2009-2010 - Casper College

Document Sample
2009-2010 - Casper College Powered By Docstoc
					                                            2009-2010
                                      DEPARTMENTAL REPORT

Department: English                                                    Department Head: David Zoby

Fundamentals:

   Department Mission Statement:
   The English Department’s primary mission is to maintain a high degree of excellence in writing and
   reading instruction for students at all levels of experience and development. Its secondary mission is
   to provide three comprehensive English degrees that prepare students for transfer and/or career
   interests. In both regards, the English Department supports Casper College’s current mission in that
   it “develops and maintains high quality, student-focused educational programs, support services and
   activities responsive to the learning needs of the diverse communities served.” In addition, the
   English Department is committed to providing students with an education that will serve them for
   life.


   Departmental Goals:
    Pedagogical to ensure pedagogically sound loads and class sizes that meet national disciplinary
   standards (NCTE) and that encourage meaningful student-teacher interaction and feedback to closely
   monitor outcomes and to fine-tune current assessment tools accordingly to encourage and support
   diversity and innovation in course design and instructional methodology Curricular to provide
   general education and major studies that broaden and deepen the students’ acculturation and enhance
   their scholarship by developing the ability to read well, think clearly, and communicate effectively in
   standard written English to provide courses parallel to those of the first two years of baccalaureate
   degree-granting institutions by offering courses in freshmen composition, literature, and other
   specialized writing and reading courses to support vocational and paraprofessional programs by
   providing core freshman composition courses to provide developmental studies classes in basic
   writing, reading, and other remedial skills so as to assist under-prepared and at-risk students in the
   acquisition of the language skills necessary to succeed in college level courses to meet the needs of
   special populations (including the disabled) Faculty to continue to secure full-time, well-trained
   faculty dedicated to composition instruction and to student learning to support faculty development
   opportunities, including participation in workshops and conferences, to stay abreast of current writing
   pedagogies and scholarship to share successful pedagogies within our department to support
   sabbaticals to allow for sustained research, writing, and/or rejuvenation Campus/Community to
   continue to support and annually showcase excellence in student writing through Expression and
   Challenge to provide educational enrichment opportunities for all members of the campus and local
   community by offering (in addition to writing and literature courses), workshops, readings, and
   lectures as part of the annual literary conference and annual humanities festival Resources/Facilities
   to secure a facility for the English Department to enhance communications among and between both
   faculty and students and to provide our program with a visible campus identity; such a facility would
   house traditional and computer-equipped classrooms specifically designed for writing instruction,
   office space for all full-time and adjunct English faculty, a central common area, and a resource
   library to provide the equipment, materials and resource centers that support both traditional and
   innovative approaches toward instruction Student Retention, Advising, and Recruitment to recruit
   more English majors to recruit more non-English majors into English classes to encourage a greater
   emphasis on the study of literature in the general education requirements for AA, AS, AB, AFA and
   AAS degrees to better motivate students to accept academic challenges to continue to advise students
   in regard to career and transfer opportunities
Departmental Strengths:
The English Department at Casper College has been quick to respond to the college’s emerging
needs. Our faculty have developed internet course, learning communities, honors courses and hybrid
courses. We teach a blend of traditional courses, and we teach night classes to reach other
populations. Our faculty serve on campus-wide committees, lead literary and humanities conferences,
and work in community outreach programs. Many of our faculty teach overload schedules to help
accommodate rising trends in DVST courses.

Department Challenges:
The loss of full-time faculty threatens our ability to offer quality English classes across the spectrum.
Many of our faculty are teaching overload to make up for this shortfall. We are in the unfortunate
position of having to do more with less. There is a real fear that we will have to turn students away if
this trend of not replacing full-time faculty continues.

Other challenges:
Maintaining teaching load and maintaining pedagogically sound class sizes (that meet national NCTE
and MLA standards) so as to allow for more meaningful student-teacher interaction and written
feedback and so as to allow our department to better address, in a timely and sustained fashion, all
other present and future challenges (in October of 2007, a formal load reduction proposal was
submitted to the VP of Academic Affairs; that proposal was not accepted, but alternatives to current
load assignments were)
Creating a regular faculty forum within the department for sharing and discussing successful
pedagogies, particularly those related to the monitoring of outcomes and the feedback received from
assessment (release time and budgetary concerns limit possibilities for such forums)
Periodically reviewing instructional strategies to reach the needs of all populations (including those
with ADD, ADHD, dyslexia, etc.)
Recruiting more English majors
Recruiting more non-English majors into English classes
Encouraging a greater emphasis on the study of literature in the general education requirements for
AA, AS, AB, AFA and AAS degrees and educating others regarding the value of the humanities
Developing a more comprehensive/detailed series of courses for international students as need
requires
Establishing a facility for the English Department to enhance communications among and between
both faculty and students and to provide our program with a visible campus identity; such a facility
would house traditional and computer-equipped classrooms specifically designed for writing
instruction, office space for all English faculty, a central common area, and a resource library
Creating a comprehensive department faculty and adjunct handbook
Maintaining English Lab hours to support DVST and international students who require one-on-one
attention

Teaching Philosophy and Pedagogy:
The English Department recognizes writing and reading as complex, inter-related processes that
encourage critical and creative thinking. Therefore, we view both as central to student success in
many, if not all, academic disciplines. We also believe that writing and reading and the humanities,
in general, contribute to satisfying and productive personal, intellectual, and civic lives.

The English Department’s philosophy towards writing
Writing is a difficult and complex process of discovery involving numerous conscious and
unconscious choices. Teaching writing is equally difficult given students’ varied abilities and
experiences, as well as previously acquired attitudes regarding writing, in general, and their writing,
in particular. The department shares the following beliefs and responsibilities:
We have an obligation to demonstrate to students that reading, writing, discussion, and thinking are
interrelated. (We must impress upon students that, due to the limits of short-term memory, a thought
can only be carried so far without the aid of a pen and paper. Through writing, an idea or thought is
allowed to germinate, evolve, synthesize with other material, and finally materialize into a
meaningful position.)
Given the above, we have an obligation to persuade students as to the importance of strong language
skills both within and outside of academia, to convince them that as their w writing develops, they,
too, develop as human beings. Therefore, all writing instruction should be focused on student
transformation.
Because writing flourishes best in a positive environment, we have a responsibility for fostering as
much, one in which students are encouraged, yet given realistic expectations that adhere to
disciplinary and departmental standards/outcomes.
Because student engagement is critical to learning, we believe classes should be student-centered and
should encourage hands-on activities. We also believe students should be encouraged to write on
subjects that they are passionate about and that they have some knowledge on to both engage and
empower them as writers.
Because writing can only improve through experience, we have an obligation to provide each student
with ample opportunities to gain as much. We also have an obligation to provide positive,
constructive, generous, and timely feedback that does not overwhelm and that judges the writing and
not the person.
Because a student’s success on any given writing activity is dependent upon his/her knowledge of the
assignment’s rhetorical construct and the instructor’s expectations, we have a responsibility to ensure
that students understand evaluation criteria prior to submitting their work.
As writing teachers, we should serve as good role models by sharing our writing, our passions, and
our joy.
Since students often require individual assistance on their writing outside of the classroom, we
believe we have a responsibility to be reasonably accessible to students and to communicate clearly
in our interactions. (We should also learn students’ names.)

The English Department’s philosophy towards reading
The English Department’s shared pedagogy towards reading is that literature is instructive in regard
to writing and often provides learning opportunities beyond our individual realm of experience.
Since many learn to write by imitating writers that they admire, students should be encouraged to
read a variety of authors with a variety of styles in a variety of genres. Additionally, reading is
extremely important for all of the following reasons:
reading can inform and/or enlighten, thereby broadening knowledge and/or enhancing understanding;
reading develops an appreciation for diverse perspectives and values, based upon others’ traditions
and experiences;
reading encourages critical inquiry and discussion;
and reading offers instruction in regard to the conscious choices involved in writing.



Distance Education Philosophy:
The English Department views distance education as a next-best means of reaching students who, due
to work and familial obligations and/or demographic considerations, cannot realistically pursue
studies on-site. When such courses are offered, we believe that it is important to incorporate real-
time class discussions whenever possible. We are not, however, in favor of dormitory students or
   BOCES students from local high schools enrolling in online or other distance education courses
   currently offered in a traditional format at Casper College. We encourage our on-campus students to
   experience campus life fully. Likewise, we are not in favor of BOCES students taking distance
   classes, given our position on dual enrollment as stated in the next section.


   Dual Enrollment Philosophy:
   The English Department opposes dual enrollment for the following reasons:
   First and foremost, dual enrollment runs counter to our profession’s view that writing is a process,
   rather than a product, that benefits from continuous practice and experience;
   While measurable academic outcomes may be replicated in dual enrollment classes, less tangible
   social variables cannot be replicated in the high school setting, thereby depriving students of the ideal
   college experience. The ideal college English class consists of individuals of a variety of ages and
   backgrounds with diverse opinions, experiences, interests, and passions, thereby fostering discussions
   that lend themselves to a higher level of critical thinking and understanding than found in the typical
   high school classroom;
   Students dually enrolled at the high school level are also deprived of the complementary inter-
   disciplinary overlap often afforded to the college student. The college student, more so than the high
   school student, is likely to find opportunities to apply, for example, a psychological theory to a
   character under study in an English class or to question an historian’s argument in a political science
   class or a scientist’ s deduction in a physics class, based on instruction in effective argument in an
   English class;
   Dual enrollment, by its very nature, suggests college classes are merely additional high school
   curricular options, rather than that college represents an opportunity. The latter distinction has long
   been at the heart of what it means to go to college. Disregarding this distinction may lead to attitudes
   that threaten student success and contribute to current retention concerns;
   Finally, dual enrollment threatens not just the integrity of our department but also of the institution of
   the community college, itself, for it suggests that high school students can conceivably complete their
   first two years of college while still in high school.
   Given that many of the above objections would seemingly exist across campus, the English
   Department is concerned that monetary rather than academic interests may have clouded Casper
   College’s judgment in regard to former decisions concerning dual enrollment. Despite the above
   objections to dual enrollment, the English Department has been directed to offer ENGL 1010 credit
   in local high schools.


Distinction:

   Articulation agreements (if any):
   We currently articulate with Kelly Walsh and Natrona High School in Casper. We only accept
   English 1010 in this agreement.

   Special events or activities:
   The English Department hosts the annual Literary Conference each fall; the English Department
   publishes Expressions Literary Journal each spring. Expressions is an award-winning journal of
   student writing and visual art.

   Third party comments, including specialized accreditation:
Personnel:

   Departmental faculty members, full-time:
   Utilization of Department Full-Time Faculty
   The English Department’s full-time faculty are stretched thin by a heavy workload that exceeds
   national standards for our profession. We currently have eleven full-time faculty: Lareau, Sawyer,
   Young, Amelotte, Moenkhaus, Rasmussen, Hughes, Zoby, Bryant, Mittan, and Wendt. We have
   always considered the number of full-time faculty in our department and across campus, in general,
   to be one of the strengths of this institution, and we hope this emphasis will continue. As for the
   credentials of our full-time faculty, the following requirements were adopted in February of 2007:

   Qualifications for Full-Time and Adjunct Instructors, Casper College English Dept.
                                         Adopted 02/05/07

   To teach English 1010/1020, English Composition I and II
   Preferred Qualifications:
   MA in English, emphasis in composition, with a minimum of six credits of graduate coursework in
   composition/rhetoric.
   Experience teaching college composition courses
       OR
   MA or MS in English Education with minimum of 18 credits in English courses, at least six of which
   should be graduate coursework in composition/rhetoric.
   Experience teaching college composition courses.
   Minimum Qualifications:
   MA or MFA in English, with a minimum of three credits of graduate coursework in
   composition/rhetoric.
   Experience teaching composition courses.
   Engaged in content-specific professional development within the past five years.
   To teach Literature Courses:
   Preferred Qualifications:
   MA or MFA in English with at least six credits of graduate coursework in the content area.
   Significant experience teaching literature in the content area.
   Minimum Qualifications:
   MA or MFA in English.
   Experience teaching literature in the content area.
   Engaged in content-specific professional development within the past five years.
   To teach Creative Writing Courses:
   Preferred Qualifications:
   MFA in Creative Writing or MA in English with a minimum of six graduate credits in creative
   writing, OR
   significant publication in the specific genre.
   Experience teaching creative writing.
   Engaged in content-specific professional development within the past five years.

   Qualifications for Full-Time and Adjunct Instructors, Casper College English Dept.

   To teach English 0600/0610, Basic Writing I and II and English Lab Courses

   Preferred Qualifications:
   MA in English, education (adult or special ed.), or a related field.
Teaching experience at an adult level with both traditional and nontraditional students in
developmental/remedial reading or writing.
Familiarity with computer assisted instruction and student assessment instruments.

Minimum qualifications:
BA/BS in English, education, or related field with three credits of graduate work in previously
mentioned disciplines and working towards a graduate degree.
Three years teaching experience.


Departmental faculty members, adjunct:
Utilization of Department Part-Time Faculty
In the fall of 2009, the English Department hired adjunct to teach 13 English classes. This is far too
many and indicates the need to hire two additional full-time faculty. To ensure that all adjunct meet
our expectations, the department adopted, in the spring of 2007, the following adjunct guidelines:

                       Casper College Adjunct English Faculty Guidelines
                                         (Adopted 02/05/07)
must meet the minimum qualifications established for adjunct instructors
must incorporate department’s established outcomes in instruction and include those outcomes in
syllabi
must participate in English Department’s annual Outcomes Assessment
must establish/maintain an email address to receive internal communications regarding department
business
must incorporate the required material identified in the college syllabus template in all course syllabi
encouraged to participate in English Department meetings and committee work when schedule allows
encouraged to hold weekly office hours or, at the very least, provide students with the opportunity to
conference one-on-one at a mutually agreed upon time

Qualifications for Full-Time and Adjunct Instructors, Casper College English Dept.
                                           Adopted 02/05/07
To teach English 1010/1020, English Composition I and II
Preferred Qualifications:
MA in English, emphasis in composition, with a minimum of six credits of graduate coursework in
composition/rhetoric.
Experience teaching college composition courses
    OR
MA or MS in English Education with minimum of 18 credits in English courses, at least six of which
should be graduate coursework in composition/rhetoric.
Experience teaching college composition courses.
Minimum Qualifications:
MA or MFA in English, with a minimum of three credits of graduate coursework in
composition/rhetoric.
Experience teaching composition courses.
Engaged in content-specific professional development within the past five years.
To teach Literature Courses:
Preferred Qualifications:
MA or MFA in English with at least six credits of graduate coursework in the content area.
Significant experience teaching literature in the content area.
Minimum Qualifications:
   MA or MFA in English.
   Experience teaching literature in the content area.
   Engaged in content-specific professional development within the past five years.
   To teach Creative Writing Courses:
   Preferred Qualifications:
   MFA in Creative Writing or MA in English with a minimum of six graduate credits in creative
   writing, OR
   significant publication in the specific genre.
   Experience teaching creative writing.
   Engaged in content-specific professional development within the past five years.




   Departmental advisory committee members (if applicable):
   Recruitment and Advising (Terry Rasmussen, Patrick Amelotte, Jill Hughes,)
   Department Handbook and Webpage (Melanie Young, Patrick Amelotte)
   Literary Conference (Terry Rasmussen, Holly Wendt)
   Demorest Lecture and Humanities Festival (David Zoby)



Operations:

                                            Yes     No
   Program assessment plan(s) on file?

   Enrollment trends:
   Casper College’s student population is growing at 5% annually. The English Department has seen
   these growing enrollment trends. Additionally, we have seen a shift toward DVST courses (0520 and
   0610 in particular). With more realistic placement requirements in place, we have seen increased
   enrollment in all of our DVST classes.

   Departmental equipment and facilities:


   Budgetary Considerations:
   Our budget was cut considerably in 2009/10. Faculty development funds and equipment funds have
   been cut across campus, but in the English department we saw a 30 percent drop. We were able to
   take money from the general budget to help fund our Yellowstone Class, but each faculty member
   had to give up development funds to accomplish this.
                            ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
                       SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS & HUMANITIES
        125                                                      FY2011
      110105                       DESCRIPTION                   BUDGET

XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9110   EDUCATIONAL SUPPLIES                             $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9117   SUBSCRIPTIONS                                    $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9118   BOOKS                                        $1,000.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9120   OFFICE SUPPLIES                               $960.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9123   SOFTWARE                                         $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9124   COMPUTER ACCESSORIES                             $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9126   POSTAGE/FREIGHT                                  $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9140   PROMOTIONAL SUPPLIES                             $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9149   YELLOWSTONE EXPERIENCE                       $2,000.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9210   PRINTING/COPYING                                 $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9212   ADVERTISING                                      $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9214   ACCREDITATION EXPENSES                           $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9227   OTHER CONTRACTED SERVICES (Food Service)         $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9232   REPAIRS - EQUIPMENT                              $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9310   DUES/MEMBERSHIPS                              $500.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9311   REG/ENTRY FEES                                $500.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9312   LICENSE/CERTIFICATION FEES                       $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9320   EMP TRAVEL IN-STATE                              $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9330   EMP TRAVEL 0UT-OF-STATE                      $9,920.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9371   RECRUITMENT                                      $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9378   OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES                     $1,120.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9419   CELL PHONE SERVICES                              $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9810   OFFICE EQUIPMENT                                 $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9820   LAB/CLASSROOM EQUIPMENT                          $0.00
XX-XXX-XXXXXX-9830   COMPUTER EQUIPMENT                               $0.00


                                                                ==========
     TOTALS                                                      $16,000.00

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:8/27/2012
language:
pages:8