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RANGE SUSTAINMENT QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER

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RANGE SUSTAINMENT QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER Powered By Docstoc
					RANGE SUSTAINMENT QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER
Vol. 12, No. 1                                                                              March to May 2012

Prepared for the Munitions Response and Operational Range Sustainment Interest Area of
the SAME Environmental Committee (Christopher Evans, Newsletter Editor)


Upcoming Events:

Apr 26, 2012           ITRC Green and Sustainable Remediation                          On Line Training
                       http://www.itrcweb.org/ibt.asp#index

May 2-3, 2012          Global Explosive Ordnance Disposal Conference                   Fort Walton Beach, FL
                       http://www.ndia.org/meetings/2950/Pages/default.aspx

May 8/15, 2012         ITRC Incremental Sampling Methodology                           On Line Training
                       http://www.itrcweb.org/ibt.asp#index

May 21-24, 2012 E2S2 Symposium and Exhibition                                          New Orleans, LA
                       Early Bird Registration through April 6th
                       http://e2s2.ndia.org/Pages/Default.aspx

May 22-25, 2012 SAME Joint Engineer Training Conference                                Saint Louis, MO
                       Early Bird Registration through April 15th
                       http://s3.goeshow.com/same/JETC/2012/

Jun 6-7, 2012          ESTCP MMRP Technology Workshop                                  Denver, CO
                       By Invitation Only



Range Sustainment News:

LANDSCAPES AS DOD MISSIONSCAPES
          Several decades ago, environmental scholar and author Barry Commoner remarked on the
“interconnectedness of everything.” Yet governing institutions and resource managers, decades after Commoner’s
insight, still often operate within bounded jurisdictions using a single-issue lens. The Department of Defense
(DOD), juxtaposing this traditional framework against the scope, scale and complexity of its resource management
challenges, is eying the benefits of collaboration across landscapes and governing boundaries. Their goal is not
simply neighborliness; their goal is better fulfillment of their mission. Consider the operating context of a 25-county
area in eastern North Carolina, an area of farms and forests and Marine installations with operational and training
needs that extend over a large area. That landscape is changing as populations expand and drive up development
pressures, simultaneously augmenting competition for water, lands and resources. On this changing landscape,
community, environmental and military goals collide, compete and intersect, amplifying the imperative of
coordination – both to overcome conflict and to find “sweet spots” of shared goals among diverse interests. For the
entire article, see http://www.centerforabetterlife.com/eng/magazine/article_detail.lasso?id=259&source=1 [by
Lynn Scarlett, livebetter eMagazine, January 2012]

AIR FORCE ANNOUNCES CANDIDATES FOR REGIONAL TRAINING CENTERS
         Air Force officials announced candidate bases for a Security Forces Regional Training Center consolidation
Dec. 14. The candidates are Camp Guernsey, Wyo.; Fort Bliss, Texas; Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.; and
Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. These locations, approved by Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley and Air

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Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz, are now candidates to host a training center which will offer training
courses attended by approximately 8,500 students per year. Consolidating Security Forces Regional Training
Centers into fewer locations is part of the Air Forces Efficiencies initiative. In 2010, the Air Force Security Forces
Center headquarters conducted a study to determine a more efficient method of conducting security forces training.
For the entire article, see http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123283553 [U.S. Air Force Press Release,
December 14, 2011]

REDEPLOYMENTS, BRAC LEAD TO CROWDED POSTS
         As the withdrawal from Iraq comes to a close and surge troops deployed to Afghanistan begin coming
home, installations across the Army are bracing for the return of thousands of soldiers. Coupled with the completion
of the 2005 base realignment and closure moves, many posts are for the first time in years expecting traffic gridlock,
shortages of training space, longer lines in the post exchange and commissary, busier dining facilities and gyms, and
higher demand for services, child care and housing. For the entire article, see
http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/12/army-redeployments-brac-lead-to-crowded-posts-121811w/ [by Michelle
Tan and John Ryan, Army Times, December 18, 2011]

BRAC CLEANUP COSTS LINGER LONG AFTER INSTALLATIONS CLOSE
           Two thousand acres on Monterey Bay in California, once home to the Army's Fort Ord, now is the site of
California State University, Monterey Bay, thousands of homes and a growing number of shops. The former field
artillery target range was closed in 1994 as part of the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process. But
more than 18 years later, the work of cleaning up the hazardous materials and unexploded weapons there continues.
The Army has spent more than $258 million cleaning up the installation and expects to pay another $110 million.
Even as the administration prepares to ask Congress for one or two more rounds of base closures as part of its 2013
budget, the government - and taxpayers - are still on the hook for cleaning up old military installations closed during
earlier rounds. For the entire article, see
http://www.federaltimes.com/article/20120206/FACILITIES02/202060307/1001 [By Andy Medici, Federal Times,
February 6, 2012]

NAVY BEGINS REVIEW FOR INCREASED TRAINING
         The Navy could increase its training and testing — possibly including a greater use of sonar — under a new
permit to be issued by the National Marine Fisheries Service. On Monday, the Navy announced its intent to draft an
environmental-impact statement for the new permit, which would allow incidental harassment of marine mammals.
The current "take" permit expires in 2015. The new permit would cover activities at four existing training range
complexes, including those along the Washington Coast and in Puget Sound. It also would cover pierside sonar
testing during repair activities at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Naval Base Kitsap at Bangor, Naval
Station Everett and other inland waterways where training and testing may take place, according to information on
the Navy's website, https://nwtteis.com/. For the entire article, see
http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2012/feb/27/navy-begins-review-for-increased-training-that/ [by Christopher
Dunagan, Kitsap Sun (WA), February 27, 2012]

NAVY TRAINING BLASTS MARINE MAMMALS WITH HARMFUL SONAR
          A coalition of conservation and American Indian groups today sued the National Marine Fisheries Service
for failing to protect thousands of whales, dolphins, porpoises, seals and sea lions from U.S. Navy warfare training
exercises along the coasts of California, Oregon and Washington. Earthjustice, representing InterTribal Sinkyone
Wilderness Council, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth, Friends of the San Juans, Natural
Resources Defense Council and People For Puget Sound, today filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District
of Northern California challenging the Fisheries Service’s approval of the Navy’s training activities in its Northwest
Training Range Complex. The lawsuit calls on the agency to mitigate anticipated harm to marine mammals and
biologically critical areas within the training range that stretches from Northern California to the Canadian border.
For the entire article, see http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2012/sonar-01-26-2012.html
[Center for Biological Diversity Press Release, January 26, 2012]




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NSWC DAHLGREN DEMONSTRATES NEW MATERIAL’S EXPLOSIVE FORCE
           Military, government and industry officials watched the demonstration of a revolutionary material that
increases the explosive force and lethality on enemy targets during a test at Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC)
Dahlgren on 2 Dec 11. The test material, called High-Density Reactive Material (HDRM), is designed to replace
steel in warhead casings with little or no compromise in strength or design. Navy scientists and engineers from
NSWC Indian Head Division (IHD) developed HDRM by combining several metals and using standard
manufacturing processes. Unlike conventional munitions, the innovative materials approach integrates the casing
with warhead explosives for increased lethality. "HDRM has demonstrated enhanced blast, multiphase blast, and
reactive fragments effects," said Dr. Jason Jouet, NSWC Indian Head Reactive Materials Team Lead. "With the
strength of aluminum, density of steel, and more than one and a half times the energy of TNT, HDRM is truly a
revolutionary enabling technology." HDRM can readily replace steel in existing systems and is compatible with
current warhead designs, thereby maintaining the same probability of a successful target strike. "This approach may
translate to less ordnance and ultimately fewer sorties to get the same result," said Jouet. For more information, go
to: http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=64164

U.S. CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS DESTRUCTION PROGRAM IN IRAQ
         The United States has invested more than $209 million in Iraq since 2003 toward the clearance and safe
disposal of landmines, unexploded ordnance, and excess conventional weapons and munitions. The goals of the U.S.
Conventional Weapons Destruction (CWD) Program in Iraq are to protect victims of conflict through innovative
Risk Education and Victims Assistance projects; to restore access to land and infrastructure by introducing
innovative mechanical technologies and Mine Detection Dogs (MDD); and to promote Iraqi development of its
humanitarian mine action capabilities. For the entire article, see
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2012/01/182316.htm [U.S. Department of State Press Release, January 20, 2012]

UNEXPLODED MILITARY ORDNANCE A CONTINUING CONCERN IN CANADA
          It was the summer of 1945 and 20-year-old able seaman Clifford Palmer was sailing up the St. Lawrence to
Quebec City on HMCS Beauharnois. On the way, however, it would perform one final duty for the Royal Canadian
Navy. It stopped in St. John's to take on a load of leftover ammunition from another ship. Then, somewhere off the
coast of the Gaspe, the Beauharnois dropped all that ship's armaments, along with the bullets, depth charges,
missiles and explosives the Beauharnois once used to hunt submarines, overboard, to lie on the floor of the Gulf of
St. Lawrence. It turns out the federal government is well aware of the Beauharnois' dumping ground. It is one of
hundreds of sites across Canada identified as containing live and dangerous explosives. "In recent years, there have
been several deaths and serious injuries caused by unexploded explosive ordnances (UXO) in Canada," a
Department of National Defence website notes. "Caution is always required when entering UXO legacy sites." For
the entire article, see
http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Unexploded+military+ordnance+continuing+concern+Canada/6187064/stor
y.html [By Rene Bruemmer, Montreal Gazette, February 21, 2012]


Site Specific News:

TOP MARINE BACKS GUAM PRESENCE
           Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos testified at a congressional hearing yesterday that it's
critical to have Marines stationed on Guam to maintain a forward presence in the Asia-Pacific region, said Guam
Delegate Madeleine Bordallo. "He clarified that although no plans have been finalized, the Marines will need a live
firing range to train on Guam regardless of the reduction in force," Bordallo said in a press release. Guam recently
received confirmation that the number of Marines relocated to Guam will be reduced from 8,000 to about half that
number. The rest, who are no longer being moved to Guam, will serve on rotation to such Asia-Pacific countries as
Australia and possibly the Philippines. For the entire article, see
http://www.guampdn.com/article/20120218/NEWS01/202180306 [by Gaynor Dumat-ol Daleno, Pacific Daily
News (GU), February 18, 2012]

NAVY TO PREPARE SUPPLEMENTAL EIS FOR TRAINING RANGES IN GUAM
         The Department of Navy on Friday published a Notice of Intent to prepare a Supplemental Environmental


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Impact Statement for a live fire training range complex to support the relocation of U.S. Marines from Okinawa,
Japan to Guam. A public scoping period has now begun and comments will be accepted until midnight, April 6,
2012 (Chamorro Standard Time). The SEIS will supplement the Final EIS for the Guam and Commonwealth of the
Northern Mariana Islands Military Relocation. The SEIS is specific to the live fire training range complex in Guam
and will evaluate the potential environmental consequences that may result from the construction and operation of
the complex and associated infrastructure. For the entire article, see
http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?cat=1&newsID=116485 [Saipan Tribune (GU), February 13, 2012]

GUAM FISHERMEN UNHAPPY WITH NAVY'S PLANS FOR RANGE COMPLEX
          Fisherman's Co-Op President Manny Duenas says many island fishermen are not happy about the Navy's
plans for the Marianas Islands Training and Testing Area and Range Complex because most of the area will be used
for live fire exercises which will keep fisherman out when training is underway. Representatives from the Navy met
with members of the Guam Fisherman's co-op Tuesday night to explain the plans for the Range Complex. Ahead of
that meeting, Duenas told PNC News that the seven southern banks where 50 percent of the island's fish comes from
are already being used as part of the Navy's training and testing area. For the entire article, see
http://www.pacificnewscenter.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19321:co-p&catid=45:guam-
news&Itemid=156 [by Clynt Ridgell, Pacific News Center, December 13, 2011]

BOARDMAN TURBINES ENCROACHING ON NAVY’S AIRSPACE
          Wind turbine construction in one of the restricted airspace zones is threatening the Navy’s ability to
conduct low-altitude training exercises at the Boardman Bombing Range. Officials with the U.S. Navy and Oregon
National Guard spoke to the Umatilla Chemical Depot Local Reuse Authority on Thursday afternoon to address
concerns regarding the use of airspace in the area of the depot for low-flying aircraft training purposes. For the
entire article, see http://www.eastoregonian.com/news/local_news/boardman-turbines-encroaching-on-navy-s-
airspace/article_ea6770f4-5998-11e1-9f55-001871e3ce6c.html [by Anna Williard, East Oregonian, February 17,
2012]

4TH STRYKER BRIGADE TRAINING AT YAKIMA CENTER
           The mortars are heavy and cold to the touch, but the winter weather doesn't stop 4th Stryker Brigade from
its mission at the Army's Yakima Training Center. However, the cold air sends the aftershocks of the mortars and
artillery fire pulsing across the Upper Valley, prompting questions and 911 calls from residents. The booms started
in earnest last week and are expected to continue for much of the month. The cold weather brings down the cloud
cover, causing sound to bounce more between earth and sky and travel farther before dissipating. For those standing
right next to the muzzle, the noise is significantly worse. For the entire article, see
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2017465092_apwamortarfiringtraining1stldwritethru.html
[by Mark Morey, Seattle Times (WA), February 9, 2012]

BASE NOISE HERE TO STAY
          If you live near Camp Lejeune and have ever felt your house vibrate from training on a distant range, know
that you’re in good company: The base has been rattling windows and making things go “boom” since its founding
in 1941. That can be small comfort for nearby residents like Mary Kahler of Swansboro, who said her home, near
the Camp Lejeune back gate, frequently rattles and shakes from reverberating explosions. “Since we moved into
this house, my husband and I have actually jumped out of bed in the middle of the night when they were doing some
of this,” Kahler said. Kahler published a letter to the editor in The Daily News complaining about the noise and
asking if anything could be done to lessen it. She received a published response from Col. Daniel Lecce, base
commander, explaining the factors that can exacerbate the noise and measures being taken to lessen the impact. But
the bottom line was clear: The booms and bangs are here to stay. For the entire article, see
http://www.jdnews.com/articles/live-100500-ever-noise.html [by Hope Hodge, JDNews.com (NC), February 12,
2012]

ARMY PLAN FOR COPTERS REIGNITES LONG FEUD
         A new front has opened in the fight between the Army and the ranching community around the Pinon
Canyon Maneuver Site as Fort Carson lays the groundwork to have a new 113-helicopter Combat Aviation Brigade,
including unmanned drones, join in a heavier training schedule at the 235,000-acre range northeast of Trinidad.


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That can't happen until the Army declares there won't be any significant environmental damage from that training.
To that end, Fort Carson officials issued a draft analysis earlier this year, an assessment rather than a full-blown
environmental study, that makes that claim. Not surprisingly, foes of the Army's past efforts to expand the Las
Animas County training range have declared the latest environmental assessment an illegal end run around a 2009
federal court ruling against the Army. For the entire article, see http://www.chieftain.com/news/local/army-plan-
for-copters-reignites-long-feud/article_182c4cd6-4fc5-11e1-88e1-001871e3ce6c.html [by Pete Roper, The Pueblo
Chieftain (CO), February 5, 2012]

FORT CARSON BOSS THRUST INTO PINON CANYON
          Army Maj. Gen. Joseph Anderson, the new commander at Fort Carson, said his instructions from the
Pentagon are explicit: there will be no discussion of expansion of the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site for the next five
years and it will not be renamed Fort Carson South. "My charter from the secretary of the Army is clear," Anderson
told reporters at a meet-the-new-commander luncheon Friday. "I have a letter (from Secretary John McHugh) that
says there will be no expansion for at least five years. And I don't know why he didn't make it longer." That letter
was written by McHugh earlier this year at the request of Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., who wanted some statement
from the Army to assure residents around Pinon Canyon that the Army had dropped its controversial plans to expand
the training range. For the entire article, see http://www.chieftain.com/news/local/fort-carson-boss-thrust-into-
pinon-canyon/article_15ab9ba0-22f3-11e1-850d-001871e3ce6c.html [Peter Roper, Pueblo Chieftain (CO),
December 10, 2011]

F-35A PUBLIC HEARINGS BEGIN
          The Wigwam Resort is a big place, and it was just right for the first of four open houses being held in
Arizona by the U.S. Air Force for comments on its environmental impact study of the F-35A training basing at Luke
Air Force Base. Luke is the USAF's preferred alternative to base the pilot training center with 72 F-35A aircraft.
However, as stated throughout the open house, no decisions regarding the proposal will be made until after the
environmental impact analysis process is complete. There are other military installations under consideration for the
training basing: Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico; Tucson International Airport Air Guard Station; and
Boise Air Terminal Airport Air Guard Station. For the entire article, see
http://www.peoriatimes.com/news/article_3fc32f4a-5811-11e1-901e-0019bb2963f4.html [by Carolyn Dryer, Peoria
Times (AZ), February 16, 2012]

PLACING F-35 TRAINING AT HOLLOMAN MAKES SENSE
          Air Force officials have cast their eyes on Holloman Air Force Base as a possible location for training
pilots to fly the F-35A. The F-35 is a multi-role fighter jet made by Lockheed Martin that has "low observability"
capabilities and, as the word "multi-role" suggests, can perform different missions, such as ground attack and
support, air-to-air combat and reconnaissance. The fighter has different variations, depending on which military
service is using it. For example, one type has short takeoff and vertical landing capabilities, and the Navy version
will, of course, be able to take off and land onto aircraft carriers. And the F-35 can carry an amazing array of
munitions, depending on the mission. For the entire article, see
http://www.alamogordonews.com/ci_19822947?source=most_viewed [Sun-News Editorial, Alamogordo Daily
News (NM), January 25, 2012]

COLORADO MAY RESTRICT SHALE FRACTURING AT FORMER BOMBING RANGE
          Proposed drilling on a former bombing range that contains unexploded munitions and a landfill prompted
Colorado lawmakers this week to introduce a bill that would require rules for fracking near toxic-waste sites. “This
is quite immediately a public health and safety issue,” said State Senator Morgan Carroll, a Democrat who co-
sponsored the measure. “The room for error here is limited.” With the measure, Colorado joins other states,
including West Virginia, New York and Ohio, seeking to regulate hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which sand,
water and chemicals are forced into rock under pressure, cracking it and releasing oil and natural gas. In January,
the Colorado State Land Board signed a tentative $137 million agreement with ConocoPhillips to lease oil and gas
resources underneath 21,048 acres on the bombing range, said Davy Kong, a ConocoPhillips (COP) spokeswoman.
For the entire article, see http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-02-04/colorado-may-take-steps-to-limit-shale-
fracturing-at-former-bombing-range.html [by Jennifer Oldham, Bloomberg.com, February 4, 2012]



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STATE WILL HELP SOLVE ROBINS ENCROACHMENT
          The State of Georgia will help Robins Air Force Base solve the encroachment issue. That's the problem of
homes being located in the crash and noise zone just north of the Robins runway. Spokeswoman for Governor
Nathan Deal Stephanie Mayfield says the state didn't commit to an exact figure or put a line item in this year's
budget. However, she said the state will kick-in some money, when the local governments ask for it. For the entire
article, see http://www.13wmaz.com/news/article/162490/153/State-Will-Help-Solve-Robins-Encroachment [by
Lorra Lynch-Jones, WMAZ TV-13 News (GA), January 18, 2012]

BOMBING RANGE LEASE SIGNING CEREMONY WEDNESDAY
          A signing ceremony is set for Wednesday in Santa Fe to pave the way for an expansion of the Melrose Air
Force Range. A two-part process will lease about 11,000 acres of state trust land in Roosevelt County to the U.S.
Air Force. The range currently includes about 66,000 acres in northwestern Roosevelt County. Officials scheduled
to attend the signing ceremony at the state land office include Gov. Susana Martinez, Land Commissioner Ray
Powell, and Assistant Secretary of the Air Force Terry Yonkers, along with state legislators and officials from Curry
and Roosevelt counties. The ceremony will happen in two stages. Powell will lease the state trust land to the state,
then Martinez will assign the lease to the U.S. Air Force. The land office is a separate entity from state government
and is tasked with using those lands to generate money for schools and other various beneficiaries.
For the entire article, see http://www.cnjonline.com/articles/state-46389-lease-land.html [CNJonline.com, January
17, 2012]

NAVY REBUILDS PRACTICE TARGET OFF N.C. COAST
          Eight years after Hurricane Isabel destroyed the last one, the Navy has rebuilt a waterborne training target
off the coast of North Carolina and plans to begin using it next week. The target is anchored in Pamlico Sound,
roughly nine nautical miles from the town of Stumpy Point, in a training area known as Long Shoal Naval Ordnance
Area -- or, more commonly, Stumpy Point Bombing Range. It's the military's only training site that resembles an
enemy ship and is located in the water. The Navy said it will be used for target practice as soon as Tuesday by
personnel aboard helicopters and fighter jets from several nearby bases, including Oceana Naval Air Station,
Norfolk Naval Station's Chambers Field, Langley Air Force Base, and, in North Carolina, Seymour Johnson Air
Force Base, Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station and New River Marine Corps Air Station. For the entire article,
see http://www.military.com/news/article/navy-news/navy-rebuilds-practice-target-off-nc-coast.html [by Corinne
Reilly, Virginian-Pilot (NC), January 3, 2012]

DESERT BOMBING RANGE WITH HUMANS, ANTELOPE
         It was like a scene out of Iraq, back when U.S. fighter jets crisscrossed the skies there, or in Afghanistan,
where air-to-ground combat continues. But the F-16 fighter jets that roared across the desert the other day with
bombs exploding underneath them were, in fact, over Arizona. The live training exercises that take place on the
nearly 2-million-acre bombing range near the border here are as realistic as can be. Jets swoop down to take out
enemy tanks. They strike mock airports or terrorist training camps. The terrain, with its vast expanse of desert scrub
ringed by rugged mountains, could be a far-away hostile place, as veterans of conflicts in the Middle East who have
used the range can attest. For the entire article, see
http://www.elpasoinc.com/news/border_business/article_93fa32e4-333f-11e1-8cde-001a4bcf6878.html [by Marc
Lacey, New York Times, December 30, 2011]

NAVY PILOT TRAINING TAKES OFF IN FALLON
          Just mention Fallon to any Navy jet pilot, and his eyes light up. Either he has recently trained at Naval Air
Station Fallon or knows someone who did. Tucked away in the central Nevada desert is the Navy's Naval Strike and
Air Warfare Center, home to the greatest tactical aviation training in the world. Fallon became the Navy's premier
training site on July 11, 1996, as a result of BRAC, the Base Closure and Realignment Committee, when many
operations transferred from NAS Miramar, which became a Marine Corps base for its aviators. Thus, Strike
University, the Naval Strike Warfare Center, TOPDOME (Carrier Airborne Early Warning Weapons School) and
TOPGUN (Navy Fighter Weapons School) unified into the current day NSAWC. For the entire article, see
http://www.lahontanvalleynews.com/article/20111222/NEWS/111229967/0/FRONTPAGE [by Steven Ranson,
Lahontan Valley News (NV), December 22, 2011]



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HAMPTON WANTS STATE HELP TO BUY LAND AROUND LANGLEY AFB
          The City of Hampton is likely to seek $6 million in state assistance to buy land around Langley Air Force
Base to protect the base from another round of possible defense closures. If successful, the city also would have to
come up with $6 million in matching funds. The request is contained in Hampton's draft of its 2012 request for
legislation from the state. The package has not been finalized. Laura Bateman, the city's lobbyist, outlined the
request for property in the "safety zone" around the base at the Oct. 26 city council meeting. More than 40 percent of
military aircraft accidents occur in the safety zones around airfields, also known as clear zones.
For the entire article, see http://www.dailypress.com/news/hampton/dp-nws-langley-land-deal-
20111207,0,2720349.story [By David Macaulay, Newport News Daily Press (VA), December 7, 2011]

EFFORT TO ALLOW LAND SWAPS BENEFITING BASES RENEWED
         Saying Arizona can't afford to lose its military jobs, a veteran state lawmaker is making yet another bid to
persuade voters to let the state trade away lands if the move helps preserve bases. Rep. John Nelson, R-Litchfield
Park, said Washington is looking at ways to pare military spending. He said one point likely to be considered is
whether it makes sense to maintain or expand an air base or if encroachment from development makes that a bad
idea. His legislation and proposed constitutional amendment would give the state the power to do land swaps if the
ultimate goal is to preserve open space around military bases. Such permission would not so much affect a direct
trade with the federal government as the ability of Arizona to obtain property around bases now owned by
developers and instead provide them with other parcels elsewhere. For the entire article, see
http://www.azcentral.com/business/abg/articles/2011/12/01/20111201abg-landswaps1201.html [by Howard
Fischer, Arizona Business Gazette, December 1, 2011]

STRAFING MOCK TARGETS, BUT HOLDING FIRE, TOO
          It was like a scene out of Iraq, back when American fighter jets crisscrossed the skies there, or out of
Afghanistan, where air-to-ground combat continues. But the F-16 fighter jets that roared across the desert the other
day with bombs exploding underneath them were, in fact, over Arizona. The live training exercises that take place
on the nearly two-million-acre bombing range near the border here are as realistic as can be. Jets swoop down to
take out enemy tanks. They strike mock airports or terrorist training camps. The terrain, with its vast expanse of
desert scrub ringed by rugged mountains, could be a far-away hostile place, as veterans of American conflicts in the
Middle East who have used the range can attest. “Having flown over Iraq during the first gulf war, the range very
much resembles what I saw,” said Jim Uken, a retired Air Force colonel and fighter pilot who is now the range
director. But there are things about this battle zone that set it apart. Take the Sonoran pronghorn, for instance, an
endangered animal that wanders into the bombing zone from time to time and forces pilots to hold their fire. Or the
illegal immigrants and drug smugglers who also sometimes interrupt operations by ignoring the warning signs
posted on the periphery of the range and crossing through this most dangerous stretch of land on their way north.
For the entire article, see http://www.the-dispatch.com/article/20111226/ZNYT02/112263032/-
1/news?Title=Strafing-Mock-Targets-but-Holding-Fire-Too [by Marc Lacey, The-Dispatch.com (AZ), December
27, 2011]

FORMER RIFLE RANGE MAY BE FORCED TO GET THE LEAD OUT
         An mound of dirt southeast of the KMMM radio station isn't impressive with its overgrown plum bushes
and a small cedar tree. But the Kansas Army National Guard once used this little berm, known as the Pratt Rifle
Range, for small arms qualifications and annual rifle practice between 1963 and the mid 1980s, said Sharon Watson,
director of public affairs for the Kansas Adjutant General’s Office. The 1.9 acre Pratt Rifle Range site sits just
southeast of the KMMM radio station and is hard to recognize because of the overgrown vegetation. Because of the
amount of lead in the ammunition, the site is one of two in Kansas, the other is the Cottonwood Falls Target Area,
being inspected for high levels of lead. Since the Kansas Army National Guard used the site, the Military Munitions
Response Program is being used for evaluation. For the entire article, see
http://www.pratttribune.com/news/x740678651/Former-rifle-range-may-be-forced-to-get-the-lead-out [By Gale
Rose, Pratt Tribune (KS), February 20, 2012]

LAND, SEA AND SKY PART OF MUNITIONS RECOVERY PROGRAM
          In the next couple of weeks, a strange-looking helicopter will take to the sky over the east end of Nantucket
in the first phase of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Military Munitions Response Program that will cover about


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3,000 acres of land and 2,000 acres of water in an effort to determine and define the extent of where potential
munitions from decades-old military training may remain buried on the beach or in the ocean. The aerial study
marks phase one, and is scheduled for March 3-23. The helicopter, equipped with geophysical instrumentation that
closely resembles PVC piping, will fly anywhere from three to nine feet above the ground along the south shore in
the general vicinity of Tom Nevers. The closer the helicopter can get to the ground, the more efficiently it will be
able to record information picked up from munitions underground, project manager Carol Charette said. For the
entire article, see http://www.ack.net/OrdnanceWork022312.html [by Lindsay Pykosz, The Inquirer and Mirror
(MA), February 23, 2012]

CENTRAL FLORIDA HOME TO POW CAMPS, ARMY TRAINING FACILITIES
          Seventy years ago, a place known as the Orange Home Tent Camp was built on 2,200 acres near Lake
Deaton, about halfway between Leesburg and Wildwood in Sumter County. Today, the area is the home of the
Continental Country Club, near county roads 44 and 468, and the camp is largely forgotten. But the Army Corps of
Engineers has not forgotten about the site, later known as the Leesburg Air Service Center. The center was a satellite
training facility of the Army Air Forces School of Applied Tactics, based in Orlando, from 1943 through 1945. The
Corps' Jacksonville district is conducting an environmental investigation of the property because of the use of
munitions there, as it does at numerous former military installations. Lake and Sumter counties were home to many
military camps and airfields during the war. For the entire article, see
http://www.dailycommercial.com/News/LakeCounty/020412armyfield [by Chris Gerbasi, The Daily Commercial
(FL), February 12, 2012]

EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT NAVY'S USE OF SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND
          About 70 miles off the San Diego coast there is a Navy-owned island that is a place of mystery to most
civilians. On a clear day, San Diegans can see San Clemente Island off our coast. What many don't know, the
southern end is covered with bombing ranges. U.S. Navy ships practice firing at land targets there and it gets
pounded on by attack aircraft dropping bombs. NBCSanDiego traveled to the island with the FBI and a Navy
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team (EOD) to learn what happens when that ordnance duds and is left lying where it
hit, ready to explode. For the entire article, see http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/San-Clemente-Island-Navy-
Bombing-Range-138602729.html [by Lea Sutton, NBC San Diego (CA), February 3, 2012]

ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CONTINUES FORT MONROE CLEANUP
         The Army Corps of Engineers continues to oversee testing, and in some cases, cleanup of more than a
dozen contaminated sites on Fort Monroe. The Army is addressing areas of concern that have so far yielded soil
contaminated with metals, mercury and other chemicals, said Robert Reali Fort Monroe Base Realignment and
Closure environmental coordinator. The cleanup continues during the Army's complex departure from Fort Monroe,
which was forced to close following the 2005 BRAC decision to realign military bases nationwide. The cost for the
environmental cleanup has been pegged at $60 million to $70 million. For the entire article, see
http://www.dailypress.com/news/hampton/dp-nws-army-monroe-update-20120203,0,2677872.story [By Robert
Brauchle, Newport News Daily Press (VA), February 3, 2012]

CLEANUP CONTINUES AS FORT MONROE'S FUTURE IS DEBATED
          Even though Fort Monroe is now largely devoid of active military personnel, what the soldiers and sailors
of yesteryear left behind may be a burden for a new crop of residents the community's new owners hope to attract.
Underground ordnance, artifacts and spilled chemicals are just a few of the challenges Fort Monroe Authority
officials face as the historic post is transformed into a residential community, historic landmark and national park.
Even after studies have been performed by the Army and independent consultants in recent years, authority officials
admit surprises may surface as residents and tenants move onto Monroe. The Fort Monroe Authority will likely
demand that residents moving to Fort Monroe receive written permission before digging more than 6 inches
underground because of fear of disturbing ordnance or artifacts laying just a few inches below the ground. For the
entire article, see http://www.dailypress.com/news/hampton/dp-nws-fort-monroe-ammo-20120123,0,5446443.story
[by Robert Brauchle, Daily Press (VA), January 23, 2012]

LOCAL ACTIVISTS HEAD TO D.C. TO PUSH FOR FORT ORD NATIONAL MONUMENT
         With more than 60 public agencies and a dozen-plus citizens' groups claiming a stake in the former Fort


                                                          8
Ord, consensus on how to manage it is as rare as the black legless lizard. So the solidarity in a push to designate up
to 14,650 acres as a national monument is something of a shocker; stakeholders from Fort Ord Reuse Authority to
the Sierra Club are asking the feds to protect the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Ford Ord acreage in perpetuity.
Next week, local activists Henrietta Stern of FORT Friends and Gordon Smith of Keep Fort Ord Wild are hoping to
find as much agreement among the many federal agencies with a hand in the designation. At the invitation of the
Conservation Lands Foundation, Stern and Smith are headed to Washington, D.C., from Jan. 30-Feb. 2. "The issue
is making sure people understand why the public land needs to be protected," foundation spokeswoman Meghan
Kissell says. For the entire article, see http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/2012/jan/26/mr-smith-goes-
washington/ [By Kera Abraham, Monterey County Weekly (CA), January 26, 2012]

NEW BOSTON UXO CLEANUP EFFORTS NEAR COMPLETION
          For a large part of the last six years New Boston Air Force Station, commonly referred to as New Boston
Tracking Station, located 12 miles west of Manchester, N.H., has been heavily involved in unexploded ordnance
cleanup efforts. Currently the installation is one of seven remote satellite tracking stations as part of the Air Force
Satellite Control Network, but in the 1940s and 50s, it served as an aerial bombardment and gunnery range for the
Army Air Corps and later, the Air Force. Fourteen years of bombing scattered munitions including 100-pound live
and 2,000-pound practice bombs, 50-caliber and 20-millimeter rounds and up to 5-inch rockets throughout the base.
The Department of Defense initiated a cleanup effort that targeted NBAFS and other former bombing ranges in the
early 2000s. These types of clean-up efforts are performed in various phases and typically take many years. For the
entire article, see http://www.schriever.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123287303 [by David Hanson, Schriever Air
Force Base Press Release, January 24, 2012]

VETERANS SAY AIR STATION SHOULD BE REOPENED TO THEM
          For Dick Gamache and Jean Gregoire, hunting and fishing at the New Boston Air Force Station is one of
the perks they've earned by serving their country, but officials have closed the base for recreation while the search
continues for unexploded ordnance from the 1940s and 1950s. “We don't want anyone to explode,” USAF Maj.
Cary Belmear said. Gamache, a retired Army sergeant major from Goffstown, and Gregoire, a retired Army staff
sergeant, said the decision to close the base is about discrimination against veterans, not safety. For the entire article,
see http://www.unionleader.com/article/20120103/NEWS/701039973 [by Nancy Bean Foster, Union Leader (NH),
January 3, 2012]

DISCOVERY OF WWII SHELLS AT STATE PARK SPURS SEARCH
          Growing up, George E. Raley Jr. heard stories that the military had conducted some sort of testing during
World War II on the quiet Southern Maryland peninsula known as Newtowne Neck. As an adult, he would learn
that his father had assisted in experiments performed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
to develop a weapon credited with helping the Allies win the war in Europe. So he was not particularly surprised
this month when the sands of the peninsula where he once camped, swam and picked blackberries shifted to reveal a
small but substantial stockpile of World War II-era munitions. "Not surprised," Raley said. "But very interested."
Authorities, alerted by a local woman who came across a 57 mm ammunition round while strolling on the beach on
New Year's Day, have found 27 pieces of suspected military ordnance along the shoreline of what is now Newtowne
Neck State Park. Military bomb experts have detonated the vintage munitions, and the Army Corps of Engineers is
combing land records and military archives to determine how they got here. Meanwhile, the Maryland Park Service
has closed Newtowne Neck until further notice. For the entire article, see
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-newtowne-neck-ordnance-20120121,0,3238969.story [by
Matthew Brown, The Baltimore Sun (MD) January 21, 2012]

WWII-ERA MUNITIONS REMOVED FROM BELLOWS DRIVING RANGE
         Several World War II-era munitions found buried at Bellows Air Force Station's golf driving range were
removed Tuesday and Wednesday, the Air Force said. The munitions were described as "bombs," but no details
were available from the service as to their size and type. The Air Force said the area was a former World War II
bomb range. Claudia de Leon, an Air Force representative, said the site is being environmentally remediated after it
was subsequently used as a clay pigeon shooting range. For the entire article, see
http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/137155373.html [Honolulu Star-Advertiser (HI), January 11, 2012]



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U.S. COURT DISMISSES PUERTO RICANS' SUIT OVER ARMS TESTING
          Puerto Rican residents lost a bid on Tuesday to force the U.S. government to recognize the health effects on
the local population of testing of weapons and experimenting with chemicals on the island of Vieques for decades.
A U.S. appeals court in Boston ruled that the federal government has immunity from any lawsuit over its actions.
For about six decades after World War II, the U.S. Navy used a portion of Vieques as a weapons-testing ground and
firing range, detonating bombs and experimenting with chemicals from napalm to Agent Orange and depleted
uranium. The military abandoned the base in 2003 under political pressure. Juanita Sanchez, a resident of the
island, sued on behalf of her daughter and some 7,000 others in 2007. The suit accused the U.S. military of causing
illnesses among inhabitants, including a 30 percent higher cancer rate compared to Puerto Rico's main island. For
the entire article, see http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/15/us-puertorico-lawsuit-vieques-
idUSTRE81E07Y20120215 [By Terry Baynes, Reuters, February 14, 2012]

U.S. FINDS NO LINK BETWEEN VIEQUES BOMBINGS AND HEALTH RISKS
         A federal agency announced Thursday that it had found no evidence that decades of live fire and bombing
exercises by the Navy on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques had caused health problems documented among its
residents. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, part of the Department of Health and Human
Services, released the results of a review that confirmed a conclusion reached by the agency in 2003 that heavy
metals and explosive compounds in the island’s soil, groundwater, air and fish posed no health hazards. Citing "gaps
in environmental data," the agency had agreed in 2009 to review the earlier finding after that report drew fierce
criticism from Puerto Rican government officials and some members of Congress. Agency officials said they had
reviewed environmental, biological and health data from Vieques in their inquiry, including some new studies. Still,
they conceded that "limitations" in the information made it hard to interpret research that has found a higher
incidence of chronic diseases like high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer in the island's population by comparison
with the rest of Puerto Rico. For the entire article, see http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/09/science/earth/us-says-
navy-bombings-on-vieques-pr-posed-no-health-risks.html?scp=1&sq=Navarro&st=cse [By Mireya Navarro, New
York Times, December 8, 2011]

SPRING VALLEY RESIDENTS STILL HARBOR HEALTH CONCERNS
          Janet Bohlen inspects a faded 1918 photo of a dozen Army soldiers standing shoulder-deep in rugged
trenches....The Bohlens have lived in the Spring Valley section of Northwest Washington for 52 years, raising three
children and now settling into retirement. Over the past two decades, the Army Corps of Engineers has excavated
pockets of their wealthy, tree-lined neighborhood, which was built over the Army's World War I chemical warfare
testing grounds, to analyze possible contamination. Now, Johns Hopkins University is about to embark on yet
another health study in this neighborhood. The Bohlens are typical of families there who still wonder whether
certain cancers and other serious health problems have been caused by the presence of buried toxic chemicals. For
the entire article, see http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/spring-valley-residents-still-harbor-health-concerns-
despite-new-hopkins-study/2011/12/07/gIQA3uuDoO_story.html [By Sylvia Carignan, Washington Post,
December 7, 2011]

SISTERS HAVE A BLAST WITH METAL DETECTOR
         Alicia Combs had been using her metal detector for only 15 minutes when she unearthed the surprise of her
young life — two mortar rounds buried inches beneath the dirt in the backyard of a rental property her family owns
in White City. The North Medford High School senior had taken the metal detector, a Christmas present from her
parents, out for a test in a field on the family's property Jan. 28, slowly swinging the device back and forth across the
recently mowed prairie grass, waiting for a hit. The metal detector came to life on a rise at the edge of a field, a
small mound of packed-down dirt overgrown with grass. With help from Laura, her 13-year-old sister, she dug out
two objects buried a mere 3 inches below the surface. At first they mistook the fins on the tails of the mortars to be
fan blades, perhaps from an old tractor engine, but quickly realized what they had found.
For the entire article, see http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120205/NEWS/202050328 [by
Nils Holst, Mail Tribune (OR), February 5, 2012

ATF, CAMP SHELBY ‘ON SAME PAGE’ IN PROBE OF EXPLOSION
          A Mississippi National Guard spokesman said he doesn’t know if anti-tank rounds found in Gulfport came
from Camp Shelby. But he said the camp’s training area is restricted and anyone who disregards warning signs is
taking a risk. Ret. Lt. Col. Timothy Powell said Thursday he was surprised to read of a possible Camp Shelby

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connection in news reports after an explosion Jan. 19 that injured a man in Gulfport. But later Thursday, the region’s
top Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives official said he had discussed the situation with Powell
and a commander. “We are on the same page and they are happy to be a part of this” investigation, said ATF’s Joel
Lee. Federal agents believe the explosion involved 84-mm rounds from what Camp Shelby calls its impact range.
Locals call it a firing range. For the entire article, see http://www.sunherald.com/2012/02/02/3728557/atf-camp-
shelby-on-same-page-in.html [by Robin Fitzgerald, SunHerald.com (MS), February 2, 2012]

5 INDICTED IN THEFT OF ANTI-TANK ROUNDS
          A grand jury has indicted five Coast residents in the federal investigation of anti-tank rounds stolen from
Camp Shelby before a related explosion in Gulfport. Lucy Rebecca Saucier, 50, was indicted Thursday along with
four men who have already been taken into custody, U.S. Attorney John Dowdy said Friday. Dowdy said all five are
charged with stealing explosives and military-grade munitions considered property of the U.S. Army. For the entire
article, see http://www.sunherald.com/2012/02/24/3776022/5-indicted-in-theft-of-anti-tank.html [by Robin
Fitzgerald, SunHerald (MS), February 24, 2012]



References for Additional Reading:

Army Public Works Digest, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January/February 2012
         1) Huntsville Center Plays Role in Chemical Agent Disposal Facility, by Debra Valine
         2) Bulletin Offers Insight into Composting for Explosives Remediation, by Giselle Rodriguez
         http://www.imcom.army.mil/hq/publications/pwd_digest/

SERDP and ESTCP Headlines – Winter 2012
         1) SERDP and ESTCP Funding Opportunities (pre-proposals due March 15th)
         2) Advanced Signal Processing for UXO Discrimination
         http://cms.serdp-estcp.org/newsletters/winter-2012.html

EPA Federal Facilities Forum Issue Paper (EPA 505-S-11-001), “Site Characterization for
      Munitions Constituents”, January 2012
         http://www.epa.gov/fedfac/pdf/site_characterization_for_munitions_constituents.pdf

ITRC ISM-1, “Incremental Sampling Methodology,” February 2012
         http://itrcweb.org/ism-1/




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