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					Setting the stage…

    Think of three things that challenge you
     in assessing your students in an e-
     learning environment.

    Write three things you want to know
     about assessing student learning.
Assessing Student Performance
in e-learning environments

   Or
Assessing Student Performance
in e-learning environments
  Or
  How do I replace my paper and pencil
  TESTS?!


  Jacque Jacobs jjacobs@wcu.edu
  Ben Coulter
  bcoulter@taskstream.com
Let’s share…

    Share/pair three things that challenge
     you in assessing your students in an e-
     learning environment.
Let’s share…

    What three things do you want to know
     about assessing student learning?
Where do I start?
Cautions from the literature…
Cautions from the literature…

    Danger of focusing on low level cognitive
     skills (McInnis & Devlin, 2002)


    “If lower-order learning is an unintended
     educational consequence of on-line
     assessment, then any perceived or real gains
     made in efficiency, staff workload reduction
     and/or cost savings may be counterbalanced
     by a significant drop in the quality of higher
     education outcomes” (McInnis & Devlin, 2002, line 1).
Where do I start?

    Syllabus
        Align assessment strategies with learning
         objectives
             Example
                  Objective: Describe a concept
                     Write a paper


                     Post information on a discussion board


                     Create a flowchart (Osika, 2006)
Where do I start?

    Syllabus
        Align assessment strategies with learning
         objectives
             Example
                  Objective: Identify or locate particular elements
                     Objective quiz


                     Post relevant URLs


                     Submit digital pictures (Osika, 2006)
Authentic Assessment

  Actively engages students
  Replicates the work/world in which
   students will use their knowledge
  Clearly relevant to the course
  Useful in demonstrating knowledge and
   abilities
          (Osika, 2006; Jubran, 2006)
Rubrics

 “A rubric is a scoring tool
  that lists the criteria for a
  piece of work…or… ‘what
  counts’ ” (Goodrich, 2005)
What is a Rubric?


  “A rubric is a scoring
   tool that lists the
   criteria for a piece of
   work…or… ‘what
   counts’ ” (Goodrich, 2005)
What is a Rubric?

  Rubrics specify the level of performance
  expected for several levels of quality
  These levels of quality may be written as:
         different ratings
           (e.g., Excellent, Good, Needs Improvement)

         numerical scores (e.g., 4, 3, 2, 1) which are
          then added up to form a total score which
          then is associated with a grade
          (e.g., A, B, C, etc).

      .
Criteria

 Make   sure your listed criteria are the
   ones you are really using to evaluate the
   assignment

 Some    criteria constitute such a “hidden
   agenda” that it’s hidden even from the
   instructor
Which Criteria Count the Most?

 Can   you weight them differently?

 Do  you want the most important ones to
   appear first?

 Are  there other ways you might indicate
   which criteria really define the
   assignment?
Clarity of criteria
Which criterion is the clearest?
  “The A essay is rich in descriptive details.”

  “The A essay contains at least a dozen uses
   of vivid, specific descriptive details.”

  “The A essay contains at least a dozen uses
   of vivid, specific descriptive details (i.e. ‘the
   hazing included five incidents of smaller
   pledges being held down and force-fed large
   quantities of water through a funnel.’)”
Provide Examples
 Providea model so that students can see
  what you mean

 Ifyour “A” box under conclusion says, “strong
  conclusion that makes the reader think,” could
  there be an example of such a conclusion
  online?

 Have  students practice using/applying your
  rubric on their own work or on an example you
  provide for them.
Do Rubrics “coddle” students?

  Yes - if having students figure out purposely
  ambiguous directions and criteria is part of your
  plan to foster critical thinking

  NO - if your goal is to avoid:
        explaining yourself over and over
        slashing up unfocused assignments
        drinking undue quantities of gin while grading


They’re good for everyone. They really are!
Summary:
Why do I want to use rubrics?


   They help you set clear expectations
      Identify what you value
        Content
        Presentation
        Grammar
Summary:
Why do I want to use rubrics?

        Rubrics help
        students and
       teachers define
          "quality"
Summary:
Why do I want to use rubrics?



  Rubrics help
  students judge and
  revise their own
  work…
Summary:
Why do I want to use rubrics?

  Rubricshelp
  students judge
  and revise
  their own
  work…
 BEFORE handing in
 their assignments!!
Effective on-line assessment

    Access and usage

    Quality of teaching and learning checklist

    Technical and administrative checklist
     (McInnis & Devlin, 2002).
Effective on-line assessment

    Access and Usage Checklist
      Network speed
      Software

      Training to use software

      Clarity of materials needed to complete
       assessment
      Other?
     (Adapted from McInnis & Devlin, 2002, line 1)
Effective on-line assessment

    Quality of teaching and learning checklist
      Differences in the assessment from F-2-F
      Is content being assessed or ability to
       manipulate the technology?
      Ability to incorporate creativity?
      What precautions to eliminate or minimize
       plagiarizing?
      How have you determined level of thinking
       required to complete the assessment?
Effective on-line assessment

    Technical and administrative checklist
      Consideration for scheduled maintenance
       periods if time specific assessment
      Students know all access tools (e.g. special
       passwords)
      Access and availability to technical support
Questions?
Using Taskstream as a tool…
Wrap up

    Start with syllabus

    Start small

    Refine as you go

				
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posted:8/25/2012
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