive
Director should follow the process outlined in the Student Grievance Policy. If the student prefers to
make a confidential report, they may use the Ethics Reporting Hotline to do so by calling 800-448-1681
or they may do so online at:
        https://www.integrity-helpline.com/accwcu.jsp

No Weapons Policy
West Coast University prohibits all persons who enter University property from carrying a handgun,
firearm, illegal knives or other prohibited weapons or explosives of any kind onto the property regardless
of whether the person is licensed to carry the weapon or not, with the exception of authorized law
enforcement officials. Failure to abide by this policy will lead to dismissal.

Security
The University strives to provide its students with a safe and secure environment. All University facilities
comply with the requirements of various regulatory agencies. Students are responsible for their own
security and safety and must be considerate of the security and safety of others. The University is not
responsible for any student’s personal belongings that are lost, stolen, or damaged on campus, in parking
lots, at clinical sites, or during any University activities. Students are encouraged to promptly and
accurately report all emergencies to University officials. Upon receipt of any report of a medical or
criminal emergency, the University will, on behalf of the student, obtain the services of medical or
security professionals, as deemed appropriate. Each fall, as required by the Higher Education
Amendment of 1992, the University publishes the “Campus Crime and Security Report.” This report is
available continually on the University website and in the Student Services Department.




       WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 49 of 155
Sexual Harassment Policy
It is the policy of West Coast University to provide all students and employees with an educational,
employment, and business environment free from all forms of harassment, exploitation, intimidation, or
unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, visual, or physical conduct or
communications of a sexual nature as defined and otherwise prohibited by the California Fair
Employment and Housing Act, California Education Code, and State and Federal rules, regulations,
statutes, and laws prohibiting sexual harassment and retaliation.
The University expressly forbids sexual harassment of its students and employees by faculty, managers,
supervisors, employees, other students, or members of the general public. The University will take
whatever action may be needed to prevent, correct, and, if necessary, discipline those engaged in
inappropriate behavior. Where evidence of sexual harassment is found, appropriate personnel (faculty,
staff, or student worker) or student disciplinary action shall be taken. Sexual harassment should be
reported immediately to the campus Executive Director, and every effort will be made to ensure that
confidentiality is maintained.

Student/Employee Fraternization
Employees of West Coast University are prohibited, under any circumstances, to date or engage in any
improper fraternization or undue familiarity with students, regardless of the student’s age and/or
regardless of whether the student may have consented to such conduct. Further, employees must not
entertain or socialize with students outside of the University environment. Similarly, any action or
comment by an employee which invites romantic or sexual involvement with a student is considered
highly unethical, in violation of University policy, and may result in disciplinary action by the University.
Inappropriate and unacceptable employee behavior includes, but is not limited to, dating; requests for
sexual activity; physical displays of affection; giving inappropriate personal gifts; frequent personal
communication with a student (via phone, e-mail, letters, notes, text messaging, etc.) unrelated to course
work or official University matters; giving or accepting rides, giving or offering housing, selling or
buying anything of more than nominal value, providing alcohol or drugs to students; inappropriate
touching; and engaging in sexual contact and/or sexual relations.
Students are also expected to behave in a professional manner towards faculty and staff and must follow
the same guidelines as presented for employees. If a student witnesses or hears of an instructor or staff
person’s participation in an inappropriate relationship with a student, the incident should be reported to
the campus Executive Director immediately.

Student Records
West Coast University will maintain student records for each student, whether or not the student
completes his or her educational program, for a period ending five years after the date of the student's
graduation, withdrawal, or termination. Student transcripts will be maintained indefinitely.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, As Amended
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to
their education records.
Review and Correction:
•   A student has the right to inspect and review his/her education records within 45 days of the day the
    Institution receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Campus Registrar written
    requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The institution official will make
    arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 50 of 155
    inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar, the student will be advised of the
    correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
•   A student has the right to request the amendment of his/her education records that the student believes
    is inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the Institution to amend a record that they believe is
    inaccurate or misleading. They should write the Institution official responsible for the record, clearly
    identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If
    the Institution decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the Institution will notify
    the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request
    for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the
    student when notified of the right to a hearing.
Disclosure of Educational Records:
• Information defined as Directory Information may be released without a student’s consent. West
    Coast University defines Directory Information to include:
        o Name
        o Address
        o Phone Number
        o Email address
        o Enrollment Status/Grade Level (e.g., First Term, Second Term, etc.)
        o Date of Graduation
        o Degrees and Honors Received
        o Photos (for identification purposes only)
        o Major Field of Study
        o Dates of Attendance
        o Most Recent Institution Attended
•   A student’s social security number is never considered Directory Information.
•   A student may opt out of Directory Information disclosure by submitting a written request to the
    Registrar.
•   The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's
    education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
•   Generally, Universities must have written permission from the student in order to release any
    information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows Universities to disclose those
    records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):
        o   University officials with legitimate educational interest;
        o   Other Universities to which a student is transferring;
        o   Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
        o   Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
        o   Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the University;
        o   Accrediting organizations;
        o   To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
        o   Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
        o   State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 51 of 155
•   The student has a right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged
    failures by the Institution to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the
    Office that administers FERPA is:

       Family Policy Compliance Office
       Department of Education
       Independence Avenue, SW
       Washington, DC 20202-4605
       http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/index.html

       (Additional FERPA information is available from the campus Registrars’ Office.)




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 52 of 155
Student Services
West Coast University offers a variety of Student Services to students. The University also maintains a
list of outside services to assist students with personal needs, such as childcare, transportation, and other
areas not directly related to their academic program of study.

Advising and Tutorial Assistance
The University has established a multi-level approach to offer to students in support of their academic and
personal needs of students are addressed. Staff and faculty members on each campus are available to
assist students in academic guidance. The Academic Department is primarily responsible for addressing
students’ academic concerns while the Student Services Department is primarily responsible for other
areas of concern related to successful program completion and may provide referral services to external
agencies as necessary.

Students who experience difficulty in their coursework and have a need for academic support should first
contact the appropriate academic administrator for the program of study to create an individualized
academic success plan. The University will make every attempt to accommodate students’ schedules in
determining tutoring sessions.

Career Services
The Career Services Department is a vital part of the student’s educational program. Although the
securing of positions cannot be guaranteed, the purpose of the department is to actively assist students in
obtaining desirable employment. The Career Services Department offers instruction and guidelines for
students and graduates in areas such as career planning and job search techniques, resume preparation,
interview planning and preparation, understanding the importance of networking, completing job
applications, the characteristics of a professional image, interview follow-up, workplace etiquette, time
management skills, and successfully navigating the workplace. Students and graduates are encouraged to
take advantage of every opportunity to work with the Career Services Department to sharpen their
interviewing and presentation skills. Successful employment assistance is dependent upon a mutual effort
by both graduates and the Career Services Department. Graduates are encouraged to aggressively seek
employment opportunities on their own, keep records of their contacts, and inform their Career Services
Specialist of these efforts.

These employment assistance services are available to all students who successfully complete the
requirements for graduation in their respective programs. Students should recognize that employment
opportunities may be limited for any student who has a criminal background. Employment assistance
services are available on an on-going basis to West Coast University graduates.

Disability Services
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA),
West Coast University abides by the regulation that “no otherwise qualified individual with a disability”
shall be excluded from participation in programs and services offered by the University unless
accommodation would impose an undue hardship. West Coast University is committed to providing
reasonable accommodations. Below is an example of some of the responsibilities of the West Coast
University Disability Office:




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 53 of 155
Services:
    • Disability Office maintains confidential records
    • Disability Coordinator(s) conducts initial intake meeting with student to review services and
        documentation required
    • Disability Coordinator(s) receives documentation from student and conducts initial review and
        evaluation (verifies appropriate documentation, complete submission of documents, verifies
        disability, if needed consults with faculty, program chair, administrative departments, etc.).
    • Disability Coordinator(s) meets with student to review documentation and appropriate/
        reasonable accommodations
    • Disability Coordinator(s) certifies approved accommodations.
            o Provides student with “Letter of Accommodation(s)”
            o Student signs “Letter of Acknowledgement and Student Responsibility”
            o When available, provides student with additional disability information and resources.
    • Disability Coordinator(s) follows up with students each semester to maintain up-to-date records
        and reasonable accommodations.

The above list of responsibilities is not all inclusive and may be affected by the timeliness of the student
request and the nature of the accommodation requests. ADA does not require institutions to provide
accommodations that result in undue burden or fundamentally alter the nature of the course or relevant
academic program. Students should submit written requests with supporting documentation at least six
weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes or as soon as practical.

To request reasonable accommodations, students should contact the Student Services Office at their
campus and speak with the Disability Services Coordinator.

Housing
The University does not provide housing assistance to students. Information about nearby housing is
available through the University’s Student Services office.

Library
A reference library is maintained at each campus, and the mission of the library is to support the
curricular and professional needs of students, faculty, and administration by continuously developing,
acquiring and maintaining information resources and services. The University continues to expand its
resources in order to make the library experience more beneficial for students.

The University Campus libraries include print and electronic collections that strengthen and support the
institution’s various academic programs. Each library provides electronic access to the collection catalog,
resource databases, and the internet. In addition, the library also has various subscriptions to trade
professional and academic journals which can be used as instructional and research tools.

The online library is a web-enabled information center. It provides access to research articles in full text,
links to scholarly and professional websites that support the curriculum, access links to web resources,
and links to e-book sites, which have been selected by the faculty and educational administration.
Specific databases which students have access to are Lexis Nexis, LIRN, EbscoHost, and Ebrary.

The librarian at each campus is available to assist students and faculty with their library and research
needs. The librarian is available to work with students to give them the basic tools to find, retrieve and
integrate information needed to successfully complete their program of study.



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 54 of 155
The University encourages students to become familiar with onsite resources as well as with other
research facilities in the community. Many courses require library assignments as part of the curriculum.
The library hours are scheduled to meet the needs of the students and faculty on a daily basis. The online
library is available 24 hours a day.

Parking
All campuses provide free daily parking on campus. Parking in the University-provided lots is a
privilege. To maintain parking privileges, students must adhere to parking policies posted in and around
the lots.

Textbooks
All books are available to students through the West Coast University Virtual Bookstore. Students can
access the Virtual Bookstore and order required and optional textbooks by going to the West Coast
University website at www.westcoastuniversity.edu and clicking on Student Affairs and Virtual
Bookstore links. Once ordered, textbooks are delivered directly to the student’s place of residence or
address on record. Textbooks are ordered every 10 weeks. Students are expected to utilize the correct
edition as specified in the syllabus. The Bookstore opens the eighth week of each term (for ordering
books for the subsequent term) and closes at the end of the third week of the next term. Students can
purchase all required textbooks from the virtual bookstore or from a retail outlet of their cho




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 55 of 155
Financial Policies and Information

Financial Assistance
West Coast University offers students several options for payment of tuition. All students are encouraged
to apply for financial assistance if unable to meet educational costs on their own. WCU participates in
several types of Title IV programs, many of which are based on financial need.
Government guaranteed loans are an important part of financing educational expenses. West Coast
University provides all students with information and counseling to assist them in managing their loans
effectively. Confidential loan counseling is available upon request.
Students seeking financial assistance must first complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) at www.fafsa.gov. The College's Financial Aid Officer uses this information to determine
students' eligibility and assists them in deciding what resources are best suited to their circumstances.
Students must meet all eligibility requirements to qualify for Federal Student Aid. The Financial Aid
Department may request additional documentation to support the student’s request for financial
assistance, including, for example, signed copies of federal income tax returns. Renewal of financial aid
is not automatic. Recipients are required to reapply each year by the announced deadline.
Federal and state grants and loans will be disbursed onto student accounts to cover direct educational
costs. Disbursements in excess of direct costs will be refunded to the student (or parent, in the case of a
PLUS loan). Federal Work Study earnings will be paid directly to the student via check on a biweekly
basis for actual hours worked.
Students who obtain a loan to pay for their educational program will have the responsibility to repay the
full amount of the loan, plus interest, less the amount of any refund. If a student withdraws, a refund
calculation will be completed and a refund of non-federal aid funds may be provided.

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements
To be eligible for financial aid, a student must:

    1. Be a citizen of the United States or an eligible permanent resident;
    2. Be enrolled in an eligible program;
    3. Be making satisfactory academic progress toward graduation;
    4. Be a high school graduate or have obtained a GED or the equivalent;
    5. Not be in default on any federal student loan nor owe a refund on a federal grant received at any
       postsecondary college or institution;
    6. Be registered with the U.S. Selective Service requirements, if applicable.


Financial Aid Programs
The following is a description of the financial aid programs available at West Coast University for
students who qualify. Additional information may be obtained through the Financial Services
Department.

Cal Grant Program: Cal Grant A and B are State Grant programs administered by the State of
California and are available to students who are California residents, who have applied before the March
2nd deadline, and who are enrolled in the institution at the commencement of the award year. Cal Grant



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                      Page 56 of 155
funds are awarded based on semester enrollment during the award year. Grants are based on funds
available from the State and do not have to be repaid.

Federal Pell Grant: The Federal PELL Grant program provides a foundation of assistance to which
other forms of aid may be added. Eligibility for the Federal PELL Grant Program is determined by a
standard formula that is revised and approved every year by the federal government. Unlike loans, grants
do not have to be paid back.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG):                     Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited number of students with exceptional financial
need. Grants are based on funds available and do not have to be repaid. Need is determined by the
financial resources of the student and parents and the cost of attendance.

Federal Work-Study (FWS): The Federal Work-Study program provides jobs for graduate and
undergraduate students with financial need, allowing them to earn money to help pay education expenses.
The program encourages community service work related to the student’s course of study. Funds under
this program are limited. Students interested in obtaining a Federal Work Study job should inquire with
their Student Services Representative.

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan: Under the Federal Direct Loan (FDL) program the
University originates the Direct Loan. The loan is then sent to the U.S. Department of Education’s
Common Origination and Disbursement Center (COD) and disbursed to the University electronically
through the Grant Administration and Payment System (G5). The loans are serviced by the Direct Loan
Servicing System.

Subsidized Direct Loan: Federal Subsidized loans are available to students with financial need.
Students may borrow up to $3,500 for their first academic year, $4,500 for the second academic year, and
$5,500 for the third and fourth academic years, at a fixed interest rate of 4.5% for undergraduates and
6.8% for graduate students, which is established annually by the U.S. Department of Education. The
interest is paid by the federal government while students are in school and for six months after students
cease their enrollment. Regular payments begin six months after students cease enrollment or fail to carry
at least one-half the normal full-time University workload.

Unsubsidized Direct Loan: Unsubsidized loans are available for students to borrow for additional
education costs. Independent students can borrow up to $9,500 for their first academic year, $10,500 for
the second academic year and $12,500 for their third and fourth academic years, as a combined total with
the Federal Subsidized Direct loan, at a fixed interest rate of 6.8%. Dependent students whose parents do
not qualify for a PLUS loan can borrow up to $9,500 for their first academic year as a combined total
with the Federal Subsidized Direct loan, $10,500 for their second academic year and $12,500 for their
third and fourth academic years, at a fixed interest rate established annually by the U.S. Department of
Education. With the exception of demonstrating financial need, borrowers must meet all eligibility criteria
of the Federal Subsidized Direct loan program. Interest payments begin immediately after the loan is fully
disbursed or may be added to the principal balance. Regular payments begin six months after students
cease enrollment or fail to carry at least one-half the normal full-time school workload.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 57 of 155
Loan Amounts

                        Additional Unsubsidized Eligibility               Additional Unsubsidized Eligibility
  Grade      Base Loan         for Dependent Students                       for Independent Students and
  Level       Amount
                       (Exclusive of dependent Students whose                    Dependent Students
                         parent(s) is/are not eligible to borrow a       (Parent(s) is/are not eligible to borrow a
                         Direct PLUS loan.)                              Direct PLUS Loan)
Freshman       $3,500                      $2,000                                          $6,000
Sophomore      $4,500                      $2,000                                          $6,000
Junior         $5,500                      $2,000                                          $7,000
Senior         $5,500                      $2,000                                          $7,000
Graduate       $8,500                        N/A                                          $12,000

Interest Rates

 Undergraduate Students - First disbursement of a loan               Interest Rate on the
                                                                                          Interest Rate on the
                                                                      Unpaid Balance of
                                                                                          Unsubsidized Loan
                                                                        the Subsidized
     Made on or after:               And made before:                                           Balance
                                                                             Loan
         July 1, 2010                   July 1, 2011                     4.5 percent                6.8 percent
         July 1, 2011                   July 1, 2012                     3.4 percent                6.8 percent


                                            Interest rate of loans disbursed after July 1, 2006
    Graduate Students
                                                                      6.8 percent

Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS): Federal Parent Loans for
undergraduate students provide additional funds for credit-worthy parents to help pay for students’
educational expenses. The interest rates for these loans are fixed at 7.9 percent (established annually by
the US Department of Education) and repayment begins immediately after the loan is fully disbursed.

Direct PLUS loans for Graduate Students (GRAD/PLUS): Federal GRAD/PLUS Loans for
students pursuing a graduate or professional degree provide additional funds for credit-worthy graduate
students to help pay for students’ educational expenses. The interest rates for these loans are fixed at 7.9
percent for Direct PLUS loans and repayment begins immediately after the loan is fully disbursed.

Private Loans & Scholarships: Private loans are available to students through various lending
institutions. Private loans, which are privately insured, cover educational expenses beyond what is
covered by federal loans. The student must be a U.S. Citizen, a U.S. national, or a permanent resident and
must be creditworthy. International students are eligible with a creditworthy cosigner (who must be a
U.S. Citizen or permanent resident) and appropriate U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service
documentation. The student may be enrolled full- or half-time. If the student has no credit or a poor
credit history, he/she may still qualify for a loan by applying with a creditworthy co-borrower. In



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                              Page 58 of 155
addition to private loans, a wide array of scholarships funded by outside sources is available to students.
Scholarship eligibility criteria vary. Contact the Financial Services Department for assistance.

BSN Scholarship Opportunity for American Career College Vocational Nursing Alumni:
WCU offers a scholarship to any eligible American Career College (ACC) graduate who has successfully
completed the Vocational Nursing program at ACC and is attending the Bachelor of Science in Nursing
program at WCU. The deadline to apply is sixty (60) days prior to the start of a student’s junior year at
WCU or any semester thereafter, and the maximum award amount is $14,000 which is applied to the
student’s account balance over each eligible semester ($3,500 per eligible semester). To meet initial
eligibility requirements, applicants must submit a completed application to the Financial Aid Director at
the University along with the following:
1. Letter of interest from the student which includes the student’s identification number.
2. Copy of American Career College Vocational Nursing transcript
3. Faculty letter of recommendation
The student must meet the following eligibility requirements:
1. Student must be a junior or senior BSN student in good standing at WCU (must have successfully
   completed a minimum of 60 semester credits).
2. Student must have graduated from the American Career College Vocational Nursing program.
3. Student must have a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average at WCU.

The University will award the scholarship each semester following the submission of an eligible
application to those who continue to meet the requirements of the scholarship. For more information,
please contact the University’s Financial Aid Director.

Veterans Educational Benefits
West Coast University degree programs are approved for training of Veterans and eligible persons under
the provisions of Title 38, United States Code. Students interested in Veterans Educational Benefits
should contact the Financial Services Department. Veterans who are unsure of their eligibility should
contact the Veterans Administration. Eligible students must maintain satisfactory academic progress to
continue receiving educational benefits.
The University participates in the Post 9/11 GI Bill Yellow Ribbon program. At West Coast University,
only students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program are eligible for funding under the
Yellow Ribbon program.

Additional Eligibility Requirements: Only individuals entitled to the maximum benefit rate (based on
service requirements) may receive this funding. Therefore, a student may be eligible if he or she:

    1. Served an aggregate period of active duty after September 10, 2001, of at least 36 months;
    2. Was honorably discharged from active duty for a service connected disability and served 30
       continuous days after September 10, 2001;
    3. Is a dependent eligible for Transfer of Entitlement under the Post-9/11 GI Bill based on a
       veteran’s service under the eligibility criteria listed above.

Reimbursement to Veterans and Eligible Persons
For information or for resolution of specific payment problems, veterans should call the DVA nationwide
toll free number at 1-800-827-1000.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 59 of 155
Tuition Payment
Tuition for the program selected is due by the first session of each term unless alternative arrangements
are made with the Financial Services Department. Payment may be made with cash, credit card, check, or
money order made payable to West Coast University. Payments should be made in person during regular
office hours or mailed and postmarked prior to the due date. Payments made after the due date may be
assessed a $15 late payment fee.

Financial Suspension
Students’ financial accounts must always be kept current or appropriate arrangements must be made with
the Financial Services Department. Students who fail to make satisfactory arrangements or who default
on their financial arrangement are subject to possible suspension or dismissal.

Students who are not in good financial standing with the University, who have not made the aforesaid
agreement with the Financial Services Department, or who have not honored the agreement after it was
made, may be suspended or withdrawn from the University. The reinstatement process includes full
payment of the delinquent portion of the tuition for readmission. Official transcripts and diplomas will be
withheld until the student has either paid the account in full or made satisfactory arrangements to repay.

Collection Expenses
All expenses incurred by the University to collect delinquent tuition or fees from students will be added to
the student account.

Returned Checks
Checks that are returned for non-sufficient funds will be assessed a $15 processing fee. If tuition
payments by check are returned more than once for non-sufficient funds during the session of the
enrollment agreement, all future payments must be in cash or by money order. Students who have checks
returned to the University, for insufficient funds, closed account, or any other reason, must make
arrangements to redeem them with cash, cashier’s check or money order as soon as possible. Students
failing to make prompt arrangements may be subject to financial suspension and will be referred to an
outside collection agency.

Cancellation and Refund Policy

Student’s Right to Cancel:
You have the right to cancel your enrollment agreement including any equipment such as books,
materials, and supplies or any other goods related to the instruction offered in the agreement, if notice of
cancellation is made within seven (7) calendar days (excluding holidays) of enrollment or by the seventh
(7th) calendar day of your first term, whichever is later.

Cancellation shall occur when you give written notice of cancellation at the address of the university
shown on top of the front page of your enrollment agreement. You can also do this by mail, hand
delivery, or email. The written notice of cancellation need not take any particular form and, however
expressed, it is effective if it shows that you no longer wish to be bound by the agreement.

If you cancel the agreement, the university will refund 100 percent of the amount paid for institutional
charges, with a deduction for equipment not returned in a timely manner in good condition, within 45
days after your notice of cancellation is received.



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 60 of 155
Withdrawal From Program:
You have the right to withdraw from a program at any time. For the purposes of determining the amount
you owe for the time you attended, you shall be deemed to have withdrawn from the program when any
of the following occurs:

        a. You notify the university of your withdrawal or the actual date of withdrawal; or
        b. The university terminates your enrollment; or
        c. You fail to attend any classes for fourteen (14) consecutive calendar days without making
           prior arrangements with the University.

Pro-Rata Refund Policy
If you withdraw from the program after the period allowed for cancellation of the agreement and have
completed 60% or less of the period of attendance (semester), the university will calculate whether a
tuition refund is due, and if so, remit a refund within 45 days following your withdrawal. For students
receiving funds through the Federal Student Aid program, unearned funds will be returned to the lenders
in the order required under Federal Law. For non-federal student financial aid program moneys, the
institutional/California state refund policy shall be a pro rata refund of moneys paid for institutional
charges for students who have completed 60 percent or less of the period of attendance. The pro rata
percentage is based on days of attendance within the period of attendance. If any portion of those charges
was paid from the proceeds of a non-federal loan, then the refund will be sent to the lender or to the
agency that guaranteed the loan, if any. Any remaining balance will be paid to you.

If you obtained equipment as specified in the agreement as a separate charge, and return it in unused, like
new condition within 10 days following the date of your cancellation or withdrawal, the university shall
refund the charge for the equipment paid by you. If you purchase textbooks through the University’s
vendor and return the books to the vendor within ten (10) days of the first day of classes in an unopened
condition, you will be fully credited the cost of the books, less shipping fees. Books returned after the ten
(10) day period or returned in an opened or used condition will be credited back to your account as used
books, pursuant to the book vendor’s used book buy-back policy. If you fail to return the equipment in
good condition, allowing for reasonable wear and tear, within this 10-day period, the university may
offset against the refund the documented cost to the University of that equipment. You shall be liable for
the amount, if any by which the documented cost for equipment exceeds the prorated refund amount. The
documented cost of equipment may be less than the amount charged, and the amount the university has
charged in the contract. In any event, you will never be charged more than the equipment charges stated
in the contract. The University will not buy back used kits.

Determination of the Withdrawal Date
The student’s withdrawal date is the last date of academic attendance as determined by the institution
from its attendance records. Since the institutional leave of absence is not considered an official leave of
absence for title IV purposes, the withdrawal date for a student who takes an institutional leave of absence
is the last date of attendance prior to the leave.

Return of Title IV Funds Policy
Federal regulations state that the amount of a Title IV refund is based on the percentage of Title IV funds
earned by the student at the time of withdrawal. In order to determine whether Title IV funds must be
returned, the University must calculate the following:

•   To determine the percentage of the payment period completed, the number of days* attended in the
    payment period is divided by the total days* in the payment period. *Days = calendar days for


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 61 of 155
    purposes of this formula, and therefore include weekends and holidays. Only scheduled breaks of 5
    days or more and approved leave of absences are excluded.
•   The net amount of Title IV funds disbursed, and what could have been disbursed for the payment
    period is multiplied by the percentage of the payment period completed. The result is the amount of
    earned Title IV aid.
•   The earned aid is subtracted from the aid that was actually disbursed to or on behalf of the student.
•   The institution will return the lesser of the total earned aid or the unearned institutional charges for
    the payment period.
•   Unearned aid is allocated back to the Title IV programs in the following order as specified by law:
    1. Unsubsidized Direct Loans
    2. Subsidized Direct Loans
    3. Federal Loans
    4. Direct PLUS Loans
If excess funds remain after repaying all outstanding loan amounts, the remaining excess shall be credited
in the following order:
     1. Federal Pell Grant Program
     2. Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
     3. Federal SEOG Program
     4. Other assistance awarded

Note: After the institution has allocated the unearned aid, any amount owed by the student to a grant
program is reduced by 50%. Unearned loan funds received by the student are paid back as per the terms
of the borrower’s promissory note.

Federal Refund Requirements vs. State Refund Requirements
In addition to the Return of Title IV requirements for federal financial aid recipients, the institution is
required by the State to calculate a prorated refund for all students who have completed less than 60% of
their period of attendance, regardless of whether or not the student received Title IV funds. However, the
federal formula for Return of Title IV funds may result in a larger refund than the state refund policy. In
that case, the institution and/or the student must return the sum resulting in the larger of the two
calculations to the appropriate Title IV program. Therefore, the student may, after Title IV funds are
returned, owe a balance to the institution.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 62 of 155
   Undergraduate Tuition and Fees (Effective with Terms after July 1, 2011)
   Full and Part-time Tuition Cost by Semester:
                                         Number                        2    3/4-time              1/2-         Less than              Total             Total
                                                        Full-time
                                           of            Status              Status               time         1/2-time              Tuition          Estimated
     Program1              Degree       Semesters          (12 to 18            (9 to 11
                                                                                Credits)
                                                                                                 Status         Status                Cost            Program
                                        (Full-time)         Credits)                             (6 to 8                             (Full-Time)        Costs
                                                                                                 Credits)                          - not including   (Tuition + Fees)
                                                                                                                                   additional fees

                                                                                                                $1,850
Dental Hygiene               BS             7             $16,800           $14,000          $10,900                               $117,600             $129,631
                                                                                                               per credit
                                                                                                                $1,740
Nursing, BSN                 BS             8             $15,750           $13,125          $10,200                               $126,000             $133,240
                                                                                                               per credit
                                                                                                                $1,740
Nursing, LVN to BSN          BS             7             $15,750           $13,125          $10,200                               $110,250             $117,278
                                                                                                               per credit
                                                                                        Under 12 Units
Nursing, RN to BSN           BS             4              $5,625                                                                  $22,500               $26,110
                                                                                       $535.71 per credit


   Other Fees:
                               Registration             Total Book         Book Shipping Cost                       Estimate for uniforms                            4
                                                                                                                                                     STRF Fees
      Program                  (Non-refundable)           Cost*                                                      and/or supply kits3                  (Non-
                                                                                                                                                       refundable)

Dental Hygiene                       $75                  $5,115                      $518                               $6,000**                       $323

Nursing , BSN                        $75                  $5,895                      $592                                  $345                        $333

Nursing, LVN to BSN                  $75                  $5,797                      $518                                  $345                        $293

Nursing, RN to BSN                   $75                  $3,174                      $296                            Not Applicable                     $65

   *The Total Book Cost reflects the Manufactures Suggested Retail Price totals compiled in May 2011
   **The Dental Hygiene supply kit must be purchased in its entirety from WCU.

   Note: Students who wish to take Challenge Exams will be subject to a fee of $100 for each Challenge exam. Please see your
   campus Business Office for a full price listing.

   Graduate Tuition and Fees (Effective with Terms after July 1, 2011)
   Tuition Cost by Credit Hour:
                                          Total       Tuition     Total Tuition       Registratio           Total        Book             STRF          Total
                                         Credits       Cost            Cost             n (Non-             Book        Shipping          Fees4       Estimated
                 1
     Program                Degree          in
                                         program
                                                        per
                                                      Credit
                                                                  (not including
                                                                    additional
                                                                                      refundable)           Cost*         Cost            (Non-
                                                                                                                                       refundable)
                                                                                                                                                      Program
                                                       Hour            fees)
                                                                                                                                                     Costs (Tuition
                                                                                                                                                         + Fees)

Health Care
                              MS           36         $625         $22,500                 $75         $1,346           $222             $60             $24,203
Management
Nursing, MSN                  MS           36         $725         $26,100                 $75         $1,163           $222             $70             $27,630

Nursing, RN to MSN            MS           77         $725         $55,825                 $75         $2,570           $444            $148             $59,062
Nursing, RN to MSN +
                            MS +
Nurse Educator                             87         $725         $63,075                 $75         $3,040           $518            $168             $66,876
                          Certificate
Certificate
Nurse Educator
                          Certificate      13         $725             $9,425              $75          $470             $74             $25             $10,069
Certificate
   *The Total Book Cost reflects the Manufactures Suggested Retail Price totals compiled in May 2011

   Note: Students who wish to take Challenge Exams will be subject to a fee of $100 for each Challenge exam. Please see your
   campus Business Office for a full price listing.


       WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                           2011-12 CATALOG                                                 Page 63 of 155
¹
    West Coast University also offers certain online courses to students enrolled in on-ground programs. If
    a student enrolled in an on-ground program chooses to take a course or courses offered online, he/she
    will be subject to a Technology fee of $150 per course in addition to the tuition charges listed above.
²
    All credits taken in a single semester which exceed 18 credits will be charged at $800 per credit with
    the exception of students in the core requirements of Dental Hygiene.
3
    The Uniform and Supply costs are based on the Manufacture Suggested Retail Price as of May 2011
    and are subject to change.
4
    You must pay the state-imposed assessment for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) if all of the
    following applies to you:
      1. You are a student, who is a California resident, or are enrolled in a residency program, and prepay
          all or part of your tuition either by cash, guaranteed student loans, or personal loans, and
      2. Your total charges are not paid by any third-party payer such as an employer, government
          program or other payer unless you have a separate agreement to repay the third party.
    You are not eligible for protection from the STRF and you are not required to pay the STRF
    assessment, if either of the following applies:
      1. You are not a California resident, or are not enrolled in a residency program, or
      2. Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, government program or other
         payer, and you have no separate agreement to repay the third party.
    The State of California created the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) to relieve or mitigate
    economic losses suffered by students, who are California residents, or are enrolled in a residency
    program attending certain schools regulated by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational
    Education.
    You may be eligible for STRF if you are a California resident or are enrolled in a residency program,
    prepaid tuition, paid the STRF assessment, and suffered an economic loss as a result of any of the
    following:
      1. The school closed before the course of instruction was completed.
      2. The school’s failure to pay refunds or charges on behalf of a student to a third party for license
         fees or any other purpose, or to provide equipment or materials for which a charge was collected
         within 180 days before the closure of the school.
      3. The school’s failure to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a federally guaranteed student loan
         program as required by law or to pay or reimburse proceeds received by the school prior to
         closure in excess of tuition and other cost.
      4. There was a material failure to comply with the Act or this Division within 30 days before the
         school closed or, if the material failure began earlier than 30 days prior to closure, the period
         determined by the Bureau.
      5. An inability after diligent efforts to prosecute, prove, and collect on a judgment against the
         institution for a violation of the act.
      Note: Tuition fees may change from year to year.




      WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 64 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 65 of 155
Programs by Campus Location

Programs                                                                                Campus Location

                                                                          Los Angeles          Anaheim             Ontario

Bachelor of Science Degree Programs
    Dental Hygiene                                                                                  X
    Nursing, BSN                                                                X                   X                  X
          LVN to BSN Program                                                    X                   X                  X
          RN to BSN Program                                                     X                   X                  X
Master of Science Degree Programs
    Nursing, MSN                                                                X
          Nursing, RN to MSN                                                    X
          Nurse Educator Certificate 1                                          X
    Health Care Management                                                      X




1
  Nurse Educator Certificate may also be taken as an education track in conjunction with the Master of Science in Nursing or RN
to MSNprogram.

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 66 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 67 of 155
Undergraduate Programs of Study
GENERAL EDUCATION

General Education Mission
       The General Education program has been designed to facilitate students’ acquisition and
       application of knowledge through intellectual stimulation, scientific methodology, information
       and computer literacy, and communication competencies. Students master problem solving
       abilities necessary for success in the core curriculum and with application to personal and
       professional growth and well-being beyond the curriculum.

General Education Philosophy
       Courses in the General Education program provide an academic foundation to prepare students
       for higher level inquiry in their chosen disciplines and prepare them to be responsible, ethical
       citizens in a global society. Content is constructed to build academic and analytical skills to
       further enhance educational, professional, and personal undertaking. The program is designed to
       advance student’s knowledge and skills in reading comprehension, professional writing, and the
       development of appropriate comportment that is expected in work settings.

General Education Program Learning Outcomes
All undergraduate programs include a general education component. The leaning outcomes for general
education are:

   1. Demonstrate competent written communication skills
   2. Employ effective oral communication skills
   3. Interpret quantitative data using mathematical principles to effectively identify core issues and
      solve problems
   4. Illustrate competence in the biological, physical, and natural sciences
   5. Locate disparate information through multiple sources demonstrating technological and
      informational literacy
   6. Analyze ideas and make decisions using critical thinking skills
   7. Describe and interpret diverse perspectives, value systems, history, cultural traditions, and artistic
      expression
   8. Articulate issues and arrive at a defensible conclusion, given a set of ethical dilemmas




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 68 of 155
DENTAL HYGIENE

Bachelor of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene
Orange County Campus only

Number of Semester Credits: 126
Program Length: 7.0 Semesters – 130 weeks

A total of 126 semester credits are required to earn the Bachelor of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene
(BSDH), including the completion of general education courses, lower and upper division didactic theory
courses, and clinical experience.
Program Mission: The Dental Hygiene Department’s mission is to shape the future of dentistry by
graduating highly qualified dental hygienists with the knowledge, skills, and values for lifelong learning
through excellence in education, patient care, research, community service, public health, faculty, and
facilities.
Program Objective: The objective of the BSDH program is to prepare students to become competent in
the knowledge, skills and values of dental hygiene while building upon a liberal arts and science
educational background that expands their view of oral health and disparity. This program focuses on the
development of dental hygienists as life-long learners with the ability to critically think and with a
commitment to professional leadership. Upon program completion and the Dental Hygiene National Board
Examination, the graduate will be eligible to take state and regional licensing exams to become a Registered
Dental Hygienist [some additional requirements may be necessary depending on the specific state or
regional criteria at the time of the examination].
Program Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of the program and as required for
licensure, the entry-level dental hygienist will be able to:
     1. Practice professional behavior in the provision of patient care based on an individual risk
         assessment.
     2. Exhibit critical thinking skills utilizing self-assessment tasks for professional growth and
         development leading to life-long learning.
     3. Demonstrate competent communication skills to effectively interact with diverse population
         groups.
     4. Provide competent oral health care procedures to individuals at all stages of life as determined by
         the evidence-based decision making approach.
     5. Participate in community-based oral health promotion and disease prevention activities.
Applicants, including applicants for advanced standing, for the Bachelor of Science Degree in
Dental Hygiene (BSDH) program must:
    1. Complete a minimum of 8 hours of observation of at least two dental hygienists in clinical
       practice. The applicant must have the dental hygienist sign the verification form and the applicant
       must write a response paper following the stated parameters. Observation hours will not qualify if
       the license cannot be verified and/or if the applicant observes a dentist or dental assistant.
       Observation hours are considered as valid for one year;
    2. Pass the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) with a minimum Individual Total Score at or
       above 70%. An applicant has two attempts at the TEAS exam. If an applicant does not pass the
       TEAS exam after two attempts, the applicant must wait a period of 6 months for a third attempt to
       pass the TEAS and must provide proof of remediation. Passing TEAS scores are valid for one
       year.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 69 of 155
Note: Application deadlines and information about the TEAS Examination and Dental Hygiene
Observation are provided during the application process and Information Sessions.
Selection Process: Dental Hygiene program applicants will be notified of acceptance status once the
completed application and supporting documentation have been evaluated and the selection process has
concluded. The selection process includes an objective evaluation of:
(1) The TEAS Examination sub-scores (maximum points possible are Math 20, Science 25, English 15,
    and Reading 15) and Individual Total Score; and
(2) The Dental Hygiene Observation verification forms and response paper.
Based on a 100 point scale, 75 maximum points from the TEAS Examination and 25 maximum points
from the Dental Hygiene Observation documents, applicants are ranked and selected for admission into
the Dental Hygiene program. There is no waiting list for subsequent admission. Applicants not selected
must reapply and resubmit all required materials.

Dental Hygiene Program Disclosure
The Dental Hygiene Committee of California will not issue a Registered Dental Hygienist (RDH) license
to anyone without a United States – issued social security number. Students must have a United States –
issued social security number in order to be able to work in the state of California. Although students will
be able to complete the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Dental Hygiene License exams in
California without a social security number, they will not receive an RDH license when they pass the
exam unless they become an American citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Dental Hygiene Deadlines for Previous Education and Challenge Credits
Any student petitioning to transfer credits into the Dental Hygiene Program at the University from
previously attended institution(s) must submit a sealed transcript from the originating institution by the
application deadline. Challenge examinations must be completed by the application deadline. Challenge
credit is not available for the Dental Hygiene program core courses.

Dental Hygiene Program Clinical Requirements
Prior to taking the core Dental Hygiene curriculum, Dental Hygiene students must:

1. Meet the requirements as outlined in the “Essential Functions of a Dental Hygienist”*;
2. Obtain a criminal background clearance*;
3. Undergo drug screening and other requirements as applicable to West Coast University policy and/or
   state licensure requirements*;
4. Meet all West Coast University clinical requirements including strict adherence to the current
   institutional Dental Hygiene Program Blood borne Pathogens Policy and Exposure Control Plan;
5. Obtain and maintain professional liability insurance*;
6. Submit documentation of immunization and tuberculosis clearance*;
7. Provide and maintain a current Basic Life Support (BLS) certification including health care provider
   CPR with AED from the American Heart Association (AHA)*;
8. Expect the hours and days to vary depending on the term schedule;
9. Expect the term schedule to be final and non-negotiable, and if a student refuses a clinical
   assignment, he/she will be terminated from the program.

*   Information regarding these requirements is provided during the application process and at the Dental
    Hygiene program orientation.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 70 of 155
Immunizations – based on the CDC Recommended Immunizations for Health-Care Personnel (HCP),
all HCPs must submit documentation of immunization to Hepatitis B (series of three doses with anti-HBs
serologic testing 1-2 months after dose #3), proof of immunity to Hepatitis B, or a signed declination;
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR); Varicella (chickenpox); and Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (booster
every 10 years). Highly recommended immunizations for the HCP include Influenza (yearly), Hepatitis
A, and Pneumonia. For some individuals, a titer test will be indicated vs. vaccinations. Titer tests
showing immunity to listed pathogens are acceptable. Titer tests showing a negative response require
appropriate immunizations and follow-up titers must be completed and submitted. If one or more of the
listed immunizations are contraindicated, documentation must be submitted clearly indentifying the
reason(s). Clinical laboratory reports with facility stamp and medical doctor’s signature are required.

Dental Hygiene Program Licensure Requirements
To practice as a Dental Hygienist in California, the student must be licensed in California by the Dental
Hygiene Committee of California. Applicants must pass both clinical and written examinations in
California dental law and ethics, and undergo a criminal history investigation, prior to receiving a license.

To be eligible for licensure, the student must:
    1. Complete an application for licensure to include a photograph and verification of graduation from
         an accredited dental hygiene program;
    2. Submit the required Department of Justice (DOJ) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
         fingerprints. A License will not be issued until the board receives the background information
         from DOJ.
             a. Processing times may vary, depending on when the Board receives documents from
                  University, agencies, and other states or countries. The time to process an application
                  indicating a prior conviction(s) may take longer than other applications.
             b. Delays may also occur with the fingerprint processing by the Department of Justice
                  and/or the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).
    3. Successfully complete the National Board of Dental Examiners' examination for dental
         hygienists;
    4. Verification of completion of soft tissue curettage, administration of local anesthetic agents, and
         administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen.
    5. Pay all required fees.

The information above was provided by the Dental Hygiene Committee of California.                    Further
information on becoming registered may be found on the Board’s website at www.dhcc.ca.gov.

Transfer Credit Evaluation: Dental hygiene applicants requesting transfer credit evaluation must provide
official transcripts at the time of application and prior to the selection process. Only general education and
pre-requisite coursework will be considered and evaluated for transfer credit, and all General Education and
prerequisite course(s) for the dental hygiene program must have been taken at an appropriately accredited
institution. Science courses must be taken within the last five years to be accepted for transfer credit. Each
of the core dental hygiene courses must be taken in-residence and taken in succession. Students who submit
an application for the Bachelors of Science in Dental Hygiene program without a request for transfer credit
evaluation will not be awarded credit for any prior coursework.

Dental Hygiene Challenge Exam Additional Requirements
The fundamental requirements of challenge examinations are found above. Additionally, prospective
Dental Hygiene students must submit a written request to the campus program administrator and if
approved, the challenge examination will be administered prior to the application deadline and student



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 71 of 155
selection process. There are no challenge examinations for previous dental hygiene, dental assisting, or
dental courses.

Blended Format in the Core Dental Hygiene Courses
Select core courses in the Dental Hygiene program will be in a blended delivery format. Blended courses
combine traditional or face-to-face classroom instruction with an online learning environment. Blended
courses are indicated by an asterisk (*) in the course listings below.

In preparation for the blended courses, students must:
    1. Complete the online New Blended Student Tutorial, which includes exercises for students to test
       accessibility and become familiar with navigation in all areas of blended courses;
    2. Meet the specific computer requirements with acceptable hardware and software configuration
       and internet access as noted on page 21.

Dental Hygiene Curriculum

Course Number                                Course Title                         Semester Credits
                                  GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
CHEM 210             Chemistry with Lab                                                   4.0
ENGL 140             Written Communication I                                              3.0
ENGL 340             Written Communication II                                             3.0
HUM 141              Critical Reasoning                                                   3.0
HUM 470              Cultural Pluralism                                                   3.0
MATH 108             College Mathematics I                                                3.0
MATH 310             Statistics                                                           3.0
MICR 140             General Microbiology with lab                                        4.0
PSYC 260             Introduction to Psychology                                           3.0
PSYC 290             Life Span Psychology                                                 3.0
SOCY 280             Sociology                                                            3.0
SPCH 142             Oral Communication                                                   3.0
                                                                          Total           38.0

Course Number                                Course Title                         Semester Credits
                   GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES WITHIN THE AREA OF STUDY

ANAT 260             Human Anatomy with Lab                                               4.0
HCA 432              Principles of Leadership for Health care                             3.0
PHYS 261             Human Physiology with Lab                                            4.0
                                                                          Total           11.0

   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                     Page 72 of 155
Course Number                            Course Title                 Semester Credits
                              CORE DENTAL HYGIENE COURSES
DHYG 100         Dental Embryology, Histology, and Anatomy with lab          3.0
DHYG 110         Dental Radiology Science with lab                           2.0
DHYG 111         Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic                 1.5
DHYG 130         Preventive Dentistry and Risk Assessment*(b)                2.0
DHYG 140         Introduction to Dental Hygiene Practice with Lab            4.0
DHYG 150         Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I                               4.0
DHYG 151         Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II                              4.5
DHYG 152         Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene III                             4.0
                 General Pathology, Immunology, and Medical
DHYG 205                                                                     2.0
                 Terminology*(b)
DHYG 206         Oral Pathology*(b)                                          3.0
DHYG 215         Head and Neck Anatomy*(b)                                   2.0
DHYG 260         Pain Management with Lab*(b)                                3.0
DHYG 265         Dental Materials with Lab*(b)                               3.0
DHYG 270         Basic and Applied Pharmacology*(b)                          3.0
DHYG 280         Introduction to Periodontology                              2.0
DHYG 290         Medically Compromised Care and Emergencies*(b)              3.0
DHYG 300         Clinical Seminar I                                          1.0
DHYG 301         Clinical Practice I                                         4.0
DHYG 310         Clinical Seminar II                                         1.0
DHYG 311         Clinical Practice II                                        4.0
DHYG 320         Clinical Seminar III                                        1.0
DHYG 321         Clinical Practice III                                       5.0
DHYG 330         Biochemistry and Nutrition*(b)                              2.0
DHYG 340         Research Methodology*(b)                                    2.0
DHYG 350         Ethics Seminar                                              1.0
                                          (b)
DHYG 380         Applied Periodontology*                                     2.0
DHYG 460         Community Dental Health Education                           2.0
DHYG 470         Practice Management and Jurisprudence*(b)                   2.0




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG          Page 73 of 155
Course Number                               Course Title                          Semester Credits
DHYG 485             Advanced Dental Hygiene Topics                                      2.0
DHYG 490             Professional Development Project                                    2.0
                                                                          Total          77.0

*(b) - This course is offered in blended format 50% on-ground and 50% online.


General Education Semester Credits:                                        38.0

General Education within the Area of Study Semester Credits:               11.0

Core Dental Hygiene Semester Credits:                                      77.0

Total Program Semester Credits:                                           126.0




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                      Page 74 of 155
COLLEGE OF NURSING

West Coast University (WCU) is committed to the education of students who have the desire to enter or
advance in the nursing profession at various levels of experience. Nursing students are supported through
innovative methods to develop critical thinking skills necessary to provide nursing interventions to a
diverse population. The Nursing Program’s mission is to assist each student in the recognition of his/her
individual abilities to progress and build competence in a chosen nursing educational goal. The
philosophy of the College of Nursing is that education is a continuous process occurring in phases
throughout an individual’s lifetime. Nurses are lifelong learners and critical thinkers.

The purpose of the Nursing programs at WCU is to provide the essential body of knowledge and
experiences necessary to prepare students for the program of their choice based on their level of
experience. WCU offers the Bachelor of Science (BSN) degree in Nursing for those students desiring to
enter the nursing profession. The University also utilizes a career ladder approach to enable Licensed
Vocational Nurses and Registered Nurses who hold an Associate Degree in Nursing to earn their BSN.
WCU also offers the Master of Science (MSN) degree in Nursing, preparing RNs for advanced nursing
practice roles, and students may also prepare for roles in nursing education.


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN)

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) track prepares students to develop nursing competencies while
building upon a liberal arts education that expands their world view of the global community. The
curriculum is sequential and integrates theory from the biological and social sciences to develop clinical
reasoning and communication skill in graduates who will be expected to serve as leaders in the changing
healthcare environment. Content is presented in a simple to complex format and is organized using
seven strands to help conceptualize the professional nursing role, including nursing process,
research, therapeutic care, teaching/learning, communications, and role development, and incorporates
theory and practice to meet the “Essentials for Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing
Practice” (AACN, 2008).

Each Essential is presented throughout the curriculum in the classroom and operationalized in clinical
settings. Incorporation of the nursing process allows the nursing student to differentiate the independent,
dependent, and interdependent functions of nursing. The programs are sequential and integrated theory
from biological and social sciences with reasoning and communication skills to develop a graduate who
can think critically, solve problems, and communicate effectively.

The General Education courses provide the foundation for the nursing major and continued learning in all
educational programs. The addition of both clinical and non-clinical nursing courses in each program
prepares graduates for practice at differing levels of experience and responsibility from entry to the
nursing profession through the baccalaureate level.

The nursing curriculum provides the opportunity for the student to acquire the professional nursing
knowledge and skills necessary to assist clients to an optimal level of health. This is accomplished
through an integration of theoretical nursing knowledge with essential clinical skills. Students are
provided the opportunity to practice in a changing health care environment in acute and long-term care
facilities, as well as in community settings.



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 75 of 155
BSN Programs – Learning Outcomes:
Upon graduation from West Coast University, students will have met, the following Program Learning
Outcomes:

1. Apply concepts or theories from biological, physical or natural sciences as basis for professional
   nursing practice
2. Utilize nursing process in health promotion, restoration, and disease and illness prevention.
3. Apply evidence - based practice in providing therapeutic nursing interventions for patients and
   families in a wide variety of health care, and community setting.
4. Apply critical thinking skills in providing culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate
   nursing care to patients who are experiencing simple and/or complex health problems in a variety of
   settings.
5. Provide health care education to individuals, families, aggregates.
6. Develop measurable goals that demonstrate the willingness to become a life-long learner in building
   expertise as a member of the nursing profession.
7. Utilize effective communication to interact with patients, families, and the interdisciplinary health
   team.
8. Assume responsibility for the delegation and supervision of the delivery of nursing care to
   subordinates based on the subordinate’s legal scope of practice and ability.
9. Demonstrate knowledge in applying client care technology skills such as computer and informatics
   skills when providing health care in a variety of settings.

Applicants for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (BSN) program must:
1. Pass the HESI admission test with a minimum score of 80% overall; OR
2. Demonstrate passage of the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) with a minimum Individual
    Total Score at or above 70%; OR
3. Provide proof of a minimum composite SAT score of 1000 on the older version or 1500 on the
    current version of the SAT with Essay; OR
4. Provide proof of a minimum composite ACT score of 20.
Applicants will have a maximum of two attempts to successfully pass the HESI admissions exam. If an
applicant does not pass the HESI admissions exam after two attempts, he or she must wait a period of 6
months for a third attempt to pass the HESI and must provide proof of remediation.

Passing TEAS scores are valid for one year.

Applicants for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing, LVN to BSN program must:
    1. Provide proof of current unobstructed licensure as a Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) in
       California;
    2. Provide proof of graduation from an approved LVN program or the equivalent; and
    3. Meet all admission requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (BSN) program as
       noted above.
    LVNs who cannot provide proof of graduation from an approved LVN program, who otherwise meet
    the entrance requirements may be admitted with proof of the following equivalent documentation:
    1. Proof of a score of 900 or above on the HESI LVN Exit Exam
    2. Successful challenge of the following courses:
          a. NURS 100 – Fundamentals of Nursing
          b. NURS 101L – Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
          c. NURS 120 – Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 76 of 155
            d. NURS 121L – Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum

Applicants for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing, RN to BSN program must:

    1. Provide proof of current unobstructed professional licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN) in
       California.
    2. Provide proof of graduation from a BRN approved Associate Degree in Nursing program;
    3. Official transcripts submitted must documenting 66 semester credits or the equivalent completed
       in a BRN approved Associate Degree in Nursing program with at least 24 credits in general
       education and 27 credits in nursing core courses.

Applicants who do not have 66 completed credits from their Associate Degree program in Nursing, but
who otherwise meet the admission requirements, may be admitted and complete additional course work
while enrolled in the program in order to meet this requirement.

Students enrolled in the RN to BSN blended program will only be charged the online fee for courses
totally online.

Additional Admission Requirements
All Nursing Applicants must:
Prior to nursing clinical assignments, Nursing students must:
1. Obtain a criminal background clearance (information on how to obtain this clearance will be provided
    to students during the enrollment process). Failure to disclose a conviction may interfere with clinical
    placement and subsequent licensure as a Registered Nurse;
2. Provide and maintain a current American Heart Association Basic Life Support (CPR) for Health
    Providers;
3. Provide a current Fire Card, where required;
4. Meet the requirements as outlined in the “Essentials of RN Job Functions” as documented by a
    licensed Physician, Nurse Practitioner;
5. Obtain and maintain Student Registered Nurse level malpractice insurance;
6. Undergo drug screening

Nursing Program Disclosure
The student satisfactory completing the pre-licensure or LVN to BSN program is eligible to apply for
licensure by the California Board of Registered Nursing. The California Board of Nursing requires that
applicants for a nursing license must provide a United States issued social security number. This
requirement will prevent anyone from applying for RN licensure in California and being employed as an
RN without a United States issued social security number. Furthermore, prospective students who do not
meet this requirement will be unable to sit for the Nursing Board Examination (NCLEX) in California,
since the California Board of Nursing will not issue an Authorization to Test (ATT) without a valid social
security number.

The University will pay the Authorization to Test (ATT) fees (approximately $200) for the NCLEX-RN
only for those students who have met the standards for NCLEX-RN testing readiness as determined solely
by the University. Students who do not meet the standards for NCLEX testing readiness or who do not
cooperate in a remediation plan to help meet the readiness standards for NCLEX-RN testing, will not
have their Authorization to Test (ATT) fees paid by the University until they meet NCLEX testing
readiness standards of the University. For further information on becoming registered, visit the Board of
Registered Nursing website at www.rn.ca.gov.

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 77 of 155
Immunizations – based on the CDC Recommended Immunizations for Health-Care Personnel (HCP),
all HCPs must submit documentation of immunization to Hepatitis B (series of three doses with anti-HBs
serologic testing 1-2 months after dose #3), proof of immunity to Hepatitis B, or a signed declination;
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR); Varicella (chickenpox); and Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (booster
every 10 years). Highly recommended immunizations for the HCP include Influenza (yearly), Hepatitis
A, and Pneumonia. For some individuals, a titer test will be indicated vs. vaccinations. Titer tests
showing immunity to listed pathogens are acceptable. Titer tests showing a negative response require
appropriate immunizations and follow-up titers must be completed and submitted. If one or more of the
listed immunizations are contraindicated, documentation must be submitted clearly indentifying the
reason(s). Clinical laboratory reports with facility stamp and medical doctor’s signature are required. See
the Nursing Student Handbook for additional information.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 78 of 155
Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing

Number of Semester Credits: 125
Program Length: 8 Semesters – 160 weeks

The purpose of the BSN program is to prepare students to develop nursing competencies while building
upon a liberal arts education that expands their world view of the global community. This program
focuses on the preparation of nurses who are life-long learners and critical thinkers, and upon completion
of the program, will be eligible to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination to become a Registered
Nurse.

A total of 125 semester credits are required to earn the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (BSN),
including the completion of general education courses, lower and upper division didactic theory courses,
and clinical experience.

Acceptance of Transfer Credit
General education and pre-requisite courses taken from a nationally or regionally accredited institution
will be considered for transfer with the exception of Science courses. All Science courses must have
been taken within the last five calendar years, unless the student possesses a degree or advanced degree in
the specific field of study for which the student is seeking transfer credit. For nursing credits to be
considered for transfer credit, there can only be one year between the end of the last nursing course taken
at a previous institution and the beginning of the first nursing course at West Coast University. The
student must be listed in good standing with the prior institution.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Curriculum

Course Number                                  Course Title                           Semester Credits

                                    GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
CHEM 260*              Biochemistry                                                           5.0
ENGL 140               Written Communication I                                                3.0
ENGL 340               Written Communication II                                               3.0
HUM 470                Cultural Pluralism                                                     3.0
MATH 108*              College Mathematics I                                                  3.0
MATH 310*              Statistics                                                             3.0
MICR 140               General Microbiology                                                   4.0
PSYC 260               Introduction to Psychology                                             3.0
PSYC 290               Life Span Psychology                                                   3.0
SOCY 280               Sociology                                                              3.0
SPCH 142               Oral Communication                                                     3.0
                                                                              Total          36.0



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 79 of 155
Course Number                              Course Title                            Semester Credits
                    GENERAL EDUCATION WITHIN THE AREA OF STUDY
ANAT 260           Human Anatomy                                                          4.0
ANAT 270           Pathophysiology                                                        3.0
HCA 206*           Epidemiology in Public Health Practice                                 3.0
HCA 434*           Medical Ethics and Issues                                              3.0
PHYS 261           Human Physiology                                                       4.0
                                                                           Total         17.0

Course Number                              Course Title                            Semester Credits
                                  CORE NURSING COURSES
NURS 100           Fundamentals of Nursing (Pre-licensure students only)                  3.0
NURS 101L          Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab (Pre-licensure students             2.0
                   only)
NURS 120           Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing                               3.0

NURS 121L          Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum                     3.0
                   Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
NURS 201                                                                                  3.0
                   Adults
                   Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness
NURS 203                                                                                  3.0
                   in the Critically Ill Client
                   Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing – Promoting Wellness
NURS 204                                                                                  2.0
                   in the Mentally Ill Client
NURS 205           Introduction to Leadership and Management                              2.0
NURS 206           Expanding and Developing Family and Community                          3.0
                   Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
NURS 211L                                                                                 3.0
                   Adults Practicum
                   Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness
NURS 213L                                                                                 3.0
                   in the Critically Ill Client Practicum
                   Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
NURS 214L                                                                                 2.0
                   the Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                   Expanding and Developing Family and Community
NURS 216L                                                                                 3.0
                   Practicum
NURS 220*          Integration of Nursing Concepts                                        2.0
NURS 221L*         Integration of Nursing Practice                                        2.0
NURS 280           Pharmacology                                                           3.0
NURS 290           Physical Assessment                                                    3.0


   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                     2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 80 of 155
Course Number                                Course Title                                Semester Credits
NURS 310             Nutrition in Health and Disease                                                  3.0
NURS 340*            Public Health Nursing                                                            3.0
NURS 341L*           Public Health Nursing Practicum                                                  3.0
NURS 350*            Research in Nursing                                                              3.0
NURS 360*            Principles of Teaching for Patient Care                                          3.0
NURS 420*            Principles of Leadership and Management                                          3.0
NURS 4308            Disaster Management                                                              3.0
NURS 440*            Issues and Trends in Nursing                                                     3.0
NURS 460*            Professional Roles within Nursing                                                3.0
                                                                               Total              72.0


General Education Semester Credits:                         36.0 *Courses identified with an asterisk are not
                                                                   required   by   the   California     Board   of
General Education within the Area of Study Credits:         17.0 Registered Nursing for Registered Nursing
Core Nursing Semester Credits:                              72.0 licensure. These courses are required for
                                                                   program graduation, however; as well as
Total Program Semester Credits:                                    being required under WCU’s Bachelor
                                                         125.0
                                                                   program accreditation through ACICS and
                                                                   CCNE.




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                              Page 81 of 155
LVN to BSN Track

Number of Semester Credits: 125
Program Length: 7 Semesters – 140 weeks

The LVN to BSN track is a specialized program of study designed specifically for the Licensed
Vocational Nurse (LVN). A total of 125 semester credits are required in this program to earn the Bachelor
of Science degree in Nursing (BSN), which includes 8 semester credits transferred in from an approved
Licensed Vocational Nurse program. This program requires the completion of general education courses,
nursing courses, and specialized health care occupation courses. Courses may be taken online, on
campus, or in combination.

The LVN curriculum includes the same general education , requirements, including the courses within the
area of study, and core nursing courses as the pre-licensure track, except the LVN to BSN students is not
required to complete NURS 100, 101L, 120, and 121L. Two transition courses are required: NURS 200B
Transition to Professional Nursing (2 units) and NURS 210LB RN Skills Laboratory (1 unit). Upon
satisfactory completion of the courses, the LVN to BSN student will receive 8 units of Advanced
Placement Credit for prior learning.

LVN to BSN Curriculum

Course Number                                       Course Title                         Total Credits
                                       ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES
NURS 100                  Fundamentals of Nursing (Pre-licensure students only)
NURS 101L                 Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab (Pre-licensure students
                          only)
                                                                                              8.0
NURS 120                  Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
NURS 121L                 Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
Note: Advanced Placement Courses are not required for the LVN to BSN Program


Course Number                                       Course Title                       Semester Credits
                                       GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
CHEM 260*                 Biochemistry                                                        5.0
ENGL 140                  Written Communication I                                             3.0
ENGL 340                  Written Communication II                                            3.0
HUM 470                   Cultural Pluralism                                                  3.0
MATH 108*                 College Mathematics I                                               3.0

MATH 310*                 Statistics                                                          3.0
MICR 140                  General Microbiology                                                4.0
PSYC 260                  Introduction to Psychology                                          3.0



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                             2011-12 CATALOG                    Page 82 of 155
Course Number                               Course Title                             Semester Credits
PSYC 290           Life Span Psychology                                                     3.0
SOCY 280           Sociology                                                                3.0
SPCH 142           Oral Communication                                                       3.0
                                                                             Total         36.0

Course Number                               Course Title                             Semester Credits
                    GENERAL EDUCATION WITHIN THE AREA OF STUDY
ANAT 260           Human Anatomy                                                            4.0
ANAT 270           Pathophysiology                                                          3.0
HCA 206*           Epidemiology in Public Health Practice                                   3.0
HCA 434*           Medical Ethics and Issues                                                3.0
PHYS 261           Human Physiology                                                         4.0
                                                                             Total         17.0

Course Number                               Course Title                             Semester Credits
                                   CORE NURSING COURSES
NURS 200B*         Transition to Professional Nursing (LVN to BSN students only)            2.0
                   Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
NURS 201                                                                                    3.0
                   Adults
                   Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness
NURS 203                                                                                    3.0
                   in the Critically Ill Client
                   Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing – Promoting Wellness
NURS 204                                                                                    2.0
                   in the Mentally Ill Client
NURS 205           Introduction to Leadership and Management                                2.0
NURS 206           Expanding and Developing Family and Community                            3.0
NURS 210LB*        RN Skills Laboratory (LVN to BSN students only)                          1.0
                   Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
NURS 211L                                                                                   3.0
                   Adults Practicum
                   Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness
NURS 213L                                                                                   3.0
                   in the Critically Ill Client Practicum
                   Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
NURS 214L                                                                                   2.0
                   the Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                   Expanding and Developing Family and Community
NURS 216L*                                                                                  3.0
                   Practicum
NURS 220*          Integration of Nursing Concepts                                          2.0



   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 83 of 155
Course Number                                 Course Title                                Semester Credits
NURS 221L*            Integration of Nursing Practice                                                  2.0
NURS 280              Pharmacology                                                                     3.0
NURS 290              Physical Assessment                                                              3.0
NURS 310              Nutrition in Health and Disease                                                  3.0
NURS 340*             Public Health Nursing                                                            3.0
NURS 341L*            Public Health Nursing Practicum                                                  3.0
NURS 350*             Research in Nursing                                                              3.0
NURS 360*             Principles of Teaching for Patient Care                                          3.0
NURS 420*             Principles of Leadership and Management                                          3.0
NURS 430*             Disaster Management                                                              3.0
NURS 440*             Issues and Trends in Nursing                                                     3.0
NURS 460*             Professional Roles within Nursing                                                3.0
                                                                                Total              64.0

Note: Upon satisfactory completion of the transition courses (NURS 200B and NURS 210LB), the LVN to BSN
student will receive 11 units of Advanced Placement Credit.


LVN Advanced Placement Credit                                 8.0 *Courses identified with an asterisk are not
                                                                    required   by   the   California     Board   of
General Education Semester Credits:                          36.0 Registered Nursing for Registered Nursing
General Education within the Area of Study Credits:          17.0 licensure. These courses are required for
                                                                    program graduation, however; as well as
Core Nursing Semester Credits:                               64.0 being required under WCU’s Bachelor
                                                                    program accreditation through ACICS and
Total Program Semester Credits:                           125.0 CCNE.




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                              Page 84 of 155
RN to BSN Track

Number of Semester Credits: 54 in program (66 credits based on prior completion of an Associate Degree
in Nursing)
Total Credits: 120
Program Length: 4 Semesters – 80 weeks
The RN to BSN track is a specialized program of study designed specifically for the Registered Nurse
(RN) with an Associate Degree in Nursing. A total of 120 semester credits are required to earn the
Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (BSN), which includes 66 semester credits transferred in from an
approved Associate Degree of Nursing program (ADN). This program requires the completion of general
education courses, nursing courses, and specialized health care occupation courses. Courses may be
taken online, on campus, or in combination
Students who do not have 66 completed credits from their Associate Degree program in Nursing, but who
otherwise meet the admission requirements, may be admitted and complete additional course work while
enrolled in the program in order to meet this requirement.
A minimum of 36 General Education Credits outside the area of study and 60 Concentration (Nursing)
Credit Units are required for graduation. These requirements may be met by a combination of transfer
credits and credits taken in the RN to BSN program.

RN to BSN Curriculum
A total of 120 semester credits are required to earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The RN to BSN
program offers the final two years of upper division coursework.


Approved Credits                                                                             Semester Credits
Credits from Associates Degree in Nursing program (pre-licensure)                                  66.0



   Course
   Number                                         Course Title                               Semester Credits
(Reference Only)
                                       PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS
                               May be included in the 66.0 Transfer (ADN) Semester Credits

ANAT 260           Human Anatomy                                                                   4.0

CHEM 210           Chemistry                                                                       4.0

ENGL 140           Written Communication I                                                         3.0

MICR 140           General Microbiology                                                            4.0

NURS 280*          Pharmacology (Integrated or a separate course)                                  3.0
                   Physical Assessment (May be challenged or taken concurrent
NURS 290*                                                                                          3.0
                   with the BSN)
PHYS 261           Human Physiology                                                                4.0


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                              2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 85 of 155
   Course
   Number                                         Course Title                                     Semester Credits
(Reference Only)

PSYC 260            Introduction to Psychology (or comparable course)                                       3.0

SPCH 142            Oral Communication (or comparable course)                                               3.0

OPEN                Additional 3 units of General Education/Pre-Requisite                                   3.0
                                                                                         Total             34.0
Note: ENGL 340 and PSYC 290 may not be required if approved transferred General Education credits exceed 24 credits Core
Courses


Course Number                                 Course Title                                         Semester Credits
                                        GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
                                              May be transferred to WCU
ENGL 340              Written Communication II                                                              3.0

HUM 470               Cultural Pluralism                                                                    3.0
MATH 310              Statistics                                                                            3.0

PSYC 290              Life Span Psychology                                                                  3.0
                                                                                         Total             12.0


Course Number                                      Course Title                                   Semester Credits
                             GENERAL EDUCATION WITHIN THE AREA OF STUDY
ANAT 270              Pathophysiology                                                                       3.0
HCA 206               Epidemiology in Public Health Practice                                                3.0
HCA 434               Medical Ethics and Issues                                                             3.0
                                                                                         Total              9.0


Course Number                                      Course Title                                   Semester Credits
                                             CORE NURSING COURSES
NURS 310              Nutrition in Health and Disease                                                       3.0
NURS 340              Public Health Nursing                                                                 3.0
NURS 340L             Public Health Practicum                                                               3.0
NURS 350              Research in Nursing                                                                   3.0
NURS 360              Principles of Teaching and Patient Care                                               3.0
NURS 420              Principles of Leadership and Management                                               3.0
NURS 430              Disaster Management                                                                   3.0


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                               2011-12 CATALOG                             Page 86 of 155
Course Number                                       Course Title                                   Semester Credits
NURS 440               Issues and Trends in Nursing                                                         3.0
NURS 460               Professional Roles within Nursing                                                    3.0
NURS 470               Alternative Therapies in Nursing and Health Care                                     3.0
NURS 490               Culminating Project                                                                  3.0
                                                                                         Total              33.0



                                                                              * Pharmacology and Physical Assessment
Transfer Credit from an AS Program:                                    66.0 may be transferred from a prior nursing
(Must include at least 24 credits of General Education)
                                                                              education program or challenged.
General Education Semester Credits                                     12.0
General Education within the Area of Study                              9.0
Core Nursing Semester Credits                                          33.0

Total Program Semester Credits:                                      120.0




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                 2011-12 CATALOG                            Page 87 of 155
Graduate Admissions Policies and Disclosures
University Admissions Requirements for Graduate Degree
A student applying for admission to a graduate program at West Coast University must:
    1. Participate in a qualitative admissions interview arranged by a University admissions
       representative;
    2. Submit a completed application for admission;
    3. Submit a copy of official transcripts demonstrating completion of an accredited bachelor’s degree
       program;
    4. Complete an enrollment agreement;
    5. Meet program admissions requirements.

Blended Format of Graduate Programs
The Master of Science in Health Care Management and Master of Science in Nursing programs and some
courses in the RN to MSN program are offered in a blended delivery format. Students attend classes on-
campus during the first and last weekend of each term, while remaining coursework and interactions are
completed and facilitated fully online. The blended modality is defined as part in-residence, part online
delivery of instruction. The location for the residential part of the Master’s Programs will be at a West
Coast University campus or approved Learning Site. See the program-specific details for further
information on this delivery modality.
International Students please note: Due to the primarily online format of the Master’s programs, these
programs are not open to enrollment by foreign students under a student visa.


Students who are taking online and/or blended courses must also:
   1. Complete the online New Student Orientation Tutorial or the online New Blended Student
       Tutorial, which includes exercises for students to test accessibility and become familiar with
       navigation in all areas of online or blended courses;
   2. Meet the specific computer requirements with acceptable hardware and software configuration
       and internet access as noted on page 12.


Satisfactory Academic Progress for Graduate Programs
Students' academic progress will be measured at the end of each semester.          In order to maintain
satisfactory progress, students must:
1. Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 3.0 (on a standard 4.0 scale)
   at the end of each semester.
2. Progress at a satisfactory rate toward completion of their program. At the end of the evaluation
   period, the student must have successfully completed at least 50% of all coursework attempted.
3. Complete the program within 200% of the published length of the program.

Graduate Academic Financial Aid Warning
Students will be placed on academic financial aid warning when their cumulative grade point average
(CGPA) falls below 3.0 or they fail to complete at least 50% of all coursework attempted at the end of
any semester in which coursework was taken. A student will be notified of probationary status in writing.
The financial aid warning period will be the duration of one semester, during which time the student will
be given the opportunity to raise his or her CGPA to a minimum of 3.0 and/or meet the minimum 50%


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 88 of 155
completion requirement. During the probationary semester, the student will remain eligible for Federal
Student Financial Aid. If, at the end of the financial aid warning semester, a student raises his or her
CGPA and rate of progress to or above the minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress, the
student will then be removed from financial aid warning and returned to regular status. However, if at the
end of the probationary semester the student fails to meet the minimum CGPA or minimum rate of
progress requirements, the student will be dismissed from the University.

Graduate Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Policy
A student who has been academically dismissed for failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress or
who has lost eligibility for Federal Student Financial Aid, may appeal the decision if special or
extenuating circumstances exist. The procedures for an appeal are as follows:
1. Appeals must be in writing and must be submitted to the academic dean or appropriate academic
   administrator who will forward it to the designated members of the Appeals Board.
2. The Appeals Board will consist of a panel of 3 to 5 members. At a minimum, the panel will consist
   of one faculty member outside of the appealing student’s program, one faculty member of the
   appealing student’s choosing and one representative from the University’s administrative staff.
3. The student’s written appeal must explain the type of circumstances that contributed to the failure to
   maintain satisfactory academic progress and what plans the student has to eliminate those potential
   problems in the future. Documentation of the circumstances should be submitted with the appeal.
   Failure to document the circumstances may result in a denial.
4. The decision of the Appeals Board is final and may not be further appealed.
5. Students who are dissatisfied with the decision made by the Appeals Board may seek further
   consideration through the University’s grievance procedures outlined in this catalog.

Academic Dismissal
If at the end of the semester on academic and financial aid warning the student fails to meet the minimum
CGPA or rate of progress requirements, the student will be dismissed from the University, but may appeal
the dismissal.

Graduate Academic Dismissal Appeal Policy
A student who has been academically dismissed for failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress
according to the standards for their program may appeal the decision on the basis of the death of a
relative, an injury or illness of the student, or other special circumstances. The procedures for an appeal
are as follows:
3. Appeals must be in writing and must be submitted to the academic dean or appropriate academic
   administrator who will forward it to the designated members of the Appeals Committee.
      a. The appealing student’s written appeal must explain the type of circumstances that
          contributed to the failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress and what the student has
          done to eliminate those potential problems in the future.
      b. Documentation of the circumstances should be submitted with the appeal. Failure to
          document the circumstances may result in a denial.
4. The denial of an appeal by the Appeals Committee is final and may not be further appealed.

Reinstatement Process for Students with Approved Appeals
When the Appeals Committee approves a student’s satisfactory academic progress appeal, the committee
may make one of the following decisions:

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 89 of 155
        1. Give the student one additional semester in which to raise the student’s GPA and rate of
           progress at least as high as the required criteria. Should a student who has been given one
           additional semester fail to return to satisfactory academic progress at the end of the additional
           semester, the student will be dismissed with no right to appeal.

            NOTE: This option is not available for students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene program. See
            Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements section of the catalog.

        2. Create an academic plan in consultation with the Dean or Chair of the student’s academic
           program that will enable the student to return to satisfactory academic progress status. For
           students in the core Dental Hygiene program the requirements of the Academic Plan must
           meet the requirements of the Dental Hygiene Program Grade Requirements section of the
           catalog. The following requirements apply to Academic Plans for students in all other
           programs.
               a. The plan must be of definite duration that may not extend beyond the number of
                   semesters remaining in the student’s maximum time frame for the program.
               b. The student must be able to achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA by the end of
                   the academic plan period.
               c. Upon completion of the academic plan the student must still be able to complete the
                   program within the maximum time frame.
               d. The academic plan must detail courses to be taken, minimum grades expected and the
                   GPA and rate of completion criteria for each semester for the plan.
               e. The academic plan may also provide expectations related to attendance, remediation,
                   conduct, and other measures intended to lead to academic success.
               f. Should a student allowed to continue on an academic plan fail to meet any condition
                   of the academic plan, the student will be dismissed with no right to appeal.

Students given an additional semester(s) to return to satisfactory academic progress, or who are allowed
to continue under an academic plan are placed on probation for the designated period.

Graduate Academic and Financial Aid Probation
Students placed on academic probation must achieve at least a term GPA of 2.0 and successfully
complete the credits attempted during the probationary period or be academically dismissed; higher
standards may be required under the academic plan as noted above. During the probationary period, the
student will remain eligible for Federal Student Financial Aid, unless the student has been reinstated
following the denial of an appeal or is auditing courses in the core Dental Hygiene program. If during or
at the end of any probationary period, a student raises his or her CGPA and rate of progress to or above
the minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress, the student will then be removed from
probation and returned to regular status, and be eligible for financial aid. However, if at the end of the
probationary period the student fails to meet the minimum CGPA or Academic Plan requirements, or rate
of progress requirements, the student will be academically dismissed from the University.

Reinstatement Process for Graduate Students Who Were Dismissed for Not Meeting
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Decisions regarding reinstatement to the University on an extended enrollment status will be based on
factors such as grades, attendance, account balance, conduct, and the student’s commitment to complete
the degree program within the maximum timeframe allowed per the University’s policy on Satisfactory

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 90 of 155
Academic Progress. Dismissed students who are reinstated will sign a new enrollment agreement, will be
charged tuition consistent with the existing published rate, and will be subject to the current policies in
effect at the time of their reinstatement. These extended enrollment status students will return on
academic probationary status, during the initial reinstatement semester, those students will not be eligible
to receive Federal Student Financial Aid. If the student raises their CGPA and rate of progress to or
above the minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress by the end of the probationary semester,
the student will be removed from extended enrollment status and probation and will reestablish Federal
Student Financial Aid eligibility.

Class Repeats for Graduate Students
Students who receive a failing grade in any course must repeat that specific course. When the student
successfully repeats the class and receives a passing grade, that grade will replace the failing grade and
the new grade will be used to calculate the final cumulative grade point average (CGPA). All attempted
coursework will be reflected on the official transcript. All credits resulting from repeated courses are
included in determining student’s satisfactory academic progress standing for credits attempted. Students
enrolled in the Master of Science in Health Care Management (MSHCM) program who fail a course, may
repeat the course one time only. Students in the MSHCM program who fail a second course will be
dismissed.

Maximum Program Completion Timeframe for Graduate Students
Students are expected to complete their program within the defined maximum program completion time,
which may not exceed 200 percent of the normal time frame. West Coast University measures program
length based on semester credit units; therefore, a student is not allowed to attempt more than 200 percent
of the number of semester credit units in their degree program of study. The requirements for rate of
progress are to ensure that students are progressing at a rate at which they will complete their programs
within the maximum allowable time frame. For example, in a 36 semester unit program, a student may
not attempt more 72 semester units (200 percent) in order to successfully complete the program. All
courses attempted and given a letter grade, including “D”, “F”, “I”, or “W” will be included as credits
attempted and successfully completed in assessing student progress against the maximum allowable time
frame. In addition, accepted transfer credits and credit achieved through challenge examination will be
included in assessing student progress against the maximum allowable time frame.
In addition, if at any point a student cannot mathematically complete his/her program within the
maximum time frame, the student will be found to not be making satisfactory progress.

Program Transfers or Additional Degrees and Satisfactory Academic Progress for Graduate
Students
Since the graduate programs have no courses in common, transfer is not possible to a different graduate
program at the University. Students wishing to transfer to a different graduate program must apply to the
program to be accepted as new students.


Graduation Requirements for Graduate Students
West Coast University awards a master’s degree to students who successfully complete the prescribed
program credits. In order to be eligible for graduation, students must complete the program with a
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 91 of 155
Graduate Programs of Study
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (MSN)
Number of Semester Credits: 36
Program Length: 4 Semesters – 80 weeks

The graduate program in nursing promotes foundational competencies that are core to advanced nursing
practice in an ever-changing and globally reaching health care environment. Both academic, practicum
and interpersonal preparation are characterized by increased depth in organizational and systems’
leadership within a culture of integrity and personal accountability in a community that values the dignity
and contributions of our members. Standards of ethical behavior and decision-making are essential
foundations of our graduate education programs, which guide individuals to distinguish ethical principles
and understand the consequences and implications beyond personal and organizational self-interest. By
pursuing more effective and innovative methodologies through which students utilize administrative
expertise with the foresight to analyze problems, structure and facilitate development, and find and
implement solutions, WCU graduates are prepared to make a positive impact on society.

The core courses and directed practicum offer expanded study in the health care areas of advocacy,
program management, education, clinical practice, research, and health policy formulation. Graduates will
be able to formulate an inspirational perspective of nursing, incorporating a wide range of theories from
nursing and other sciences. The Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing (AACN, 2011) provides a
foundation for the theoretical and clinical emphasis of the MSN program.

A total of 36 semester credits are required to earn the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). Students
may also complete an additional 13 units in preparation for a nurse educator role. Full time enrollment in
the Master’s program is 9 credits per semester.

Program Learning Outcomes
Upon graduation, MSN student will:
       1. Integrate the various sciences from nursing and such other fields as physiology, statistics,
          psychosocial, political, financial, genetics, public health and the organizations sciences in the
          continued improvement of nursing across the continuum of various health care settings.
       2. Provide leadership in a variety of settings that promote high quality safe patient care that also
          incorporates ethical decision making and effective working relationships across a variety of
          disciplines.
       3. Demonstrate the skills needed to effect quality improvement that incorporates the various
          models, standards and performance measures necessary to apply quality principles, within
          any type of organization.
       4. Apply evidenced based research in clinical practice by identifying actual or potential practice
          problems in a setting and resolving them through the role of change agent.
       5. Demonstrates proficiency in computer skills both technical and in the application of
          informatics to enhance, deliver, communicate and integrate and coordinate patient care.
       6. Recognize the need for and ability to affect policy changes by using the policy development
          process and advocacy strategies to influence health and health care.
       7. Communicate and coordinate with a variety of health professionals in a variety of settings to
          manage and coordinate care.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 92 of 155
        8. Identify and integrate the various evidenced based practices of health promotion and disease
           prevention using client centered, culturally and age appropriate concepts in the nursing
           process of services to individuals, families and broad based aggregate populations.
        9. Demonstrate an advanced level of nursing and relevant sciences and the ability to integrate
           that knowledge into nursing practice that influences health care outcomes for individual,
           families, populations or systems.

Applicants for the Master of Science in the Nursing program must:
   • Have a minimum of a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing or closely related field from an
       accredited institution for admission to the MSN curriculum, or
   • Students with a Bachelor degree in a field other than Nursing, will be required to verify course work
       or experience in undergraduate research, leadership/management, and public/community health. If
       course work is required, the student may be admitted, but must complete the following additional
       course requirements as part of the MSN program:
           • NURS 340 Public Health Nursing
           • NURS 350 Research in Nursing
           • NURS 420 Principles of Leadership and Management
       All transfer credit or course substitutions must be approved by the Campus Dean. Enrollment in
       higher level courses prior to completion of these pre-requisite courses may be approved by the
       Campus Dean.
   • Be licensed as a Registered Nurse (RN) in California or applicant’s state of residence.
   • Pass the HESI A2 at the 90% level, or have achieved 1000 on the GRE, or have achieved a
       cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the bachelor’s degree program;
           o Applicants with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.7 to 2.99 may be considered for
               admission on probation, but must achieve a cumulative undergraduate GPA of B (3.0) or
               better prior to entering the Nursing Core courses in order to be removed from probation.
           o Students on probation who do not achieve a cumulative undergraduate GPA of B (3.0) or
               better and are scheduled to enter the Nursing Core courses must either transfer to the RN
               to BSN program or will be dismissed from the program.

Applicants for the RN to MSN Track must:
   • Have a Bachelors degree from an accredited institution;
   • Have an Associate degree in Nursing from an accredited institution with a 3.0 cumulative GPA or
       higher.
           a. Applicants with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.7 to 2.99 may be considered for
               conditional admission, but must achieve a B (3.0) or better in the first 12 credits in the
               program to be removed from probation.
           b. Students on probation who do not achieve a B or better in the first 12 credits will be
               dismissed from the program.
   • Pass the HESI A2 at the 90% level, or have achieved a score of 1000 on the GRE or have
       achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in their undergraduate program;
   • Be licensed as a Registered Nurse (RN) in California or applicant’s state of residence.
   • Have completed one year of full-time continuous employment as a licensed RN (or the equivalent
       of 2,080 hours), or be scheduled to complete the equivalent of one year of continuous
       employment as a licensed RN prior to entering the graduate level 500- or 600-level courses in the
       program.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 93 of 155
RN Licensure
RNs who are not licensed in California, will be required to apply for a California RN license in order to
complete their clinical practicum in California. RNs wishing to complete their clinical practicum in their
state of residence must identify a clinical site in their state of residence with which the university can execute
a clinical affiliation agreement.

Transfer Credit Evaluation: Only courses in which a grade of B (3.0) or better has been received will be
considered for transfer credit into the graduate program. With respect to the currency of the credit being
considered, all General Education and Science course(s) must have been taken within the last five calendar
years, unless the student possesses a degree or advanced degree in the specific field of study for which the
student is seeking transfer credit. The student must be listed in good standing with the prior institution. A
student is limited to a maximum of six (6) transfer credits for graduate level (500 and 600 level) courses.

Master of Science in Nursing Curriculum
Course Number                                     Course Title                                   Semester Credits
                                            CORE NURSING COURSES
MATH 500             Biostatistics (Required for MSN)                                                    3.0
NURS 500             Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice                                         3.0
NURS 510             Policy Organization & Financing of Health Care                                      3.0
NURS 520             Ethics in Health Care                                                               2.0
NURS 530             Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology                                             3.0
NURS 540             Research Utilization                                                                3.0
NURS 550             Advanced Nursing Practice Role Development                                          3.0
NURS 560             Health Promotion and Disease Prevention                                             4.0
NURS 570             Advanced Pharmacology                                                               3.0
NURS 580             Advanced Health/Physical Assessment                                                 3.0
NURS 590             Advanced Clinical Practice : Theory                                                 3.0
NURS 591L            Advanced Clinical Practice: Practicum                                               3.0
                                                                                      Total             36.0

Note: Students admitted to the MSN track may choose to complete an additional 13 units to prepare for a role in
education and receive a post-graduate certificate with the MSN. The additional courses will increase the total units of
the program to 49 and the program length by 20 weeks for a total of 100 weeks.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                             2011-12 CATALOG                            Page 94 of 155
Master of Science in Nursing with Education Track
A total of 49 semester credits are required to earn the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) with
Education Track. Full-time enrollment in the Master’s program is 9 credits per semester.

MSN with Education Track Curriculum

Course Number                            Course Title                        Semester Credits
                                     CORE NURSING COURSES
MATH 500         Biostatistics (Required for MSN)                                   3.0
NURS 500         Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice                        3.0
NURS 510         Policy Organization & Financing of Health Care                     3.0
NURS 520         Ethics in Health Care                                              2.0
NURS 530         Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology                            3.0
NURS 540         Research Utilization                                               3.0
NURS 550         Advanced Nursing Practice Role Development                         3.0
NURS 560         Health Promotion and Disease Prevention                            4.0
NURS 570         Advanced Pharmacology                                              3.0
NURS 580         Advanced Health/Physical Assessment                                3.0
NURS 590         Advanced Clinical Practice : Theory                                3.0
NURS 591L        Advanced Clinical Practice: Practicum                              3.0
NURS 600         Principles of Teaching and Learning                                3.0
NURS 610         Curriculum Design                                                  3.0
NURS 620         Educational Administration                                         2.0
NURS 630         Simulation and Clinical Nursing Education                          2.0
NURS 641L        Education –Teaching Practicum                                      3.0
                                                                     Total         49.0




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                      2011-12 CATALOG                  Page 95 of 155
Nurse Educator Certificate (Post- Master’s)
Number of Semester Credits: 13
Program Length: 2 Semesters – 40 weeks
The Nurse Educator certificate program is committed to the development of the nursing professional who
can integrate enhanced leadership skills with nursing education in the academic or service setting, to
formulate a professional commitment to learning and to make a contribution to quality improvement.
A total of 13 semester credits are required to earn the Nurse Educator Certificate. The Nurse Educator
Certificate is a postgraduate certificate program that includes didactic theory courses and practicum
experience. Individuals who hold an MSN and complete this educational component will be qualified to
teach nursing.

Entrance Requirements:
   • Master of Science in Nursing degree, or
   • Concurrent enrollment in the West Coast University MSN program or RN to MSN program.

Nurse Educator Curriculum

Course Number                              Course Title                             Semester Credits
                                 CORE NURSE EDUCATOR COURSES
NURS 600          Principles of Teaching and Learning                                      3.0
NURS 610          Curriculum Design                                                        3.0
NURS 620          Educational Administration                                               2.0
NURS 630          Simulation and Clinical Nursing Education                                2.0
NURS 641L         Education –Teaching Practicum                                            3.0
                                                                           Total           13.0




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                       2011-12 CATALOG                      Page 96 of 155
RN to MSN Track

Number of Semester Credits:       77 (MSN)
                                  87 (MSN with Nurse Educator Certificate)
Program Length:        6 Semesters – 120 weeks (MSN)
                       8 Semesters – 160 weeks (MSN with Nurse Educator Certificate)

This is an accelerated path to the MSN degree for the nurse possessing strong academic skills and
experience as an RN. This program enables the nurse to earn her Bachelor degree (BSN) within this
Master of Science program. This program also includes the option to earn a Nurse Educator Certificate
by taking an additional semester of courses for those nurses wishing to become nurse educators. A total
of 77 semester credits are required to earn the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) or 87 credits to earn
the MSN with Nurse Educator Certificate. This program includes the completion of general education
courses, upper division didactic theory courses, graduate coursework and clinical experience.

The RN to MSN option provides educational mobility for registered nurses who are seeking a Master of
Science in Nursing. Through full-time or part-time study, RNs are provided the opportunity to advance
their professional careers. The RN to MSN option is highly selective. Graduates receive the MSN and
complete requirements for the BSN. Nurses interested in teaching can complete an optional 10 credits to
earn a nurse educator certificate.

Petition for BSN: Students in the RN to MSN program may apply for a BSN during their last semester
in residence once they have met the following requirements:
     • Completion of 60 credits or more beyond the Associate Degree in Nursing.
     • The 60 credits may be composed of both transfer credits and course credits earned.
     • The 60 credits must include:
            o All General Education Courses in the RN to MSN Program
            o All 300- and 400-level Nursing Core Courses in the RN to MSN Program
            o All courses required for the BSN or the upper level equivalent of the BSN course. See
                RN to BSN program.
The BSN will be awarded concurrently with the MSN.

RN to MSN Curriculum
Course Number                              Course Title                               Semester Credits
                                    GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
                                          May be transferred to WCU
CHEM 210             Biochemistry                                                            5.0
ENGL 140             Written Communications I                                                3.0
ENGL 340             Written Communications II                                               3.0
HCA 206              Epidemiology in Public Health Practice                                  3.0
HUM 470              Cultural Pluralism                                                      3.0
MATH 500             Biostatistics (Required for MSN)                                        3.0
PSYC 290             Lifespan Psychology                                                     3.0
SPCH 142             Oral Communication                                                      3.0
                                                                             Total          26.0

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                     Page 97 of 155
Course Number                                    Course Title                              Semester Credits
                                       RN TO MSN CORE COURSES
NURS 310              Nutrition in Health and Disease                                             3.0
NURS 340              Public Health                                                               3.0
NURS 341L             Pub Health Practicum                                                        3.0
NURS 360*             Principles of Teaching and Patient Care                                     3.0
NURS 420              Principles of Leadership                                                    3.0
NURS 430              Disaster Management                                                         3.0
NURS 500              Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice                                 3.0
NURS 510              Policy, Organization & Financing of Health Care.                            3.0
NURS 520              Ethics in Health care                                                       2.0
NURS 530              Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology                                     3.0
NURS 540              Research Utilization                                                        3.0
NURS 550              Advanced Nursing Practice Role Development                                  3.0
NURS 560              Health Promotion & Disease Prevention                                       4.0
NURS 570              Advanced Pharmacology                                                       3.0
NURS 580              Advanced Health/Physical Assessment                                         3.0
NURS 590              Advanced Clinical Practice : theory                                         3.0
NURS 591L             Advanced Clinical Practice: practicum                                       3.0
                                                                                 Total           51.0
                                                                       Program Total             77.0

*Students enrolled in the Education Track Option will take NURS 600 in place of NURS 360



Education Track Option – Additional Core Requirements


Course Number                                    Course Title                              Semester Credits
                                    CORE NURSE EDUCATOR COURSES
NURS 600**            Principles of Teaching and Learning                                         3.0
NURS 610              Curriculum Design                                                           3.0
NURS 620              Educational Administration                                                  2.0
NURS 630              Simulation & Clinical Nursing Education                                     2.0
NURS 641L             Nursing education teaching practicum                                        3.0
                                                                         TOTAL CORE              13.0
                      OVERALL TOTAL FOR PROGRAM WITH EDUCATION TRACK                             86.0
**Replaces NURS 360


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 98 of 155
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
Master of Science Degree in Health Care Management
Los Angeles Campus Only

Number of Semester Credits: 36
Program Length: 4 Semesters – 80 weeks
A total of 36 semester credits are required to earn the Master of Science (MS) degree in Health Care
Management (HCM). Full time enrollment in the Master’s program is 9 credits per semester.

Program Mission: The mission of the Health Care Management program is to provide students from
diverse educational and cultural backgrounds with the managerial tools required to make informed and
socially responsible decisions for the benefit of the society, organization and its stakeholders.
Program Objective: The Master of Science (MS) in Health Care Management degree provides students
with a strong foundation in the core functional areas of Management with a focus on the Health Care
industry. The program prepares students with the multidisciplinary skills required for the supervisory and
managerial positions to meet the challenges facing the health care industry and the significant social
impact it has on the economy.

Program Learning Outcomes
Upon graduation, MSHCM students should be able to:
    1.   Develop plans for healthcare programs.
    2.   Evaluate the health care environment.
    3.   Analyze businesses for ethical and legal practices.
    4.   Combine the core business knowledge to develop viable business solutions
    5.   Assess leadership models and healthcare management practices.
    6.   Evaluate the opportunities to promote Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Applicants for the Master of Science Degree in Health Care Management program must:
    1. Have a baccalaureate degree in Business, Health Care Management or related field from an
       accredited institution with a 3.0 cumulative GPA or higher, or.
    2. Have a baccalaureate degree in a program other than Business, Health Care Management, or
       related field from an accredited institution with a 3.0 cumulative GPA or higher, and meet the
       following additional requirements:
           a. Basic Business requirement:
                     i. Composite GRE score of 1000 OR
                    ii. Total GMAT score of 400 OR
                   iii. Enroll in WCU’s BUSI 100 course (Introduction to Business) and earn a B or
                        higher during first term of enrollment.
           b. Course requirements:
                     i. Provide an official transcript prior to the first day of the first term indicating
                        completion with a grade of B or better of Math 108 (College Mathematics) and
                        Math 310 (Statistics) or approved equivalent courses, or
                    ii. Take the following additional courses at West Coast University:
                             1. Math 108 prior to taking HCM 515 (normally taken in the third term of
                                 enrollment), and
                             2. Math 310 prior to taking HCM 535 (normally taken in the fourth term of
                                 enrollment)

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 99 of 155
The official transcript provided to meet the course requirements must reflect equivalent content and course
credit hours.
Students with an undergraduate GPA of 2.7 to 2.99 may be considered for admission. The applicant must
satisfy program prerequisites and achieve a grade of B (3.0) or better on all first semester (two terms) of
course work attempted. The probation status will be removed after earning a B or higher in the courses. If
the student does not achieve the required grades, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Transfer Credit Evaluation: Only graduate level courses in which a grade of B (3.0) or better was
received, taken in a program similar to the Master’s of Science in Health Care Management will be
evaluated for transfer credit. A maximum of 6 credit hours will be considered for transfer, and must reflect
the same content and course credit as the course for which transfer credit is requested.

Health Care Management Curriculum

Course Number                                 Course Title                           Semester Credits
                             CORE HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT COURSES
HCM 505              Epidemiology Management                                                  3.0
HCM 510              Strategic Planning in Health Care Organizations                          3.0
HCM 515              Financial Management for Health Care Managers                            3.0
HCM 520              Marketing Management for Health Care Professionals                       3.0
HCM 525              Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Care Management                       3.0
HCM 530              Information Systems for Health Care Programs                             3.0
HCM 535              Research Methods in Health Care Management                               3.0
HCM 540              Hospital Administration and Management                                   3.0
HCM 550              Leadership Models for Health Care Managers                               3.0
HCM 560              Project Management                                                       3.0
HCM 570              Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Health Care Industry                    3.0
HCM 580              Capstone Course: Cases in Health Care Management                         3.0
                                                                             Total           36.0




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 100 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 101 of 155
Course Numbering

               Letter Codes                                       Numbering Definitions
ANAT        Anatomy
BUSI        Business Administration                      100 -199: Initial or introductory courses
CHEM        Chemistry
DHYG        Dental Hygiene                               200 - 299: Second-year courses in a sequence or
                                                                    development in a field of study
ENGL        English
ESCI        Environmental Science
HCA         Health Care Administration                  300 - 499: Third- and Fourth- year courses in a
                                                                   sequence of courses – Upper Division
HCM         Health Care Management                                 Bachelor’s courses

HIST        History
HUM         Humanities                                   500 - 699: Master’s level graduate courses

MATH        Mathematics
MICR        Microbiology                           NURS XXXL : Clinical courses which must be taken
                                                               simultaneously    with     corresponding
NURS        Nursing                                            theory courses, unless the corresponding
                                                               theory course has been successfully
PHYS        Physiology                                         completed.
PSYC        Psychology

SOCY        Sociology                             Note: Courses acceptable for general education credit, and
                                                  core courses in a program are indicated in the course outline
SPCH        Oral Communication                    for the program.



Online Courses
Several courses listed are offered to students in a fully online format. Please see an Admissions Representative
or the University Registrar for a current listing of courses offered online.

Blended Courses
Some courses in some programs are only available in blended format, which combines residential and online
classes. Please see an Admissions Representative or the University Registrar for a listing and description of
the blended format and courses.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 102 of 155
Course Descriptions
ANAT 260 Human Anatomy
4.0 Semester Credits: 3.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Includes a logical analysis of body tissues, organs and organ systems. Stresses the microscopic,
developmental and gross anatomy of mammals, with special emphasis on human anatomy. Major topics
include cell structure and function, tissues, organization of the human body, and all body systems. The
laboratory work includes study of the developmental, microscopic and gross anatomy of preserved
specimens and models. This course is considered a general education course for the BRN and a core
requirement for the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. Pre-requisites: None.

ANAT 270 Pathophysiology
3.0 Semester Credits
Provides a comprehensive approach to diseases based on physiological concepts. Students will learn to
correlate basic physiological functions with the abnormal occurrence of disease when homeostasis is
disrupted. Topics include physical responses to injury, disturbances of homeostasis in major body
systems, and both physical and chemical stressors. Prerequisites: CHEM 260, ANAT 260 and PHYS 261.

BUSI 100 Introduction to Business
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides students with an overview of business in an increasingly global society serving as an
introduction to business terminology, concepts, environments, systems, strategies, and current issues. Topics
include an overview of the business environment, business ethics, entrepreneurship and global business,
management, marketing, production, information systems, and financial elements of business. This course
provides a solid foundation for more detailed and higher-level study in subsequent courses. Pre-requisites:
None.

CHEM 210 Chemistry
4.0 Semester Credits - 3.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Provides an overview of general chemistry. Topics will include stoichiometry, nuclear and electronic
structure, chemical bonding, and thermochemistry, kinetic theory, equilibrium, acids and bases, as well as
a periodic survey of the physical and chemical properties of the elements. In the laboratory, students will
become familiar with laboratory techniques used in identifying and analyzing the strength and reactions
surrounding acids and bases. Students will also be introduced to organic and biochemical principles.
Prerequisites: ANAT 260, PHYS 261, MATH 108 or the equivalent.

CHEM 260 Biochemistry
5.0 Semester Credits - 4.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Introduces general, organic and biological chemistry. Lecture topics include scientific measurement,
classification of elements and matter, chemical bonding and reactions, properties of biological molecules,
and metabolic pathways. Laboratory activities include determining density and specific gravity,
analyzing strengths and reactions of acids and bases, investigation of various biochemical pathways, and
understanding the nature of biological reactions. Prerequisites: ANAT 260, PHYS 261, and MATH 108
or the equivalent.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 103 of 155
DHYG 100 Dental Embryology, Histology, and Anatomy with Lab
3.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credit Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Introduction to orofacial structures and the study of orofacial embryology, oral histology, and dental
anatomy. Clinical considerations relevant to dental hygiene practice and root morphology to enhance
instrumentation are included. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case
studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of all Dental Hygiene Program
General Education and Core Health care courses.

DHYG 110 Dental Radiology Science with Lab
2.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Provides the student with a basic understanding of theories and principles in dental radiology. including a
study of the dental x-ray, the characteristics and methods of controlling x-radiation, types of film used,
methods of processing, identifying, and mounting radiographs, radiation safety procedures, and
interpretation of radiographs for preliminary evaluation. It includes techniques of intra-oral and extra-oral
radiography with laboratory experience and analysis of technique errors. Methods of instruction include
guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Prerequisites: DHYG 100,
DHYG 130, DHYG 140, and DHYG 205.

DHYG 111 Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic
1.5 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Theory and 0.5 Credit Clinical
Analyzes the clinical discipline of radiographic interpretation of oral and maxillofacial disease is
presented for the dental hygienist. Techniques in extra-oral and specialized radiography are discussed.
Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities.
Prerequisites: DHYG 110, DHYG 150, DHYG 206, and DHYG 215.

DHYG 130 Preventive Dentistry and Risk Assessment
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credit Theory
Provides the fundamentals for the clinical application of primary preventive dentistry and risk assessment
procedures based on epidemiology and critical evaluation of scientific literature. Content centers on the
strategies to prevent plaque diseases and the skills required for effective patient education and motivation.
Prepares students to assess, develop, plan, implement and evaluate preventive dental services for
individual patients. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and
classroom activities. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Dental Hygiene Program General
Education and Core Health care courses. This is a blended course.

DHYG 140 Introduction to Dental Hygiene Practice with Lab
4.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory and 2.0 Credits Lab
Provides the student with basic concepts and theories related to practice of clinical dental hygiene as well
as an introduction to the WCU patient care system. Emphasis is placed on didactic knowledge of clinic
protocol, patient assessment, treatment interventions, and recognition of abuse. Provides the dental health
care worker with the principles and practical application concepts of infection control in dentistry with
discussion and application of the governmental agency standards. Methods of instruction include guided
facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: Successful completion
of all Dental Hygiene Program General Education and Core Health care courses.

DHYG 150 Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
4.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory and 2.0 Credits Lab
Provides beginning dental hygiene students with the scientific knowledge and understanding of the basic
principles of dental hygiene techniques and procedures for applying comprehensive dental hygiene
services. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom
activities. Prerequisites: DHYG 100, DHYG 130, DHYG 140, and DHYG 205.

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 104 of 155
DHYG 151 Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
4.5 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory, 2.0 Credits Lab, and 0.5 Credits Clinical
Develops the skills and techniques required for performing dental hygiene services, and to orient the
student to the role of the clinical dental hygienist through direct patient care. Methods of instruction
include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG
110, DHYG 150, DHYG 206, and DHYG 215.

DHYG 152 Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene III
4.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory, 1.0 Credit Lab, and 1.0 Credit Clinical
Provides a continuation of preclinical learning with a transfer to clinical knowledge, skills, and values
related to direct dental hygiene care. Emphasis will be placed on the dental hygiene process of care –
assess, diagnose, plan, implement, and evaluate. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation,
demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 111, DHYG 151, DHYG
260, and DHYG 265.

DHYG 205 General Pathology, Immunology, and Medical Terminology
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Focuses on the basic pathologic mechanisms in human disease with an understanding of immunology and
related medical terminology. Major diseases and disorders encountered in practice are discussed, with
emphasis on the clinical aspects of the diseases. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation,
demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of all Dental
Hygiene Program General Education and Core Health care courses. This is a blended course.

DHYG 206 Oral Pathology
3.0 Semester Credits – 3.0 Credits Theory
Interpretations of oral pathological conditions are presented with emphasis on clinical signs and
symptoms. Emphasis is placed on the clinical recognition, differential diagnosis, and treatment of oral
pathologic conditions and associated systemic disorders. Methods of instruction include guided
facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 100, DHYG
130, DHYG 140, and DHYG 205. This is a blended course.

DHYG 215 Head and Neck Anatomy
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of the human head and neck. Emphasis is placed on the
correlation of structure and function especially where applicable to clinical dental hygiene. Methods of
instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-
requisites: DHYG 100, DHYG 130, DHYG 140, and DHYG 205. This is a blended course.

DHYG 260 Pain Management with Lab
3.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Management of pain control through the use of local anesthetics and nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation is
studied and applied. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and
classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 110, DHYG 150, DHYG 206, and DHYG 215. This is a
blended course.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 105 of 155
DHYG 265 Dental Materials with Lab
3.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Reviews the properties, composition and manipulation of materials used in dentistry. The study of dental
materials enables the dental hygienist to understand the behavior of these materials, and provides a
scientific rationale for selecting, using and understanding the varied relationships of dental bio-materials.
Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities.
Pre-requisites: DHYG 110, DHYG 150, DHYG 206, and DHYG 215. This is a blended course.

DHYG 270 Basic and Applied Pharmacology
3.0 Semester Credits – 3.0 Credits Theory
Presentation of general principles of pharmacology, including the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetic
adverse reactions, and contraindications of drugs. Emphasis will be placed on those drug groups
especially relevant to dental practice including the general anesthetics, local anesthetics, sedatives,
analgesics, antiseptics, autonomic drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Methods of instruction
include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG
111, DHYG 151, DHYG 260, and DHYG 265. This is a blended course.

DHYG 280 Introduction to Periodontology
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Introduction to the anatomy and histology of the periodontium and changes that occur in the presence of
the disease processes. Pathogenesis and etiology of periodontal diseases and mechanisms of tissue
destruction are emphasized as well as clinical management of periodontal patients. Methods of instruction
include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG
111, DHYG 151, DHYG 260, and DHYG 265.

DHYG 290 Medically Compromised Care and Emergencies
3.0 Semester Credits – 3.0 Credits Theory
Focuses on an understanding of the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of treating
patients with special needs. Provides the student with the background and skill to recognize and manage
any medical emergency situation. Emphasis will be placed on prevention, prompt recognition, and
effective treatment of life-threatening emergency situations that can occur in the practice of dentistry.
Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities.
Pre-requisites: DHYG 111, DHYG 151, DHYG 260, and DHYG 265. This is a blended course.

DHYG 300 Clinical Seminar I
1.0 Semester Credit – 1.0 Credit Theory
Analysis of the dental hygiene process of care through seminar discussions. Provides the student with
continued instruction in advanced clinical skills and experience synthesizing knowledge and values from
all segments of the profession of dental hygiene. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation,
demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 152, DHYG 270, DHYG
280, and DHYG 290.

DHYG 301 Clinical Practice I
4.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Lab and 3.0 Credits Clinical
Provides advanced clinical practice in whole patient care services following the dental hygiene process of
care. Emphasis will be on treating the patient with moderate active periodontal involvement. Clinical
experiences at higher levels of skill are required to prepare the student for licensure. Methods of
instruction include clinical experience and guided demonstrations. Pre-requisites: DHYG 152, DHYG
270, DHYG 280, and DHYG 290.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 106 of 155
DHYG 310 Clinical Seminar II
1.0 Semester Credit – 1.0 Credit Theory
Analysis of the dental hygiene process of care through seminar discussions. Provides the student with
continued instruction in advanced clinical skills and experience synthesizing knowledge and values from
all segments of the profession of dental hygiene. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation,
demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 300, DHYG 301, DHYG
330, DHYG 340, and DHYG 350.

DHYG 311 Clinical Practice II
4.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Lab and 3.0 Credits Clinical
Provides advanced clinical practice in whole patient care services following the dental hygiene process of
care. Emphasis will be on treating the patient with moderate-advanced active periodontal involvement.
Clinical experiences at higher levels of skill are required to prepare the student for licensure. Methods of
instruction include clinical experience and guided demonstrations. Pre-requisites: DHYG 300, DHYG
301, DHYG 330, DHYG 340, and DHYG 350.

DHYG 320 Clinical Seminar III
1.0 Semester Credit – 1.0 Credit Theory
Analysis of the dental hygiene process of care through seminar discussions. Provides the student with
continued instruction in advanced clinical skills and experience synthesizing knowledge and values from
all segments of the profession of dental hygiene. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation,
demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 310, DHYG 311, DHYG
380, DHYG 460, and DHYG 470.

DHYG 321 Clinical Practice III
5.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Lab and 4.0 Credits Clinical
Provides advanced clinical practice in whole patient care services following the dental hygiene process of
care. Emphasis will be on treating the patient with moderate-advanced active periodontal involvement.
Clinical experiences at higher levels of skill are required to prepare the student for licensure. Methods of
instruction include clinical experience and guided demonstrations. Pre-requisites: DHYG 310, DHYG
311, DHYG 380, DHYG 460, and DHYG 470.

DHYG 330 Biochemistry and Nutrition
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Covers the relationship of diet and nutrition to various diseases such as periodontal disease, cancer,
diabetes, and obesity will be considered, as will the nutritional considerations of patients with special
needs. Each major nutrient group will be covered along with its biological role. The biochemical or
physiological role of required dietary nutrients and the relevance of nutrition to preventive dentistry will
be emphasized Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and
classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 152, DHYG 270, DHYG 280, and DHYG 290. This is a
blended course.

DHYG 340 Research Methodology
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Reviews the meaning evidence-based dentistry and standard of care. Qualitative and quantitative research
methodologies are discussed with an emphasis on critical evaluation of scientific literature in health-
related areas. Provides the student with the opportunity to design, implement and present a project that
enriches their existing knowledge and contributes to the profession of dental hygiene. Methods of
instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities.     Pre-
requisites: DHYG 152, DHYG 270, DHYG 280, and DHYG 290. This is a blended course.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 107 of 155
DHYG 350 Ethics Seminar
1.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Theory
Explores in a seminar/discussion format the ethical behavior in clinical dental practice and includes
clinical decision making models, practitioner-patient relationship, obligations of trust and confidentiality,
and dealing honestly with patients. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case
studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 152, DHYG 270, DHYG 280, and DHYG 290.

DHYG 380 Applied Periodontology
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Provides the dental hygiene student with an advanced understanding of periodontics. The development of
a periodontal treatment philosophy will be accomplished through reading in the classical and current
scientific literature. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and
classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 300, DHYG 301, DHYG 330, DHYG 340, and DHYG 350.
This is a blended course.

DHYG 460 Community Dental Health Education with Lab
2.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credit Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Covers the concepts and methods of community-based oral health programs with health promotion and
disease prevention activities. Issues central to community dental health such as access to care, supply and
demand, quality assurance, health financing, as it is described in health policies are discussed. Methods of
instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities.         Pre-
requisites: DHYG 300, DHYG 301, DHYG 330, DHYG 340, and DHYG 350.

DHYG 470 Practice Management and Jurisprudence
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Evaluation of the legal aspects of dental practice, covering negligence, informed consent, risk
management and quality assurance. Discussion of peer view, regulatory agencies, and the California
Dental Practice Act. Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and
classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 300, DHYG 301, DHYG 330, DHYG 340, and DHYG 350.
This is a blended course.

DHYG 485 Advanced Dental Hygiene Topics
2.0 Semester Credits – 2.0 Credits Theory
Analysis of advanced dental hygiene topics to improve clinical skills related to dental hygiene care
specifically focused on technology to enhance and improve patient care. Methods of instruction include
guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities. Pre-requisites: DHYG 310,
DHYG 311, DHYG 380, DHYG 460, and DHYG 470.

DHYG 490 Professional Development Project
2.0 Semester Credits – 1.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credits Lab
Assists the student in exploring areas of interest related the many professional roles of a dental hygienist
specifically focused on opportunities for a BSDH graduate. Emphasis will be placed on employment
preparation such as interviewing, resume writing, and completion of individual professional portfolio.
Methods of instruction include guided facilitation, demonstration, case studies, and classroom activities.
Pre-requisites: DHYG 310, DHYG 311, DHYG 380, DHYG 460, and DHYG 470.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 108 of 155
ENGL 140 Written Communication I
3.0 Semester Credits
Develops competency in effective written communication for creative, academic, and professional written
communication. Focuses on four basic areas of effective writing: unity, specifics, coherence and grammar.
Utilizes reading, discussion and personal insight to increase students’ capacity to write simple paragraphs,
formal essays, reports and research projects. APA style and library usage/research is required. Pre-requisites:
None.

ENGL 340 Written Communication II
3.0 Semester Credits
Conducts intensive study and practice of advanced writing principles for research papers. Detailed review of
APA style format and library research. Focus on development of critical thinking skills to analyze and critique
written communication. Review of writing principles include developing thesis statements, providing support,
proper citation and reference pages, and creating clear organization of main points. APA style and library
usage/research is required. Pre-requisite: ENGL 140 or the equivalent.

ESCI 150 Environmental Science
3.0 Semester Credits
Appraises the principles of ecology with emphasis on the relationship of humankind to the environment.
Includes human, biological and cultural evolution; environmental issues; ethics and politics of ecological
relations and decisions. Pre-requisites: None.

HCA 206 Epidemiology in Public Health Practice
3.0 Semester Credits
Covers principles and the practice of epidemiology, including surveillance, descriptive epidemiology, outbreak
investigation, and analytic methods, with emphasis on field epidemiology. Focuses on the use of sound
epidemiologic judgment, particularly when epidemiologic theory and practical considerations conflict.
Students will be able to apply these principles to address public health problems in the community. Pre-
requisites: None.

HCA 209 Introduction to Health Care Management
3.0 Semester Credits
Introduces basic functions of health care management. Covers the changing environment of health care with a
focus on basic management functions of planning, organizing, decision-making, and staffing. Other issues of
motivation and conflict management, leadership, human resources management, and communication are
covered. Pre-requisites: None.

HCA 331 Human Resource Management for Health Care Professionals
3.0 Semester Credits
Constructs an overview of human resource management in health services organizations. Covers topics such
as external environment, corporate environment, legal and economic factors, and organizational strategy as
they impact human resource management. Basic concepts include job analysis, recruitment and retention,
selection and placement, training and development, performance appraisal and compensation, labor relations,
and diversity. Pre-requisite: HCA 209 or the equivalent.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 109 of 155
HCA 432 Principles of Leadership for Health Care Organizations
3.0 Semester Credits
Critiques and analyzes leadership principles and theories and the application of these principles to the health
care industry. Reviews the essential attributes required of a leader in today’s health care organization, making
a distinction between managers and leaders. Students evaluate their own leadership styles utilizing a leadership
assessment questionnaire. Pre-requisites: HCA 201, HCA 209, HCA 331, HUM 470 (dental hygiene students
only) or the equivalent.

HCA 434 Medical Ethics and Issues
3.0 Semester Credits
Introduces biomedical and health care ethics. Topics include a wide range of subjects such as research
involving humans and animals, human genetics, reproduction, death and dying, organ transplantation, public
health, biotechnology, and bioscience. Designed to help students understand how health care professionals
and consumers make difficult health care choices for their patients, their loved ones, and themselves. Pre-
requisites: None.

HCM 505 Epidemiology Management
3.0 Semester Credits
This course takes a managerial approach to the prevention and control of diseases in the public and
private arena. Basic concepts of epidemiology are applied to the policy, marketing, management, and
geography of disease prevention and control.

HCM 510 Strategic Planning in Health Care Organizations
3.0 Semester Credits
Successful managers understand the importance of strategic planning for achieving long-term growth,
profitability, and competitive advantage for the organization. Topics include strategy development,
evaluating the environment, conducting SWOT analysis, implementing and monitoring the strategy.

HCM 515 Financial Management for Health Care Managers
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on the application of financial concepts to managing cost and profitability in health
care organizations. Topics include preparing and analyzing financial statements, budgeting, cost
management, break-even analysis, variance analysis, and capital financing. Pre-requisite: Math 108 or
equivalent.

HCM 520 Marketing Management for Health Care Professionals
3.0 Semester Credits
This course examines how managers make decisions in a complex and competitive environment. The
student is introduced to the application of the marketing concepts and practices as they relate to the
management of the marketing strategy development and implementation in health care organizations. As
part of the course requirements students will be required to develop a marketing plan on a health care
related opportunity and make a presentation to the class.

HCM 525 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Care Management
3.0 Semester Credits
In this course students will examine the legal and ethical issues involved in the use of health related
information. Topics include ethical theories and dilemmas, contemporary ethical issues, tort law,
contracts, corporate responsibilities, ethical and legal responsibilities of the health care professionals, and
the regulatory environment.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 110 of 155
HCM 530 Information Systems for Health Care Programs
3.0 Semester Credits
With the ever increasing costs of health care and the demand for quality of care, information systems are
expected to play an important role in managing health care organizations. Topics include the analysis,
design, selection, implementation, and evaluation of information systems in a variety of health care
settings.

HCM 535 Research Methods in Health Care Management
3.0 Semester Credits
Application of univariate and multivariate research methods and computer analysis of data using
statistical packages. During the term, students are required to identify a health care related problem,
design the data collection instrument, collect the data, analyze and interpret the data, and make
recommendations to the management. Pre-requisite: Math 310 or equivalent

HCM 540 Hospital Administration and Management
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on the operation, administration, and management of health care organizations.
Topics include planning, organizing, recruiting, training, motivating and directing the employees of the
organization, Additional topics include conflict resolution, workplace diversity, patient privacy and
confidentially issues.

HCM 550 Leadership Models for Health Care Managers
3.0 Semester Credits
This course explores a broad range of leadership issues. Topics include leadership theories, models,
styles, competencies, ethics in health leadership, change management, mentoring and succession
planning.

HCM 560 Project Management
3.0 Semester Credits
This course introduces the student to the use of computer based project management to plan and
implement complex projects in a health care organization. Topics include the selection and role of the
project manager, organization and planning, budgeting and cost estimation, scheduling and resource
allocation, monitoring, controlling, and auditing the project. Students will use the MS project to plan and
organize a health care related project.

HCM 570 Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Health Care Industry
3.0 Semester Credits
This course is intended primarily for students who are interested in creating businesses related to the
health care industry both within the organization and outside the organization. Topics include
conceptualization of the product/service, planning, raising capital, hiring the team, launching, growing,
and successfully exiting the business. During the term students will be required to develop an investment
grade business plan and make a presentation to the class.

HCM 580 Capstone Course: Cases in Health Care Management
3.0 Semester Credits
This course will bring to bear on the student’s ability to integrate the various concepts, models, theories,
and topics relating to the health care industry that were discussed throughout the program by participating
in a series of case analysis exercises. Pre-requisites: HCM 510, HCM 515, HCM 520, HCM 540.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 111 of 155
HIST 280 United States History
3.0 Semester Credits
Surveys United States history with particular focus on civic institutions, foundational facts, multicultural
perspectives, and their impact on modern-day national and international social and political developments.
Covers main events, and themes, primarily focusing on their impact on American history (i.e. cultural,
political, and social movements), including a discussion of America's central institutions. Pre-requisites:
None.

HUM 141 Critical Reasoning
3.0 Semester Credits
Differentiates and analyzes the understanding, recognition, and construction of critical thinking. Emphasis on
critical thinking and perception, cognitive development, decision making, emotional intelligence, deductive
and inductive reasoning, formal logic, and informal logic. Designed to improve critical thinking in written
and spoken arguments by applying established modes of reasoning, analyzing rhetorical strategies,
evaluating logical fallacies, and detecting propaganda techniques. Pre-requisites: None.

HUM 470 Cultural Pluralism
3.0 Semester Credits
Compares varied cultural traditions among groups of people in a given society who are simultaneously
interdependent and autonomous. Emphasis on shared socioeconomic and political systems of people in a
society and an appreciation of the distinct cultural practices among groups who coexist within that society. Pre-
requisite: SOCY 280 or the equivalent.

MATH 108 College Mathematics I
3.0 Semester Credits
Students are introduced to algebra topics such as properties of real numbers including basic operations,
solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and their properties, factoring
polynomials, simplifying rational expressions, radical expressions, complex numbers, solving and
graphing quadratic equations, solving system of two linear equations, logarithmic functions and their
properties, and exponential functions. Pre-requisites: None.

MATH 109 College Mathematics II
3.0 Semester Credits
Students are introduced to more advanced topics in algebra such as solving polynomial equations, solving
systems of equations, graphing functions, conic sections, sequences and series, and basic probability
concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 108

MATH 310 Statistics
3.0 Semester Credits
Covers descriptive and inferential statistics, including survey and research, sampling, organizing and
analyzing data, estimating mean and proportion, and hypothesis testing. Linear correlation, regression
analysis, and basic probability concepts are also covered. Pre-requisites: None.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 112 of 155
MATH 500 Biostatistics
3.0 Semester Credits
This course intends to give the student an idea of what medical research is about and what the role of
biostatistics is in the process. Included in this course of study is the review of different types of
descriptive statistics, principles of probability and various probability models, and inferential statistics
used in biomedical practice. Major topics include contingency table analysis, simple and multiple linear
regressions, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Logistic regression. The emphasis of this class is on
learning how to summarize, analyze, and interpret real-world data, and to prepare students for their future
courses and careers by introducing these statistical methods most often used in medical literature. Pre-
requisite: MATH 310 or equivalent.

MICR 140 General Microbiology
4.0 Semester Credits: 3.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Representative examples of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and multi-cellular parasites are studied,
with special concentration given to micro-organisms that are significant to human health. Aspects of
classification, metabolism, genetics, control mechanisms, chemotherapy, and antibiotic/resistance are
considered. Topics covered include principles of infectious disease transmission, immunology,
biotechnology, bioterrorism, and environmental remediation. Laboratory activities include aseptic
techniques, staining, identification, and antibiotic sensitivity assays. Prerequisites: ANAT 260 and PHYS
261 or the equivalent.

NURS 100 Fundamentals of Nursing
3.0 Semester Credits
This course offers the basic aspects of professional nursing and aspects of nursing care. Included are: the
nature of nursing, contemporary health care, the nursing process, research process, principles of teaching and
communication, therapeutic care, role development and Gordon’s 11 Functional Health Patterns. Pre-
requisites: Required pre-requisite and General Education courses. Co-requisite: NURS 101L.

NURS 101L Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
2.0 Semester Credits
This is a clinical skills laboratory course designed to teach the basic nursing skills for delivery of nursing care.
This includes performing basic skills in assessment, patient care across the admission discharge continuum,
documentation, teaching, basic life support, fire safety and infection control. Nursing process is utilized in the
management of care. Pre-requisites: Required pre-requisite and General Education courses. Co-requisites:
NURS 100.

NURS 120 Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
3.0 Semester Credits
This is the first medical surgical nursing course, in a series of three, devoted to learning the professional
aspects of therapeutic nursing care. The focus will be on therapeutic care for patients with medical and surgical
conditions utilizing the nursing process and Gordon’s conceptual framework. Included also will be the role of
patient advocate and manager of care utilizing principles of therapeutic communication, research and teaching
learning concepts. Pre-requisites: NURS 100 and 101L. Co-requisite: NURS 121L.

NURS 121L Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
This first clinical practicum for a medical surgical nursing course in a series of three, going from simple to
complex, devoted to learning the professional aspects of nursing in terms of the complex acute health problems
of the adult. The course will focus on nursing care involved in maintaining or restoring health of
clients/patients with medical and surgical conditions. Pre-requisites: NURS 100 and 101L. Co-requisite:
NURS 120.

    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                            2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 113 of 155
NURS 200B Transition to Professional Nursing
2.0 Semester Credits
This course is an introduction to the professional role of Registered Nursing practice and education with an
emphasis on roles and processes. Discussion includes contemporary health care, research, principles of
teaching and communication, and role development. The course includes the concepts devoted to learning the
professional aspects of therapeutic nursing care utilizing the nursing process and Gordon’s 11 Functional
Health Patterns. LVN to BSN students are expected to have completed the General Education requirements
prior to taking this course. Pre-requisites: Required pre-requisite and General Education courses; admission
to the LVN to BSN program. Co-requisites: NURS 210LB, NURS 290.

NURS 201 Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides knowledge for nursing of older adults with complex acute health problems focusing on
maintaining or restoring health of acutely ill clients with medical and surgical conditions. The needs of older
adults returning to the community and community health care issues will be addressed. Pre-requisites for LVN
to BSN: NURS 200B and 210LB for BSN students: NURS 120 and 121L. Co-requisite: NURS 211L.

NURS 203 Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the Critically Ill Client
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides knowledge for nursing of critically ill persons across the life span and promoting
wellness in culturally diverse populations. Pre-requisites: NURS 201 and 211L. Co-requisite: NURS 213L.

NURS 204 Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the Mentally Ill Client
2.0 Semester Credits
This course provides knowledge for psychiatric nursing of adults and groups within a self-care framework.
Related community experiences and pharmacology of psychotropic drugs are included. Pre-requisites: NURS
100 and NURS 101L. Co-requisite: NURS 214L.

NURS 205 Introduction to Leadership
2.0 Semester Credits
Provides information related to the leadership and management role when working within a team to help
diverse clients achieve optimal wellness. Organizational skills, time management, delegation, and teaching
skills are emphasized. Pre-requisites: NURS 120, 121L, or LVN License.

NURS 206 Expanding and Developing Family and Community
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on nursing concepts in the therapeutic care of women, mothers, infants, children,
adolescents and their families. Included are Gordon’s conceptual framework, major health promotion and
disease prevention, nursing process, therapeutic communication, evidenced based practice, teaching/learning
principles and role development in the care of women, infants and children and families. Pre-requisites:
NURS 120 and 121L. Co-requisite: NURS 216L

NURS 210LB RN Skills Laboratory
1.0 Semester Credit
This course is a laboratory experience to assess skill level from LVN experience and includes skills discussed
in NURS 101L/121L. Basic nursing skills for the delivery of nurse care includes assessment, documentation,
teaching, and infection control. This course addresses the role of patient advocate and manager of care utilizing
principles of therapeutic communication, research, and teaching learning concepts. Pre-requisites: Required
pre-requisite and General Education courses; admission to LVN to BSN program. Co-requisites: NURS 200.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 114 of 155
NURS 211L Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults Practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
This course is a practicum for the nursing care of older adult clients with complex acute and chronic health
problems in the acute care setting. Experience with care of the older adult in the community is also included.
Pre-requisite for BSN students: NURS 120 and 121L. Pre-requisites for LVN to BSN: NURS 200B and
210LB. Co-Requisite: NURS 201.

NURS 213L Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the Critically Ill Client
Practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
Experience in helping critically ill persons effectively negotiate a transition to wellness, or to lower level acuity
nursing care, or to a long-term nursing facility. Clinical practice of critical care nursing occurs in a variety of
settings. This course allows for comprehensive examination of all aspects of critical care nursing. Settings
with invasive procedures and/or peri-operative nursing are employed. Pre-requisites: NURS 201 and 210L.

NURS 214L Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the Mentally Ill Client
Practicum
2.0 Semester Credits
This course teaches nursing care for adolescents, adults, and older adults with psychiatric health problems.
Practice in public and private clinical agencies and in community settings. Pre-requisites: NURS 100 and
101L. Co-requisite: NURS 204.

NURS 216L Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on nursing concepts in the therapeutic care of women, mothers, infants, children,
adolescents and their families. Included are Gordon’s conceptual framework, major health promotion and
disease prevention, nursing process, therapeutic communication, evidenced based practice, teaching/learning
principles and role development in the care of women, infants and children and families. Pre-requisites:
NURS 120 and 121L. Co-requisite: NURS 206.

NURS 220 Integration of Nursing Concepts
2.0 Semester Credits
This course combines the knowledge base from each of the different clinical specialties in nursing by
reviewing material in a case study format and discussing the studies in seminars. The course follows up with
testing in each subject area in preparation for taking the NCLEX examination. To pass this course, students
must demonstrate a knowledge base in each subject area necessary to successfully pass the NCLEX-RN exam.
Pre-requisites: NURS 203 and NURS 213L. Co-requisite: NURS 220.

NURS 221L Integration of Nursing Practice
2.0 Semester Credits
This is the last in a series of nursing practicum courses whose purpose is to prepare students for the real life
work environment of an RN. This course includes Gordon’s conceptual framework in providing therapeutic
care and evidenced based practice using the nursing process, therapeutic communication, teaching/learning
principles and role development. The student will work with a pre-approved preceptor RN in a pre-approved
clinical setting following the same clinical schedule as the preceptor RN. The student will work side by side
with the preceptor in the clinical setting with the same caseload and responsibilities of the preceptor RN. Pre-
requisites: None. Co-requisite: None.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                             2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 115 of 155
NURS 280 Pharmacology
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides an in depth understanding of the different classifications of drugs, their physiologic and
chemical basis of operation within the human body. It will also provide an understanding of the methods of
delivery of drugs, how to properly administer complex pharmacologic treatments and the interactions different
drugs may have with each other, foods, other therapies, and the environment. Pre-requisites: None. Co-
requisite: None.

NURS 290 Physical Assessment
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides a more in depth view of patient assessment including interviewing, history taking,
physical exam, and recording, analysis, and use of assessment data in planning patient care. This course is
offered both online and on campus. Pre-requisite: Progression into the core nursing courses or consent of
campus dean. Co-requisite: NURS 100 and NURS 101L.

NURS 310 Nutrition in Health and Disease
3.0 Semester Credits
Food is the basis of human life so what, how and when a person ingests food or other substances affects human
life and potentially brings on disease or helps cure it. Culturally and geographically different types of foods are
available and ingested by people. A nurse needs to have an understanding of how food and special diets fit
with the lifestyle, culture, and therapeutic plan of care for each person under his/her care. Pre-requisites:
None.

NURS 340 Public Health Nursing
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides the theoretical framework to incorporate public health principles with nursing knowledge
and skills to offer preventative, health promoting, and protective services that benefit the aggregates and
populations. This course is offered both online and on campus. Pre-requisites: RN licensure or NURS 206
and NURS 216L. Co-requisite: NURS 341L.

NURS 341L Public Health Nursing Practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
This course prepares RN students for population-focused practice in public health and community health
nursing by applying the public health theories, prevention and health promoting and protective nursing care to
the individual, family, and community. Pre-requisites: RN licensure or NURS 206 and 216L. Co-requisite:
NURS 340.

NURS 350 Research in Nursing
3.0 Semester Credits
This course offers an understanding of the basics of research in nursing and health care including survey,
descriptive, quantitative, and qualitative and outcomes research. It teaches the ability to read and understand
nursing research and adequately critique and understand it for the purpose of developing evidence based
practice. Pre-requisites: None. Co-Requisite: None.

NURS 360 Principles of Teaching and Patient Care
3.0 Semester Credits
The principles and practice for basic teaching to small groups and individual clients. Development of different
teaching techniques, handout material, and lesson plans etc. to insure specific content is covered in a manner
understood by different groups or individuals under stressful situations such as illness, surgery. Pre-requisites:
RN licensure or LVN licensure OR completion of NURS 100 and 101L.



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                            2011-12 CATALOG                          Page 116 of 155
NURS 420 Principles of Leadership and Management
3.0 Semester Credits
This course teaches the concept of leadership, what makes a leader, what are the principles of good leadership
and how that blends with the role of a manager. Understanding the role of nurse manager in a complex health
care system and how regulatory, union, and leadership issues interact with those role responsibilities.
Pre-requisites: RN licensure OR NURS 201 and NURS 211L.

NURS 430 Disaster Management
3.0 Semester Credits
In an era of homeland security and devastating natural disasters, it is the responsibility of each nurse to
understand what they must do in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist event. Pre-requisites: RN licensure
OR NURS 201 and 211L.

NURS 440 Issues and Trends in Nursing
3.0 Semester Credits
Nursing is a dynamic profession undergoing a dramatic change during this nursing shortage. There are many
factors affecting nursing recruitment, education, regulatory issues, practice retention, and type of practice and
these will be explored in a seminar format. Pre-requisites: NURS 201 and 211L. Co-requisite: None. Pre-
requisites for this course are waived for students who participate in the Oxford Nursing Honors Colloquium.

NURS 460 Professional Roles within Nursing
3.0 Semester Credits
Registered nurses will use a systems approach in analyzing a variety of contemporary practice environments.
This course should assist with developing new ideas of nursing practice and how to implement it within the
present health care system. Pre-requisites: NURS 203 and NURS 213L or consent of the campus dean. Co-
requisite: NURS 220 and NURS 221L.

NURS 470 Alternative Therapies in Nursing and Health Care
3.0 Semester Credits
Concepts and principles underlying biomedical and biopsychosocial approaches to health care delivery are
analyzed to determine their impact on health and to provide a framework for integrating allopathic,
homeopathic, naturopathic, and other approaches to the care of a humans in different cultures. Pre-requisites:
None.

NURS 500 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on critical analyses of theory and its use for advanced nursing practice. The text
presents historical perspectives on the development of nursing theory, assessments of concept and theory
development and theory evaluation, middle-range theories, and shared theories from other disciplines in
the sociologic, behavioral, and biomedical sciences, focusing on the application of theory. Students
synthesize theory development knowledge with strategies for testing theoretical statements. The student
critically evaluates, compares, and contrasts the major theory development strategies used in nursing.
This knowledge will be used to construct theoretical statements at a specific theory level, as well as
design nursing research in which the theoretical statements will be examined. Pre-requisites: None.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                           2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 117 of 155
NURS 510 Policy, Organization & Financing of Health Care
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on health policy formation and evaluation in politics enhancing the student’s political
knowledge and skills in preparing for leadership roles in policy-making and public health. Topics include
history, trends, and issues in health care systems; legal issues; legislation and regulation; funding,
planning, delivery systems, and evaluation of health care services to individuals and populations.
Methods of fostering creative and positive change in nursing roles, both as participants in policy
processes and as professionals affected by policy changes, are included in this course. The student will
analyze the complex dynamics of organizational process, structure, culture, and outcomes in state and
national public sector policy making that affects nursing. Pre-requisites: None.

NURS 520 Ethics in Health Care
3.0 Semester Credits
Nursing and Health Care Ethics explores the work of nurse scholars in ethics, and goes well beyond a
mere documentation of what has transpired and a list of what can be done in the future. It creatively looks
back to assess previous accomplishments and forward to find new directions and strengthen future
scholarly contributions in nursing ethics. The content of each class is focused on weekly critical thinking
discussion groups based on the reading assignment which gives the student an opportunity to examine and
evaluate information regarding the unique contributions of nurses to ethics and health care. Critical
thinking activities, organized by the book’s themes are examples of applying these scholarly insights into
practice. Pre-requisites: None.

NURS 530 Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology
3.0 Semester Credits
This course provides the foundation for clinical decision making processes and diagnostic reasoning in
advanced practice nursing, focusing on pathophysiological processes in major organ systems in
individuals.    By applying advanced knowledge of the complex physiological functions and
pathophysiological processes related to the care of individuals with health care problems the student can
differentiate between normal and abnormal underlying mechanisms of changes in physiology by
comparing and contrasting differential diagnosis within physiological systems of cellular and sub-cellular
origin, biochemical, and anatomical changes across the life span. Thus students gain knowledge needed
to assess acute and chronic health problems, to recommend clinical and pharmacological interventions
and to support decisions for restoring and maintaining health. Pre-requisites: None.

NURS 540 Research Utilization
3.0 Semester Credits
The primary goal of this course is to promote an evidence-based approach to advanced nursing practice.
Evidenced-based research findings for nursing practice will be evaluated in terms of racial, ethnic, and
socioeconomic relevance. An understanding of the research process, applicable theories, organizational
dynamics, and leadership functions are applied to design and process of implementing research in health
care settings. This course presents methods and tools for generating and assessing data for nursing
practice, emphasizing the link between research and evidence-based practice, and providing guidance on
evaluating and critiquing research evidence. Other topics include more in-depth coverage of both
qualitative and quantitative research and the basics on developing and testing new instruments. Pre-
requisites: NURS 500 and MATH 310 or equivalent.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 118 of 155
NURS 550 Advanced Nursing Practice Role Development
3.0 Semester Credits
This course focuses on the multiple professional roles of the Advanced Practice Nurse who functions
autonomously and in collaboration with health care providers as a practitioner, educator, consultant,
researcher and manager. Expansion of the nurses’ role permits the student to undertake and explore the
influence and responsibility as health promoter, teacher-learner, leader-manager, research consumer,
advocate, colleague, and collaborator. The student will gain knowledge of the historical, theoretical,
ethical, and legal foundations of professional nursing, and explore the changing health care system
especially related to health care economics, nursing in a culture of violence, and nursing in a culturally
and spiritually diverse world. Health care system demands are continuously transforming the nurse's
emerging role and function of promoting change within the health care delivery system. Pre-requisites:
None.

NURS 560 Health Promotion & Disease Prevention
4.0 Semester Credits
This course of study provides comprehensive analysis of major concepts of health promotion and disease
prevention. All population groups are addressed with separate chapters for individuals, families, and
communities, conveying multicultural perspectives important to care planning.
The assessment framework for the textbook is based on Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns and offers a
consistent presentation of content and a health promotion approach. Extensive coverage of growth and
development throughout the life span emphasizes the unique problems and health promotion needs during
each stage of development. The student will be able to present a realistic clinical scenario, discuss
current research efforts in health promotion, and explore significant issues, trends, and controversies in
health promotion to spark critical discussion and debate. Pre-requisites: None.

NURS 570 Advanced Pharmacology
3.0 Semester Credits
Featuring a unique clinical reasoning format this course provides both the content knowledge and the
clinical reasoning the student will need to become proficient in pharmacology. This in-depth course
builds on students' knowledge of normal developmental physiology and serves as the basis for the
advance practice nurses' direct pharmacotherapeutic management of a variety of common minor and acute
illnesses.     Preparing the student principles of pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics and
pharmacotherapeutics are emphasized and analyzed. The most current National Institute of Health (NIH)
mortality and morbidity statistics for adolescents and adults are used as a basis for medical management.
Additional focus in prescription writing and role restriction by state, federal regulations from the Food
and Drug Administration (FDA), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATFE) and
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is included to ensure successful transition to the primary care
role. Pre-requisites: NURS 530 or consent of the campus dean.

NURS 580 Advanced Health/Physical Assessment
3.0 Semester Credits
This course is designed to prepare the student to complete an accurate patient history, physical
examination and utilize the diagnostic reasoning process to develop diagnoses as a foundation for
advanced practice in primary and/or acute care settings. The course focus on physical examination and
history taking contains foundational content to guide students' approaches to history taking, interviewing,
and other core assessment concepts, as well as fully illustrated, step-by-step techniques that outline
correct performance of physical examination. Physical assessment is accomplished with the progression
of critical thinking from data analysis through the routine head to toe examination to the progression of a
targeted system work up leading to differential diagnosis. Pre-requisites: NURS 530 or consent of the
campus dean.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                        2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 119 of 155
NURS 590 Advanced Clinical Practice: Theory
3.0 Semester Credits
This course is a seminar that employs the concept of synchronization of learning to prepare the student for
the Advanced Clinical Practice Practicum. Utilizing diverse learning activities the theory topics include
informatics and microsystem management for improvement of clinical outcomes and how to utilize them
in their clinical area of interest. This is designed to help the student bring together knowledge from the
master’s level courses and applying that to a broader view of delivering nursing care at an advanced and
broader scope of practice to the chosen vulnerable population. Special topics and assignments focus on
issues and learning needs that will likely present themselves in the clinical area in order to prepare the
student for the situations that will be encountered in the advanced practicum. Pre-requisite: Completion
of NURS 500 – NURS 580. Co-requisite: NURS 591L.

NURS 591L Advanced Clinical Practice: Practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
In this clinical practicum, the student provides in depth care in a community, office, hospital, or outpatient
clinic. This course focuses on the development of clinical decision-making and advanced practice skills
by analyzing the specific needs of a vulnerable population of clients/patients. The student will experience
advanced assessment, diagnosis, planning and evaluation of clients/patients and their families with
complex problems specifically related to a vulnerable population. Students are mentored by preceptors
that are experienced in leadership roles in complex health systems. The student is required to select and
complete a mentored clinical experience with only Masters level RN clinician as preceptors. Each
preceptor and site must be approved by the faculty prior to starting this clinical Pre-requisite:
Completion of NURS 500 – NURS 580. Co-requisite: NURS 590.

NURS 600 Principles of Teaching and Learning
3.0 Semester Credits
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to explore the role of educator in both academic and
clinical settings as advanced practice nurses. Understanding how people learn and the various theories
about learning is fundamental to being able to develop solid educational plans. Faculty roles are changing
to meet the needs of learners in a world experiencing explosive technological advances. The educator role
now synthesizes a broader range of scholarship which emphasizes discovery, integration, application, and
the scholarship of teaching. A variety of both traditional and innovative teaching and evaluation
methodologies will be explored as well as appraising the four major components of the educator role:
teaching, curriculum, information technology, and evaluation of students and programs.

NURS 610 Curriculum Design
3.0 Semester Credits
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to explore how people learn and the various theories
about learning which are fundamental to being able to develop solid educational plans. A variety of both
traditional and innovative teaching and evaluation methodologies will be explored as well as appraising
the four major components of the educator role: teaching, curriculum, information technology, and
evaluation of students and programs. Covered in the class are the steps involved in test construction, with
guidelines on how to develop test length, test difficulty, item formats, and scoring procedures. Also
included are guidelines for assembling and administering a test and strategies for writing multiple-choice
and multiple-response items. Faculty roles are changing to meet the needs of learners in a world
experiencing explosive technological advances. The educator role now synthesizes a broader range of
scholarship which emphasizes discovery, integration, application, and the scholarship of teaching.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 120 of 155
NURS 620 Educational Administration
2.0 Semester Credits
This course addresses the administrative responsibilities for administering a nursing education program.
Educational Administrators are responsible for coordinating administrative activities, approving faculty
hiring, evaluating faculty performance, directing budget plans, creating academic policies and programs.
Educational Administrators in Nursing assess programs and develop partnerships with internal and
external organizations regarding compliance with state regulatory and accrediting agencies in terms of
program data, licensure, curriculum compliance, accreditation approvals. They determine course
scheduling and recommend implementation of additional courses to meet the needs of the students and
the institution. All forms related to the Education program of the California Board of Registered Nursing
are included in the BRN Handbook on reserve at the WCU Library.

NURS 630 Simulation & Clinical Nursing Education
2.0 Semester Credits
This course is designed to meet the unique requirements of faculty working in health professions
education using simulation as an educational modality. The course enables participants to develop their
teaching, curriculum design, and program evaluation skills and addresses the psychosocial, technical and
organizational elements unique to simulation education. This course will equip graduates with the
simulation-specific skills and experiences required to design, deliver and evaluate simulation based
educational activities.

NURS 641L Nursing Education -Teaching practicum
3.0 Semester Credits
Teaching Practicum Students are placed in schools of nursing, staff development or client education
settings that are not a regular part of their current job. Practicum includes time with the mentor, class and
clinical observation time, class and clinical preparation time, and actual classroom teaching and clinical
supervision time. Mentors must have a minimum of a MSN. Students initiate contact with a mentor in
one educational setting who will work with the student to help meet their course objectives. Students
develop personal learning objectives for the teaching practicum. Students are required to prepare for and
teach in at least one theory and clinical class and participate in clinical and simulation as well as
administration in at least one educational setting. Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 600 – NURS 630.

PHYS 261 Human Physiology
4.0 Semester Credits: 3.0 Credits Theory and 1.0 Credit Lab
Provides an in-depth introduction to the physiology of the human body. Provides students an opportunity
to study the functions and physiological mechanisms of several important organ systems from the
molecular level to the body’s gross entirety. Organ systems are studied with respect to their interactions
under normal and abnormal conditions. Major topics include cell function, tissues, organization of the
human body, and physiology of all body systems. Laboratory experiences reinforce concepts studied in
lecture and introduce students to clinical techniques. Pre-requisite: ANAT 260 or the equivalent. This
course is considered a general education course for the BRN and a core requirement for the Accrediting
Council for Independent Colleges and Schools.

PSYC 260 Introduction to Psychology
3.0 Semester Credits
Examines basic psychological concepts, such as the nervous system, memory, intelligence and development
along with Freudian, humanistic, social, cognitive, and trait theories. Presents an introduction to the issues,
methods, and descriptions of psychology. Discusses individual and social problems of everyday life
through the viewpoints and methods of modern scientific psychology. Examines the psychological
processes through which people deal with the challenges of everyday life. Pre-requisites: None.


    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 121 of 155
PSYC 290 Life Span Psychology
3.0 Semester Credits
Covers basic concepts and theories of child and adult development. Study’s findings from classic as well as
recent studies of physical growth, brain development, perception, language, cognitive development, social
interaction, emotional, personality, and moral development. Interplay between an individual’s biology with the
environment, family, and culture is discussed. Covers topics in seven major periods of life: prenatal, infancy,
preschool, school-age, adolescence, adulthood, and old age/death. Pre-requisite: PSYC 260 or the equivalent.

SOCY 280 Introduction to Sociology
3.0 Semester Credits
Questions basic sociological concepts, such as socialization and culture; social organizations; stability and
change in societies; cooperation and conflict among human groups; religious, political, economic, technical,
and scientific institutions. Sociological concepts and issues as culture and subculture; development of the
self; gender and age roles; social class and caste; groups, communities, collectivities, and organizations;
deviance; racism; human institutions: family, religion, education, government, economics; and population
change in society are discussed. Pre-requisites: None.

SPCH 142 Oral Communication
3.0 Semester Credits
Evaluates the construction, delivery, and analysis of public speaking. Students present several speeches to the
class. Communication theory, research, and best practices are discussed in relation to persuasion, ethos,
pathos, logos, logical fallacies, audience analysis, language choice, nonverbal messages, culture and
communication, visual aids, listening, supporting materials, organizational patterns, evaluating research, and
speech delivery. Different types of speeches are studied, such as informative, persuasive, special occasion.
Students become critical consumers of communication. Pre-requisites: None.




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                          2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 122 of 155
WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 123 of 155
Board of Trustees, Administration and Personnel

                                      BOARD OF TRUSTEES
David A. Pyle                                   Executive Chairman of the Board
Jerome W. Cwiertnia                             Board Member
Mark B. Hacken                                  Board Member
Robert A. Alter                                 Board Member
James M. Connelly                               Board Member



                                 WEST COAST UNIVERSITY
                            ADMINISTRATION & KEY PERSONNEL
Barry T. Ryan, J.D., Ph.D.                      President and Chief Executive Officer
Eric Chiusolo                                   Chief Financial Officer
Jeb Egbert, Ed.D., M.B.A.                       Provost
Dianne Moore, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M.               Associate Provost, Nursing Education and
                                                Regulatory Affairs
Katherine Lee Carey, Esquire                    General Counsel
Timothy Lee                                     Vice President, Admissions
Rick Moore                                      Vice President, Employer Relations
Marilyn Faller                                  Vice President, Financial Aid
Glenda Giles-Luick                              Vice President of Human Resources
Dawn Werling, M.S.                              Vice President, Operations
Kathi Crowley                                   Vice President of Government and External Affairs
Robyn Nelson, D.N.Sc., M.S.N., R.N.             Dean, College of Nursing
William J. Kakish, J.D., Ph.D.                  Assistant Vice President, Compliance
Rochelle Asanti                                 Director of Student and Alumni Affairs
Errin Heyman, Ed.D.                             Director of the Center for
                                                Excellence in Learning, Teaching & Assessment
Renee Schweitzer, M.S.N., R.N., F.N.P.          Director of University Relations
Susan Roig, M.A.                                Director of Online Instruction
Dennis John                                     Director of Institutional Research
Kathleen Atchison                               Director of Simulation Education
Kimberly Smith-Glover, M.Ed.                    University Registrar


  WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                    2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 124 of 155
                                     LOS ANGELES CAMPUS
Ladd Graham, M.A.                               Executive Director
Miriam Kahan, Ph.D., M.P.H.                     Academic Dean
Rosie Curtis, Ed.D., M.N., B.S.N.               Dean of Nursing
Belinda Bickley, M.S.N., R.N.                   Associate Dean of Nursing, Academic
Judith Frances, M.A.                            Associate Dean of Nursing, Administration
Evan Pepper, M.S.M.B., Ph.D.                    Chair of Science
Ravi Tripuraneni, MEC, Ph.D.                    Chair of Health Care Management
Gerry VanBooven                                 Director of Student Affairs
Ann Marie Rivera                                Career Services Specialist
Herman Whitaker                                 Director of Admissions
Tracy Cabuco                                    Senior Director of Financial Aid
Amy Kavukchyan                                  Associate Director of Financial Aid
Kathleen Stuart, M.L.S.                         Librarian
Felicia Lockhart                                Registrar


                                    ORANGE COUNTY CAMPUS

David House, Ph.D.                              Executive Director
Elizabeth Atilano, M.Ed.                        Associate Executive Director
LaWanda Bowles-Costello, M.P.A.                 Academic Dean
Nancy Hoff, M.S.N., R.N.                        Dean of Nursing
Chiarina Piazza, M.S.N., R.N.                   Associate Dean of Nursing, Academic
Debi Gerger, R.D.H., M.P.H.                     Dean of Dental Hygiene
Mo Entezampour, Ph.D.                           Chair of Science
Sherry Koshi                                    Director of Student Affairs
Christina Downey                                Director of Admissions
Larissa Gomez Luna                              Director of Financial Aid
Katrina Richmond                                Senior Career Services Specialist
Belen Aguilar, M.L.S.                           Librarian
Miriam Torres                                   Registrar




  WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                    2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 125 of 155
                                       ONTARIO CAMPUS
Danielle Hammoud, M.S.                          Executive Director
Bart Lerner, Ed.D., M.A.C.                      Academic Dean
Catherine Earl, D.P.A., M.S.N., R.N.            Dean of Nursing
Gloria Huerta                                   Associate Dean of Nursing, Academic
Moheb Youssef, M.S.                             Chair of Science
Tracy McMurry                                   Director of Student Affairs
Shamir Patel                                    Director of Admissions
Becky Verduzco                                  Director of Financial Aid
Sarai Maldonado                                 Senior Career Services Specialist
Cindy Runnels, M.L.S.                           Librarian
Monica Ceron                                    Registrar




   WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                    2011-12 CATALOG                         Page 126 of 155
West Coast University Faculty by location

WCU | Los Angeles Campus

                                                       NURSING
         Faculty Name and Education                        Status                            Courses
Sheryl Abelew, MSN, RN
                  University of California, Los Angeles
                                           M.S., Nursing             NURS 205
                                                                     Introduction to Leadership
               California State University, Long Beach       P/T     NURS 420
                                           B.S., Nursing             Principles of Leadership and Management
                                  Santa Monica College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Sharlynn Bekkendahl, MN, RN                                          NURS 204
                  University of California, Los Angeles              Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
      M.S., Psychiatric Nursing and Community Mental                 Mentally Ill Client
                                                             F/T
                                                  Health             NURS 214L
               California State University, Los Angeles              Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                               B.S., Psychiatric Nursing             Mentally Ill Client Practicum
Marcy Bregman, MSN-Ed., RN
          California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                  M.S., Nurse Educator               NURS 213L
                       University of State of New York       P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
                                            B.S. Nursing             the Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                                          Pierce College
                                            A.S. Nursing
Ted Creekmur, RN                                                     NURS 214L
               California State University, Los Angeles      P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                           B.S., Nursing             Mentally Ill Client Practicum
Allan Cresencia, MSN-Ed., RN
                                  University of Phoenix              NURS 206
                               M.S., Nursing Education               Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                                             F/T
                                           B.S., Nursing             NURS 216L
                               Antelope Valley College               Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                  A.A., Natural Science
Melanie Cross, MSN, RN
                           Mount Saint Mary’s College                NURS 101L
                                           M.S., Nursing             Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
               California State University, Los Angeles              NURS 121L
                                                                     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing     F/T     NURS 340
                           Mount Saint Mary’s College                Public Health Nursing
                                           A.S., Nursing             NURS 341L
                                College of the Canyons               Public Health Nursing Practicum
                                       A.A., Humanities
Brenda DaCosta, MSN, RN, FNP                                         NURS 340
                                  University of Phoenix              Public Health Nursing
                        M.S., Family Nurse Practitioner              NURS 341L
                                                                     Public Health Nursing Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                                                     NURS 430
                                       Compton College               Disaster Management
                                           A.S., Nursing             NURS 213L
                                                             F/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                                                     Critically Ill Client Practicum




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 127 of 155
Christine Dyer
                             University of Dayton, Ohio
                            B.A., Elementary Education               NURS 216L
                                                             P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                         College of Los Angeles County
                                           A.S., Nursing

Karima Esmail, MSN, RN, ANP                                          NURS 203
               California State University, Los Angeles              Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
     M.S., Nursing – Adult Nurse Practitioner Specialty              Critically Ill Client
                                                                     NURS 213L
                                           B.S., Nursing     F/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                           A.S., Nursing             Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                                                     NURS 290
                                                                     Physical Assessment
Elizabeth Hartman, MSN, RN
     Columbia University School of Nursing, New York                 NURS 360
                                                                     Principles of Teaching and Patient Care
                                         M.S., Nursing       F/T     NURS 216L
           Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland                Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                         B.S., Nursing
Saba Jamalpanah, MSN, RN
                          Mount Saint Mary’s College
                                                                     NURS 211L
                                         M.S., Nursing
                                                             P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting wellness in Older Adults
                            Oklahoma State University                Practicum
                                         B.S., Nursing
                                   B.S., Microbiology
Michelle Jocson, MSN-Ed., RN                                         NURS 280
                                 University of Phoenix               Pharmacology
                  M.S., Nursing- Healthcare Education                NURS 213L
                                                                     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                     Holy Names University, Oakland
                                                             P/T     Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                         B.S., Nursing               NURS 440
                         Glendale Community College                  Issues and Trends in Nursing
                                         A.S., Nursing               NURS 460
                                                                     Professional Roles within Nursing
Karine Khachatryan, MSN, RN, PHN
                               University of Phoenix
                                        M.S., Nursing
                         M.S. Health Care Education
             California State University, Los Angeles                NURS 211L
                                         B.S., Nursing       P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                    Los Angeles Community College                    Practicum
                                         A.S., Nursing
                        Glendale Community College
                                    A.A., Humanities

Khadeer Khan, MD, RN, FNP
                             Bangalore Medical College               NURS 220
                                  Doctorate in Medicine              Integration of Nursing Concepts
                                                             F/T     NURS 280
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
    M.S., Nursing – Nursing Educator & Family Nurse                  Pharmacology
                                            Practitioner
Kathleen Lally-Arena, MSN, RN, NPF
                       University of Southern California             NURS 213L
                                          M.S., Nursing      P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
           California State University, Dominguez Hills              Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
Jennifer Lord, RN                                                    NURS 101L
                                  University of Vermont              Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                           B.S., Nursing             NURS 216L
                                                                     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                                             P/T




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 128 of 155
Catherine Marin, RN, NP                                               NURS 200B
                                                                      Transition to Professional Nursing
                                Azusa Pacific University              NURS 210L
                                            B.S., Nursing     F/T     Registered Nurse Skills Lab
                                                                      NURS 216L
                      University of California, Riverside             Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                        B.A., Psychology
Sigalit Marmorstein, MSN, RN, FNP                                     NURS 590
                       University of Southern California              Advanced Clinical Practice: Theory
                                                              F/T
                                            M.S., Nursing             NURS 591L
                                            B.S., Nursing             Advanced Clinical Practice: Practicum
Zoya Minasyan, MSN, RN
                            Mount Saint Mary’s College
                                            M.S., Nursing             NURS 210
                                                                      Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                                Yerevan State University      F/T     NURS 121L
                                            B.S., Nursing             Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                            Mount Saint Mary’s College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Michelle Modina, MSN, RN, NP                                          NURS 201
                California State University, Long Beach               Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                            M.S., Nursing             NURS211L
                                                                      Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                California State University, Los Angeles      F/T     Practicum
                                            B.S., Nursing             NURS 203
                                Long Beach City College               Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                            A.S., Nursing             Critically Ill Client
Victor Ogaldez, MBA, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                           M.S., Business Administration              NURS 100
                                            B.S., Nursing             Fundamentals of Nursing
                                                              P/T     NURS 101L
                            Los Angeles Valley College
                                            A.S., Nursing             Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                               Los Angeles City College
                                       A.A., Liberal Arts
Shake Ovasapyan, MSN, RN, NPF                                         NURS 121L
                California State University, Los Angeles              Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                            M.S., Nursing     P/T     NURS 211L
                  University of California, Los Angeles               Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                      B.S., Microbiology              Practicum
Teodra Palma, MNM, RN                                                 NURS 121L
                                   University of Phoenix              Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                             M.S., Nursing Management                 NURS 211L
                                                                      Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
           California State University, Dominguez Hills       P/T     Practicum
                                            B.S., Nursing             NURS 213L
                                                                      Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                                                      Critically Ill Client Practicum
Benoy Pullukalayil, MSN, RN
              California State University, Los Angeles                NURS 211L
                                         M.S., Nursing        P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                 Bangalore University                 Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing
Sasha Rarang, MSN-Ed., RN
                          Mount Saint Mary’s College                  NURS 120
                                                                      Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                              M.S., Nursing Education         F/T     NURS 121L
       Lyceum Northwestern University, Dagupan City                   Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing
Barbara Roces, MSN, RN, ONP                                           NURS 201
                 University of California, Los Angeles                Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                    M.S., Nursing – Nurse Practitioner                NURS 211L
                                                                      Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                     University of Southern California        F/T     Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing               NURS 290
                                                                      Physical Assessment



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 129 of 155
Jeanne Schaffer, MSN, RN                                             NURS 121L
                 University of California, Los Angeles               Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                         M.S., Nursing               NURS 310
                                                                     Nutrition in Health and Disease
                          Mount Saint Mary’s College         F/T     NURS 221L
                                          B.S., Nursing              Integration of Nursing Practice


Soloman Tan, MSN, RN                                                 NURS 204
                                 University of Phoenix               Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                        M.S., Nursing                Mentally Ill Client
                                                             F/T
                                         B.S., Nursing               NURS 214L
                                 Pasadena City College               Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                         A.S., Nursing               Mentally Ill Client Practicum
Lynette Taylor, MSN, RN                                              NURS 100
                                  University of Phoenix              Fundamentals of Nursing
                                                             F/T
                                         M.S., Nursing               NURS 101L
                                          B.S., Nursing              Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
Armenui Telliyan, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix              NURS 211L
                                          M.S., Nursing      P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                         Armenian Art/Theatre Institute              Practicum
                           B.A., Theater Theory/History
Cinthya Vasquez-Gifford, DNP, RN, FNP
                                University of Tennessee
                         Doctorate in Nursing Practice
                                                                     NURS 101L
                  University of California, Los Angeles      P/T     Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
             M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner
                      University of Nevada, Las Vegas
                                           B.S., Nursing
Fiona Virani, MSN, RN
                                                                     NURS 211L
                  University of California, Los Angeles
                                                             P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                          M.S., Nursing              Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
Samsom Yigezu, Ph.D., RN, PHN
                                     Capella University
                                Doctorate in Philosophy              NURS 121L
                                                             P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
          California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                  M.S., Nurse Educator
                   B.S., Nursing – Public Health Nurse




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 130 of 155
WCU | Los Angeles Campus

                                    HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
         Faculty Name and Education                         Status                             Courses
Joe Abrego, MHSA, Ed.D.
                        Alliant International University
 Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Management                   HCM 530
                                                              P/T     Information Systems for Health Care Programs
                           Mount Saint Mary’s College
                  M.S., Health Services Administration
                                     B.A., Management
Justin Ako, DC
                  Los Angeles College of Chiropractic
                                                                      HCM 570
                              Doctorate in Chiropractic       P/T     Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Health Care Industry
                                   Creighton University
                                         B.S., Marketing
Marlene Lugg, MHSA, DHSR
                                 University of Pittsburg
                Doctorate in Health Services Research                 HCM 505
                                                              P/T
                  M.S., Health Services Administration                Epidemiology Management
                               University of Wisconsin
                                  B.S., General Science
Ron Macias, MHA, DTL
                        Alliant International University
                Doctorate in Technology and Learning                  HCM 510
                                                              P/T     Strategic Planning in Health Care Organizations
                                 University of LaVerne
                           M.S., Health Administration
                        B.S., Health Care Management
Paul Chris Okpala, MHCA, D.H.Sc.
                                    A.T. Still University
                          Doctorate in Health Sciences
                                     Bellevu University               HCM 580
                                                              P/T
                       M.S., Healthcare Administration                Captsone Course: Cases in Health Care Management
                       B.S., Healthcare Administration
                                   Ashworth University
                         A.S., Healthcare Management
Jong yi, MSE, DBA
                      University of Southern California
                 Doctorate in Business Administration                 HCM 515
                                                              P/T     Financial Management for Health Care Managers
                                  University of Chicago
                                       M.S., Economics
                                        B.S., Economics




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 131 of 155
WCU | Los Angeles Campus

                                            GENERAL EDUCATION
         Faculty Name and Education                          Status                               Courses
Sharam Bakhtiari, MD                                                   ANAT 260
                                 Tehran Azad University                Human Anatomy
                                                               F/T
                                  Doctorate in Medicine                ANAT 270
                                          B.S., Biology                Pathophysiology
Gerald Biggerstaff, MAP                                                PSYC 260
                             Oklahoma City University                  Introduction to Psychology
             M.A., Psychology/Teaching and Counseling                  PSYC 290
                                                                       Life Span Psychology
                                      B.S., Pyschology         F/T     HUM 470
                                                                       Cultural Pluralism
                                                                       HCA 434
                                                                       Medical Ethics and Issues
Constance Chappell, MEd.
                                    University of Phoenix
                                                                       BUSI 100
                                         M.A., Education       P/T     Introduction to Business
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
                             B.S., Public Administration
Joel Gamo, MD
      University of the Philippines College of Medicine                ANAT 260
                                                                       Human Anatomy
                                   Doctorate in Medicine       P/T     HCA 206
                            University of the Phillipines              Epidemiology in Public Health
                                             B.S., Zoology
Carrie Geisbauer, MSBE, Ph.D.
                   University of California, Los Angeles
                                                                       PHYS 261
     Doctorate of Philosophy in Biomedical Engineering         P/T     Human Physiology
                           M.S. Biomedical Engineering
                           B.S., Biomedical Engineering
Hong Joon Kim, MSM
                California State University, Los Angeles               MATH 108
                                                                       College Mathematics I
                                       M.S., Mathematics       F/T     MATH 310
                   University of California, Los Angeles               Statistics
                                       B.S., Mathematics
Soo Kim, Ph.D.
                   University of California, Los Angeles               PHYS 261
                                                                       Human Physiology
    Doctorate of Philosophy in Molecular, Cellular, and        P/T     ANAT 270
                                   Integrative Physiology              Pathophysiology
                              B.S., Physiological Science
Vyacheslav Palchevskiy, MSMB
                       University of Southern California
                                 M.S., Molecular Biology
                                                                       CHEM 260
                   University of California, Los Angeles       P/T     Biochemistry
                                       B.S., Microbiology
                                    Santa Monica College
                                             A.S., Biology
Brian Paulin, MACC
                         Trinity International University
                          M.A., Communication Culture
                                Azusa Pacific University
                                   B.A., Political Science             SPCH 142
                                                                       Oral Communication
                                            Citrus College     P/T     ENGL 340
                    A.A., Social and Behavioral Science                Written Communication I




     WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 132 of 155
Evan Pepper, MSMB, Ph.D.
Chair of Science
                       University of Southern California
           Doctorate of Philosophy in Molecular Biology               MICRO 140
                                                                      General Microbiology
                                 M.S., Molecular Biology      F/T     HCA 206
                 California State University, Northridge              Epidemiology in Public Health
                                            B.S., Biology
                   University of California, Los Angeles
                                          B.A., Sociology
Santosh Sinha, MSC, Ph.D.
                                Kanpur University, India
                                                                      CHEM 260
                   Doctorate of Philosophy in Chemistry       F/T     Biochemistry
                                          M.S., Chemistry
                      B.S., Chemistry, Physics and Math
Anthony White, Ph.D.
                    University of Southampton, England
                                                                      PHYS 261
  Doctorate in Philosophy in Cardiovascular Physiology        P/T     Human Physiology
                                       and Pharmacology
                     B.S., Physiology and Pharmacology
Burt Stillar, MPA, DPA
                                   University of LaVerne
                     Doctorate in Public Administration               SPCH 142
                                                                      Oral Communication
                 California State University, Northridge      P/T     SOCY 280
                             M.S., Public Administration              Introduction to Sociology
                            Washington State University
                                            B.A., English
Matthew Yamashita, MPW
                       University of Southern California
                                                                      ENGL 140
                              M.A., Professional Writing      P/T     Written Communication I
                   University of California, Los Angeles
                                B.A., Film and Television




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 133 of 155
WCU | Orange County Campus

                                               DENTAL HYGIENE
         Faculty Name and Education                         Status                             Courses
Karen Andrews, RDH                                                    DHYG 150
                            University of Detroit Mercy               Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                  B.S., Dental Hygiene                DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                                                      DHYG 301
                                                              F/T     Clinical Practice I
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
                                                                      DHYG 350
                                                                      Ethics Seminar
Nancy Andrews, RDH                                                    DHYG 150
                  University of Southern California                   Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                              B.S., Dental Hygiene                    DHYG 151
                                                              P/T     Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                                                      DHYG 206
                                                                      Oral Pathology
James Baker, D.D.S.
                   University of California, Los Angeles
                                                                      DHYG 301
                            Doctorate in Dental Surgery       P/T     Clinical Practice I
                     University of California, Riverside
                                            B.A., History
Tricia Bato, D.D.S.
                   University of California, Los Angeles              DHYG 111
                                                                      Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic
                            Doctorate in Dental Surgery       P/T     DHYG 260
        B.A., Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular                 Pain Management with Lab
                                                Genetics
Aubree Chismark, MSDH-Ed., RDH                                        DHYG 150
                           University of North Carolina               Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                        M.S., Dental Hygiene Education                DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                  Ohio State University
                                                                      DHYG 301
                                   B.S., Dental Hygiene       F/T     Clinical Practice I
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
                                                                      DHYG 340
                                                                      Research Methodology
Aimee Coughlin, MEA, RDH
                    The George Washington University                  DHYG 110
                M.A., Higher Education Administration                 Dental Radiology Science with Lab
                                                              P/T     DHYG 111
                              Clayton State University
      B.S., Dental Hygiene Practice and Administration                Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic
                                  A.S., Dental Hygiene
Arezou Dejakam, RDH                                                   DHYG 151
                               Loma Linda University                  Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                                              P/T     DHYG 321
                                  B.S., Dental Hygiene
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
Larry Freestone, RDH                                                  DHYG 150
                                  Loma Linda University               Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                    B.S., Dental Hygiene              DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
             California State University, San Bernardino
                                                                      DHYG 260
                             B.S., Environmental Studies              Pain Management with Lab
                                                              P/T     DHYG 265
                                                                      Dental Materials with Lab
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 134 of 155
Andrea Grammatica, RDA
                                   Columbia College                   DHYG 151
                                    B.A., Psychology                  Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                     Cerritos College         P/T     DHYG 260
                                A.S., Dental Hygiene                  Pain Management with Lab
                                              Cypress
                  A.S., Science and Dental Assisting
Audrey Hung, MPH, RDH                                                 DHYG 151
                  University of Southern California                   Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                 M.S., Public Health                  DHYG 215
                                                              F/T     Head and Neck Anatomy
                                B.S., Dental Hygiene
                                                                      DHYG 260
                                                                      Pain Management with Lab
Leslie Krieger, D.D.S                                                 DHYG 151
                              New York State University               Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                 Doctorate in Dentistry               DHYG 265
                                                                      Dental Materials with Lab
                                     B.A., Liberal Arts       P/T     DHYG 301
                                                                      Clinical Practice I
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
Ashlynn Le, RDH                                                       DHYG 150
                        University of Southern California             Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                    B.S., Dental Hygiene              DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                                              F/T     DHYG 301
                                                                      Clinical Practice I
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
Beverly Lovelace, MHN, RDH
                University of New Haven, Connecticut                  DHYG 301
                                                                      Clinical Practice I
                                M.S., Human Nutrition         P/T     DHYG 330
                                University of Missouri                Biochemistry and Nutrition
                                  B.S., Dental Hygiene
Thomas Luong, RDH                                                     DHYG 150
                    University of Southern California                 Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                  B.S., Dental Hygiene                DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                              B.S., Biological Sciences       P/T     DHYG 301
                                                                      Clinical Practice I
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
Laurene Medina, MOS-Ed., RDH                                          DHYG 150
Dental Hygiene Junior Clinical Coordinator                            Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
               California State University, Long Beach                DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
     M.A., Occupational Studies – Vocational Education        F/T     DHYG 301
                            B.A., Vocational Education                Clinical Practice I
                                        Cerritos College              DHYG 321
                                   A.S., Dental Hygiene               Clinical Practice III
Fariba Mehr, MDH, RDH                                                 DHYG 150
                      Columbia University, New York                   Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                  M.S., Dental Hygiene                DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                               Tehran Business College        F/T     DHYG 301
                          B.S., Business Administration               Clinical Practice I
                                     Tehran University                DHYG 321
                                   A.S., Dental Hygiene               Clinical Practice III
Diane Millar, MEd., RDH
                                 Pepperdine University
                                        M.A., Education
               California State University, Long Beach
                                                                      DHYG 321
                    B.S., Health Science – Health Care        P/T     Clinical Practice III
                             West Los Angeles College
                                   A.S. Dental Hygiene




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                            Page 135 of 155
Jerry Minsky, D.D.S., RDH
                  Georgetown University, Washington
                                                                     DHYG 321
                           Doctorate in Dental Science       P/T     Clinical Practice III
                 California State University, Fullerton
                                B.S., Computer Science
Christine Newman, MPH, RDH                                           DHYG 150
                California State University, Northridge              Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                   M.S., Public Health               DHYG 151
                                                                     Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                     Northern Arizona State University       P/T     DHYG 301
                                  B.S., Health Services              Clinical Practice I
                                       Phoenix College               DHYG 321
                                  A.S., Dental Hygiene               Clinical Practice III
Mihaela Popa, RDH                                                    DHYG 110
                                University of Bucharest              Dental Radiology Science with Lab
                         B.S., Environmental Research                DHYG 111
                                                             F/T     Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic
                            West Los Angeles College
                                                                     DHYG 151
                                  A.S., Dental Hygiene               Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
Jo Anne Schram, MEA, JD, RDH
Dental Hygiene Clinic Administrator
                       Kaplan University, Los Angeles
                                Juris Doctorate Degree               DHYG 321
          California State University, Dominguez Hills               Clinical Practice III
                                                                     DHYG 485
                       M.A., Education Administration        F/T     Advanced Dental Hygiene Topics
               California State University, Long Beach               DHYG 490
                            B.A., Vocational Education               Professional Development Project
                                        Cerritos College
                                   A.S., Dental Hygiene

Nushin Shir, D.D.S.
                 University of California, Los Angeles
                                                                     DHYG 265
                          Doctorate in Dental Surgery        P/T     Dental Materials with Lab
                       University of California, Irvine
                                          B.S., Biology
Marlena Shore, RDH                                                   DHYG 110
                          Northern Arizona University                Dental Radiology Science with Lab
                                 B.S., Dental Hygiene                DHYG 111
                                                                     Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic
                            West Los Angeles College         P/T     DHYG 301
                                 A.S., Dental Hygiene                Clinical Practice I
                                                                     DHYG 321
                                                                     Clinical Practice III
Frances Soderling, MOS, RDH                                          DHYG 300
Dental Hygiene Senior Clinical Coordinator                           Clinical Seminar I
               California State University, Long Beach               DHYG 301
                                                                     Clinical Practice I
                            M.A., Occupational Studies       F/T     DHYG 320
                    University of Baylor Caruth, Dallas              Clinical Seminar III
                                   B.S., Dental Hygiene              DHYG 321
                                                                     Clinical Practice III
Karen Sohn, D.D.S.
                                 Loma Linda University               DHYG 320
                                                                     Clinical Seminar III
                                  Doctorate in Dentistry     P/T     DHYG 321
                                  Pacific Union College              Clinical Practice III
                                           B.A., Spanish
Annette Stelter, RDH
                   University of Southern California                 DHYG 320
                                                                     Clinical Seminar III
                                B.S., Dental Hygiene         P/T     DHYG 321
                                     Cypress College                 Clinical Practice III
                                        A.S., Biology
Masami Takahashi, MDH-Ed., RDH                                       DHYG 320
                 University of Missouri, Kansas City                 Clinical Seminar III
                                                             P/T     DHYG 321
                    M.S., Dental Hygiene Education
                                                                     Clinical Practice III



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 136 of 155
Diana Tira, RDA                                                       DHYG 150
                                 Loma Linda Univeristy                Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene I
                                   B.S., Dental Hygiene               DHYG 151
                                                                      Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene II
                                        Cypress College       P/T     DHYG 301
                                   A.S., Dental Hygiene               Clinical Practice I
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                                                      Clinical Practice III
David To, D.D.S.                                                      DHYG 111
                   University of California, Los Angeles              Dental Radiology Interpretation with Clinic
                            Doctorate in Dental Surgery               DHYG 260
                                                              P/T     Pain Management with Lab
                         University of California, Irvine
                                                                      DHYG 301
                                B.S., Biological Sciences             Clinical Practice I
April Turner, RDH
                                                                      DHYG 321
                                 Loma Linda University        P/T     Clinical Practice III
                                  B.S., Dental Hygiene
Elizabeth Valdivia, RDA
               California State University, Los Angeles               DHYG 301
                                   B.S., Health Science       P/T     Clinical Practice I
                                       Cerritos College
                                  A.S., Dental Hygiene
Marjorie Williams, RDH                                                DHYG 301
                      University of Southern California       P/T     Clinical Practice I
                                  B.S., Dental Hygiene




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 137 of 155
WCU | Orange County Campus

                                                         NURSING
         Faculty Name and Education                          Status                          Courses
Almina Abellera, MSN, RN                                               NURS 216L
                                   University of Phoenix               Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                          M.S., Nursing                Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing       F/T     NURS 350
                                                                       Research in Nursing
                                                                       NURS 360
                                                                       Principles of Teaching and Patient Care
Manal Alatrash, MSN, RN
                                                                       NURS 121L
                                Georgetown University
                                                                       Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                          M.S., Nursing        F/T
                                                                       NURS 206
                          University of Jordan, Amman
                                                                       Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                  B.S., Nursing Science
Fe Anoina-Murray, MNA, RN                                              NURS 204
          California State University, Dominguez Hills                 Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness
                             M.S., Nurse Administrator                 in the Mentally Ill Client
               California State University, Long Beach         P/T     NURS 206
                                           B.S., Nursing               Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                                                       NURS 310
                                                                       Nutrition in Health and Disease
Andrea Anzalone, MSN, RN, NP
                                        Drexel University
                                            M.S., Nursing
                  California State University, Northridge              NURS 216L
       B.S., Environmental/Occupational Health Science         P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                   University of California, Los Angeles               Practicum
                                            B.A., English
                                    Santa Monica College
                                            A.S., Nursing
Jocelyn Argame, MSN-Ed., RN
                                                                       NURS 101L
            California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                                                       Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                            M.S., Nursing      P/T
                                                                       NURS 430
                    California State University, Fullerton
                                                                       Disaster Management
                                            B.S., Nursing
Mahnaz Baradar, MPA, RN, NP
                University of New York, Suny Brockport
                              M.S., Public Administration              NURS 101L
                                  University of Rochester      P/T     Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                            B.S., Nursing
                                         Cerritos College
                                            A.S., Nursing
Vanessa Barragan, MSN, RN
                 California State University, Long Beach               NURS 341L
                                                               P/T
                         M.S., Nursing and Public Health               Public Health Nursing Practicum
                                            B.S., Nursing
Christiana Baskaran, MSN, RN                                           NURS 121L
               College Nursing, Christian Medical, India               Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                            M.S., Nursing              NURS 213L
                             Bharathiar University, India              Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting
                                            B.S., Nursing              Wellness in the Mentally Ill Practicum
                                                               F/T




     WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                             Page 138 of 155
Suzette Bosveld, MSN, RN, FNP                                         NURS 203
                              Azusa Pacific University                Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting
             M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner                Wellness in the Critically Ill Client
                            Brenau University, Georgia                NURS 213L
                                                              F/T
                                         B.S., Nursing                Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting
                 Dekalkb Community College, Georgia                   Wellness in the Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                         A.S., Nursing                NURS 220
                                                                      Integration of Nursing Concepts
Jean Chung, MEd., RN
                                     Cambridge College
                                                                      NURS 341L
                                       M.A., Education        P/T
                                                                      Public Health Nursing Practicum
                                       Biola University
                                          B.S., Nursing
Jane Desrosiers, MSN, RN
                                                                      NURS 101L
                   California State University, Fullerton
                                                                      Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                           M.S., Nursing      P/T
                                                                      NURS 340
                         The City College of New York
                                                                      Public Health Nursing
                                            B.S., Nursing
Martha Dispoto, MNA, RN
                                                                      NURS 420
                           Teachers College, New York
                                                                      Principles of Leadership and Management
                           M.S., Nursing Administration       P/T
                                                                      NURS 460
                           University of North Carolina
                                                                      Professional Roles within Nursing
                                            B.S., Nursing
Cecilia Fernan, MSN, RN
Clinical Education Manager                                            NURS 206
                                   University of Phoenix              Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                           M.S., Nursing      F/T     NURS 216L
                   University of San Carlos, Philippines              Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                            B.S., Nursing             Practicum
                                            B.S., Biology
Azita Ghaderifard, MSN, RN, NP
                                                                      NURS 211L
                                     University of Texas
                                                              F/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                                      Adults Practicum
                                            B.S., Nursing
Maria Gonzales, DPA, RN
                                 University of La Verne
                                                                      NURS 205
                     Doctorate in Public Administration
                                                                      Introduction to Leadership
                      Seton Hall University, New Jersey       P/T
                                                                      HCA 206
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                                      Epidemiology in Public Health Practice
                  University of San Tomas, Philippines
                                            B.S., Nursing
Editha Gutierrez, MSN, RN , FNP
               California State University, Los Angeles
                                                                      NURS 121L
             M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner        P/T
                                                                      Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                            University of the Philippines
                                            B.S., Nursing
Afsaneh Helali, MSN, RN, NP
                                                                      NURS 101L
                California State University, Long Beach
                                                                      Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                                      NURS 121
                        Shahid Beheshti University, Iran      F/T
                                                                      Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                                            B.S., Nursing
                                                                      NURS 121L
                               Orumieh University, Iran
                                                                      Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                            A.S., Nursing
Sarah Hoang, MPH, RN
                California State University, Long Beach
                                     M.S., Public Health
                                            B.S., Nursing
                                                                      NURS 341L
                                                              P/T
                                                                      Public Health Nursing Practicum




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                             Page 139 of 155
Sandra James, MSN-Ed., RN
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
                         M.S., Nursing: Nurse Educator                NURS 121L
                                                              P/T
                                           B.S., Nursing              Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                      Santa Ana College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Nancy Kazan, MSN, NP
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                           M.S., Nursing              NURS 211L
                                   University of Phoenix      P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                           B.S., Nursing              Adults Practicum
                            Northern Arizona University
                                           A.S., Nursing
Joy Kiat-Floro, MSN, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                                                                      NURS 216L
    M.S., Nursing/Business Administration/Health Care
                                                              P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                            Management
                                                                      Practicum
           Metropolitan Hospital and School of Nursing
                                           B.S., Nursing
Dana Lambrose, RN                                                     NURS 214L
                California State University, Long Beach       P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness
                                           B.S., Nursing              in the Mentally Ill Client Practicum
May Manning, MSN, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                                                                      NURS 121
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                              P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                     Goldenwest College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Rochelle McAlpin, MSN-Ed., RN
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                                                      NURS 121
                                 M.S., Nursing Educator
                                                              F/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                                           B.S., Nursing
                        Rio Hondo Community College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Maribeth McKinney, MSN, RN, FNP
                                   University of Phoenix              NURS 121
             M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner                Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                                                              F/T
                                           B.S., Nursing              NURS 290
                                     Saddleback College               Physical Assessment
                                           A.S., Nursing
Gayle McLean, MSN, RN, NP
                California State University, Long Beach
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                                      NURS 340
                   California State University, Fullerton     P/T
                                                                      Public Health Nursing
                                           B.S., Nursing
                            Hartnell Community College
                                            A.S, Nursing
Esther Montoya, MSN, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                                                                      NURS 121L
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                              P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
                         Long Beach Community Beach
                                           A.S., Nursing
Bobbie Murphy, MSN, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                Azusa Pacific University              NURS 211L
                                            B.S. Nursing      F/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                                                      Adults Practicum




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 140 of 155
Jane Nocum, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                                                                      NURS 101L
                                          M.S., Nurisng       P/T
                                                                      Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                              University of Santo Tomas
                                           B.S., Nursing
Marcia Noonan, MEd., RN
                    US International University, Irvine               NURS 214L
                                       M.A., Education        P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness
              California State University, Long Beach                 in Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing
John Norris, MSN, RN                                                  NURS 211L
                               Wichita State University               Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                         M.S., Nursing                Adults Practicum
                                                              F/T
                                          B.S., Nursing               NURS 213L
                                                                      Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting
                                                                      Wellness in the Critically Ill Client Practicum
Maimoona Qadeer, MSN, RN
                                                                      NURS 216L
                                  University of Phoenix
                                                                      Expanding and Developing Family and Community
                                         M.S., Nursing
                                                              F/T     Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing
                                                                      NURS 280
                                  Pasadena City College
                                                                      Pharmacology
                                          A.S., Nursing
Jaimie Quach, MSN, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                                                                      NURS 214L
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                              P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                                                      in the Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                                     Saddleback College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Nasreen Rahman, MSN, RN, FNP
                                   University of Phoenix
                                           M.S., Nursing
                          Mahidol University, Thailand                NURS 211L
              M.S., Primary Health Care Management                    Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                                              P/T
                    Quaid-I-Azam University, Pakistan                 Adults Practicum
                           M.S., Environmental Biology
                                            B.S., Biology
                                    Excelsior, New York
                                           A.S., Nursing
Ruth Reyes, MSN, RN, NP
                   California State University, Fullerton
                                                                      NURS 211L
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                                      Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                   University of Phoenix      P/T
                                                                      Adults Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
                               Long Beach City College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Cheryl Rojas, MSN, RN, FNP                                            NURS 100
                                   University of Phoenix              Fundamentals of Nursing
             M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner        F/T     NURS 213L
                            Mount Saint Mary’s College                Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting
                                           B.S., Nursing              Wellness in the Critically Ill Client Practicum
Janet Smith, MSN, RN
                                   University of Phoenix
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                    Chapman University
                                            B.S, Nursing
                                                                      NURS 214L
                                     Saddleback College
                                                              P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness
                                           A.S., Nursing
                                                                      in the Mentally Ill Client Practicum




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                            Page 141 of 155
Kirstan Survillas, MSN, RN
                                 University of Phoenix              NURS 211L
                                          M.S., Nursing             Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older
                                                            F/T
                                          B.S., Nursing             Adults Practicum
                              Long Beach City College
                                          A.S., Nursing
Jennifer Ty-De Guzman, MSN, RN
                                 University of Phoenix
                                                                    NURS 120
                                          M.S., Nursing     P/T
                                                                    Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                     UERMMC University, Philippines
                                          B.S., Nursing
Anne Marie Watkins, MSN, RN                                         NURS 420
               California State University, Long Beach              Principles of Leadership and Management
                                                            P/T
         M.S., Nursing and Health Care Administration               NURS 460
                                          B.S., Nursing             Professional Roles within Nursing
Nina Woolfolk, MSN, RN
                 University of California, Los Angeles              NURS 213L
                                          M.S., Nursing     P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting
                      University of Southern California             Wellness in the Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                 2011-12 CATALOG                            Page 142 of 155
WCU | Orange County Campus

                                            GENERAL EDUCATION
         Faculty Name and Education                          Status                           Courses
Ahmed Al-Assal, MD                                                     PHYS 261
                                                               F/T
                          Al-Kindy College of Medicine                 Human Physiology
Gene Bohimann, MFT, Ed.D.
                                        Argosy University
                                  Doctorate in Education
   M.A., Counseling Psychology – Marriage and Family
                                                                       PSYC 260
                                                   Therapy     P/T
                                                                       Introduction to Psychology
                   New England Conservatory of Music
                               M.A., Music Composition
                       Berklee College of Music, Boston
                                B.A., Music Composition
Laurence Bush
                   California State University, Fullerton              ENGL 340
                                                               P/T
                                  B.S., Computer Science               Written Communication II
                                         B.A., Psychology
Dale Conjurski, MBA
                                    University of Phoenix
                                                                       HCA 431
                           M.S., Business Administration       P/T
                                                                       Technology and Future Trends in Health Care
             California State University, San Bernardino
                                  B.S., Computer Science
Mo Entezampour, MSMB, Ph.D.
Chair of Science
                                                                       ANAT 260
                               University of North Texas
                                                                       Human Anatomy
          Doctorate of Philosophy in Molecular Biology         F/T
                                                                       MICRO 140
                                 M.S., Molecular Biology
                                                                       General Microbiology
                            North Texas State University
                                 B.S., Biology/Chemistry
Maria Gonzales, DPA, RN
                                   University of La Verne
                                                                       HCA 206
                     Doctorate in Public Administration
                                                                       Epidemiology in Public Health Practice
                      Seton Hall University, New Jersey        P/T
                                                                       NURS 205
                                            M.S., Nursing
                                                                       Introduction to Leadership
                   University of San Tomas, Philippines
                                             B.S., Nursing
Nam Ho, Ph.D.
                       University of Southern California
                                                                       CHEM 260
                   Doctorate of Philosophy in Chemistry        P/T
                                                                       Biochemistry
                                     Creighton University
                             B.S., Environmental Science
Amir Jahani, MSBS                                                      ANAT 260
                               University of North Texas               Human Anatomy
                                 M.S., Biological Science              ANAT 270
                                                               F/T
                            North Texas State University               Pathophysiology
                                  B.S., Biological Science             MICRO 140
                                                                       General Microbiology
Elijah Levy, MAP, Ph.D.
          California School for Professional Psychology
        Doctorate of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology
                                                                       HUM 470
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                                                       Cultural Pluralism
                              M.A., Clinical Psychology        P/T
                                                                       PSYC 290
                California State University, Long Beach
                                                                       Life Span Psychology
                                        B.S., Psychology




     WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                            Page 143 of 155
Amie Muldong Hein, MEL, Ph.D.
            Angeles University Foundation, Philippines
   Doctorate of Philosophy in Educational Management                  HCA 432
                                                              P/T
                          M.A., Educational Leadership                Principles of Leadership for Health Care Organizations
                        New Era University, Philippines
                                         B.A., Psychology
Patricia Obrite, MSC
                  California State University, Fullerton
                           M.A., Speech Communication                 SPCH 142
                                                              P/T
                           B.A., Speech Communication                 Oral Communication
                               Long Beach City College
                           A.S., Business Administration
Even Peterson, MAM
                                                                      MATH 108
                         San Francisco State University
                                                                      College Mathematics I
                                      M.A., Mathematics       F/T
                                                                      MATH 109
                       University of California, Berkley
                                                                      College of Mathematics II
                                       B.A., Mathematics
La’Keisha Philips, MSHCA
                                                                      SOCY 280
                California State University, Long Beach
                                                                      Introduction to Sociology
                      M.S., Health Care Administration        P/T
                                                                      HCA 441
                  University of California, Los Angeles
                                                                      Senior Seminar in Health Care
                                          B.A., Sociology
Ryan Shiroma, MFA
                         Eastern Washington University
                                                                      ENGL 140
                     M.A., Fine Arts – Creative Writing       P/T
                                                                      Written Communication I
                California State University, Long Beach
                        B.A., English – Creative Writing
Shahrokh Sirossians, MSC
                              Texas Southern University
                                          M.S., Chemistry
                                                                      CHEM 260
                            Huston-Tillotson University       P/T
                                                                      Biochemistry
                                          B.S., Chemistry
                                       Santa Ana College
                                            A.S., Nursing
Benjamin Tran, MBSc., MNSc.
                       University of Southern California
                                                                      ANAT 260
                                      M.S., Neuroscience
                                                                      Human Anatomy
                           University of Hawaii, Manoa        F/T
                                                                      MICRO 140
                               M.S., BioMedical Science
                                                                      General Microbiology
                         University of California, Irvine
                                 B.S., Biological Science
Zhenyun Yang,MSZ, Ph.D.
                                       Indiana University
                                                                      ANAT 260
  Doctorate of Philosophy in Anatomy and Cell Biology
                                                                      Human Anatomy
                          East China Normal University        P/T
                                                                      PHYS 261
                                            M.S., Zoology
                                                                      Human Physiology
                     Suzhou Railway Teacher’s College
                                 B.S., Biology Education




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                           Page 144 of 155
WCU | Ontario Campus

                                                        NURSING
         Faculty Name and Education                         Status                            Courses
Olivia Aparicio, MSN, RN
                              California State University
                                                                      NURS 216L
                                           M.S., Nursing      P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                  Loma Linda University
                                            B.S., Nursing
Jocelyn Arranga, MSN-Ed., RN
                                   University of Phoenix              NURS 211L
                  M.S., Nursing – Healthcare Education        P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                      Saint Rita College              Practicum
                                            B.S., Nursing
Jolene Balatero, MSN, RN
                California State University, Long Beach
                                                                      NURS 340
                                           M.S., Nursing      F/T     Public Health Nursing
                 California State University, Bakersfield
                                            B.S., Nursing
Jo Ann Beach, MSN, RN                                                 NURS 120
                                   University of Phoenix              Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing
                                           M.S., Nursing              NURS 121L
                                                              F/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
           California State University, Dominguez Hills
                                                                      NURS 206
                                            B.S., Nursing             Expanding and Developing Family and Community
Johanna Boone, MSN, FNP, RN
                       University of California, Irvine
                         M.S., Nursing/ Family Nurse
                                          Practitioner        F/T     NURS 430
                 California State University, Fullerton               Disaster Management
                                        M.S., Nursing
                             Azusa Pacific University
                                         B.S., Nursing
Tiffany Burnham, MSN, RN
                                                                      NURS 213L
                             Grand Canyon University
                                                              P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                        M.S., Nursing                 Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                          B.S.,Nursing
Mike Burton, MSN, RN
                                  University of Kansas
                                                                      NURS 214L
                                        M.S., Nursing
                                                              P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                       Union College                  Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                                          B.S, Nursing
                                       B.A., Theology
Shannon Buttram, MSN, RN, FNP
                                 University of Phoenix                NURS 100
                                                              F/T     Fundamentals of Nursing
                        M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse                  NURS101L
                                          Practitioner                Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                         B.S., Nursing
April Clark, MSN, RN
                                 University of Phoenix
                                        M.S., Nursing                 NURS 280
                             Azusa Pacific University                 Pharmacology
                                                                      NURS 350
                                         B.S., Nursing        F/T
                                                                      Research in Nursing
                           Mount San Jacinto College                  NURS 203
                                         A.S., Nursing                Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
                                                                      the Clinically Ill Client




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 145 of 155
Lorri Clayton, MSN, RN
                                                                     NURS 213L
            California State University, San Bernardino
                                                             P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                          M.S., Nursing              Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
Jacqueline Clemens, MSN-Ed., RN
                                 University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 360
                 M.S., Nursing – Healthcare Education        P/T     Principles of Teaching and Patient Care
                              Indiana University-Purde
                                           B.S., Nursing
Brandy Colleti, MBA-HCM, RN                                          NURS 440
                                 University of Phoenix               Issues and Trends in Nursing
                     M.B.A., Health Care Management          F/T     NURS 216L
                                                                     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                              Azusa Pacific University
                                                                     NURS 420
                                           B.S., Nursing             Principles of Leadership and Management
Shannon Cook, MSN, RN
                               Azusa Pacific University
                                         M.S., Nursing
                                          B.S., Nursing              NURS 280
                                                             P/T     Pharmacology
                                       Whittier College
                                          B.S., Biology
                             Mount San Antonio College
                                      A.A., Liberal Arts
Joyce Crocker, MBA, RN
                                 University of Phoenix               NURS 214L
                         M.S., Business Administration       P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                          M.S., Nursing              Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing
Latanya Davidson-Wilson, MSN, RN
                                Loma Linda University
                                                                     NURS 121L
                                          M.S., Nursing      P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                  University of Arizona
                                          B.S., Nursing
Mary Del Valle, Psy.D., RN
                        University of California, Irvine
                               Doctorate in Psychology
                                                                     NURS 221L
                                 University of Phoenix       P/T     Integration of Nursing Practice
                               M.S., Nursing Education
                                Long Island University
                                          B.S., Nursing
Laura Espinoza, MSN, RN, FNP
               California State University, Long Beach
            M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner                NURS 216L
                      Pacific Union College, Angwing         F/T
                                                                     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                          B.S., Nursing
                              East Los Angeles College
                                          A.S., Nursing
Patricia Essilfie, DNP, RN
                                Arizona State University
                          Doctorate in Nursing Practice
                California State University, Long Beach
                                           M.S., Nursing
                       University of Southern California
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                                                     NURS 121L
                                                             P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 146 of 155
Evangeline Fangonil-Gagalang, MSN, RN
                  California State University, Fullerton
                                          M.S., Nursing              NURS 203
                                  University of Phoenix              Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
                                                             F/T     the Clinically Ill Client
                                          B.S., Nursing              NURS 211L
                                 Pasadena City College               Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                          A.S., Nursing              Practicum
                            Citrus Community College
                                   A.S., Health Science
Machel Gilmore, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                                          M.S., Nursing              NURS 121L
                                                             P/T
                                          B.S., Nursing              Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                         Riverside Community College
                                           A.S. Nursing
Robin Green, MSN, RN, FNP
                                  University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 211L
            M.S., Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner
                                                             P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                          B.S., Nursing              Practicum
                                       Cerritos College
                                          A.S., Nursing
Melanie Hanson, MSN-Ed., RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 211L
                 M.S., Nursing – Healthcare Education
                                                             P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                          B.S., Nursing              Practicum
                        San Bernardino Valley College
                                          A.S., Nursing
Dana Hinton, MSN-Ed., RN
                  South University, Savannah, Georgia                NURS 121L
                               M.S., Nursing Education               Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
          California State University, Dominquez Hills       F/T     NURS 200B
                                                                     Transition to Professional Nursing
                                          B.S., Nursing              NURS 210L
                                                                     RN Skills Laboratory
Chris Hollis, MSN, RN
                 South University, Savannah, Georgia
                                       M.S., Nursing                 NURS 201
                                                                     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                University of Phoenix        F/T     NURS 101L
                                         B.S. Nursing                Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                    Victor Valley Community College
                       A.S. Math Science and Nursing
Steven Howe, MSN-Ed., RN
                                University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 203
                M.S., Nursing – Healthcare Education
                                                             P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
                                        B.S., Nursing                the Clinically Ill Client
                            Maric College, San Diego
                                         A.S. Nursing
LaToyia Jackson, MSN, RN
                                   Walden University                 NURS 213L
                                       M.S., Nursing         P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                     Chaffey College                 Critically Ill Client Practicum
                                        A.S., Nursing
Donna Lundgren, MSN, RN
                                University of Phoenix
                                       M.S., Nursing
                                        B.S., Nursing
                      Saddleback Community College                   NURS 216L
                                                             P/T
                                        A.S., Nursing                Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 147 of 155
Ligaya Macayaon, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix              NURS 101L
                                                             F/T
                                         M.S., Nursing               Fundamentals of Nursing Skills Lab
                                          B.S., Nursing
Marie Malicki, RN                                                    NURS 213L
                              Loma Linda University          P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                        B.S., Nursing                Critically Ill Client Practicum
Debra Martinez, MSN, RN, PNP
                            Azusa Pacific University
          M.S., Nursing – Pediatric Nurse Practitioner               NURS 290
                                                             P/T     Physical Assessment



LeAnn Matlin, MSN, RN                                                NURS 204
            Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville               Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                M.S., Nursing Saint Louis University                 Mentally Ill Client
                                                             F/T     NURS 214L
                                          B.S., Nursing
                                                                     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                                                     Mentally Ill Client Practicum
Frances McCann, MSN, RN, NP
                  University of California, Los Angeles
                                          M.S., Nursing
                                                                     NURS 216L
                                 Loma Linda University       P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                          Citrus College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Antoinette McHenry-Culver, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 205
                                          M.S., Nursing      P/T     Introduction to Leadership
                               Chicago State University
                                           B.S., Nursing
Kathy McNeilly, MSN, RN
                                                                     NURS 214L
                      Oregon Health Science University
                                                             P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
       M.S., Nursing – Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse               Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
Jean Marie Molyneux, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                                          M.S., Nursing
                                                                     NURS 216L
           California State University, Dominguez Hills      P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
                         San Bernardino Valley College
                                           A.S., Nursing
Ruth Ngati, MSN, RN
                                 Loma Linda University               NURS 211L
                                          M.S., Nursing      P/T     Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                               Azusa Pacific University              Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
Aleksandra Niciejewski, MSN, RN
                  Western University of Health Science
                                                                     NURS 216L
                       M.S., Nursing – Ambulatory Care       P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                    University of California, Santa Cruz
       B.S., Molecular Cellular Developmental Biology
Henrietta Nwamu, MSN-Ed., RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                  M.S., Nursing – Healthcare Education
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                                                     NURS 214L
       California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                                                             P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                 B.A., Home Economics                Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                            Mount Saint Mary’s College
                                           A.S., Nursing




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                                Page 148 of 155
Darling Paul-Richiez, RN, MPH
                                         TUI University
                                    M.S., Public Health              NURS 213L
                               Indiana State University      F/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                           B.S., Nursing             Critically Ill Client Practicum
               California State University, Long Beach
               A.S., Health Science, Community Health
Julie Pham, MSN, RN
            California State University, San Bernardino
                                          M.S., Nursing              NURS 341L
                                                             P/T
                                           B.S., Nursing             Public Health Nursing Practicum
                         Riverside Community College
                                 A.A., Natural Sciences
Erlinda Redoblando, MSN, RN
                                 University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 216L
                                          M.S., Nursing      P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                  The Philippines Women’s University
                                           B.S., Nursing
Tamara Rhoads, MSN, RN                                               NURS 211L
                                 University of Phoenix               Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults
                                          M.S., Nursing              Practicum
                                                             P/T     NURS 213L
               California State University, Long Beach
                                                                     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                           B.S., Nursing             Critically Ill Client Practicum
Ronilyn Ricaforte, MSN, RN
                               Azusa Pacific University
                                           M.S., Nursing             NURS 341L
                                                             P/T
                                           B.S., Nursing             Public Health Nursing Practicum
                  California State University, Fullerton
                   B.S., Child Adolescent Development
Harriet Russell, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                                                                     NURS 121L
                                           M.S., Nursing     P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                           Medical College of Georgia
                                           B.S., Nursing
Geoffrey Schroder, MSN, RN
                                  University of Phoenix              NURS 205
                                           M.S., Nursing             Introduction to Leadership
                                                             P/T
                                           B.S., Nursing             NURS 350
                                  Golden West College                Research in Nursing
                                           A.S., Nursing
Georgina Sims, MSN, RN
                                     Walden University
                                           M.S., Nursing
                                                                     NURS 216L
                     University of Southern California       P/T     Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                 LA Southwest College
                         A.A., Interdisciplinary Studies
Alicia Skibar, MSN, RN
                  California State University, Fullerton
                                           M.S., Nursing             NURS 121L
                                                             P/T     Introduction to Medical Surgical Nursing Practicum
                                Loma Linda University
                                           B.S., Nursing
                                           A.S., Nursing
David Smith, MBA, RN
                                     DePaul University
                         M.S., Business Administration
                                                                     NURS 214L
                              University of Washington
                                                             P/T     Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                           M.S., Nursing             Mentally Ill Client Practicum
                        University of Illinois at Urbana
                                           B.S., Nursing



    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                               Page 149 of 155
Syreeta Starnes, MSN, RN
                           Grand Canyon University
                                                                     NURS 203
   M.S., Nursing – Leadership in Health Care Systems
                                                             P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in
                                        B.S., Nursing                the Clinically Ill Client
                                  El Camino College
                                        A.S., Nursing
Magdalena Suarez, MSN, RN
                                     Bicol University
                                       M.S., Nursing
                 Ago Medical and Educational Center                  NURS 216L
                                                             P/T
                                        B.S., Nursing                Expanding and Developing Family and Community Practicum




Stephanie Umali, MSN-Ed., RN
                                  University of Phoenix
                  M.S., Nursing - Healthcare Educator                NURS 213L
                  California State University, Fullerton     P/T     Advanced Medical Surgical Nursing: Promoting Wellness in the
                                          B.S., Nursing              Critically Ill Client Practicum
                           Mount San Antonio College
                                     A.A., Liberal Arts




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                  2011-12 CATALOG                              Page 150 of 155
WCU | Ontario Campus

                                            GENERAL EDUCATION
         Faculty Name and Education                          Status                            Courses
Bellarieve Dean, MEA
                                      National University              MATH 108
                                                               P/T
                        M.S., Educational Administration               College Mathematics I
                                       B.S., Mathematics
Cynthia Dixon, MBMB
                      University of California, Riverside              CHEM 260
                                                               P/T
              M.S., Biochemistry and Molecular Biology                 Biochemistry
                  B.S., Natural and Agricultural Science
Jesse Escalante, MBMB
                      University of California, Riverside              CHEM 260
                                                               F/T
              M.S., Biochemistry and Molecular Biology                 Biochemistry
                                       B.S., Biochemistry
Kelly Felton, MSI, MMM
                        University of Southern California
                           M.S., Molecular Microbiology
                                                                       PHYS 261
                   California State University, Fullerton      P/T
                                                                       Human Physiology
                                       M.S., Immunology
                                     Chapman University
                                             B.S., Biology
Ava Hardiek, MEd.
                                      National University
                                                                       ENGL 340
                                            M.A., English      P/T
                                                                       Written Communication II
                                         Biola University
                         B.S., Organizational Leadership
Howard Ku, MBA                                                         MATH 108
        California State Polytechnic University, Pomona                College Mathematics I
                                                               P/T
                           M.S., Business Administration               MATH 310
                                       B.A., Engineering               Statistics
David Lagerson, MSC
                  California State University, Northridge              ENGL 140
                                                               P/T
             M.S., Counseling – Marriage, Family Child                 Written Communication I
                                         B.A. Psychology
Michael Manning, MBA
        California State Polytechnic University, Pomona                MATH 108
                                                               P/T
                           M.S., Business Administration               College Mathematics I
                                            B.S., Business
Douglas Morales, MPH
                                                                       MATH 310
                  California State University, San Diego
                                                                       Statistics
                        M.S. Public Health Epidemiology        P/T
                                                                       HCA 206
                   University of California, Los Angeles
                                                                       Epidemiology in Public Health Practice
                                             B.S., Biology
Amie Muldong, MEL, D.Ed.M.                                             PSYC 260
                         Angeles University, Philippines               Introduction to Psychology
                    Doctorate in Education Management                  PSYC 290
                           M.S., Educational Leadership                Life Span Psychology
                         New Era University, Philippines               HUM 470
                                        B.S., Psychology               Cultural Pluralism
                                                               P/T     HCA 434
                                                                       Medical Ethics and Issues




     WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                             Page 151 of 155
Eric Nwazue, MPH, MD
                           Obafemi Awolowo University
                                                                       PHYS 261
                                  Doctorate in Medicine
                                                                       Human Physiology
                                 Loma Linda Univeristy         P/T
                                                                       ANAT 270
                            M.S., Public Health Practice
                                                                       Pathophysiology
                                    Andrews University
                                          B.A., Religion
Raymond Oropeza, MSB
        California State Polytechnic University, Pomona                PHYS 261
                                                               P/T
                                            M.S., Biology              Human Physiology
                                             B.S., Biology
Chris Palma, MPH
                                  Loma Linda University
                                                                       PHYS 261
                                      M.S., Public Health      P/T
                                                                       Human Physiology
                   University of California, Los Angeles
                                         B.S., Physiology
Basemeh Rihan, MIC
                                                                       HUM 470
             California State University, San Bernardino
                                                                       Cultural Pluralism
                     M.A., Intercultural Communication
                                                                       SPCH 142
                 California State University, San Marcos       P/T
                                                                       Oral Communication
                                     B.A., Liberal Studies
                                                                       SOCY 280
                           Palomar College, San Marcos
                                                                       Introduction to Sociology
                                        A.A., Liberal Arts
Laila Shahrestani, MBS
                    California State University, Pomona
                                                                       MICRO 140
                                 M.S., Biological Science      P/T
                                                                       General Microbiology
                   California State University, Fullerton
                                 B.A., Biological Science
Valencia Williams, Ph.D.
                      University of California, Riverside
                                                                       MICRO 140
        Doctorate of Philosophy in Biomedical Sciences         F/T
                                                                       General Microbiology
                                 Clark Atlanta University
                                             B.S., Biology
Moheb Youssef, MSOS, MD
                                  Medical School, Egypt
                     Doctorate in Medicine and Surgery
                                                                       ANAT 260
                    German Medical Hospital, Germany           F/T
                                                                       Human Anatomy
                               M.S., Orthopedic Surgery
                        Cairo University Medical, Egypt
                                           B.S., Medicine




     WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                                   2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 152 of 155
NOTES




 WEST COAST UNIVERSITY   2011-12 CATALOG   Page 153 of 155
ADDENDA AND ERRATA

Should there be any addenda or errata to the printed version of this catalog, they should be inserted here.


TEXAS ADDENDUM

West Coast University does not currently offer any programs in the State of Texas, but has conditional
approval from its accrediting agency (ACICS), from the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC), and a
conditional Certificate of Authorization from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for a
campus in Dallas, Texas. TWC requires that all approved schools post the following policy.

        WCU Dallas Campus
        8435 North Stemmons Freeway
        Dalls, TX 75247
        972-800-7762

NOTICE
Student Complaint Policy

Dear Students:

This school has a Certificate of Approval from the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC). TWC has
assigned the school, School Number: S3921.

The school is approved to offer an RN to BSN program, additional program approvals are in process.
Students must address their concerns about this school or any of its educational programs by following
the grievance process outlined in the school's catalog. Schools are responsible for ensuring and
documenting that all students have received a copy of the school's grievance procedures and for
describing these procedures in the school's published catalog. If, as a student, you were not provided with
this information, please inform school management.

Students dissatisfied with this school's response to their complaint or who are not able to file a complaint
with the school, can file a formal complaint with TWC, as well as with other relevant agencies or
accrediting agencies, if applicable. Information on filing a complaint with TWC can be found on TWC's
Career Schools and Colleges Website at http://csc.twc.state.tx.us.

        Texas Workforce Commission
        101 E. 15th St.
        Austin, TX 78778-0001
        (512) 936-3100
        http://csc.twc.state.tx.us




    WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                         2011-12 CATALOG                        Page 154 of 155
GENERAL EDUCATION ERRATA

In this “September Edition” dated “09012011”, under the Grading section on page 36, the
missing “General Education Grade Requirements,” is an error. The missing section during
this “September Edition” catalog should read:


  General Education Grade Requirements
  Any student enrolled in the BSDH, BSN, LVN to BSN, or RN to BSN Track must
  complete all General Education courses with a minimum grade of “C,” as indicated on the
  Numerical Grade Conversion Scale outlined in this catalog. Any General Education
  course with an earned grade of “D” or below will not be accepted for credit and therefore
  must be repeated. Students should contact their major department for specific information
  related to grade requirements in the major program of study.




WEST COAST UNIVERSITY                      2011-12 CATALOG                       Page 155 of 155

				
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