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Travel Back in Time to the Dust Bowl

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					                           Travel Back in Time to the Dust Bowl

                                          Leslie Lessig
                                          Fall 2010




Pioneer Woman Emerges from her home
In the Oklahoma Panhandle

Students will identify conditions of the Oklahoma Dust Bowl, identify causes for the Dust Bowl conditions,
and describe government attempts to assist pioneers.

    Overview/ Materials/LOC Resources/Standards/ Procedures/Evaluation/Rubric/Handouts/Extension


Overview                                                                         Back to Navigation Bar
Objectives                             Students will:
                                       *Recognize that the availability of natural resources contributed to
                                       the geographic and economic expansion of the United
                                       States, sometimes resulting in unintended environmental
                                       consequences. They will recognize that pioneers moved west for
                                       the availability of land, but by using the land in Oklahoma to raise
                                       wheat, they changed it so drastically that they created dust bowl
                                       conditions. (Ohio SS GEO Human 14)
                                       *Identify programs created by the US government to assist
                                       pioneers since the movement of people, products and ideas
                                       resulted in new patterns of settlement and land use that influenced
                                       the political and economic development of the United
                                       States. (Ohio SS GEO Human 15)
                                       *Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis
                                       of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the
                                       text. (Ohio LA 8RPA1, 8RPB2, 8WAB2)
                                       *Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and
                                       convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection,
                                       organization, and analysis of relevant content. (8WAD4)
Recommended time frame                 2 weeks
Grade level                            8th grade inclusion (center) social studies class
Curriculum fit                         Social studies and Language arts block (or either class)
Materials                              Primary source images (smart board for display)
                                       Photo Analysis Chart
                                       Class copies of Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse
                                       Novel comprehension guide
                                       Writing Prompt Outline worksheet
                                       Essay Rubrics
                                       Access to mobile laptops or computer writing lab




Ohio Revised Learning Standards 2010                                             Back to Navigation Bar
                                       Students will:

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                                                                        Illinois State University
             *Read historical fiction to gain information about the Dust Bowl and
             federal programs designed to assist farmers during the drought.
             *Identify programs created by the US government to assist
             pioneers since the movement of people, products and ideas
             resulted in new patterns of settlement and land use that influenced
             the political and economic development of the United
             States. (Ohio SS GEO Human 15)
             *Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis
             of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the
             text. (Ohio LA 8RPA1, 8RPB2, 8WAB2)
             *Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and
             convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection,
             organization, and analysis of relevant content. (8WAD4)
             *Work in small groups, pair and individually.
             *Research using internet and/or text references.
             *Share information with the class.
             *Complete work on time
             *Keep materials organized
Procedures                                             Back to Navigation Bar
             Day One:
              Divide the class into small groups. Using one the model
                picture, model how the group should analyze the photograph.
                Look without writing/talking for two whole minutes. Try to
                identify setting and how it might relate to history. Search for
                people and what they are doing. Use teacher “think out loud”
                to identify aspects of the picture. Take responses from the
                class. Tell the students that it is now their turn. Each group is
                given a photo (laminated in large manila envelope along with a
                photo analysis sheet for every student) to analyze. The group
                will work together to evaluate the photographs, but each
                student will turn in an analysis worksheet. Have the students
                put their worksheets into the class work section of their binder.
                Tell them that each group will be sharing their photos with the
                class, and that on the day they share, they will turn the
                worksheet in for a grade.
              Tell the students that they will be learning more about an event
                in history by reading historical fiction. Ask them to define the
                genre. Distribute books (Or require the students to purchase
                novels and bring to class) and novel comprehension guides.
              Read aloud Winter 1934 (pages 1-33) Discuss writing style
                and its poetic appearance. Call on students to read and answer
                the corresponding questions #1-10 in complete sentences.
                Remind them to also put the page number from the text where
                they locate the answer for citations later.
              With the remaining time or as homework, assign the students
                to individually read (*can pair read if ESL or Spec. Ed students
                could benefit) the section Spring 1934 and answer the
                questions 1-4.
             Day Two:
              Display group one’s photograph on the smart board. Have
                them describe what information they were able to get from the
                photo. As they share information, teacher asks students to
                have their novel comprehension guide on their desks, and does
                a completion check.

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  Have students reflect on the group’s presentation. Offer them
   the prompts “I wonder . . .” and “I don’t understand . . .” or “I
   hadn’t realized . . .” After a few students have reflected, go
   over the questions for the section Spring 1934. Have group
   one turn in their photo analysis worksheets.
 Assign the students Summer 1934 and Autumn 1934 reading
   and comprehension guide questions. Allow the students to use
   the remaining time to begin their reading.
Day Three:
 Display group two’s photograph on the smart board. Have
   them describe what information they were able to get from the
   photo. Take student reflections as with group one yesterday.
   Repeat this process with group three. As they share
   information, teacher asks students to have their novel
   comprehension guide on their desks, and does a completion
   check.
 Have the students work in their groups to check their
   comprehension guide questions. Have them go round robin
   reading questions from yesterday’s assignment and share their
   answers. Allow students to make corrections/revisions as
   needed to have quality answers.
 Assign students Winter 1935 reading and questions. If there is
   any time remaining, allow students to begin on this
   assignment.
Day Four:
 Display and share group four and group five photos, take
   reflections and do comprehension guide completion check.
 Have student groups draw a research topic from the bag.
   Allow them to research the topic using the internet and social
   studies textbooks. Distribute 11 x 13 sheets of paper and have
   them create a visual defining the topic and how it relates to the
   dust bowl. Students may work with their group, but each
   should create a visual. If visual is not finished, it becomes
   homework.
 Assign Spring 1935 reading and comprehension questions.
Day Five:
 Display and share group six and group seven photos (if class
   size has this many groups, if not display
   http://www.americaslibrary.gov/es/ok/es_ok_dustbowl_1.html
   and Listen to Mrs. Flora Robertson talk about the dust storms
   in Oklahoma.), take reflections and do comprehension guide
   completion check.
 Collect visuals for completion grade. Post on classroom wall
   to assist students in learning New Deal Programs.
 Have the students partner up and check comprehension
   questions from homework for accuracy.
 Assign Summer 1935 and Autumn 1935 reading and
   comprehension questions. Announce that comprehension
   guides will be collected tomorrow for a grade.
Day Six:
 If groups remain, allow them to share their photos and reflect.
 Collect comprehension worksheets for accuracy grades.
 Distribute the United States outline maps and colored pencils.
   Have the students label the maps. Display the resource map on

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                                 Illinois State University
                smartboard or overhead if the map is not available in the
                textbook. Collect maps for grade.
              Show students the posters from the WPA using the following
                link<http://pzrservices.typepad.com/vintageadvertising/2007/0
                5/wpa_posters_194.html> or via overhead. Discuss why these
                visuals were made, and how people might have responded.
                How are they different from the photos groups originally
                viewed?
              If time allows, let student groups define their research terms
                orally (visuals have been displayed)
             Day Seven:
              Return graded comprehension guides (this is very important, as
                guides are needed for essay development.
              Inform students that they will be writing informative essays
                about the Dust Bowl and how it is portrayed in Out of the Dust
                by Karen Hesse. Distribute writing outline worksheets and
                essay rubrics. Go over the rubrics to share how the essay will
                be scored. Review the terms: thesis, introduction, body
                paragraphs, conclusion, audience, voice, and conventions.
                Allow students to ask questions as they arise.
              Go over each of the three essay outlines. Model how the thesis
                fits into an introductory paragraph by writing a funnel
                introduction using the smartboard or overhead. Demonstrate
                how the questions can be used to create solid body paragraphs.
              Give students the remainder of the period to select a thesis,
                define program terms as necessary, and work on their outlines.
             Day Eight:
              Allow students the period with the laptops or in the writing lab
                to create their essays. Assist as needed. @Five minutes
                remaining in class, have students send initial draft to the printer
                for teacher check. Save work to flash drive or send to
                student’s email or backpack account so they can work at home.
                Inform them that essays will be due on day ten.
             Day Nine and Ten:
              Have students Pair and Share their writing. Encourage use of
                our prompts-“I wonder . . .” and “I don’t understand . . .” to
                expand writing or clarify.
              Allow students to continue writing or make revisions. Collect
                papers at the end of day ten, or have students submit
                electronically (i.e. turnitin.com)




Evaluation                                           Back to Navigation Bar
             *photo analysis worksheet graded on the 1-4 grading scale (4 being

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                                              Illinois State University
            work above grade level norm, 3 = on grade level, 2 = some areas of
            weakness to develop further, 1 = significantly below
            benchmark/remediation needed, 0 = did not attempt task-no work to
            evaluate)
            *daily check of the novel comprehension guide for completion on
            0-2 scale (0=not attempted, 1=partially completed, 2=fully
            completed)
            *Research terms visual aid for completion on 0-2 scale (0=not
            attempted, 1=partially completed, 2=fully completed)
            *Novel comprehension worksheet accuracy grade. Score one point
            for each correct answer and an addition point for answering in
            coherent and complete sentences. Put total out of 108 possible
            points to determine percentage grade.
            *map labeling activity-1 point for identifying each state correctly, 1
            point for using correct two letter abbreviation, 2 points for correctly
            placing Dust Bowl. Put total out of 12 possible points to determine
            percentage grade.
            *Completion grade for initial draft of essay on 0-2 scale (0=not
            attempted, 1=partially completed, 2=fully completed)
            *Using rubric grade essay. Put total out of 24 possible points to
            determine percentage grade.



Extension                                              Back to Navigation Bar
            *Students can create a cover sheet for their essay with a graphic
            relating to the topic
            *Students can reach the author Karen Hesse
            *Students can create a powerpoint relating to the Dust Bowl




                                       Teaching with Primary Sources
                                              Illinois State University
Primary Resources from the Library of Congress
                Back to Navigation Bar




                                     Teaching with Primary Sources
                                            Illinois State University
Image        Description                     Suggested                        URL
                                             CreditLine
        Dust bowl farmer                                             <!--
                                       Library of Congress, Prints   <permanent_url>http://mem
                                       & Photographs Division,       ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       FSA-OWI Collection,           bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,   @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                sa+8b31990))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->
        Farm condition in Dust                                       <!--
        Bowl                           Library of Congress, Prints   <permanent_url>http://mem
                                       & Photographs Division,       ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       FSA-OWI Collection,           bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,   @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                sa+8b38292))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->

        Where the buffalo once         Library of Congress, Prints   <!--
        roamed. Panhandle              & Photographs Division,       <permanent_url>http://mem
        vegetation during the Dust     FSA-OWI Collection,           ory.loc.gov/cgi-
        Bowl                           [reproduction number, e.g.,   bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                                                     sa+8b28201))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->

        Travel difficult during dust   Library of Congress, Prints   <!--
        bowl                           & Photographs Division,       <permanent_url>http://mem
                                       FSA-OWI Collection,           ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,   bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                                                     sa+8b38644))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->

        Mailbox and yard in the        Library of Congress, Prints   <!--
        Panhandle                      & Photographs Division,       <permanent_url>http://mem
                                       FSA-OWI Collection,           ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,   bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                                                     sa+8b32342))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->

        Panhandle home with            Library of Congress, Prints   <!--
        pioneer woman greeting         & Photographs Division,       <permanent_url>http://mem
                                       FSA-OWI Collection,           ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,   bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                                                     sa+8b38279))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->

        Dust bowl farmer and son       Library of Congress, Prints   <!--
                                       & Photographs Division,       <permanent_url>http://mem
                                       FSA-OWI Collection,           ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,   bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       LC-USF35-1326]                @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                                                     sa+8b32438))</permanent_
                                                                     url>-->

        Drifts of sand from dust       Library of Congress, Prints  <!--
        storm surround pioneer         & Photographs Division,      <permanent_url>http://mem
        buildings                      FSA-OWI Collection,          ory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                       [reproduction number, e.g.,  bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:
                                       LC-USF35-1326]         Teaching with Primary Sources
                                                                    @field(NUMBER+@band(f
                                                                    sa+8b27287))</permanent_
                                                                     Illinois State University
                                                                    url>-->
Teaching with Primary Sources
       Illinois State University
                                         Rubric
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  Name ________________________________________________________________________________

 Scoring Rubric for Informative Writing
                 Score of 4           Score of 3             Score of 2         Score of 1
Ideas            The paper fits the   The paper fits         The purpose        It is not possible to
                 purpose. The         the purpose. The       and                identify the
                 audience would       audience would         audience are not   purpose and
                 understand it.       probably               very clear.        audience.
                                      understand it.
Organization     The paper has a      The paper has an The topic is not         The paper does not
                 clear                introduction, a  introduced               have an
                 introduction,        middle that is   clearly. Some            introduction.
                 a well-organized     organized and    details are not          Details are poorly
                 middle, and a        mostly in logicalin order or drift        organized. There is
                 summary or           order, and a     from the topic.          no summary or
                 conclusion.          summary or       The ending is            conclusion.
                                      conclusion.      not clear.
Word Choice      The paper has        The paper has    The paper has            The paper has
                 description and      some description few details, not         almost not
                 rich details, and    and details.     enough                   description or
                 it uses signal       Some signal      description, and         details, and no
                 words and            words or phrases few signal               signal words or
                 phrases              are not clear or words or                 phrases.
                 appropriately.       specific.        phrases.
Voice            The writing is       The writing is   The writing              Writer’s voice is
                 original and         appropriate for  isn’t always             not evident in the
                 engaging. It is      the purpose and  appropriate              writing.
                 appropriate for      audience.        for the audience
                 the purpose and                       and lacks
                 audience.                             originality.
Sentence         The sentences       Some sentences Most of the                 Most sentences are
Fluency          are written in a    show variety, but sentences are            not written
                 variety of ways.    many are the      written in the           correctly.
                                     same type.        same way.
Conventions      There are very      There are a few   There are many           There are so many
                 few                 errors in         errors in                errors that the
                 errors in spelling, spelling,         spelling,                writing is hard to
                 grammar, and        grammar, and      grammar, and             understand.
                 punctuation.        punctuation.      punctuation.




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                                    Handouts
                                  Back to Navigation Bar

                                Out of the Dust
                           Novel comprehension Guide

                            Name _____________________
                                           Period _____________________

After reading each section, answer the following questions in complete sentences on lined
paper. Name the section as you see below. Number the questions, but you do not have to
copy them onto your paper. Instead, you should be able to restate the question in the
answer so that it would make sense to a reader. Remember to put the page number
where you find the answer to assist with citations as needed later.



WINTER 1934:

1. When was the protagonist born?
2. Describe her birth.
3. What is her name?
4. Describe her family? (How many people live in her house. Who are
   they? What are they like?)
5. What happened to the rabbits?
6. When was the last good crop?
7. What are Ma’s rules for setting the table? Why does she have these
   rules?
8. What is Daddy considering taking from Mr. Roosevelt? Describe the
   terms and why Daddy is considering this.
9. What does her family do to stop the dust during the “Fields of Flashing
   Light?”
10.What signs do we have that dust is affecting Daddy’s health?


SPRING 1934:

1. What two suggestions does Ma make to help the farm as the wheat crop
   dies?
2. Why was the rain no blessing?
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3. How much does Mr. Tuttle’s wheat sell for? Where is the grain taken to
   be sold?
4. How does Billie Jo earn money? How is she paid?


SUMMER 1934:

1. Who was the wild boy? How did Billie Jo’s family help him?
2. Describe the accident.
3. What did her father do with the money Ma had hidden?
4. What came to the crops in August 1934?
5. Why did Aunt Ellis come? Why did she return to Lubbock so quickly?
6. What does she see along the road as she walks to Arley Wanderdale’s
   house?
7. What suggestion does President Roosevelt give to the Oklahoma
   residents? Will it work?
8. What is father digging?
9. What is the “Night Bloomer?” How can this “Bloomer” offer hope?
10.How did selling wheat during the Great War affect the farmers? How did
   this affect the land conditions? (Post it mark this page to refer to later.)
11.Ask your teacher to explain why they didn’t call the great war “World
   War One yet, then write the answer here.


AUTUMN 1934:

1. Describe father’s new job.
2. How did Mad Dog get his name?
3. Describe the art exhibit. Why does Billie Jo get angry?


WINTER 1935:

1. What does County Agent Dewey do to Joe De La Flor’s cows? Why?
2. Describe the panhandle when Haydon P. Nye first came to Oklahoma.
3. Describe the President’s Ball. How much money was raised? For what
   cause was this money raised?
4. What did the government send to school?
5. Who were the guests at the school? How were they treated?

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6. Why does Miss Freeland have Billie Jo keep the students outside of the
   school?
7. Why did government men take Ashby and Rush away? What happened
   to their sugar?
8. Describe the competition, and the prizes. Who won?
9. Where does father decided to go in the evenings?
10.What happened to Pete Guyman? What happened to his produce in the
   truck?
11. How does Billie Jo navigate during the Dust Storm? What happened to
   some of the other children outside during the storm?


SPRING 1935:

1. What does father have on his nose?
2.  What happened to the school? Why did they separate the three boxcars?
3. What stops the mail? What letter eventually arrived?
4. What is a migrant? Where do many migrants go?
5. What were the birds trying to stay ahead of?
6. Describe the effects of the Dust Storm. (pp. 164-167)
7. Who was James Kingsbury?
8. Describe the “kindest kind of rain.”
9. What application is Mrs. Love taking from boys between 18 and 28 years
   of age?
10. Why did everyone gather at Joyce City Hardware and Furniture
   Company?
11. Where did Billie Jo ask her father if they could go? What is his
   response?


SUMMER 1935:

1. What isn’t a dream?
2. What does the stranger on the train take from Billie Jo? What does he
   leave her?
3. Where did she get off the train? What did she do there?




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AUTUMN 1935:

1. What does Doc Rice do to Daddy’s spots? What does he tell Billie Jo
   about her hands?
2. Who is Louise? What does she give to Billie Jo’s daddy? What comes
   with it?




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      F.E.R.A                  CCC



                           Roosevelt’s
      W.P.A.            Shelterbelt Project



 Soil Conservation        Taylor Grazing
      Service                  Act



   Bank Holiday           Agriculture
                         Adjustment Act



Rural Electrification   the Farm Credit Act
  Administration
Name ________________________________________ Period ________________
                                                Map of Dust Bowl
Label the following states by placing their two letter abbreviations in the correct place on the map.
       Colorado CO                            New Mexico NM
       Kansas KA                              Texas TX
       Oklahoma OK


Using a colored pencil, shade in the region affected by the Dust Bowl drought conditions.
Informative essay outline #1

Thesis: During the drought conditions in the Oklahoma Panhandle during the 1930s, the federal government started
programs to help residents through these difficult times.


Introduction:



Body Paragraph #1: Farm Loans
     Winter 1934 question #8
     Terms visuals



Body Paragraph #2: Work Programs
     Spring 1935 question #9 and #7
     Terms visuals



Body Paragraph #3: Survival Assistance
     Summer 1934 question #7
     Winter 1935 questions #3
     Terms visuals




Conclusion
Informative essay outline #2

Thesis: During the mid 1930s, Oklahoma was known as the “Dust Bowl” and farmers and their crops suffered the
effects of Dust Storms and severe drought.




Introduction:



Body Paragraph #1: Cause
     Spring 1934 question #10




Body Paragraph #2: Effect on crops
     Winter 1934 question #10
     Summer 1934 question #4
     Winter 1935 question #2
     Spring 1935 question #5-6




Body Paragraph #3: Effects on People
     Winter 1934 question #7 and #10
     Summer 1934 question #3
     Spring 1935 question #1 and #4
     Summer 1935 all questions
     Autumn 1935 question #1




Conclusion
                                              Informative essay outline #3
      Roosevelt’s New Deal Terms
                                              Thesis: In her novel Out of the Dust, Karen Hesse describes
                                              adversity in life. “The way I see it, hard times aren’t only about
money, or drought, or dust. Hard times are about losing spirit, and hope, and what happens when dreams dry up”
(Hesse 225). During the 1930s, Oklahoma residents searched for hope despite the harsh conditions of the Dust Bowl.



Introduction:




Body Paragraph #1: Hope for a Better Crop
     Winter 1934 question #6 and #8
     Spring 1934 question #1
     Summer 1934 question #7 and #8



Body Paragraph #2: Raising Spirits
     Summer 1934 question #1 and #9
     Autumn 1934 question #3
     Winter 1935 question #3, #5, and #8
     Spring 1935 question #10
     Autumn 1935 question #2



Body Paragraph #3: Searching for a Better Life
     Winter 1934 question #8
     Spring 1935 questions #4 and #9
     Summer 1935



Conclusion
Define from visuals or internet as needed to assist with informative essay.



F.E.R.A:

CCC:

W.P.A.:

Shelterbelt Project:

Soil Conservation Service:

Taylor Grazing Act:

Bank Holiday:

Agriculture Adjustment Act:

Farm Credit Act:

				
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