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Calumet County Inventory _ Trends Report

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					Planning Report



Calumet County
Inventory & Trends Report
For the Development of Local Comprehensive Plans
and the Calumet County Comprehensive Plan


Adopted May 2007
Draft Amendments January 2012
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   Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
Note to Reader: Please be advised that the page numbers contained in the ‘Contents’
section below are incorrect. The page numbers will be updated after the document
amendments have been adopted.

                                                            Contents

                                                                                                                                    Page

1. Issues and Opportunities ...................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1        Introduction............................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2        Regional Perspective............................................................................................... 1-5
1.3        Planning Process ..................................................................................................... 1-6
1.4        Planning Framework and Reporting Process.......................................................... 1-7
1.5        Public Participation Efforts..................................................................................... 1-8
1.6        Trends and Opportunities...................................................................................... 1-16
2. Population and Housing....................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1        Population Characteristics ...................................................................................... 2-2
2.2        Population Forecasts ............................................................................................. 2-11
2.3        Housing Characteristics ........................................................................................ 2-17
2.4        Housing Unit Forecasts......................................................................................... 2-27
2.5        Household Forecasts ............................................................................................. 2-30
2.6        Housing Programs................................................................................................. 2-35
2.7        Population and Housing Trends and Outlook....................................................... 2-37
3. Transportation ...................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1       Existing Road System ............................................................................................. 3-1
3.2       Road Functional/Jurisdictional Classification ........................................................ 3-4
3.3       Traffic Volume Trends ........................................................................................... 3-9
3.4       Crash Trends ......................................................................................................... 3-11
3.5       Additional Modes of Transport............................................................................. 3-12
3.6       Existing Transportation Plans ............................................................................... 3-18
3.7       Planned Transportation Improvements ................................................................. 3-22
3.8       Transportation Programs....................................................................................... 3-24
3.9       Transportation Trends and Outlook ...................................................................... 3-27
4. Utilities and Community Facilities ...................................................................................... 4-1
4.1         County Administrative Facilities and Services....................................................... 4-1
4.2         Local Administrative Facilities, Services, and Buildings....................................... 4-4
4.3         Protective Services................................................................................................ 4-10
4.4         School Facilities.................................................................................................... 4-19
4.5         Quasi Public Facilities .......................................................................................... 4-23
4.6         Parks, Recreation, and Open Space ...................................................................... 4-26
4.7         Locally Owned Parks, Recreation, and Open Space............................................. 4-28
4.8         Trails ..................................................................................................................... 4-39

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4.9                Private Park and Recreational Facilities ............................................................... 4-40
4.10               Solid Waste Management and Recycling ............................................................. 4-40
4.11               Communication and Power Facilities ................................................................... 4-44
4.12               Sanitary Sewer Service ......................................................................................... 4-53
4.13               Private On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems (POWTS).................................. 4-58
4.14               Public Water Supply ............................................................................................. 4-60
4.15               Stormwater Management ...................................................................................... 4-64
4.16               Health Care Facilities............................................................................................ 4-67
4.17               Day Care Facilities................................................................................................ 4-68
4.18               Utilities and Community Facilities Programs....................................................... 4-71
4.19               Utilities, Community Facilities, and Services Trends and Outlook...................... 4-72
5. Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources..................................................................... 5-1
5.1        Soils......................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.2        Agriculture & Farmland.......................................................................................... 5-9
5.3        Forests and Woodlands ......................................................................................... 5-15
5.4        Topography ........................................................................................................... 5-18
5.5        Geology................................................................................................................. 5-18
5.6        Metallic and Non-Metallic Mineral Resources..................................................... 5-21
5.7        Wetlands ............................................................................................................... 5-21
5.8        Basins and Watersheds ......................................................................................... 5-24
5.9        Floodplains............................................................................................................ 5-25
5.10       Surface Water Features ......................................................................................... 5-27
5.11       Groundwater ......................................................................................................... 5-35
5.12       Water Quality........................................................................................................ 5-43
5.13       Air Quality ............................................................................................................ 5-46
5.14       Environmental Corridors & Sensitive Areas ........................................................ 5-47
5.15       Wildlife Habitat .................................................................................................... 5-53
5.16       Threatened and Endangered Species .................................................................... 5-54
5.17       Historic and Cultural Resources ........................................................................... 5-55
5.18       Community Design ............................................................................................... 5-63
5.19       Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Programs ..................................... 5-64
5.20       Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resource Trends and Outlook ...................... 5-68
6. Economic Development....................................................................................................... 6-1
6.1      Labor Force and Employment Analysis ................................................................. 6-2
6.2      Economic Base Analysis......................................................................................... 6-6
6.3      Employment Forecast ........................................................................................... 6-21
6.4      Economic Development Programs ....................................................................... 6-23
6.5      Economic Development Trends and Outlook....................................................... 6-27
7. Intergovernmental Cooperation ........................................................................................... 7-1
7.1        Multi-Jurisdictional Plan Building Process ............................................................ 7-3
7.2        Status of Planning in Neighboring Counties and Communities ............................. 7-4
7.3        Existing Intergovernmental Relationships.............................................................. 7-6
7.4        Wisconsin Intergovernmental Agreement Statutes............................................... 7-10

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7.5                Intergovernmental Plans and Programs Currently in Use..................................... 7-13
7.6                Intergovernmental Cooperation Trends and Outlook ........................................... 7-15
8. Land Use .............................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.1       Existing Land Use................................................................................................... 8-1
8.2       Land and Resource Management............................................................................ 8-7
8.3       Supply, Demand, and Price Trends of Land ......................................................... 8-14
8.4       Projected Land Use Demand ................................................................................ 8-20
8.5       Land Use Programs............................................................................................... 8-23
8.6       Land Use Trends and Outlook .............................................................................. 8-23
9. Implementation .................................................................................................................... 9-1
9.1      Existing County Ordinances, Codes, and Plans...................................................... 9-1

                                                                Tables
Table 2-1          Population Counts, Calumet County, 1970-2000 ................................................... 2-3
Table 2-2          Calumet County Population of Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                   1970-2000 ............................................................................................................... 2-4
Table 2-3          Population Change, Calumet County, 1970-2000 .................................................. 2-4
Table 2-4          Calumet County Population Change of Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                   1970-2000 ............................................................................................................... 2-5
Table 2-5          Town, Village, and City Population, Calumet County, 1970-2000........................ 2-6
Table 2-6          Population Estimates, Calumet County, 2000-2005 ............................................... 2-8
Table 2-7          Population Estimates of Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 2000-2004 ... 2-8
Table 2-8          Population by Age Cohort, Calumet County, 2000 .............................................. 2-10
Table 2-9          Population by Age Cohort of Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 2000... 2-11
Table 2-10         WDOA Population Forecasts, Calumet County, 2000-2025 ................................ 2-12
Table 2-11         WDOA Population Forecasts of Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                   2000-2025 ............................................................................................................. 2-13
Table 2-12         Linear Population Forecast, Calumet County, 2000-2030.................................... 2-14
Table 2-13         Linear Population Forecast for Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                   2000-2030 ............................................................................................................. 2-15
Table 2-14         ECWRPC Population Forecasts, Calumet County, 2005-2030 ............................ 2-15
Table 2-15         Housing Units, Calumet County, 1990-2000........................................................ 2-18
Table 2-16         Housing Units of Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 1990-2000 ............ 2-18
Table 2-17         Housing Occupancy and Tenure, Calumet County, 1990 and 2000..................... 2-19
Table 2-18         Units in Structure, Calumet County, 2000............................................................ 2-21
Table 2-19         Units in Structure, Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 2000.................... 2-21
Table 2-20         Persons per Household, Calumet County, 1990 and 2000.................................... 2-22
Table 2-21         Year Structures Were Built, Calumet County, 2000............................................. 2-23
Table 2-22         Year Structures Were Built, Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 2000 .... 2-24
Table 2-23         Housing Values, Calumet County, 2000............................................................... 2-25
Table 2-24         Housing Values, Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 2000 ...................... 2-26
Table 2-25         Linear Trends Housing Unit Projection, Calumet County, 2000-2030 ................ 2-28


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Table 2-26 Linear Trends Housing Unit Projection for Municipalities Located in Other
           Counties, 2000-2030 ............................................................................................. 2-29
Table 2-27 Building Permit Forecast, Calumet County Municipalities, 2000-2030............... 2-30
Table 2-28 WDOA Household Forecast, Calumet County, 2000-2025.................................. 2-31
Table 2-29 WDOA Household Forecast, Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
           2000-2030 ............................................................................................................. 2-32
Table 2-30 ECWRPC Household Forecast A, Calumet County, 2005-2030.......................... 2-32
Table 2-31 ECWRPC Household Forecast B, Calumet County, 2005-2030.......................... 2-33
Table 3-1 Miles of Road, Calumet County, 2004 ................................................................... 3-3
Table 3-2 Miles of Road by Municipality, Calumet County, 2004......................................... 3-4
Table 3-3 U.S. and State Highway AADT Counts, Calumet County, 1994-2004.................. 3-9
Table 3-4 County Trunk Highway AADT Counts, Calumet County, 1994-2004 ................ 3-10
Table 3-5 Local Road AADT Counts, Calumet County, 1994-2004.................................... 3-10
Table 3-6 Top Ten Exports by Tonnage, Calumet County, 2005 ......................................... 3-13
Table 3-7 Railroad Miles, Calumet County, 2004 ................................................................ 3-15
Table 4-1 School District Enrollment, Calumet County, 1999/2000-2003/2004.................. 4-22
Table 4-2 Post Offices, Calumet County............................................................................... 4-25
Table 4-2 Sewer Service Areas, Calumet County, 2005 ....................................................... 4-53
Table 4-3 Day Care Facilities, Calumet County ................................................................... 4-70
Table 5-1 Prime Soils, Calumet County, 2004........................................................................ 5-4
Table 5-2 Farm and Cropland, Calumet County, 2004 ......................................................... 5-10
Table 5-3 Farmland Preservation, Calumet County Towns, 2004 ........................................ 5-12
Table 5-4 Agricultural Land Sales, Calumet County, 1999-2003......................................... 5-13
Table 5-5 Cash Receipts for Agriculture Commodities State of Wisconsin, 2001............... 5-14
Table 5-6 Woodlands, Calumet County, 2004 ...................................................................... 5-16
Table 5-7 Enrollment in Management Forest Law, Calumet County, 2004 ......................... 5-17
Table 5-8 Wetlands, Calumet County, 2004 ......................................................................... 5-23
Table 5-9 Watersheds, Calumet County, 2004...................................................................... 5-25
Table 5-10 Floodplains, Calumet County, 2004 ..................................................................... 5-26
Table 5-11 Lakes, Ponds, and Rivers, Calumet County, 2004................................................ 5-27
Table 5-12 Lakes, Ponds, and Rivers by Municipality, Calumet County, 2004* ................... 5-28
Table 6-1 Civilian Labor Force Annual Averages, Calumet County and Wisconsin,
           1999-2003 ............................................................................................................... 6-2
Table 6-2 Educational Attainment of Persons Age 25 & Over, Calumet County and
           Wisconsin, 2000...................................................................................................... 6-4
Table 6-3 Travel Time to Work, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 2000 ............................... 6-5
Table 6-4 Household Income, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 2000 ................................... 6-6
Table 6-5 Employment by Industry, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 2000.......................... 6-7
Table 6-6 Employment by Occupation, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 2000 .................... 6-8
Table 6-7 Average Annual Wage by Industry, Calumet County, 2002 ................................ 6-10
Table 6-8 Commuting Patterns, Calumet County, 2000 ....................................................... 6-11
Table 6-9 Industrial Parks, Calumet County, 2004 ............................................................... 6-16
Table 8-1 Existing Land Use, Calumet County ...................................................................... 8-3
Table 8-2 Farmland Preservation Agreements, Calumet County Towns, 2004...................... 8-8
Table 8-3 Managed Forest Law Agreements, Calumet County Towns, 2004 ........................ 8-9
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Table 8-4  Natural Resource Management Ownership, Calumet County, 2004 .................... 8-13
Table 8-5  Equalized Valuation, Calumet County, 1999-2003 .............................................. 8-14
Table 8-6  Agricultural Land Sales, Calumet County, 1999-2003......................................... 8-15
Table 8-7  Forestland Sales, Calumet County, 1998-2001..................................................... 8-15
Table 8-8  WRA Residential Sales Data, Calumet County, 1999-2002................................. 8-16
Table 8-9  WRA Vacant Land Sales Data, Calumet County, 1999-2002 .............................. 8-17
Table 8-10 CSM/Lots, Calumet County Towns, 1994-2003 .................................................. 8-18
Table 8-11 Plat Reviews, Calumet County Towns, 1994-2003 .............................................. 8-18
Table 8-12 Sanitary Permits for New Systems, Calumet County Towns, 1993-2003............ 8-19
Table 8-13 Building Permit Activity for New Home Construction (New Homes Added),
           Calumet County, 1993-2003................................................................................. 8-20
Table 8-14 Projected Land Use Demand (acres) Based on ECWRPC Population Projection,
           Calumet County, 2005-2030................................................................................. 8-21
Table 8-15 Projected Land Use Demand (acres) Based on Linear Population Projection,
           Calumet County, 2005-2030................................................................................. 8-22
Table 8-16 Projected Residential Land Use Demand (acres) Based on Historic Building
           Permit Data, Calumet County, 2005-2030............................................................ 8-23

                                                                 Figures
Figure 2-1        Comparative Percent Population Change, Calumet County and Selected Areas,
                  1990-2000 ............................................................................................................... 2-7
Figure 2-2        Percentage of Total Population by Age Cohort, Calumet County, 1990-2000 ...... 2-9
Figure 2-3        Comparative Population Projections, Calumet County, 2000-2030..................... 2-16
Figure 2-4        Housing Occupancy and Tenure, Calumet County, 2000..................................... 2-20
Figure 2-5        Comparative Household Forecasts, Calumet County, 2005-2030........................ 2-34
Figure 2-6        Comparative Housing Unit Forecasts, Calumet County, 2005-2030 ................... 2-35
Figure 3-1        Total Percentage of Roads, Calumet County, 2004 ................................................ 3-3
Figure 5-1        Prime Soils, Calumet County, 2004........................................................................ 5-5
Figure 5-2        Percentage of Total County Wetlands by Municipality, Calumet County, 2004 . 5-24
Figure 6-1        Monthly Unemployment Rates, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 2003 ................ 6-3
Figure 8-1        Existing Land Use, Calumet County ...................................................................... 8-4

                                                                   Maps
Map 1-1          Regional Perspective ................................................................................................ 1-3
Map 3-1          Functional and Jurisdictional Road System ............................................................. 3-7
Map 4-1          Community Facilities and Services ........................................................................ 4-49
Map 4-2          Emergency Services ............................................................................................... 4-51
Map 5-1          Soils .......................................................................................................................... 5-7
Map 5-2          Environmental and Water Features ........................................................................ 5-31
Map 5-3          Aquifer Vulnerability ............................................................................................. 5-39
Map 5-4a         Water Table Elevation and Groundwater Flow...................................................... 5-41
Map 5-4b         Calumet County Groundwater Protect Area
Map 5-5          Natural and Ecological Areas................................................................................. 5-51

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Map 5-6          Historical and Cultural Resources .......................................................................... 5-59
Map 6-1          Economic Development ......................................................................................... 6-19
Map 8-1          2004 Existing Land Use ........................................................................................... 8-5
Map 8-2          Natural Resource Management .............................................................................. 8-11
Map 9-1          Zoning and Land Use Regulations ........................................................................... 9-5
Map 9-2          Growth Management Map and Sewer Service Areas ............................................ 9-21

                                                         Appendices

Appendix A Utilities and Community Facilities Appendix
Appendix B Existing Land Use Classifications Descriptions




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1.        Issues and Opportunities
1.1       Introduction

Calumet County, Wisconsin is located in northeast Wisconsin and is considered part of the Fox
Valley Region. Calumet County is located between Lake Winnebago and Lake Michigan. It
covers an area of 324 square miles or 207,360 acres. Calumet County is home to nine towns,
four villages, three cities and portions of threefour other cities. It should be noted that at the time
of the January 2012 updates, one of the towns, Harrison, is pursuing incorporating a portion of
the town to a village. According to the year 20002010 Census, Calumet County had a population
of approximately 40,60048,971 people, which . The January 2005 population estimate of 45,168
represents an 1120.5% growth rate from the its population of 40,631 in year 2000. Calumet
County experienced significant growth for the last threefour decades, and is forecast to have the
second highest growth rate in Wisconsin over the next 20 years.

The majority of Calumet County can be generally described as rural with small cities and
villages that provide more urban type services. The northwestern portion of the county,
including much of the Town of Harrison, is quite different from most areas of the county. The
northwest area generally has both urban and suburban development patterns as adjacency to the
Cities of Appleton, Menasha, and Kaukauna significantly influence land use and development.
Outside of the incorporated communities, Calumet County has a rural development pattern that is
predominantly agricultural and woodland and rural with intermixed low density residential
development.

The economic base of Calumet County is heavily dependent on manufacturing and agriculture,
followed by retail trade and tourism related businesses. The extensive road network found in the
county allows for relatively easy commutes within the region and throughout the county.
Calumet County also shares the majority of its western border with Lake Winnebago, the largest
inland lake in Wisconsin and the second largest inland lake in the United States. Calumet also
features significant outcroppings of the Niagara Escarpment and has an extensive variety of park
and recreational features such as the spectacular High Cliff State Park, underground caves at
Ledge View Nature Center, the Stockbridge Harbor, and Calumet County Park to name a few.
The very things that people value about Calumet County, such as access to local and regional
employment markets, the high quality of life, natural resources, and quality schools also create
development and service demands that potentially lead to land use conflicts.

Calumet County will be facing significant demographic changes in the next 20 years. These
changes will impact the demand for housing and services, the land use pattern, the transportation
system, needed infrastructure, the economic base, and the relationships between different levels
of government. This report will help to identify these future trends and anticipated changes
while providing the necessary background information detailing how Calumet County got to
where it is today.




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Map 1-1 Regional Perspective




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History

Calumet County was organized in 1836
                                               We Extend the Calumet to All
under the laws of Wisconsin Territory. In
1840, Calumet County’s territory was           Mankind!
declared to be non-existent and it reverted
back to Brown County. It was re-               Originally spelled "Chalumet", Calumet County
established on February 18, 1842 when          derived its name from a Menominee Indian
the Act declaring Calumet County non-          Village lying on the east shore of Lake
existent was rescinded. The boundaries of      Winnebago. The name means 'peace' and
Calumet County were first set in the           signifies the Indian Pipe of Peace. "We Extend
Revised Statutes of 1849, Chapter 20.          the Calumet to All Mankind" was first adopted
                                               as the County’s official slogan by a county
The Calumet County slogan was                  newspaper editor over a century ago.
originally derived from a Menominee
Indian Village lying on the east shore of
Lake Winnebago. That slogan has
remained in use to present day. The
Indians believed that the smoke from the
Peace Pipes of the resident Menominee's
ascended to the Great Spirit from within
the peaceful border of the county. Traces
of prehistoric mound builders can be found today as evidence of their earlier occupation.

The county’s population at the time of incorporation was 275. By 1850, it had risen to 1,753.
The County Seat, originally located in Stockbridge, was moved to Chilton in 1856. By 1860, the
population had grown to 7,895. Notwithstanding the Civil War, the population continued to
grow. In 1870, the county’s population had risen to 12,335. Despite poor wheat yields due to
disease and drought, the population increased to 16,631 in 1880. After 1880 however, the
population remained constant until the early 1960s. Explanations for this lack of growth include
the outward migration of the wheat farmers and the lack of urban centers that supported
employment opportunity beyond agriculture. After World War II, growth in the manufacturing
sector in the county economy and general economic development in the Fox Valley area
stimulated population growth. People began to migrate from the major city centers to the rural
areas as automobiles were affordable and developing road networks made for easier commutes.
Combined with the proximity to employment both locally and in the Fox Valley, Calumet
County became an appealing location to both live and work. These same trends continue to
drive population growth.

1.2       Regional Perspective

Calumet County is bordered by Brown, Manitowoc, Sheboygan, Fond du Lac, Winnebago, and
Outagamie Counties (see Map 1-1). The majority of the county’s western border is Lake
Winnebago. While Calumet County is generally more rural with small cities and villages, the
region in which Calumet County is located is also rural, but contains major economic and
population centers. The Green Bay metropolitan area is located in Brown County 35 miles to the
north, the Cities of Appleton and Menasha are partially located in the county in the northwest

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corner, the City of Fond du Lac is located to the south in Fond du Lac County, the City of
Oshkosh is located on the opposite shore of Lake Winnebago in Winnebago County, and there
are several other populous communities that make up the region. The overall Fox Valley region,
which will be noted several times throughout this report, generally includes those counties that
border the Fox River and Lake Winnebago. As urbanization within these areas and the region
continues to grow, many people will be attracted to Calumet County because of its location and
amenities.

1.3       Planning Process

Phase I, Plan for Planning

During the summer of 2003, Calumet County facilitated a “Plan for Planning” process with local
communities to identify needs and desires of a planning process. The process was intended to
determine:

         The work effort needed to develop a county comprehensive plan in conformance with
          Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning legislation;

         The resources, both internal and external, that could contribute to the planning effort;

         An efficient and coordinated planning process between Calumet County and its
          communities;

         How the document and maps should be built;

         The committee structure to direct the comprehensive planning process;

         Staff and consultant workloads and responsibilities; and

         Comprehensive Plan development costs and the number of participating communities.

This process resulted in the submission of a Wisconsin Department of Administration (WDOA)
Comprehensive Planning Grant on November 1, 2003. In February of 2004, the county was
informed by the state that Calumet County and its participating communities were awarded
$248,000 to develop a comprehensive plan.

Phase II, Plan Development

Development of the Calumet County Year 2025 Smart GrowthComprehensive Plan was in
response to the passage of Wisconsin’s comprehensive planning legislation (Statute 66.1001).
This law requires any local governmental unitall municipalities (counties, cities, towns, and
villages, and regional planning commissions) to adopt a comprehensive plan by the year 2010 if
they wish to engage in programs such as zoning, land division or official mappingmake any local
land use decisions. Calumet County falls under this requirement because it administers a variety
of ordinances. Therefore, according to the legislation, Calumet County is required to develop a
countywide plan to meet the conditions of the legislation.
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Furthermore, As ofafter January 1, 2010, any local governmental unitmunicipality that enacts or
amends any zoning, land division, or official mapping ordinance, the ordinance must be
consistent with that local governmental unit’s comprehensive plan.“affects land use” through
regulation, such as zoning, land division or subdivision ordinances, or official mapping must
make its decisions in accordance with that community’s comprehensive plan.
Calumet County falls under this requirement because it administers a variety of ordinances.
Therefore, according to the legislation, Calumet County is required to develop a countywide plan
to meet the conditions of the legislation.

Incorporated community comprehensive plans are part of the county plan. However, a city or
village plan is adopted separately and has autonomous authority for regulation and
administration within its respective border. While the comprehensive planning law encourages
coordinated planning between jurisdictions, it does not require consistency between plans.
Accordingly, it is possible that a city or village preferred land use map may conflict with the plan
of a neighboring town and that each respective plan will portray this difference. The state
comprehensive planning law does not change the basic authorities or relationships between
counties and towns in adoption or administration of plans or zoning.

The Calumet County multi-jurisdictional comprehensive planning effort includes 13 of 1920
Calumet County communities. The communities are as follows:

          Cities                         Villages     Towns
          Chilton                        Hilbert      Brothertown
          Menasha                        Potter       Chilton
          New Holstein                   Sherwood     Charlestown
                                                      Rantoul
                                                      New Holstein
                                                      Stockbridge
                                                      Woodville

The remaining five communities have either adopted or are nearing completion of a their own
plan. Due to the proposed integration of the existing plans and 100% participation of
communities with their ownwithout plans, the county planning process has provided the
framework for both county and local plan development. The county process has tried to develop
consistency between county and local plans through integrated decision making and coordination
of ideas, policies, and plan recommendations.

1.4       Planning Framework and Reporting Process

The Calumet County planning process has resulted in compliant plans for all participating
communities as contained in Wisconsin Statute 66.1001. The “Plan for Planning” process
resulted in a coordinated plan development and document production process. Plan documents
were developed into four main components, detailed as follows:

         Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report. This document component contains
          inventory, background, and trend data for eight of the nine required comprehensive

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          planning elements, for all communities in Calumet County. Subjects include: population,
          housing, transportation, utilities and community facilities, agriculture, natural and
          cultural resources, economic development, intergovernmental cooperation, land use, and
          related programs. Information that is more qualitative or related to implementation is
          included within the other three portions of the planning framework. This document is
          used to build the next three documents and is referenced continually within them.

         Municipal (Incorporated Communities) Comprehensive Plans. The second component of
          the Calumet County planning process is the development of individual municipal
          comprehensive plans for cities and villages. The Villages of Hilbert and Sherwood and
          the Cities of Chilton, New Holstein, and Menasha have developed their own
          comprehensive plans on a timeframe similar to the county and participating towns. The
          city and village plans are individual documents that also include necessary information
          and recommendations to make each city and village comprehensive plan compliant with
          Wisconsin’s comprehensive planning legislation.

         Expanded Land Use Elements. The Towns of Brothertown, Charlestown, Chilton, New
          Holstein, Rantoul, Stockbridge, and Woodville and the Village of Potter have developed
          expanded land use plan elements that include goals and objectives, maps of existing and
          planned land use, and implementation strategies. The towns and the Village of Potter
          have adopted the land use element document they created as their official Land Use
          Element. To be compliant with statute 66.1001, the participating towns and Village of
          Potter have also adopted both the Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report and the
          Calumet County Year 2025 Smart GrowthComprehensive Plan which contain the
          remaining required eight elements.

         Calumet County Year 2025 Smart GrowthComprehensive Plan. This document
          references the Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report and provides goals,
          objectives, policies, recommendations, and future programs for the county as well as for
          each individual participating town. The document also discusses proposed facilities and
          services, identifies preferred land uses, includes an implementation element, and further
          develops the other elements of the plan. This document, in coordination with the
          Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report, meets the requirements of Wisconsin’s
          comprehensive planning legislation for the county and participating towns. The county
          comprehensive plan references the incorporated community plans, the town land use
          plans, and the existing plans of record.

These documents provide the planning framework upon which decisions can be based, allow for
local control, and provide planning and implementation strategies that can direct the entire
county in a desirable direction for the next 20 years.

1.5       Public Participation Efforts

Wisconsin’s comprehensive planning legislation specifies that the governing body for a unit of
government must prepare and adopt written procedures to foster public participation in the
comprehensive planning process. The procedures must include open discussion, communication

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programs, information services, and public meetings for which advance notice has been
provided, in every stage of the preparation of a comprehensive plan. In addition, the
participation procedures must provide for a wide distribution of proposed drafts, alternatives, and
amendments of the comprehensive plan. The public participation procedures should address
how members of the public can send written comments on the plan to the governing body, and
how the governing body will respond.

Public Participation Plan

To address the public participation directive as identified under Section 66.1001(4)(a) of the
Wisconsin Statutes, Calumet County developed a Public Participation Plan for the development
of a comprehensive plan for Calumet County. Each participating community also adopted its
own public participation plan, with each plan built to address specific community priorities.

Among the many opportunities that were used to foster public participation, the following core
efforts were implemented. The core efforts include adherence to the statutory requirements
relative to public participation meetings, the corresponding notification procedures, and the
directives of the open meeting law. Core efforts to gather public input throughout the planning
process include the following:

         Posting of public informational meetings, all other meetings, and public hearings in
          accordance with Wisconsin’s Open Meetings Law;

         Sending meeting and hearing agendas and notices to all municipalities and county
          departments within Calumet County;

         Sending notices and issuing press releases regarding public informational meetings, and
          public hearings to local media outlets;

         Displays and exhibits in the Calumet County Courthouse throughout the planning process
          to keep the public informed about the planning process and outcomes of
          meetings/hearings, when applicable;

         Keeping materials/documents at the Calumet County Planning Department;

         Posting information on the Calumet County website for review by local residents.

         Interactive feedback and communication on the Calumet County website via electronic
          mail and a message board.

Focus Group Meetings

In July of 2004 a series of four focus group sessions were held to further explore ideas, issues,
and solutions regarding land use topics in Calumet County. Topics for the focus group sessions
were selected based on primary issue areas as identified from the Calumet County Advisory
Committee. The four focus group sessions included the following topics:


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1.    Growth Management, July 19, 2004
2.    Natural Resources, July 20, 2004
3.    Intergovernmental Cooperation, July 22, 2004
4.    Transportation, July 29, 2004

All meetings were held at the Calumet County Courthouse in the City of Chilton. Panelists were
invited to attend based on relevant experiences and associations to the topic. At each of the
meetings, John Williams of Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC and County Planner, Julie
Heuvelman, presented the topic and then led the group in a facilitated discussion. The
participants were asked to list their answers to questions, with each question presented and
discussed individually with participant responses recorded and numbered on flip charts. In an
effort to help prioritize the responses, participants were asked to vote for their top three
responses per question. The results of the focus group meetings were utilized to assist in the
development of county goals, objectives, policies, and vision. Results of the Focus Group
meetings were also posted on the Calumet County Website and discussed at Public Information
Meetings.

Summary of Growth Management Focus Group

Participants of the Growth Management Focus Group included a representative from the Land
and Water Conservation Department, WDNR, Regional Planning Commission, and County
Highway Department as well as town representatives, local farmers, and a local realtor.
Members of the public were also in attendance. Overall the group supported a growth
management policy, provided it was more flexible than the current policy. Specifically, some
members favored smaller lot sizes in the Exclusive Agricultural Zoning District and the concept
of allowing a property owner to sell off more property than currently permitted, based on site
conditions such as soil type and groundwater.

          Question 1: Based on the existing Growth Management Policy, where should growth be
          allowed to occur?

Top proposals: Development should occur based on the specifics of a site (i.e., if land is
unsuitable for agriculture then it should be used for other development); development should
occur in those areas close to services and where there is a developed road network; follow the
current policy (restrict development to growth management areas that can provide public sewer
and water).

          Question 2: How would you propose keeping land available for agriculture and open
          space, assuming the growth projections are realized?

Top proposals: Maintain the current growth management policy but revise it; keep the focus on
agriculture but consider options to permit development; build incentives into county policy to
stimulate preservation and maintenance of agricultural land; educate public on impacts and costs
of development; and reduce the rate of consumption by lowering the size of lots in the
agricultural areas.



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          Question 3: Under what conditions should a landowner be able to sell productive
          cropland for non-farm purposes?

Top proposals: Productive agricultural land should stay in production; develop a formula
whereby for every acre developed an equal or greater number of acres be preserved; allow
development in sewer service areas only and provide incentives to those who don’t develop their
land (such as requiring the developer to pay a tax which is given to those who don’t develop their
land).

        Question 4: What types of new development do you feel are appropriate among the
        active farming areas of Calumet County?
Top proposals: Those compatible with surrounding land use; agricultural related uses (those
uses that support agriculture); various types but all uses should not be a right (some need
conditional use approval).

          Question 5: Are there any areas in the county that should have little, or no, residential
          development?

Top proposals: Niagara Escarpment; the land between the escarpment and the lake; no areas
should be limited to no development.

Summary of Natural Resources Focus Group

Participants of the Natural Resources Focus Group included representatives from the WDNR
including the High Cliff State Park, the Land and Water Conservation Department, the Calumet
County Parks Department, Ledgeview Nature Center, Natural Resource Conservation Service,
and the City of Brillion as well as local developer and a town chairman. Members of the public
were also in attendance. Overall the group felt our water resources and the Niagara Escarpment
were our most valuable resources, and, those features, along with our open spaces, needed the
most preservation. The group listed ways to best preserve and protect these resources and
indicated the best way would be to develop a mechanism that would balance priorities (create a
formula that is outcome based).

          Question 1: What are the most desirable environmental features in Calumet County?

Top proposals: Water resources (surface water and groundwater), the Niagara Escarpment, open
spaces and farm land.

          Question 2: What environmental resources within Calumet County require the greatest
          amount of immediate attention or protection?

Top proposals: Water (water quality, surface water, lakes, groundwater), open space (open space
losses, development impacting farmland and view sheds, loss of character), soil degradation
(erosion).




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          Question 3: What are the driving forces that could affect our natural resources in
          Calumet County over the next 20 years either positively or negatively (i.e., trends,
          threats, opportunities)?

Top proposals: Uncontrolled growth and impacts on resources, economy, balance of property
rights and consideration in policy development.

          Question 4: What is the best way for Calumet County to effectively preserve and protect
          its natural resources?

Top proposals: Develop mechanism to balance priorities (develop a formula that is outcome
based); educate policy and decision makers to help create sound policy; implement existing plans
and regulations.

Summary of Intergovernmental Cooperation Focus Group

Participants of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Focus Group included two town chairmen, the
County Board chairman, a Calumet County GIS specialist, representatives from the City of
Menasha and Kiel, the Calumet County Highway Commissioner, as well as several other
government related representatives. Members of the public were also in attendance. Overall the
group felt lack of trust was the biggest barrier to intergovernmental cooperation. They also felt
the best opportunity to improve services and efficiencies is to work together as a region rather
than pursue individual efforts. This regional approach was also considered to be the best way to
improve cooperation between all units of government, school districts, etc. There was a strong
desire to have the county facilitate meetings to discuss shared expenses and other opportunities.

          Question 1: What barriers exist to greater intergovernmental cooperation in Calumet
          County?

Top proposals: Lack of trust and misunderstanding between communities; communities want
their own identity and to control their own resources; lack of incentives and financial
considerations.

          Question 2: What possible intergovernmental opportunities are present in Calumet
          County that could result in better service and improved efficiencies?

Top proposals: Leverage strengths of region rather than focus on individual efforts;
communicate and coordinate between multiple entities (i.e., fire, police); joint management
between towns to create uniformity and improve efficiency (the idea of one employee who does
all applications and paperwork for the towns).

          Question 3: What can be done locally, regionally, and/or statewide to increase
          cooperation between governmental units, school districts, etc.?

Top proposals: Look at regional services and how services are distributed (should boundaries be
ignored or altered); develop common ground and language between communities; state level
regulations need to change to allow the opportunity to cooperate.
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          Question 4: What should be Calumet County’s role in facilitating intergovernmental
          cooperation (i.e., border issues, shared services, information, etc.) among local units of
          government?

Top proposals: Main role for the county is to facilitate and mediate; continue meetings amongst
municipal leaders and expand participation; county could offer services to increase efforts
throughout the area (county web site, data clearinghouse, contact information, etc.).

Summary of Transportation Focus Group

Participants of the Transportation Focus Group included the Calumet County Highway
Commissioner, the Transportation Planner from the Regional Planning Commission,
representatives from the Town of Harrison, a representative for the City of New Holstein
Airport, the City of Chilton Public Works Director, representative from Fox Cities Greenways, a
representative from the Town of Charlestown, representative from Human Services, and a
representative from New Holstein School District. Members of the public were also in
attendance. Overall the group felt that financial constraints were the major limitation for road
maintenance and improvements. From the discussion it also became evident that the County
Highway Department was already coordinating services with municipalities in the county, and,
with neighboring counties.

          Question 1: What are some of the major transportation issues facing Calumet County for
          the next 20 years?

Top proposals: Funding limitations, roads being over used (roads carrying a higher volume of
traffic than they were designed to carry), and a lack of other modes of transportation (and the
issues associated with alternative types of transportation).

          Question 2: Can the existing transportation system accommodate the anticipated growth
          for the county?

Top proposals: Highway 10 corridor improvements are necessary but will be costly; the
efficiency of the corridors needs to be coordinated to address safety and pedestrian needs, and
needs to be balanced with demand and realize that traffic isn’t that bad in the county.

          Question 3: In what ways can communities and the county share or pool resources for
          maintenance and further development of the transportation system?

Top proposals: Change the mind-set of politicians and let them know cooperation is an available
alternative; coordinate funding to get better leverage for joint purchasing; consolidate
jurisdictions and services to address limited resources.

          Question 4: Is there a need for further trail development? If so, where, and how can it be
          funded?



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Top proposals: Trails are a matter of funding priority and need to be budgeted for; a funding
strategy has to be created that incorporates construction and maintenance; trails should be
planned for before land is sold for development so developer agreements can be made.

Calumet County Advisory Committee

Calumet County established a County Advisory Committee (CAC) consisting of at least two
representatives from the Calumet County Planning and Zoning Committee, one representative
and an alternate from each of the Planning Commissions of all Calumet County communities,
and two citizens appointed by the County Board Chairperson. This Committee’s main
responsibility was to develop the county plan and provide the framework (goals, objectives,
policies, and recommendations) for both the county and local community plans. The CAC was
in charge of developing county plan recommendations in conjunction with coordinated land use
and regulatory policy with local communities. In performing that function, the CAC spent a
majority of it its time assessing growth trends and evaluating county level policy decisions in
regard to growth and service demands. The CAC focused on overall county issues, policies, and
directives that were utilized by the county and local communities during plan development. In
addition, non-participating municipalities and other agencies/jurisdictions such as East Central
Regional Planning Commission, Wisconsin Realtors Association, WDNR, WDOT, and the
general public were invited to participate at all public informational meetings.

Local Community Planning Processes

Each participating town and incorporated community adopted a Public Participation Plan,
managed a project meeting schedule, held meetings in accordance with the Open Meetings Law,
and facilitated some community specific public outreach efforts. These efforts included such
activities as community mailings, developing and tallying local surveys, and holding special
meetings to address local issues of local concern. Some communities also held joint open houses
to review and discuss neighboring plans. The project schedules were also coordinated to align
the timing of meetings and workshops to build continuity, coordination, and cooperation between
neighboring jurisdictions. A joint meeting was also held on April 26, 2005 for the Village of
Potter and all participating towns. This meeting included presentations on agriculture, open
space, and housing.

Public Informational Meetings

A primary component of the public involvement strategy included planned public informational
meetings at key points in the planning process, with the intent to present information, gather
feedback, and provide input from Calumet County residents and landowners. The first meeting
was held December 1, 2004 and included a one-hour presentation on the comprehensive plan’s
progress to date, covering county growth trends, inventory data and maps, a refresher on the
local and county plan building process, the level of local municipality participation,
accomplishments to date, opportunities and challenges, and a timeline for project completion.
Fifty people attended the meeting. The County Advisory Committee (CAC) had met five times
prior the meeting and had developed draft county goals, objectives, and a vision statement for the
process, which the meeting participants were asked to review and provide comment.


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A second public informational meeting was held July 27, 2005 for all communities. The meeting
covered several topics including conservation easements, land trusts, conservation subdivisions,
joint sanitary systems, cluster development, purchase and transfer of development rights,
annexation, boundary agreements, extraterritorial zoning, and plat review. Approximately 125
people attended the meeting.

A third public informational meeting was held August 24, 2005 with focus on resource issues
associated with the Niagara Escarpment. The meeting took place at the Chilton High School
Auditorium, with a general purpose to educate the public about the Niagara Escarpment and
discuss citizens concerns about land use. A survey was conducted to allow citizens of Calumet
County the opportunity to voice their opinions regarding the Niagara Escarpment and how it
should be protected or developed for the future.

Approximately 925 notices were mailed out to individuals that owned land along the
Escarpment, members of the two Town Plan Commissions and Town Boards, and County Board
Supervisors for the area. The meeting was also open to the general public and did have a few
survey participants from other areas of Calumet County. There were approximately 125 people
in attendance at the meeting. Approximately 115 individuals completed a survey.

The meeting agenda included presentations by two staff members of the Calumet County
Planning Department, one member of the Calumet County Land and Water Conservation
Department, and a Wisconsin DNR representative. A question and comment period was
followed after the presentations and the meeting was concluded with a survey regarding the
potential overlay. Results were tabulated and mailed to the respective Town Plan Commissions
and posted on the Calumet County Smart Growth web site. The results were used to formulate
plan recommendations for each respective community and Calumet County, the results of which
are discussed in the Calumet County Year 2025 Smart GrowthComprehensive Plan.

A fourth informational meeting was held on May 24, 2006. The meeting focused on land use
coordination between local units of government, as many of the participating communities were
finalizing their respective land use plans. In preparation for the meeting, several communities
met to discuss their plans in the border areas and discussed potential land use implications in the
extraterritorial areas. The meeting was held in conjunction with a CAC meeting, with eight
people attending in addition to the CAC members.

At the time of this report, additional public meetings were planned in conjunction with the
planning process and are discussed in the Calumet County Year 2025 Smart Growth
Comprehensive Plan.

Updates

Since adoption of the Calumet County Year 2025 Smart Growth Plan in 2007, amendments have
been made. In January 2012, the county conducted a 5-year update of the comprehensive plan in
an effort to comply with s. 66.1001(2)(i), Wis. Stats., and to meet the update objectives of
Chapter 9, Implementation, of the Calumet County Year 2025 Smart Growth Plan
Recommendations Report. Amendments to this document, which include text, table, chart and
map amendments, were made to reflect available updated statistical and factual data with the

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majority of the updated data provided by the 2010 Census and American Community Survey.
No amendments were made to the goals, objectives, policies and recommendations in the
Recommendations Report.

1.6       Trends and Opportunities

There are a number of major issues, opportunities, and trends that Calumet County leaders and
citizens will deal with over the 20-year planning period. The reason Calumet County chose to
facilitate the Focus Groups as discussed earlier in this report speaks to this very point. Pro-active
planning may help resolve these issues and facilitate the realization of opportunities. Several
primary topics are provided to facilitate this discussion at the end of every chapter in this report.




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2.        Population and Housing
Wisconsin’s comprehensive planning law requires that a comprehensive plan include a housing
element as well as demographic information. Planning for the provision of housing and taking a
thorough look at community demographics may be new to many local units of government.
Nonetheless, the programs, policies, and actions of local government can influence the housing
market and who chooses to locate in a community.

Housing plays a major role in local demographics and the overall characteristics of a county.
Housing costs are typically the single largest expenditure for most Wisconsin residents. For
homeowners, their home is likely their most valuable asset and largest investment. Housing also
plays a critical role in state and local economies. The housing in a community may be its largest
asset. The construction industry and other occupations that support housing are a major portion
of the economy. Residential development is also a major source of revenue for local
communities in the form of property taxes. Beyond the financial aspects of housing, there are
also social effects that are not so easily measured. People develop a sense a pride in their homes,
which in turn creates a sense of community and a likely increase in participation in community
activities.

The comprehensive planning process necessitates that each community and the county analyze
the impact of the local, state, and federal policies and regulations on the development of various
types of housing. The analysis is intended to take into account the current and projected housing
needs in the community and the county. The analysis should result in policies that provide
opportunities for the development of the types and amounts of housing expected to be needed
over a 20-year planning horizon.

There are a number of benefits that can be realized by developing a housing element and
analyzing demographics:

         The process of developing the housing element encourages citizens to start thinking and
          talking about local housing concerns.

         The data collection and analysis can increase understanding of the local housing situation
          and who lives in the community.

         The data allows for an understanding of future trends and how the community can
          prepare for change.

         More influence over the nature of future housing development can be attained.

         It increases the chances that housing decisions are coordinated with decisions regarding
          other comprehensive plan elements such as the land use, transportation, economic
          development, utilities and community facilities, and agriculture, natural, and cultural
          resources elements.



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         It can bring together a diverse range of groups, agencies, and citizens that otherwise may
          not work together.

         It provides the chance to consider the community’s housing concerns in relation to those
          of adjacent communities.

The following sections discuss in more detail, specific information about Calumet County and
local municipalities’ housing stock and patterns, demographics, and future trends.

United States Census 20002010 and American Community Survey

A significant amount of information, particularly with regard to population, housing, and
economic development, was obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau of the Census. There were
four two primary methodologies for data collection employed by the Census in 20002010, STF-1
andthrough STF-42. STF-1 data were collected through a household-by-household census and
represent responses from every household within the country. STF-2 data are similar to STF-1;
however, data are available to the census tract level for limited information meeting an
established population threshold. In cases were 2010 Census data was unavailable, data from the
2000 Census was used. While the 2010 Census focused on counting the population for purposes
of apportionment and redistricting, the American Community Survey (ACS) provides more
detailed socioeconomic information, which is asked annually of a small percentage of the
population. The ACS data provided in this document are 2005-2009 5-year estimates. To get
more detailed information, the U.S. Census Bureau also randomly distributes a long-form
questionnaire to one in six households throughout the nation. Tables that use this sample data
are indicated as STF-3 and STF-4 data.

Throughout the Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report, data from the U.S. Census will be
designated as STF-1 or STF-3ACS data. It should be noted that STF-1 and STF-3ACS data may
differ for similar statistics, due to survey limitations, non-response, or other attributes unique to
each form of data collection. It should be further noted that the City of Kaukauna has not been
identified in the charts and figures using census and ACS data because the annexation of land
from the Town of Harrison into the city did not occur until after the census was completed.

2.1       Population Characteristics

Population Outlook

Calumet County had a population of 40,63148,971 persons in the year 20002010. The county
has had a history of higher than average population growth over the last 20 30 years compared to
other counties in Wisconsin. That growth trend is anticipated to continue during the planning
period at rates higher than experienced in the recent past. On a percentage basis, Calumet
County ranks second in the state, only behind St. Croix County, based on Wisconsin Department
of Administration population growth forecasts from 2000 to 2030. Calumet County’s abundant
recreational opportunities, small rural centers, quality transportation system, access to major
urban centers, quality schools, and high quality of life have made the county a desirable place to
live. Population growth is not only going to occur in total number, but in the structure of
population, called age cohort, in certain age categories. As an example, it is anticipated that

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increases in population of older age groups within the county will continue during the planning
period.

Population Counts

Population change is the primary component in tracking growth as well as predicting future
population trends. Population characteristics relate directly to demands on community services
as well as housing, education, utilities, social services, and recreational facility needs, as well as
future economic development.

Table 2-1 displays the population trends of local communities, Calumet County, and the State of
Wisconsin from 19701980 to 20002010.

                                      Table 2-1
             Population Counts, Calumet County, 19701980-20002010
                  Municipality      1980      1990      2000      2010
             T. Brillion           1,191     1,300     1,438     1,486
             T. Brothertown        1,494     1,409     1,404     1,329
             T. Charlestown        1,090       875       789       775
             T. Chilton            1,120       998     1,130     1,143
             T. Harrison           3,541     3,195     5,756    10,839
             T. New Holstein       1,527     1,406     1,457     1,508
             T. Rantoul            1,184       895       812       798
             T. Stockbridge        1,248     1,317     1,383     1,456
             T. Woodville          1,160     1,071       993       980
             V. Hilbert            1,176     1,211     1,089     1,132
             V. Potter                 0       252       252       253
             V. Sherwood             372       837     1,550     2,713
             V. Stockbridge          567       579       649       636
             C. Appleton*         58,913    65,695    70,087    72,623
             C. Brillion           2,907     2,840     2,937     3,148
             C. Chilton            2,965     3,240     3,708     3,933
             C. Kiel*              3,083     2,910     3,450     3,738
             C. Menasha*          14,728    14,711    16,331    17,353
             C. New Holstein       3,412     3,342     3,301     3,236
             Calumet County       30,867    34,291    40,631    48,971
             Wisconsin         4,705,642 4,891,769 5,363,675 5,686,986
            *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
            Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1970-20001980-2010. Calumet County
            total does not equal the sum of municipalities listed due to communities located in other
            counties.

Table 2-2 provides the population in Calumet County for those municipalities located partially in
other counties.


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                                 Table 2-2
         Calumet County Population of Municipalities Located in Other
                       Counties, 19701980-20002010
                                                 1980        1990        2000       2010
                    C. Appleton*                5,484        9,075      10,974    11,088
                    C. Kiel*                      429          376         321       309
                    C. Menasha*                      0          73         688     2,209
                   *Only includes population located in Calumet County.
                   Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1970-20001980-2010.

Population Change

Table 2-3 displays the number and percent population change for municipalities in Calumet
County and the State of Wisconsin.

                                        Table 2-3
           Population Change, Calumet County, 19701980-20002010
                 # Change % Change # Change % Change # Change % Change # Change % Change
   Municipality 1980-1990 1980-1990 1990-2000 1990-2000 2000-2010 2000-2010 1980-2010 1980-2010
T. Brillion           138     10.6%        48      3.3%        48      3.3%       295     24.8%
T. Brothertown         -5     -0.4%       -75     -5.3%       -75     -5.3%      -165    -11.0%
T. Charlestown        -86     -9.8%       -14     -1.8%       -14     -1.8%      -315    -28.9%
T. Chilton            132     13.2%        13      1.2%        13      1.2%        23      2.1%
T. Harrison         2,561     80.2%     5,083    88.3%      5,083    88.3%      7,298    206.1%
T. New Holstein        51      3.6%        51      3.5%        51      3.5%       -19      1.2%
T. Rantoul            -83     -9.3%       -14     -1.7%       -14     -1.7%      -386    -32.6%
T. Stockbridge         66      5.0%        73      5.3%        73      5.3%       208     16.7%
T. Woodville          -78     -7.3%       -13     -1.3%       -13     -1.3%      -180    -15.5%
V. Hilbert           -122    -10.1%        43      3.9%        43      3.9%       -44     -3.7%
V. Potter               0        NA         1      0.4%         1      0.4%         1      0.4%
V. Sherwood           713     85.2%     1,163    75.0%      1,163    75.0%      2,341    629.3%
V. Stockbridge         70     12.1%       -13     -2.0%       -13     -2.0%        69     12.2%
C. Appleton*        4,392      6.7%     2,536      3.6%     2,536      3.6%    13,710     23.3%
C. Brillion            97      3.4%       211      7.2%       211      7.2%       241      8.3%
C. Chilton            468     14.4%       225      6.1%       225      6.1%       968     32.6%
C. Kiel*              540     18.6%       288      8.3%       288      8.3%       655     21.2%
C. Menasha*         1,620     11.0%     1,022      6.3%     1,022      6.3%     2,625     17.8%
C. New Holstein       -41     -1.2%       -65     -2.0%       -65      2.0%      -176     -5.2%
Calumet County      6,340     18.5%     8,340    20.5%      8,340    20.5%     18,104     58.7%
Wisconsin         471,906      9.6% 471,906        6.0% 323,311        6.0% 981,344       20.9%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided is for the entire municipality.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-4                               Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                            Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1970-20001980-2010.

Table 2-4 provides the population change in Calumet County for those municipalities partially
located in other counties.

                             Table 2-4
 Calumet County Population Change of Municipalities Located in Other
                   Counties, 19701980-20002010
              # Change % Change   # Change % Change   # Change % Change   # Change % Change
Municipality 1980-1990 1980-1990 1990-2000 1990-2000 2000-2010 2000-2010 1980-2010 1980-2010
C. Appleton*              3,591           65.5%   1,899    20.9%         114          1.0%             5,604        50.5%
C. Kiel*                    -53          -12.4%     -55   -14.6%         -12         -3.7%              -120       -28.0%
C. Menasha*                  73              NA     615   842.5%       1,521        221.1%             2,209      3026.0%
*Only includes population located in Calumet County.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1970-20001980-2010.

In 20002010, Calumet County’s total population reached its highest point for the 30 year period
shown. From 19701980 to 19801990, the county experienced a population increase of 11.81%,
.this greatly exceeded the growth experienced by the state as a whole. From 19801990 to
19902000, the county experienced an even higherhad a similar rate of growth with 11.118.5%,
againbut most noteworthy was that this growth greatly exceeded that experienced exceeding the
state’s overall growthby the state as a whole. From 19902000 to 20002010, the county’s
population increased by 1820.5%, once again significantly higher thatthan the population growth
experienced by the state.

Population change experienced by individual communities in the county varies greatly. Some
communities have experienced continued population declines while others have experienced
significant growth. The most notable population increases have occurred in the Village of
Sherwood, and the Town of Harrison, and the Calumet County portion of the City of Menasha.
The largest decreases have occurred in the Towns of Charlestown and Rantoul. The population
decreases can be attributed to several factors, including annexation and population migration.

The following section will help further identify where the county’s growth occurred.

Town, Village, and City Population

Table 2-5 summarizes Calumet County’s population by town, village, and city. Where growth
occurs is important to recognize due to the different level of services that are provided by
different municipal types. The location of growth can also be evaluated by how it places
demands on the community, and how much growth costs versus how much benefit in tax dollars
is received. For example, incorporated communities may be administratively equipped to
accommodate a rapidly growing population because of the infrastructure, ordinances, programs,
and services that are already in place. Unless the town is similar to the Town of Harrison, towns
are not typically staffed with full time administration nor do they have community services such
as the sewer and water infrastructure to accommodate rapid growth. Growth in most


Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-5
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
unincorporated areas will be much lower in density, have fewer services, and yet require similar
demands.

                               Table 2-5
  Town, Village, and City Population, Calumet County, 1970-20001980-
                                  2010
                                                                               # Change         % Change
                                          1980    1990     2000     2010     1980-2010         1980-2000
 Total in Towns                         13,555   12,466   15,162   20,314           7,848            63.0%
 Total in Villages                       2,115    2,879    3,540    4,734           1,855            64.4%
 Total in Cities                        15,197   18,946   21,929   23,923           8,726            57.4%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1970-20001980-2010. For municipalities that cross
at least one county line, data only includes portion of municipality in Calumet County.

From 19701980 to 20002010, the towns, and villages and cities in Calumet County increased at
relatively the same rate, all within 7% of each other. The cities increased in population by 8,726
(57.4%), the towns by 7,848 (63%), and the villages by 1,855 (64.4%).nearly the exact same
amount, approximately 1,700 persons. However, for towns this was a growth of 12.8%, but for
villages this was a growth of 93.7%. The cities in Calumet County increased in population by
9,600 or 77.9%, a greater percentage than towns but significantly less than villages.

Comparative County Population

Calumet County shares its borders with six other counties including Brown, Manitowoc,
Sheboygan, Fond du Lac, Winnebago, and Outagamie County. Figure 2-1 displays the percent
of population change for these counties and the State of Wisconsin from 19902000 to 20002010.
As indicated by the figure, Calumet County experienced a greater percentage population growth
than any other surrounding county or the state from 19902000 to 20002010. It is worthy to note
all counties in the Fox Valley region experienced growth of 10% or greater. Calumet County
offers advantages in geography and natural resources that certainly have contributed to high
growth rates. Similar to past trends, the county is positioned for future growth in accordance
with forecasted growth trends.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-6                           Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                        Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                               Figure 2-1
                       Comparative Percent Population Change, Calumet County and
                                  Selected Areas, 1990-20002000-2010

                       25.0%

                               20.5%
                       20.0%
      Percent Change




                       15.0%


                                         9.4%                            9.7%
                       10.0%
                                                                                                 6.5%           6.0%
                                                    4.5%
                       5.0%
                                                                                   2.5%
                                                              -1.8%
                       0.0%
                               Calumet   Brown    Fond du Lac Manitowoc Outagamie Sheboygan Winnebago Wisconsin
                               County    County     County     County    County    County    County
                       -5.0%

                                 Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000-2010.

Population Estimates

Every year the Wisconsin Department of Administration (WDOA), Demographic Services
Center develops population estimates for every municipality and county in the state. Tables 2-6
and 2-7 display year 20002010 Census counts and the 20052011 population estimates for
Calumet County. Population estimates should be utilized as the official source for population
information, except when Census population counts for a given year are available.

Even though the population estimate represents a single year, Calumet County continues to see
its population increase. It is estimated that the county’s population has increased by 138 persons
over the past year. The greatest increase has occurred in the Calumet County portion of the City
of Menasha with 37 persons or 1.7%.

Calumet County had an estimated 2005 population of 45,168, an 11.2% increase from the 2000
population count. The majority of this growth can be attributed to the significant increases
estimated in the Town of Harrison and the Village of Sherwood. Both of these communities
experienced greater than 40% growth in the five-year period.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-7
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                   Table 2-6
          Population Estimates, Calumet County, 2000-20052010-2011
                                                   2010        2011    # Change      % Change
                           Municipality          Census    Estimate   2010-2011      2010-2011
                    T. Brillion                  1,486       1,488             2          0.1%
                    T. Brothertown               1,329       1,328            -1         -0.1%
                    T. Charlestown                 775         778             3          0.4%
                    T. Chilton                   1,143       1,142            -1         -0.1%
                    T. Harrison                10,839      10,885             46          0.4%
                    T. New Holstein              1,508       1,507            -1         -0.1%
                    T. Rantoul                     798         797            -1         -0.1%
                    T. Stockbridge               1,456       1,459             3          0.2%
                    T. Woodville                   980         981             1          0.1%
                    V. Hilbert                   1,132       1,132             0          0.0%
                    V. Potter                      253         253             0          0.0%
                    V. Sherwood                  2,713       2,725            12          0.4%
                    V. Stockbridge                 636         635            -1         -0.2%
                    C. Appleton*               72,623      72,715             92          0.1%
                    C. Brillion                  3,148       3,172            24          0.8%
                    C. Chilton                   3,933       3,935             2          0.1%
                    C. Kaukauna*               15,462      15,519             57          0.4%
                    C. Kiel*                     3,738       3,741             3          0.1%
                    C. Menasha*                17,353      17,381             28          0.2%
                    C. New Holstein              3,236       3,238             2          0.1%
                    Calumet County             48,971      49,109            138          0.3%
                    Wisconsin               5,686,986 5,694,236            7,250          0.1%
                  *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
                  Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 20002010. Wisconsin Department of
                  Administration, Demographic Services Center, Final Population Estimates, 20052011.

                                Table 2-7
     Population Estimates of Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                           2000-20042010-2011
                                                 2010         2011     # Change       % Change
                        Municipality           Census     Estimate    2010-2011       2010-2011
                    C. Appleton*               11,088      11,095             7              0.1%
                    C. Kaukauna*                    0           0             0                NA
                    C. Kiel*                      309         313             4              1.3%
                    C. Menasha*                 2,209       2,246            37              1.7%


Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-8                                  Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                               Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                       *Municipality crosses at least one county line, only includes population located in Calumet
                                       County.
                                       Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 20002010. Wisconsin Department of
                                       Administration, Demographic Services Center, Final Population Estimates, 20052011.

                        Age Distribution

                        The population age structure affects a variety of services and needs within a community.
                        Incorporated communities can vary significantly in the age distribution of their residents as
                        compared to unincorporated towns due to the services offered in a more urban area. Services are
                        driven by demand, and a community will typically provide services and facilities to meet the
                        needs of the given population. As an example, people of retirement age may need more access
                        to health care and transportation services, which are typically offered in urban areas. People
                        raising families will require schools, and schools are constructed where population drives service
                        demands.

                        This social dynamic of a community’s age structure has evolved into a significant trend
                        throughout the country, and is evident in Wisconsin and also Calumet County. The baby-boomer
                        generation, which is a large segment of the overall population, is nearing retirement age. Service
                        demands will result from the age distribution. How a community serves the population demands
                        created by the age distribution is as much a factor in defining community character as the
                        location of the community itself. It will become increasingly important to anticipate potential
                        service demands created from the population shift. Figure 2-2 displays population cohorts by the
                        percentage of the total population for 19902000 and 20002010 in Calumet County.

                                                       Figure 2-2
                          Percentage of Total Population by Age Cohort, Calumet County, 1990-
                                                    20002000-2010
                        20.0%

                        18.0%                                                                              16.6%

                        16.0%                                                                   14.9%

                        14.0%
% of Total Population




                                                                                     12.0%
                        12.0%

                        10.0%
                                                                                             18.3%
                                             7.8%     7.5%                        13.7%
                        8.0%      7.0%                           6.9%                                                 6.6%
                                                                                                        13.5%                             6.1%
                        6.0%                                                                                                    4.9%
                                                                           4.3%
                                                                                                                                                     3.8%
                                          8.0%      8.5%
                        4.0% 7.0%                            7.5%
                                                                        4.8%                                       4.5%
                                                                                                                                       5.7%                   1.6%
                        2.0%                                                                                                 3.4%                3.9%
                                                                                                                                                            1.2%
                        0.0%
                                Under 5    5 to 9   10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 59 60 to 64 65 to 74 75 to 84 85 years
                                 years     years     years    years    years    years    years    years    years    years    years    years and over
                                                                                  2000               2010

                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                                  Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-9
                        Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                    Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-20002000-2010.

Figure 2-2 visually shows the shifting of the population to older age groups over the ten year
period shown. In 19902000, 14.913.5% of the population was in the 3545 to 4454 age group, but
in 20002010 this same group accounted for 18.316.6% of the population. A similar trend was
found for the 4555 to 5459 age group. This trend is consistent with the aging of the baby-
boomer generation. Both age groups have employment demands, are raising families, and are
building new homes, which have substantial impact on community facilities, housing, economic
development, and land use. Relative to persons 60 years and older, the total number of people of
retirement age is significantlyalso growing in number.

Tables 2-8 and 2-9 display population by age cohort and median age for all communities in
Calumet County for 20002010.

                                      Table 2-8
                 Population by Age Cohort, Calumet County, 20002010
                                                                                                       Median
        Municipality       Under 5        5-19       20-44       45-64          65+      Total           Age
    T. Brillion                  95        334          453        453          151      1,486           39.2
    T. Brothertown               68        258          370        444          189      1,329           43.2
    T. Charlestown               40        158          186        267          124        775           45.6
    T. Chilton                   67        249          321        371          135      1,143           41.6
    T. Harrison                 924      2,828        3,633      2,703          751     10,839           35.2
    T. New Holstein              99        298          416        494          201      1,508           42.2
    T. Rantoul                   51        180          230        247           90        798           40.3
    T. Stockbridge               74        256          377        546          203      1,456           45.9
    T. Woodville                 50        244          254        303          129        980           41.6
    V. Hilbert                   78        228          373        293          160      1,132           38.3
    V. Potter                    13         63           79          59          39        253           38.8
    V. Sherwood                 221        583          821        811          277      2,713           40.0
    V. Stockbridge               28         96          196        200          116        636           44.8
    C. Appleton               4,996     15,352      25,101      18,945        8,229     72,623           35.3
    C. Brillion                 224        633        1,019        761          511      3,148           37.8
    C. Chilton                  275        733        1,216      1,019          690      3,933           40.0
    C. Kiel                     238        825        1,155        935          585      3,738           38.7
    C. Menasha                1,255      3,424        6,094      4,574        2,006     17,353           36.0
    C. New Holstein             159        595          878        883          721      3,236           44.7
    Calumet County            3,418     10,894      15,300      13,734        5,625     48,971           38.4
    Wisconsin              358,443 1,143,753 1,833,912 1,573,564 777,314 5,686,986                       38.5
    *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided is for the entire municipality.
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 20002010.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-10                             Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                           Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                              Table 2-9
 Population by Age Cohort of Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                              20002010
                                                                                               Median
         Municipality        Under 5         5-19    20-44   45-64      65+         Total        Age
         C. Appleton*              761       2,571   3,578   3,222       956       11,088           35.7
         C. Kiel*                    22        55      103      85        44           309          39.5
         C. Menasha*               169        532      797     573       138        2,209           35.2
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for portion of municipality in Calumet
County only.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STH-1, 20002010.

By reviewing the median ages provided in Table 2-8, it is evident that the age structure from one
community to the next is somewhat different, requiring each community to consider the services
and needs of its population differently. The median age in the Town of HarrisonVillage of Potter
was 32.335.2 while the median age in the Town of StockbridgeCity of New Holstein was
41.045.9. Each community may therefore receive different demands for services and facilities
from its residents.

Overall, the median age of Calumet County appears to be getting older. For example, in
19902000 the greatest percentage of the population was in the 25-3435-44 age group, but in
20002010 the greatest percentage of the population shifted to the 35-4445-54 age group. This
shift indicates an aging of the population base and perhaps an increase in in-migration due to
high quality of life accompanied by geographic access advantages to employment in the Fox
Valley.

2.2       Population Forecasts

Population forecasts are based on past and current population trends and are not predictions,
rather they extend past growth trends into the future and their reliability depends on the
continuation of these past growth trends. Forecasts are therefore most accurate in periods of
relative socio-economic and cultural stability. Forecasts should be considered as one of many
tools used to help anticipate and predict future needs within Calumet County.

Wisconsin Department of Administration Forecasts

The Wisconsin Department of Administration (WDOA), Demographic Services Center develops
population forecasts for the State of Wisconsin in accordance with Wisconsin Statute 16.96.
Forecasts created by WDOA are deemed the official determinations for the state. WDOA
forecasts to the year 20302035, for the State of Wisconsin, reveal several important trends that
should be noted. These trends are anticipated at the state level, and will therefore have effects on
county level population characteristics as well.



Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                             Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-11
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                   Wisconsin’s population in 20302035 is projected to be 6.356.65 million, nearly one1.3
                    million more than the 2000 Census count of 5.36 million.


                   The working age population – ages 18 through 64 – will peak in 20152020 at 3.673.75
                    million and, by 20302035 decline slightly to 3.603.72 million (but still be
                    300,000430,000 above the 2000 Census count).

                   The volume of deaths will increase substantially due to the aging population.

                   The 65-plus population will increase slowly up to 2010, and then grow dramatically as
                    the baby boomers join the ranks of the elderly. Senior citizens formed 13% of the state’s
                    total population in 2000. Their proportion will rise to over 2122% in 20302035.

          Tables 2-10 and 2-11 display the WDOA population forecasts for Calumet County to the year
          20252030.

                                       Table 2-10
              WDOA Population Forecasts, Calumet County, 20002005-20252030


                         2000 Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection # Change % Change
   Municipality       Census          2005        2010        2015        2020         2025        2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion             1,438        1,542       1,642       1,759       1,880        1,995       2,102       664     46.2%
T. Brothertown          1,404        1,433       1,455       1,491       1,527        1,557       1,579       175     12.5%
T. Charlestown            789          776         737         704         668          629         585      -204    -25.9%
T. Chilton              1,130        1,151       1,189       1,237       1,287        1,333       1,372       242     21.4%
T. Harrison             5,756        8,284      10,121      12,063      14,065       16,074     18,037     12,281    213.4%
T. New Holstein         1,457        1,526       1,577       1,642       1,707        1,767       1,818       361     24.8%
T. Rantoul                812          842         831         828         823          814         802       -10     -1.2%
T. Stockbridge          1,383        1,447       1,508       1,583       1,661        1,733       1,797       414     29.9%
T. Woodville              993          953         923         899         872          842         806      -187    -18.8%
V. Hilbert              1,089        1,111       1,113       1,125       1,137        1,145       1,145        56      5.1%
V. Potter                 252          264         290         319         349          378         406       154     61.1%
V. Sherwood             1,550        2,282       2,776       3,313       3,868        4,424       4,967     3,417    220.5%
V. Stockbridge            649          683         723         771         820          868         910       261     40.2%
C. Appleton*          70,087       72,053       74,260      77,005      79,817       82,421     84,683     14,596     20.8%
C. Brillion             2,937        2,980       3,045       3,138       3,231        3,315       3,381       444     15.1%
C. Chilton              3,708        3,776       3,961       4,184       4,412        4,630       4,826     1,118     30.2%
C. Kiel*                3,450        3,584       3,739       3,918       4,100        4,275       4,432       982     28.5%
C. Menasha*           16,331       17,188       17,609      18,168      18,768       19,345     19,857      3,526     21.6%
C. New Holstein         3,301        3,328       3,364       3,428       3,493        3,544       3,578       277      8.4%
Calumet County        40,631       45,302       49,274      53,782      58,409       62,942     67,219     26,588     65.4%
Wisconsin          5,363,675 5,589,920 5,772,370 5,988,420 6,202,810 6,390,900 6,541,180 1,177,505                    22.0%
            *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.


          Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-12                           Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                   Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
         Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center, Final Population
         Projections for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-20252030, January 20042008.

                                          Table 2-11
                   WDOA Population Forecasts of Municipalities Located in Other
                                   Counties, 2000-20252030

                    2000 Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection # Change % Change
Municipality       Census     2005       2010       2015       2020       2025       2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
C. Appleton* 10,974         11,224       12,050       13,016       14,004       14,965      15,867          4,893                 44.6%
C. Kiel*          321          316          303           293         284           273         260           -61                -19.0%
C. Menasha*       688        1,384        1,666        1,989        2,321         2,656       2,981         2,293                333.3%
         *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for potion of municipality in Calumet
         County only.
         Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center, Final Population
         Projections for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-20252030, January 20042008.

         The following are trends and notable information provided by the WDOA population forecasts
         for Calumet County:

                   From 2000 to 20252030, Calumet County’s population is estimated to increase by
                    38.765.4%. The year 20302035 population estimate for the county is 58,96671,227,
                    which would result in a 45.175.3% increase from 2000 to 20302035. (Year 20302035
                    forecasts are not provided by the WDOA for municipalities.)

                   On a percentage basis, Calumet County ranks second in the state, only behind St. Croix
                    County, for population growth from 2000 to 20302035.

                   On a percentage basis, the Town of Harrison and the Village of Sherwood are both
                    anticipated to grow by over approximately 133200% from 2000 to 20252030.

                   SixThree communities in the county are estimated to experience varying decreases in
                    population from 2000 to 20252030 including the Towns of Brothertown, Charlestown,
                    Rantoul, and Woodville, the Village Hilbert, and the City of New Holstein.

         Linear Trend Population Forecasts

         Linear forecasts were created by using the 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000 Census counts.
         Increasing and decreasing population counts were used to calculate a constant value that was
         based on past Census counts. These constant values were used to project the population to the
         year 2030 using a linear trend. Therefore, linear trends are based directly on historical
         population trends. This data was not updated as part of the 2012 amendment process. Table 2-
         12 displays the resulting linear trends from the 2000 Census count to the estimated 2030
         projection.

         In general, the linear forecasts that are provided are more conservative than the WDOA forecasts
         provided in the previous section.
         Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                              Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-13
         Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                    Table 2-12
              Linear Population Forecast, Calumet County, 2000-2030
                          2000          2005       2010       2015       2020       2025       2030 # Change % Change
   Municipality          Census      Forecast   Forecast   Forecast   Forecast   Forecast   Forecast 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion          1,438      1,432      1,426      1,449     1,471      1,494     1,516          78                     5.4%
T. Brothertown       1,404      1,401      1,399      1,392     1,385      1,379     1,372         -32                    -2.3%
T. Charlestown         789        738        687        633       579        524       470        -319                   -40.4%
T. Chilton           1,130      1,101      1,071      1,067     1,063      1,059     1,055         -75                    -6.6%
T. Harrison          5,756      5,740      5,724      6,081     6,438      6,795     7,152       1,396                    24.3%
T. New Holstein      1,457      1,430      1,404      1,389     1,375      1,360     1,346        -111                    -7.6%
T. Rantoul             812        725        638        559       480        401       322        -490                   -60.4%
T. Stockbridge       1,383      1,391      1,399      1,417     1,435      1,453     1,472          89                     6.4%
T. Woodville           993        959        925        888       852        815       779        -214                   -21.6%
V. Hilbert           1,089      1,168      1,247      1,277     1,308      1,339     1,369         280                    25.7%
V. Potter              252        315        378        428       479        529       580         328                   130.0%
V. Sherwood          1,550      1,672      1,794      1,997     2,200      2,403     2,607       1,057                    68.2%
V. Stockbridge         649        648        648        658       669        679       690          41                     6.3%
C. Appleton*        70,087     72,417    74,746      77,142    79,537     81,933    84,328      14,241                    20.3%
C. Brillion          2,937      3,000      3,063      3,112     3,161      3,210     3,259         322                    11.0%
C. Chilton           3,708      3,761      3,813      3,928     4,044      4,159     4,275         567                    15.3%
C. Kiel*             3,450      3,466      3,481      3,563     3,644      3,726     3,808         358                    10.4%
C. Menasha*         16,331     16,300    16,269      16,492    16,715     16,939    17,162         831                     5.1%
C. New Holstein      3,301      3,384      3,466      3,506     3,546      3,586     3,625         324                     9.8%
Calumet County      40,631     42,303    43,975      46,100    48,225     50,350    52,476      11,845                    29.2%
Wisconsin        5,363,690 5,482,200 5,600,709 5,751,909 5,903,109 6,054,310 6,205,510         841,820                    15.7%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 2000. Foth & Van Dyke linear projections 2005-
2030.
The following trends and notable information are provided by the linear population forecast:

         From 2000 to 2030, Calumet County’s population is estimated to increase by 29.2%.

         On a percentage basis, the Villages of Potter, Sherwood, and Hilbert and the Town of
          Harrison are estimated to increase the most in population from 2000 to 2030.

         Six communities within Calumet County are estimated to experience population declines
          from 2000 to 2030 including the Towns of Brothertown, Charlestown, Chilton, New
          Holstein, Rantoul, and Woodville.

For the Cities of Appleton, Kiel, and Menasha, which are partially located in other counties, it is
expected that each community will continue to experience population growth at varying rates
within Calumet County. For the year 2000, Appleton, Kiel, and Menasha had 15.7%, 9.3%, and
4.2% of their total population located in Calumet County. If these same percentages are applied


Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-14                                     Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                   Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
to the linear population forecasts provided in the previous table the following estimates are
created. Future linear population projections will need to include the City of Kaukauna.

                                 Table 2-13
        Linear Population Forecast for Municipalities Located in Other
                            Counties, 2000-2030
                          2000         2005       2010       2015       2020       2025        2030 # Change % Change
   Municipality          Census     Forecast   Forecast   Forecast   Forecast   Forecast    Forecast 2000-2030 2000-2030
C. Appleton*             10,974       11,369    11,735     12,111     12,487     12,863       13,240          2,266        20.6%
C. Kiel*                    321          322       324        331        339        347          354             33        10.3%
C. Menasha*                 688          685       683        693        702        711          721             33         4.8%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are an estimate for portion of municipality in
Calumet County only.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 2000. Foth & Van Dyke linear projections 2005-
2030.

It is estimated that Kiel and Menasha will add approximately 30 new residents to Calumet
County from 2000 to 2030. The City of Appleton is estimated to add approximately 2,266
residents to Calumet County, a 20.6% increase from the current population located in the city
within Calumet County. Future linear population projections will need to include the City of
Kaukauna.

East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission Population Forecasts

The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (ECWRPC), which serves Calumet
County, has also developed population forecasts for the region it serves. This data was not
updated as part of the 2012 amendment process. Table 2-14 displays the 2005 through 2030
forecasts provided by ECWRPC for Calumet County.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                      Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-15
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                Table 2-14
           ECWRPC Population Forecasts, Calumet County, 2005-2030
                     2000 2004 WDOA ECWRPC ECWRPC ECWRPC ECWRPC ECWRPC ECWRPC # Change % Change
   Municipality     Census    Estimate 2005   2010   2015   2020   2025   2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion          1,438          1,529        1,571    1,643    1,702    1,759    1,803      1,835         397       27.6%
T. Brothertown       1,404          1,425        1,448    1,429    1,387    1,332    1,256      1,159        -245      -17.5%
T. Charlestown         789            782          787      732      658      572      469        352        -437      -55.4%
T. Chilton           1,130          1,146        1,169    1,179    1,172    1,159    1,131      1,090         -40       -3.5%
T. Harrison          5,756          7,917        8,384   10,112   11,937   13,930   16,005     18,143      12,387      215.2%
T. New Holstein      1,457          1,512        1,540    1,538    1,514    1,479    1,422      1,347        -110       -7.5%
T. Rantoul             812            826          833      785      719      641      546        437        -375      -46.2%
T. Stockbridge       1,383          1,433        1,465    1,494    1,504    1,508    1,496      1,468          85        6.1%
T. Woodville           993            967          975      917      838      744      631        500        -493      -49.6%
V. Hilbert           1,089          1,106        1,121    1,090    1,038      974      892        793        -296      -27.2%
V. Potter              252            251          259      275      290      306      320        332          80       31.7%
V. Sherwood          1,550          2,059        2,188    2,677    3,196    3,765    4,358      4,972       3,422      220.8%
V. Stockbridge         649            681          699      724      743      759      770        774         125       19.3%
C. Appleton*        10,974         11,241       11,588   12,323   12,982   13,656   14,258     14,788       3,814       34.8%
C. Brillion          2,937          2,969        3,022    3,008    2,949    2,866    2,741      2,577        -360      -12.3%
C. Chilton           3,708          3,760        3,849    3,944    3,997    4,034    4,031      3,990         282        7.6%
C. Kiel*               321            320          324      314      298      278      253        223         -98      -30.5%
C. Menasha*            688          1,124        1,225    1,661    2,133    2,655    3,208      3,789       3,101      450.7%
C. New Holstein      3,301          3,313        3,364    3,301    3,181    3,028    2,824      2,573        -728      -22.1%
Calumet County      40,631         44,361       45,812   49,146   52,239   55,445   58,414     61,141      20,510       50.5%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for portion of municipality in Calumet County only.
Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2005-2030 Population Projections for
Communities in East Central Wisconsin, October 2004.

The following trends and notable information are provided by the ECWRPC population forecast:

         From 2000 to 2030, Calumet County’s population is estimated to increase by 50.5%,
          significantly higher than previous forecasts estimated.

         The Town of Harrison, Village of Sherwood, and City of Menasha are all estimated to
          experience a percentage population increase of over 200% from 2000 to 2030.

         Ten communities within Calumet County are estimated to experience population declines
          from 2000 to 2030 including the Towns of Brothertown, Charlestown, Chilton, New
          Holstein, Rantoul, and Woodville and the Village of Hilbert and Cities of Brillion, Kiel,
          and New Holstein.

Comparative Population Forecasts

The following figure displays the three population forecast techniques including the Wisconsin
Department of Administration projection, the linear forecast created by Foth & Van Dyke, and
the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission’s forecast.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-16                                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                             Figure 2-3
 Comparative Population Projections, Calumet County, 20002005-2030

                 80,000


                 70,000                                                                                         67,219
                                                                                              62,942
                                                                                                                         61,141
                                                                            58,409                     58,414
                 60,000                                                              55,445
                                                          53,782                                                    52,476
                                                                   52,239
                                          49,274 49,146                                          50,350
                                                                               48,225
                 50,000   45,302 45,812                      46,100
                                             43,975
    Population




                             42,303
                 40,000


                 30,000


                 20,000


                 10,000


                     0
                              2005            2010            2015              2020              2025                2030
                                                                        Year

                                                           WDOA       Linear    ECWRPC

Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center, Final Population
Projections for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-20252030, January 20042008. Foth & Van Dyke linear
projections 2005-2030. East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2005-2030 Population
Projections for Communities in East Central Wisconsin, October 2004. Data provided are only for
population located within Calumet County.

Based on the previous projections, it is anticipated that Calumet County’s population will
continue to increase at a moderate to somewhat significant rate. The linear population projection
is somewhat conservative when compared to the other estimates. To be prepared for any
potential population growth situation, the county should plan for population growth as shown by
the WDOA projection and the ECWRPC projection.

2.3               Housing Characteristics

There are many market factors that influence housing development within Calumet County.
Analysis of the housing interdependency with the other comprehensive plan elements is a very
important component contributing to the overall development of the Calumet County
comprehensive plan. The physical location of housing often determines the location and cost of
many public services and facilities, not the other way around. In addition, housing
characteristics relate directly to the social and economic conditions of a community’s residents.
Housing information, such as the number, type, value, occupancy, age of the existing housing

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                               Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-17
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
supply, and projections of future housing units can be used in conjunction with the other socio-
economic characteristics to provide the foundation from which decisions regarding future
housing development can be determined. This section details the housing characteristics and
trends that are found within Calumet County.

General State of Housing and Outlook

The total number of housing units in Calumet County has increased dramatically in the last 10
years when compared to the State of Wisconsin. The majority of homes in the county are single
family owner-occupied homes, but there are also a significant number of two-unit and mobile
homes. The majority of housing units in Calumet County were built between 1990 and March of
20001999. The majority of housing units in the State of Wisconsin were built prior to 1939. The
median housing value in the county is slightly less than the State of Wisconsin; however, the
median values of homes have a significant range depending on location in the county. The
number of housing units in Calumet County is estimated to continue to increase at a dramatic
rate in some areas of the county, similar to the population increases that are forecasted.

Housing Supply

Tables 2-15 and 2-16 detail the number of housing units in municipalities, Calumet County, and
the State of Wisconsin.

The U.S. Census Bureau of the Census classifies housing units as a house, apartment, mobile
home or trailer, a group of rooms, or a single room occupied as separate living quarters, or if
vacant, intended for occupancy as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in
which the occupants live separately from any other individuals in the building and which have
direct access from outside the building or through a common hall.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-18                      Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                    Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                        Table 2-15
                      Housing Units, Calumet County, 1990-2000-2010

                 .                                                          # Change       % Change
                       Municipality              2000          2010        2000-2010       2000-2010
                 T. Brillion                       521             580              59          11.3%
                 T. Brothertown                    627             642              15           2.4%
                 T. Charlestown                    300             319              19           6.3%
                T. Chilton                        371           431            60         16.2%
                T. Harrison                     2,139         3,801         1,662         77.7%
                T. New Holstein                   558           614            56         10.0%
                T. Rantoul                        258           285            27         10.5%
                T. Stockbridge                    614           704            90         14.7%
                T. Woodville                      337           352            15           4.5%
                V. Hilbert                        458           482            24           5.2%
                V. Potter                          89             99           10         11.2%
                V. Sherwood                       593         1,027           434         73.2%
                V. Stockbridge                    299           348            49         16.4%
                C. Appleton*                   27,736        30,348         2,612           9.4%
                C. Brillion                     1,230         1,349           119           9.7%
                C. Chilton                      1,606         1,808           202         12.6%
                C. Kiel*                        1,498         1,697           199         13.3%
                C. Menasha*                     7,271         7,973           702           9.7%
                C. New Holstein                 1,394         1,520           126           9.0%
                Calumet County                 15,758        19,695         3,937         25.0%
                Wisconsin                  2,321,144     2,624,358        303,214         13.1%
               *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
               Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000-2010.

                               Table 2-16
 Housing Units of Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 1990-2000-
                                  2010
                                                                         # Change     % Change
                        Municipality          2000         2010     2000-2010        2000-2010
                      C. Appleton*           3,952         4,347             395           10.0%
                      C. Kiel*                 149          146                -3          -2.0%
                      C. Menasha*              263          841            578       219.8%
                     *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for portion of
                     municipality in Calumet County only.
                     Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000-2010.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                    Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-19
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
The number of housing units in Calumet County has increased by 26.425% from 19902000 to
20002010, a rate of growth significantly higher than the State of Wisconsin, which experienced a
growth rate of 12.913.1%. While theDespite the population decreasing over the last decade in
some communities, Villages of Hilbert and Potter experienced a decline in housing units in the
last decade, all communities have seen an increase in the number of housing unitsother
communities experienced growth. The Town of Harrison and the Village of Sherwood
experienced the most significant growth. The growth in housing units in the Cities of Appleton
and Menasha, within Calumet County, has also greatly influenced and significantly increased the
total number of housing units in Calumet County.

Housing Occupancy and Tenure

Table 2-17 displays the occupancy and tenure characteristics of housing units for Calumet
County in 19902000 and 20002010.

                              Table 2-17
      Housing Occupancy and Tenure, Calumet County, 19902000 and
                              20002010
                                        Percent of            Percent of  # Change % Change
                                 2000        Total      2010       Total 2000-2010 2000-2010
  Total housing units           15,758     100.0%     19,695    100.0%       3,937    25.0%
   Occupied housing units       14,910      94.6%     18,575      94.3%      3,665    24.6%
      Owner-occupied            11,994      76.1%     15,066      76.5%      3,072    25.6%
      Renter-occupied            2,916      18.5%      3,509      17.8%        593    20.3%
   Vacant housing units            848       5.4%      1,120       5.7%        272    32.1%
      Seasonal units               287       1.8%        326       1.7%         39    13.6%
 Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000-2010.

Approximately 7676.5% of the housing units in Calumet County are owner-occupied while
18.517.8% are renter-occupied. The housing vacancy rate in the county in 20002010 was
5.45.7%, which is an important measure of whether the housing supply is adequate to meet
demand. A housing market's supply of available housing units must be sufficient to allow for the
formation of new households by the existing population, to allow for in-migration, and to
provide opportunities for households to change their housing. According to the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development, an overall available vacancy rate of 6.5% (1.5% for the
owned portion and 5.0% for the rented portion) allows an adequate housing choice among
consumers. Also, high vacancy rates offer a degree of competition in terms of price. The
available vacancy rate of a housing market is a good indication of the adequacy of the housing
supply, which influences the cost of housing. Using this measure, the housing occupancy and
tenure percentages in the county appear healthy, but could be slightly higher. Note that figures
provided are from the 20002010 Census, vacancy rates likely fluctuate from year to year and
even month to month.

Figure 2-4 further details the housing characteristics in Calumet County.



Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-20                      Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                    Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                Figure 2-4
          Housing Occupancy and Tenure, Calumet County, 20002010



                                                                        Renter-occupied
                                                                            17.8%


                                                                               Seasonal units
                                                                                   1.7%

                Owner-occupied
                   76.5%                                                         Other vacant units
                                                                                       4.0%




                           Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 20002010.

Units in Structure

Tables 2-18 and 2-19 display the number of units in
structure for Calumet County and its municipalities
inaccording to the 20002005-2009 American
Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. The City of
Kaukauna was not included in these tables because
lands were not annexed from the Town of Harrison
to the City of Kaukauna until October 2010.

Attached housing units are defined as one-unit
structures which have one or more walls extending
from ground to roof separating them from adjoining
structures, for example, row houses. Detached           Multi-Family housing, Forest Junction
housing units are one-unit structures detached from
any other house, with open space on four sides. Structures are considered detached even if they
have an attached garage or contain a business unit.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                               Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-21
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                                 Table 2-18
                            Units in Structure, Calumet County, 20002005-2009

                                     1-unit   1-unit            2     3 or 4   5 to 9 10 to 19     20 or         Mobile Boat, RV,           Total
           Municipality           detached attached         units      units    units    units more units         home van, etc.            Units
        T. Brillion             464         11       20        4       41          0          19        80                           0       639
        T. Brothertown          635          0       19        0        0          0           0        80                           0       734
        T. Charlestown          271          0         5       0        0          0           0        17                           0       293
        T. Chilton              483          0       26        3        0          0           0        24                           0       536
        T. Harrison           2,937        105       57        9        0         47           0         9                           0     3,164
        T. New Holstein         547          0         2       3        7          0           0        83                           0       642
        T. Rantoul              267          5         4       0        0          0           0        15                           0       291
        T. Stockbridge          691          3         0       0        0          0           0        52                           0       746
        T. Woodville            344          0       10        0        0          0           0        14                           0       368
        V. Hilbert              331          3       42       13       42         16           0        67                           0       514
        V. Potter                 67         5         0       9        0          0           0         0                           0        81
        V. Sherwood             887         35       43       11       15          3          28         0                           0     1,022
        V. Stockbridge          302          0       36        0        0         22           0         3                           0       363
        C. Appleton*        19,937       1,297    3,035      853    1,393      1,098       1,827       125                           0    29,565
        C. Brillion             932         18      132       35      116         51          19        72                           0     1,375
        C. Chilton            1,022        133      158       21      199         51          11         9                           0     1,604
        C. Kiel*              1,098        110      207       57       62         12          38        32                           0     1,616
        C. Menasha*           4,486        240      942      204      533        397         398       201                           0     7,401
        C. New Holstein       1,081         45      208       16      127         71          12         0                           0     1,560
        Calumet County      15,008         570    1,072      179      904        495         160       614                           0    19,002
        Wisconsin        1,692,527 106,987 183,099 95,357 121,560 85,333                 164,002 100,694                           356 2,549,915
        *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
        Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
        EstimatesSTF-3, 2000.

                                            Table 2-19
                   Units in Structure, Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                                          20002005-2009
                      1-unit        1-unit              2    3 or 4        5 to 9   10 to 19     20 or        Mobile Boat, RV,            Total
 Municipality      detached      attached           units     units         units      units more units        home van, etc.             Units
C. Appleton*       3,275        196         288          55        357        181          71         68          0                       4,491
C. Kiel*             119           0         12           0          0           0          0         21          0                         152
C. Menasha*          353          11         10           0          0          53          0          0          0                         427
         *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for portion of municipality in Calumet
         County only.
         Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
         EstimatesSTF-3, 2000.




         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-22                                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                              Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
The majority of housing units in Calumet County, 71.679%, are one-unit detached structures or
single family homes. Approximately 6.35.6% of units are 2-unit structures and 4.33.2% are
mobile homes. All other units each make up less than 4.012.2% of total units.

Persons per Household

Table 2-20 displays the number of persons per household for Calumet County in 19902000 and
20002010.

                                 Table 2-20
         Persons per Household, Calumet County, 1990 and 2000-2010

                                        Municipality                  2000           2010
                               T. Brillion                             2.87           2.72
                               T. Brothertown                          2.68           2.47
                               T. Charlestown                          2.71           2.62
                               T. Chilton                              3.09           2.75
                               T. Harrison                             2.88           2.97
                               T. New Holstein                         2.70           2.60
                               T. Rantoul                              3.22           2.93
                               T. Stockbridge                          2.73           2.51
                               T. Woodville                            2.98           2.91
                               V. Hilbert                              2.53           2.45
                               V. Potter                               2.86           2.58
                               V. Sherwood                             2.71           2.75
                               V. Stockbridge                          2.45           2.18
                               C. Appleton*                            2.52           2.43
                               C. Brillion                             2.53           2.42
                               C. Chilton                              2.35           2.28
                               C. Kiel*                                2.42           2.39
                               C. Menasha*                             2.35           2.32
                               C. New Holstein                         2.36           2.25
                               Calumet County                          2.70           2.63
                               Wisconsin                               2.50           2.43
                          *For 2000, dData provided are for the entire municipality. For 1990, data provided
                          are only for portion of municipality in Calumet County.
                          Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000-2010.

For the portions of the Cities of Appleton, KielMenasha, and KielMenasha that are located in
Calumet County, the number of persons per household for the portion in Calumet is 2.832.62,
2.332.40, and 2.852.79 respectively.

The decrease in the number of persons per household is both a national and state trend. As
indicated in Table 2-240, the number of persons per household in Calumet County decreased by
6.62.6%. From 19902000 to 20002010 only onetwo communityies, the Town of Harrison and

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                 Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-23
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
the Village of PotterSherwood, experienced an increase in persons per household during that
time. According to the Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographics Services
Center, Calumet County is projected to have 2.642.65 persons per household in 2010, 2.56 in
2020, which is more than the 2010 Census count of 2.63 persons per household, and 2.512.58 in
2030. It appears thatAs anticipated, the number of persons per household is decreasing even
quicker than estimated and estimated will to continue to decline.

Age of Housing Units

The age of the housing stock is an important element to be analyzed when planning for the
future. If there is a significant amount of older housing units within the housing supply they will
most likely need to be replaced, rehabilitated, or abandoned for new development within the
planning period. The age status may lead into county or community housing assistance or
redevelopment programs. Allowing for a newer housing supply also requires community
planning regarding infrastructure, land availability, community utilities, transportation routes,
and a variety of other items which are affected by new housing development.

Tables 2-21 and 2-22 describe the year that structures were built in Calumet County, its
municipalities, and the State of Wisconsin based on the 20002005-2009 American Community
Survey 5-Year Estimates Census.

                                 Table 2-21
          Year Structures Were Built, Calumet County, 20002005-2009
                              2005 to       2000- 1990 to 1980 to 1970 to 1960 to 1940 to 1939 or                 Total
  Municipality                   later       2004   1999    1989    1979    1969    1959 earlier                  Units
T. Brillion                        5      64     148      89      64      11      30     228       639
T. Brothertown                     3      17      94      64     134      45      96     281       734
T. Charlestown                     3      20      17      44      60       9      23     117       293
T. Chilton                        15      53      80      34      64      36      57     197       536
T. Harrison                      214   1,050     914     187      68     108     109     514     3,164
T. New Holstein                   33      78      93      63      91      42      23     219       642
T. Rantoul                         3      27      28      14      20       7      41     151       291
T. Stockbridge                    21     115      92      98      91      25      86     218       746
T. Woodville                       0      20      50      44      46      30      26     152       368
V. Hilbert                         0      12      48      83      96      48      76     151       514
V. Potter                          3       2       5       3       8      10      10      40        81
V. Sherwood                       21     313     302      80     162      38      53      53     1,022
V. Stockbridge                    11       8      84      22      46      43      72      77       363
C. Appleton*                     358   1,721   3,256   3,773   5,227   3,112   6,130   5,988    29,565
C. Brillion                        9     138     205     138     249     207     147     282     1,375
C. Chilton                         7     192     227     179     111     151     256     481     1,604
C. Kiel*                          29      66     278      84     200     138     330     491     1,616
C. Menasha*                      172     541     922     749     915     699   1,760   1,643     7,401
C. New Holstein                    0      64     136     219     230     170     297     444     1,560
Calumet County                   414   2,544   3,553   2,675   2,688   1,542   1,756   3,830    19,002
Wisconsin                     57,283 207,180 360,824 253,932 394,599 260,339 454,597 561,161 2,549,915
Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-24                               Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                             Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-3, 20002005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
Estimates.

                              Table 2-22
 Year Structures Were Built, Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                           20002005-2009
                      2005 to       2000-    1990 to   1980 to   1970 to   1960 to    1940 to      1939 or         Total
  Municipality           later       2004      1999      1989      1979      1969        1959       earlier       Units
 C. Appleton*         30        255      772      1,314     1,123        548       354        95      4,491
 C. Kiel*              0          0        19          0       13          0          0      120         152
 C. Menasha*          36        116      239           0       12         14          0       10         427
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the portion of the municipality in
Calumet County only.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 20002005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
Estimates.

Based on housing growth by decade, the most significant growth in Calumet County history
occurred between 1990 and March of 20001999, with 4,0083,553 units added to the housing
stock. Housing growth during the 1990s was nearly double that experienced in prior decades. In
comparison to the State of Wisconsin, which had its highest decade of housing growth prior to
1939, Calumet County is an emerging high growth area. Having such a new housing stock is
expected due to the more recent increases in population in the area. The growth trends in
housing are expected to mirror those of population forecasts which have similar anticipated
growth trends.

Housing Values and Rent

Tables 2-23 and 2-24 provide year 2000estimated housing values of specified owner-occupied
units in Calumet County. A housing unit is owner-occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the
unit even if it is mortgaged or not fully paid for. The U.S. Census Bureau of the Census
determines value by the respondent’s estimate of how much the property (house and lot, mobile
home and lot, or condominium unit) would sell for if it were for sale.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                    Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-25
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                                 Table 2-23
                               Housing Values, Calumet County, 20002005-2009

                            Less than $50,000 to $100,000 to $150,000 to $200,000 to $300,000 to $500,000 to $1,000,000                         Median
        Municipality        $50,000    $99,999 $149,999       $199,999    $299,999    $499,999    $999,999       or more                       (dollars)
     T. Brillion                   57           64           164            87           72           60              13                  0   $141,800
     T. Brothertown                25           52           146           119          110           46               6                  0   $159,000
     T. Charlestown                 9           46            78            73           40           22               0                  3   $151,600
     T. Chilton                     3           29           115           106          119           61               5                  0   $182,700
     T. Harrison                   47          143           356           783        1,034          316              71                  0   $203,400
     T. New Holstein               27           56           123           168          161           40               7                  0   $171,700
     T. Rantoul                     2           23            73            72             51         26               0                  0   $163,600
     T. Stockbridge                16           36           145           112            134         90              23                  9   $179,900
     T. Woodville                   6           33            90            99             51         27              14                  0   $161,700
     V. Hilbert                    49          114           163            52              3          1              10                  0   $106,900
     V. Potter                      8           27            17            13              5          0               0                  0   $100,000
     V. Sherwood                   17           35           122           293            275        123              35                  9   $198,300
     V. Stockbridge                 0           46           105            58             39         17              17                  0   $144,700
     C. Appleton*                247         3,073          9,087         3,930       2,325          900            153               27 $136,000
     C. Brillion                  80           270            442           129          41            9              0                0 $119,100
     C. Chilton                    39          304           474           104             73            0               0                0 $114,100
     C. Kiel*                      18          258           433           320            117            4               0                0 $127,200
     C. Menasha*                 201         1,280          1,686        592           372           136             60                1      $118,300
     C. New Holstein              24           346            495        195            48             0              0                0      $112,500
     Calumet County              452         1,960          4,872      3,494         2,690           966            201               21      $150,600
     Wisconsin                74,488       221,058        363,574    341,211       336,925       170,893         50,188           10,892      $166,100
          *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
          Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
          EstimatesSTF-3, 2000.

                                            Table 2-24
               Housing Values, Municipalities Located in Other Counties, 20002005-
                                               2009
                Less than    $50,000 to      $100,000 to    $150,000 to     $200,000 to    $300,000 to   $500,000 to         $1,000,000        Median
Municipality     $50,000       $99,999         $149,999       $199,999        $299,999       $499,999      $999,999             or more       (dollars)
C. Appleton*           30            280            1,680           837            332            100                0               0        $141,200
C. Kiel*               25             52              146           119            110             46                6               0        $115,500
C. Menasha*             9             46               78            73             40             22                0               3        $191,500
          *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the portion of the municipality
          located in Calumet County only.
          Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.

          The median value of homes in Calumet County for 20002010 was $109,300150,600, which is
          slightly less than the State of Wisconsin’s median of $112,200166,100. Housing values in the


          Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-26                                         Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                                 Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
county range from a low of $82,300100,000 in the Village of Potter to a high of
$160,000203,400 in the Village of Sherwood.

Housing Affordability

The 2000 CensusAmerican Community Survey also provides some additional information
regarding housing costs. For example, the median monthly owner cost for a mortgaged housing
unit in Calumet County was $1,0281,386, only $427 more than Wisconsin’s median. For those
in the county who rent, the majority paid between $300500 and $499749 in gross rent with a
median rent being $491613. For the State of Wisconsin the median gross rent was $540700. If a
singular determination of affordable housing is created upon comparison to the state averages,
housing costs in Calumet County are reasonable and affordable.

The generally accepted definition of affordability is for a household to pay no more than 30% of
its annual income on housing. Families who pay more than 30% of their income for housing are
considered cost burdened and may have difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing,
transportation, and medical care. According to the 2000 Census2005-2009 American
Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, approximately 13.333.6% of specified owner-occupied
homes with a mortgage in Calumet County required 30% or more of household income for
monthly owner costs. For the State of Wisconsin, approximately 17.830.4% paid 30% or more
of income for monthly owner costs. For Calumet County, approximately 18.310.5% of specified
renter-occupied units required 30% or more of household income for gross rent. For the State of
Wisconsin, approximately 32.345.9% paid 30% or more of income for gross rent.

Lower Income Rental Housing

WIFrontDoor, offered through the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority
(WHEDA), is a comprehensive list of affordable housing units available to low-and moderate-
income households in Wisconsin. It’s a web-based resource available to anyone who has access
to the internet and includes a comprehensive, searchable list of affordable housing in Wisconsin.
This service is free of charge.The Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority
(WHEDA) maintains a listing of federally assisted rental housing available in Calumet County.
This inventory catalogs the location, management agency, number of units, and type of
subsidized household available. The inventory for Calumet County was last updated in May of
2004. According to the inventory there are 13 project locations in Calumet County consisting of
263 total housing units. Of those units, 182 are designated as for the elderly, 58 for family
occupancy, and 23 units for disabled individuals. These facilities are located in the Cities of
Brillion, Chilton, and New Holstein and the Villages of Hilbert, Sherwood, and Stockbridge.

Community Based Residential Facilities (CBRF)

A Community Based Residential Facility (CBRF) is a home or apartment type setting where five
or more unrelated adults live together. The goal of the CBRF is to assist individuals in achieving
the highest level of independence of which they are capable. Different populations are targeted
by the CBRF and some of these populations include elderly, Alzheimer's patients, emotionally
and mentally disturbed, developmentally and physically disabled, and veterans. A CBRF is
required to provide assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, medication, community and in-

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                        Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-27
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
house activities, information and referral services, health monitoring, and meals. They are not
required to have professional nurses on duty 24 hours a day but do have staff available at all
times.

CBRF facilities in Calumet County include:

         Century Ridge, Inc., 533 E. Calumet St., Chilton
         Colonial Residence, 705 S. Madison St., Chilton
         Comfort Years Assisted Living, Inc., 2 Brighton Circle, Appleton
         Darboy Living Center, N9520 Silver Ct., Appleton
         Garrow Villa, 210 S. Parkway Dr., Brillion
         Roads To Freedom-Brillion, 610 S. Main St., Brillion
         Roads To Freedom-Chilton, 1024 Steenport Lane, Chilton
         Willowpark Residence, 1318 Jordan Ave., New Holstein
         Gardens of Fountain Way, 1050 Fountain Way, Menasha
         Brillion West Haven, 220 Achievement Drive, Brillion
         Libby’s House, 323 Field Lane, Chilton
         Oak Creek Assisted Living, 1237 Tekla Place, Kiel

2.4       Housing Unit Forecasts

Linear Trends Housing Forecasts

Using the Census counts from 1990 and 2000, a linear trend was created to estimate the
projected number of housing units from 2005 to 2030 in Calumet County. This data was not
updated as part of the 2012 amendment process. Table 2-25 displays the forecasts.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-28                      Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                    Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                               Table 2-25
    Linear Trends Housing Unit Projection, Calumet County, 2000-2030
                   Census                         Projections                          # Change % Change
   Municipality      2000      2005      2010      2015      2020      2025      2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion           521       562       603       644       685       726       767       246     47.2%
T. Brothertown        627       644       660       677       693       710       726        99     15.8%
T. Charlestown        300       304       307       310       314       317       321        21      7.0%
T. Chilton            371       401       430       460       489       519       548       177     47.7%
T. Harrison         2,139     2,631     3,123     3,615     4,107     4,599     5,091     2,952   138.0%
T. New Holstein       558       604       650       696       742       788       834       276     49.5%
T. Rantoul            267       274       281       288       295       302       309        42     15.7%
T. Stockbridge        614       634       653       673       692       712       731       117     19.1%
T. Woodville          337       344       350       356       363       369       376        39     11.6%
V. Hilbert            458       450       441       432       424       415       407       -51    -11.1%
V. Potter              80        73        67        60        54        47        41       -39    -48.8%
V. Sherwood           593       727       861       995     1,129     1,263     1,397       804   135.6%
V. Stockbridge        299       320       341       362       383       404       425       126     42.1%
C. Appleton*       27,736    28,840    29,944    31,048    32,152    33,256    34,360     6,624     23.9%
C. Brillion         1,230     1,311     1,391     1,472     1,552     1,633     1,713       483     39.3%
C. Chilton          1,606     1,766     1,925     2,085     2,244     2,404     2,563       957     59.6%
C. Kiel*            1,498     1,657     1,815     1,974     2,132     2,291     2,449       951     63.5%
C. Menasha*         7,271     7,823     8,374     8,926     9,477    10,029    10,580     3,309     45.5%
C. New Holstein     1,394     1,472     1,549     1,627     1,704     1,782     1,859       465     33.4%
Calumet County     15,758    17,405    19,051    20,698    22,344    23,991    25,637     9,879     62.7%
Wisconsin       2,321,144 2,453,829 2,586,514 2,719,199 2,851,884 2,984,569 3,117,254   796,110     34.3%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 1990-2000, STF-1. Foth & Van Dyke linear trend projection,
2005-2030.

According to linear trend forecasts, Calumet County is estimated to have 25,637 housing units in
2030, an increase of 62.7% from 2000. This estimated percentage increase is significantly
higher than the State of Wisconsin’s estimate. Two communities, the Village of Sherwood and
the Town of Harrison, are estimated to experience a housing unit increase of over 100% for the
30-year period shown.

For the Cities of Appleton, Kiel, and Menasha, which are partially located in other counties, it is
estimated that each community will continue to grow within Calumet County. For the year
2000, Appleton, Kiel, and Menasha had 14.2%, 9.9%, and 3.6% of their total housing units
located in Calumet County. If these same percentages are applied to the linear housing forecasts
provided in the previous table the following estimates are created.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-29
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                              Table 2-26
   Linear Trends Housing Unit Projection for Municipalities Located in
                      Other Counties, 2000-2030
                           Census                         Projections                           # Change % Change
   Municipality              2000          2005   2010    2015       2020    2025         2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
C. Appleton*                3,952         4,095   4,252   4,409     4,566    4,722        4,879      927    23.5%
C. Kiel*                      149           164     180     195       211      227          242       93    62.7%
C. Menasha*                   263           282     301     321       341      361          381      118    44.8%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are an estimate for portion of municipality in
Calumet County only.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 2000. Foth linear projections 2005-2030.

It is estimated that Kiel and Menasha will add between 90 and 120 new housing units to Calumet
County from 2000 to 2030. The City of Appleton is estimated to add approximately 927 housing
units to Calumet County, a 23.5% increase from the current number of housing units located in
the city within Calumet County.

Building Permit Housing Forecast

Using available information on the number of building permits issued by municipalities and the
county, the following forecast was completed. Except where noted, the forecast is based on an
11 year trend of building permit information. Due to past difficulties in obtaining data from each
municipality, and because each municipality must now track such data independently, Calumet
County no longer keeps a comprehensive record of this data. Therefore, this information was not
updated as part of the 2012 amendment process. Table 2-27 displays the forecasts.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-30                               Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                             Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                              Table 2-27
  Building Permit Forecast, Calumet County Municipalities, 2000-2030
                              Census                   Projections                     # Change % Change
   Municipality                 2000   2005    2010    2015 2020       2025      2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion                      521    579     637     696     754     812       870       349    67.0%
T. Brothertown                   627    665     702     740     778     816       853       226    36.1%
T. Charlestown                   300    310     321     331     342     352       363        63    20.9%
                2
T. Chilton                       371     407     443     479     515     551      587             216         58.2%
T. Harrison                    2,139   3,009   3,878   4,748   5,617   6,487    7,356           5,217        243.9%
T. New Holstein                  558     608     659     709     760     810      861             303         54.3%
T. Rantoul                       267     283     299     315     331     347      362              95         35.8%
                          3
T. Stockbridge                  614     666      718     769     821     873      925             311         50.6%
T. Woodville                    337     359      382     404     426     448      471             134         39.7%
V. Hilbert                      458     473      487     502     516     531      545              87         19.1%
V. Potter                        80      86       93      99     105     112      118              38         47.7%
V. Sherwood                     593     821    1,049   1,278   1,506   1,734    1,962           1,369        230.9%
                          3
V. Stockbridge                  299     328     356     385     414     442        471            172          57.5%
                    1
C. Appleton                    3,952   4,175   4,397   4,620   4,843   5,066    5,288           1,336          33.8%
C. Brillion                    1,230   1,276   1,322   1,368   1,414   1,460    1,505             275          22.4%
C. Chilton                     1,606   1,668   1,731   1,793   1,855   1,917    1,980             374          23.3%
          1,4
C. Kiel                         149     150     151     152     153     154        154                5          3.7%
                    1,5
 C. Menasha              263     412     561      710      859 1,008 1,158         895     340.1%
 C. New Holstein       1,394 1,436 1,478 1,519 1,561 1,603 1,645                   251       18.0%
 Calumet County 15,758 17,711 19,664 21,616 23,569 25,522 27,475                11,717       74.4%
1
  Data are for portion of community in Calumet County only.
2
  Includes new homes in shoreland and data obtained from Town Clerk. Clerk data only available for
2000 through 2004. Projections based on five-year average.
3
  No data available for 1995 for creation of trend projection.
4
  No data available for 1995 and 1996 for creation of trend projection.
5
  No data available for 1994, 1995, or 2001 for creation of trend projection.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 2000. Calumet County Planning Department, 2004.

Similar to linear trend forecasts, a number of communities are anticipated to experience
significant increases in housing units from 2000 to 2030. The Town of Harrison and Village of
Sherwood are anticipated to experience the greatest increases and the portion of the City of
Menasha within Calumet County is also anticipated to experience significant housing growth for
the period shown.

2.5       Household Forecasts

WDOA Household Forecasts

Similar to population forecasts, the Demographics Services Center of the Wisconsin Department
of Administration also develops household forecasts. Note that projections are for households
rather than total housing units. Households are defined as occupied housing units. For example,
Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                     Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-31
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
 in 20002010 the county had 15,75819,695 housing units and 8481,120 vacant housing units
 resulting in a total of 14,91018,575 households for the county in 20002010. Table 2-28 details
 the WDOA household forecast for Calumet County.

                                Table 2-28
           WDOA Household Forecast, Calumet County, 2000-20252030
                        2000                             Projections                          # Change        % Change
 Municipality          Census         2005       2010   2015      2020   2025      2030      2000-2030        2000-2030
T. Brillion           501    538        577      622    672      721     772          271        54.1%
T. Brothertown        523    534        547      565    583      601     619           96        18.4%
T. Charlestown        291    286        274      264    253      241     227          -64       -22.0%
T. Chilton            366    374        389      408    428      447     468          102        27.9%
T. Harrison         1,998 2,880 3,544 4,257 5,010 5,786 6,596                       4,598       230.1%
T. New Holstein       539    565        588      617    648      677     709          170        31.5%
T. Rantoul            253    263        261      262    263      263     264           11         4.3%
T. Stockbridge        506    530        557      588    624      657     692          186        36.8%
T. Woodville          333    320        312      307    300      293     285          -48       -14.4%
V. Hilbert            430    439        443      452    461      469     477           47        10.9%
V. Potter              86     90        100      111    122      134     146           60        69.8%
V. Sherwood           572    844 1,033 1,243 1,465 1,693 1,930                      1,358       237.4%
V. Stockbridge        265    279        298      320    344      367     391          126        47.5%
C. Appleton*      26,864 28,039 29,378 30,854 32,331 33,649 34,944                  8,080        30.1%
C. Brillion         1,155 1,173 1,208 1,254 1,303 1,352 1,400                         245        21.2%
C. Chilton          1,512 1,558 1,646 1,753 1,866 1,978 2,096                         584        38.6%
C. Kiel*            1,425 1,503 1,596 1,699 1,797 1,887 1,969                         544        38.2%
C. Menasha*         6,951 7,349 7,611 7,912 8,210 8,480 8,724                       1,773        25.5%
C. New Holstein     1,329 1,350 1,370 1,409 1,447 1,487 1,525                         196        14.7%
Calumet County 14,910 16,608 18,152 19,936 21,816 23,726 25,710                    10,800        72.4%
 *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for the entire municipality.
 Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center. Final Household
 Projections for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-20252030. January 20042008.

 According to the Demographics Services Center, the total number of households in the county is
 estimated to increase from 14,910 to 22,02725,710 households by 20252030, an increase of
 47.772.4% for the 2530-year period.




 Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-32                                  Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                 Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                           Table 2-29
 WDOA Household Forecast, Municipalities Located in Other Counties,
                           2000-2030
                                                      Projections               # Change % Change
  Municipality     2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030                          2000-2030 2000-2030
 C. Appleton*     3,872 3,964 4,286 4,668 5,068 5,474 5,895                        2,023         52.2%
 C. Kiel*           138      136     131     128      125     121      118            -20       -14.5%
 C. Menasha*        241      485     588     708      834     965 1,100              859        356.4%
*Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for portion of municipality in Calumet
County only.
Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center. Final Household
Projections for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-20252030. January 20042010.

East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission Household Forecasts

The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (ECWRPC), which serves Calumet
County, has also developed housing forecasts for Calumet County. Official housing projections
are not adopted by the Commission for the region; however, for sewer service area planning
purposes, draft projections are completed. The Commission has completed two projections
utilizing two methodologies for Calumet County. This data was not updated as part of the 2012
amendment. Tables 2-30 and 2-31 display the forecasts provided by ECWRPC from 2005
through 2030 for Calumet County.
                                         Table 2-30
        ECWRPC Household Forecast A, Calumet County, 2005-2030
                                                         Projections                         # Change % Change
   Municipality           2000      2005       2010      2015      2020     2025       2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion                501        549       584        615       643      666        682      181     36.1%
T. Brothertown             523        543       554        556       551      538        515       -8     -1.5%
T. Charlestown             291        292       281        264       240      209        171     -120    -41.2%
T. Chilton                 366        379       389        395       396      391        380       14      3.8%
T. Harrison              1,998      2,913     3,553      4,249     5,001    5,788      6,591    4,593   229.9%
T. New Holstein            539        574       593        605       611      609        597       58     10.8%
T. Rantoul                 261        258       244        223       196      162        121     -140    -53.6%
T. Stockbridge             506        539       563        582       596      603        602       96     19.0%
T. Woodville               333        329       323        310       291      265        231     -102    -30.6%
V. Hilbert                 430        445       437        421       396      361        317     -113    -26.3%
V. Potter                   78         84        90         97       102      108        112       34     43.6%
V. Sherwood                572        811     1,008      1,223     1,458    1,705      1,958    1,386   242.3%
V. Stockbridge             265        288       307        325       341      354        364       99     37.4%
C. Appleton*             3,872      4,096     4,411      4,707     4,988    5,234      5,438    1,566     40.4%
C. Brillion              1,155      1,198     1,219      1,223     1,211    1,179      1,127      -28     -2.4%
C. Chilton               1,512      1,585     1,657      1,712     1,754    1,776      1,775      263     17.4%
C. Kiel*                   138        142       147        149       151      150        147        9      6.5%
C. Menasha*                241        430       594        778       981    1,200      1,428    1,187   492.5%
C. New Holstein          1,329      1,371     1,390      1,389     1,368    1,324      1,257      -72     -5.4%
Calumet County          14,910     16,829    18,369     19,870 21,349      22,721     23,948    9,038     60.6%
*Data only include portion of municipality in Calumet County.
Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2004.

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                          Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-33
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                               Table 2-31
          ECWRPC Household Forecast B, Calumet County, 2005-2030

                                                  Projections                      # Change % Change
   Municipality       2000      2005      2010     2015     2020  2025       2030 2000-2030 2000-2030
T. Brillion            501       548       577      601       624   643       656       155     30.9%
T. Brothertown         523       540       537      525       506   479       444       -79    -15.1%
T. Charlestown         291       291       272      246       215   177       133      -158    -54.3%
T. Chilton             366       379       384      385       382   374       362        -4     -1.1%
T. Harrison          1,998     2,911     3,516    4,161    4,863  5,596     6,350     4,352   217.8%
T. New Holstein        539       571       574      569       558   539       512       -27     -5.0%
T. Rantoul             261       259       245      226       202   173       139      -122    -46.7%
T. Stockbridge         506       537       551      559       563   561       552        46      9.1%
T. Woodville           333       327       310      285       254   216       172      -161    -48.3%
V. Hilbert             430       443       434      416       393   361       322      -108    -25.1%
V. Potter               78        91        97      103       109   114       119        41     52.6%
V. Sherwood            572       808       996    1,197    1,417  1,648     1,886     1,314   229.7%
V. Stockbridge         265       286       298      308       317   323       326        61     23.0%
C. Appleton*         3,872     4,094     4,381    4,646    4,910  5,148     5,357     1,485     38.4%
C. Brillion          1,155     1,190     1,193    1,178    1,151  1,106     1,044      -111     -9.6%
C. Chilton           1,512     1,572     1,623    1,658    1,683  1,690     1,680       168     11.1%
C. Kiel*               138       140       136      130       122   112        99       -39    -28.3%
C. Menasha*            241       430       586      758       947 1,150     1,362     1,121   465.1%
C. New Holstein      1,329     1,356     1,341    1,303    1,247  1,169     1,069      -260    -19.6%
Calumet County      14,910 16,774 18,074 19,298 20,533 21,673              22,706     7,796     52.3%
*Data only include portion of municipality in Calumet County.
Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2004.

Household projections provided by ECWRPC continue to show an anticipated significant growth
in housing in some communities, particularly the Town of Harrison, Village of Sherwood, and
City of Menasha. ECWRPC has forecasted a housing growth for Calumet County between 52%
and 61% from 2000 to 2030. Future linear population projections will need to include the City
of Kaukauna.


Comparative Housing Forecasts

The following figures display the household forecasts created for Calumet County. Note that
Figure 2-5 displays forecasts which represent households, occupied units, not total housing units.
Figure 2-6 displays forecasts for housing units.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-34                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                           Figure 2-5
                   Comparative Household Forecasts, Calumet County, 2005-2030

           30,000
                                                                                                                                    25,710
                                                                                                               23,726
           25,000
                                                                                          21,816                                              22,706
                                                                     19,936                                                21,673
           20,000                                 18,152                                             20,533
                                                                                                                     22,721             23,948
                              16,608                                           19,298
                                                            18,074                             21,349
                                       16,774
           15,000                                                       19,870
                                                     18,369
                                 16,829
           10,000

                  5,000

                     0
                                  2005                2010               2015                   2020                 2025                2030

                                                           WDOA       East Central RPC-A         East Central RPC-B

                    Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center. Final Household
                    Projections for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-20252030. January 20042008. East Central
                    Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2004.

                                            Figure 2-6
                  Comparative Housing Unit Forecasts, Calumet County, 2005-2030
                   30,000
                                                                                                                                             27,475
                                                                                                                         25,522
                   25,000                                                                           23,569
                                                                                                                                    25,637
                                                                               21,616
                                                            19,664                                              23,991
                                                                                           22,344
                   20,000                17,711                       20,698
  Housing Units




                                                   19,051
                                17,405
                   15,000


                   10,000


                    5,000


                          0
                                       2005            2010               2015                  2020                 2025               2030
                                                                                        Year
                                                                     Linear                          Building Permit
                  Source: Foth linear trend projection, 2005-2030. Calumet County Planning Department, 2004.

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                                                   Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-35
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
2.6       Housing Programs

The following are housing programs, agencies, and activities that are currently in use or available
for use in Calumet County. The following can be used to gather further information about
housing and to assist in implementation of housing goals.

State Programs

Wisconsin Rural Development, Rural Housing Service
The mission of the Rural Housing Service is to enhance the quality of life of rural people through
the creation of safe, affordable housing where people can live, work, and prosper as part of a
community. The Wisconsin Rural Housing Service offers housing preservation grants, loans and
grants for farm labor housing, loans and grants for home improvement and repair, loans for
financing housing site development, loans for home purchase or construction, loans on apartment
buildings, and self-help technical assistance grants. For further information contact Wisconsin
Rural Development or visit their web-site.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) – Housing Program
The Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program for housing,
administered by the Wisconsin Department of Commerce, provides grants to general purpose
units of local government for housing programs which principally benefit low- and moderate-
income (LMI) households. The CDBG program is a federally funded program through the
Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Small Cities CDBG Program. CDBG funds
can be used for various housing and neighborhood revitalization activities including housing
rehabilitation, acquisition, relocation, demolition of dilapidated structures, and handicap
accessibility improvements. The maximum grant to an applicant is $500,000. Approximately 15
communities are awarded funds yearly in Wisconsin. For more information on this program
contact the Wisconsin Department of Commerce.

Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA)
The Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority serves Wisconsin residents and
communities by working with others to provide creative financing resources and information to
stimulate and preserve affordable housing, small business, and agribusiness. For further
information contact WHEDA.

WI Front Door Housing & WI Front Door
WiFrontDoorHousing is a web-based community service that is intended to better connect
providers of housing and housing services to renters who are looking for these types of housing
opportunities. Their goal is to provide access to up-to-date housing information with user-
friendly tools. These tools are customized for each user group: renters, landlords and property
managers, and housing agency staff that help people find and keep housing.

WIFront Door is a guide to community resources located throughout the state of Wisconsin. The
directory provides listings of over 2000 agencies and programs providing services to the
homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless as well as those with other housing needs. For
further information visit the Front Door web-site.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-36                      Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                    Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Habitat for Humanity
The goal of this program is to eliminate inadequate housing and poverty housing throughout the
world. Local affiliates, including dozens in Wisconsin, are responsible for raising funds,
recruiting volunteers, identifying project sites, and constructing owner-occupied housing for the
benefit of participating low-income families. In August of 2004, Calumet County received
$55,000 from the Wisconsin Department of Commerce through a Community Development
Block Grant to assist with the acquisition of two lots and site improvements needed to construct
two homes by Habitat for Humanity.

Regional Programs

Aging and Disability Resource Center
In 2005 Governor Jim Doyle announced that a grant of $755,300 (payable in July of 2006) was
awarded to Outagamie, Calumet, and Waupaca Counties (working together) to fund an Aging
and Disability Resource Center. Until the Legislature acts, however, only about $55,000 (for
"planning") has actually been committed to the project. The center will provide services that
elderly and disabled Fox Valley residents need to stay in their homes. For further information
contact the Center.

Outagamie Weatherization
The weatherization program may help with home weatherization repair and rehab. Outagamie
Weatherization manages this program on behalf of Calumet County. For further information
contact Outagamie Weatherization.

County Programs

Calumet County Homebuyer Program
The Calumet County Homebuyer Program is offered through the County’s Planning Department
and is administered by Community Housing Coordinators. Funds are allocated to qualifying
persons in order to help them make a down payment on a home, make repairs to a home they are
purchasing, or even construct a home. Applicants must be income eligible to qualify for services
and family size also helps determine eligibility. Applicants must complete an application,
participate in homebuyer classes and financial counseling, prepare a spending/savings plan, and
use a minimum of $1,000 of personal funds toward the down payment. Information is available
at the County Planning Department which can also be contacted for further information.In 2012
the county will discuss whether to retain this program in house via an independent contractor, or
partner with an adjoining county to provide services on behalf of the county.

CAP (Community Action Program) Services, Inc.
CAP has been on the frontline of the war on poverty since 1966. As a private, non-profit
corporation, CAP offers programs in Marquette, Outagamie, Portage, Waupaca, and Waushara
counties as well as in parts of Calumet and Wood counties. CAP Services, Inc. is a member of
the Wisconsin Community Action Program Association (WISCAP). CAP offers a number of
housing related programs including home buyer’s assistance, weatherization, housing
rehabilitation, rental housing assistance, and a lease/purchase program. For further information
contact CAP Services, Inc.

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                        Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-37
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
2.7       Population and Housing Trends and Outlook

The following are anticipated trends with regard to demographics and housing in Calumet
County for the next 20 years.

         The northwestern portion of the county will continue to experience high levels of growth
          in population and housing due to its location and access to the Fox Cities area.

         The county’s population will continue to age and have resulting effects on local service
          demands and housing needs.

         Over the last 30 years, Calumet County’s population grew over twice as fast as that of the
          State of Wisconsin. Calumet County is forecasted to continue that growth trend over the
          next 30 years.

         The number of persons per household will continue to decrease requiring more housing
          units and more land to accommodate the county’s growing population.

         The number of housing units in Calumet County will continue to grow at rates over
          double that of the State Wisconsin as a whole.

         The Wisconsin Department of Administration forecasts over 7,00010,000 new
          households will be added in Calumet County between 2000 and 20252030.

         The East-Central Regional Planning Commission forecasts between 7,796 and 9,879 new
          households will be added in Calumet County between 2000 and 2030.

         Assuming the level of new residential home construction continues at levels experienced
          between 1994 and 2003over the last 10 years, Calumet County could see an additional
          11,717 new homes between 2000 and 2030.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  2-38                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
3.        Transportation
Broadly speaking, a transportation system can be defined as any means used to move people
and/or products. A community relies on its transportation system daily to transport people and
goods. How effectively and efficiently the transportation system functions has broad reaching
effects in every sector of the community. System functionality is also significantly interrelated
with a community’s growth potential. Calumet County’s transportation network plays a major
role in the efficiency, safety, and overall desirability of the area as a place to live and work.

                                             The transportation system is comprised of different modes,
                                             which include: automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses,
                                             bicycles, trains, boats, airplanes, and pedestrians. While this
                                             coordination often appears seamless on an everyday level,
                                             there are certain functional characteristics, linkages, and
                                             planning components that make a transportation system
                                             productive.

                                             Roads and highways account for the majority of a
                                             transportation system, both in overall use and in cost.
                                             However, they are not the only component. Rail lines,
                                             waterways, airways, and trails are all additional elements that
                                             contribute to the entire transportation system. Taken together,
                                             these individual transportation modes create Calumet
                                             County’s transportation system. Thus, it is critical that the
                                             transportation element address each of these choices, as
                                             applicable to the county.
 Local Town of Stockbridge Road,
 Calumet County
                                    In addition, it is imperative that the system be as safe as
possible. For example, one common safety concern involves private driveway access to public
roadways and the potential hazards of poorly coordinated access management. In order to ensure
safety and operational efficiency, the transportation system needs to be efficiently managed and
maintained. Therefore, in addition to the necessary budgetary and safety considerations of the
system, planning for the location and density of new development will need to be evaluated for
potential impacts on the transportation system.

The following sections discuss in more detail, specific information about Calumet County’s
transportation system.

3.1       Existing Road System

Calumet County’s road configuration is characterized by a rural grid pattern of local roads that
typically serve property access, county highways that primarily move traffic between local roads,
larger highways, and a system of state and U.S. highways that link more urbanized areas.

Primary roadways within the county include the following:


Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                   Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-1
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
         U.S. 10 serves as a major route for northern Calumet County and provides for east-west
          travel. This route travels through the City of Brillion, community of Forest Junction, and
          eventually, the City of Menasha, providing access to the greater Fox Cities area. The
          WDOT has both is in the process of adding 824.25 Statutorily Access Controls and 84.09
          Statutorily Purchased Access Controls on U.S. 10 in the county.

         U.S. 151 is a major east-west route for southern Calumet
          County. This highway travels from the county’s eastern
          border through the City of Chilton to the county’s western
          border. The route then goes south paralleling the
          shoreline of Lake Winnebago, providing access to Fond
          du Lac County.

         STH 32/57 is one of two major roadways linking northern
          Calumet County to southern destinations in the county.
          This highway travels from the county’s northern border
          through Forest Junction, Hilbert, Chilton, New Holstein,
          and eventually Kiel. This route also provides a linkage to    USH 151
          the Green Bay area to the north. The WDOT has added
          84.25 Statutorily Access Controls on STH 32/57 from the railroad track crossing in
          Hilbert and going north into Brown. Between Chilton and New Holstein there are 84.09
          Statutorily Purchased Access Controls at intersections only and between Kiel and New
          Holstein some 84.09 Statutorily Purchased Access Controls.

         STH 55 is the other major roadway linking north to south in Calumet County. This
          highway begins east of Darboy and links Sherwood to Stockbridge and connects to U.S.
          151 in the southern portion of the county. This route generally parallels the eastern
          shoreline of Lake Winnebago.

         STH 114 is located in northwest Calumet County and travels from Menasha in
          coordination with U.S. 10 to Sherwood jointly with STH 55. The route then turns south
          from Sherwood and then east, providing access to the Village of Hilbert. Statutory
          Access Controls are in place for STH 55/114 from USH 10 to the Village of Sherwood.

         Calumet County also has an extensive network of county trunk highways linking the
          above listed highways to local roads and destinations.

Table 3-1 shows the total miles of roadway in Calumet County by type of roadway. Figure 3-1
displays the percentages of total roadway found in Calumet County. Table 3-2 shows the total
miles of roadway by municipality.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-2                           Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                        Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                           Table 3-1
                           Miles of Road, Calumet County, 20042011
                                       Feature                   Miles           % of Total
                         US Highways                          34.9               4.0%
                         State Highways                       54.0               6.2%
                         Ramps                                  3.0              0.3%
                         County Highways                     133.3              15.3%
                         Town Roads                          478.2              54.9%
                         City Roads                          126.3              14.5%
                         Village Roads                        35.0               4.0%
                         State Park Roads                       2.9              0.3%
                         Alleys                                 1.8              0.2%
                         Private Roads                          2.0              0.2%
                         Total                               871.5            100.0%
                        Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Calumet County Highway
                        Department, and Calumet County Planning Department.

                                    Figure 3-1
               Total Percentage of Roads, Calumet County, 20042011

                                        Village Roads    US Highways
                                             4.0%           4.0%
                                                                         State Highways
                                                                              6.2%
                              City Roads
                                14.5%


                                                                                      County Highways
                                                                                          15.3%




                                                 Town Roads
                                                   54.9%


          Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Calumet County Highway Department, and
          Calumet County Planning Department. Features with less than 1% of total mileage are not
          shown.
Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                    Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-3
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                            Table 3-2
                     Miles of Road by Municipality, Calumet County, 20042011
                         US            State                   County   Town     City   Village         State                Private
 Municipality       Highways       Highways       Ramps      Highways   Roads   Roads    Roads    Park Roads       Alleys     Roads     Total
T. Brillion                 4.9            6.1         0.0       11.7    54.1     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     76.9
T. Brothertown              6.5            0.1         0.0       17.4    53.6     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.7     78.2
T. Charlestown              4.7            3.3         0.0        8.5    35.9     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     52.5
T. Chilton                  2.5            5.3         0.0       14.2    45.4     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     67.4
T. Harrison                 8.6           13.6         1.3        7.9    89.1     0.0      0.0              2.9       0.0        0.5    123.8
T. New Holstein             0.0            3.3         0.0       19.8    48.8     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     71.9
T. Rantoul                  0.0            0.4         0.0       13.8    45.5     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.2     59.9
T. Stockbridge              2.3            7.4         0.3        9.2    58.9     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     78.1
T. Woodville                4.0            4.7         0.0       15.9    46.8     0.0      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     71.4
V. Hilbert                  0.0            1.9         0.0        0.0     0.0     0.0      7.4              0.0       0.0        0.0      9.3
V. Potter                   0.0            0.0         0.0        1.3     0.0     0.0      1.2              0.0       0.0        0.0      2.6
V. Sherwood                 0.0            2.0         0.0        1.0     0.0     0.0     19.5              0.0       0.0        0.0     22.5
V. Stockbridge              0.1            1.1         0.0        2.2     0.0     0.0      6.9              0.0       0.0        0.0     10.3
C. Appleton*                0.5            3.2         1.5        3.2     0.0    45.8      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.1     54.3
C. Brillion                 0.5            0.0         0.0        0.9     0.0    18.6      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.0     20.0
C. Chilton                  0.0            0.8         0.0        3.2     0.0    24.9      0.0              0.0       0.1        0.0     29.0
C. Kiel*                    0.4            0.6         0.0        0.3     0.0     2.4      0.0              0.0       0.1        0.0      3.7
C. Menasha*                 0.0            0.0         0.0        0.8     0.0    13.5      0.0              0.0       0.0        0.5     14.7
C. New Holstein             0.0            0.4         0.0        2.0     0.0    21.2      0.0              0.0       1.6        0.0     25.2
Calumet County             34.9           54.0         3.0      133.3   478.2   126.3     35.0              2.9       1.8        2.0    871.5
        Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Calumet County Highway Department, and Calumet
        County Planning Department. Includes miles for entire City of Menasha. *Only includes roads in
        Calumet County.

        3.2       Road Functional/Jurisdictional Classification

        The principal components of the county’s transportation system are its highways and roads. For
        planning and design purposes, the roadways are divided into different classes, such as arterials
        and collectors, which relate to the function of the roadway. Factors influencing function include
        traffic circulation patterns, land use, the land access needs, and traffic volumes.

        Roadways can be further defined by the entities that have authority over the roadway. These
        provide jurisdictional classifications. State and federal roads are commonly classified as arterials
        and county highways as collectors. In addition to arterial and collector roads providing for
        movement between communities, local roads provide public access to private property.
        Although a community may not have direct jurisdictional authority over a specific roadway, the
        development and land use decisions surrounding the roadway impact the roadway users, the
        community where the roadway is located, and the communities that are linked through the
        roadway. Additionally, the local street system decisions regarding local travel directly impact
        the amount of traffic that is diverted onto state and/or county facilities.

        Calumet County, administered through the Highway Department, has jurisdiction and
        responsibility for 128.33133.3 centerline miles of county roadway. The functional road

        Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-4                                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                            Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
classification system for Calumet County is depicted on Map 3-1. The functional classification
of roads is generally the basis of transportation funding related to construction and maintenance.
The functional classification of roads in Calumet County is detailed below.

It should be noted that STH 149, from the west county line to the western corporate limits of
Kiel became CTH HH in January 2006. This resulted in 7.1 miles being transferred to the CTH
system. One of the reasons for the transfer was that traffic volumes were not meeting volumes
expected for the highway to be a part of the state highway system. This jurisdictional transfer
meant that Calumet County has become responsible for maintenance on the highway.

Principal Arterials

Principal arterials generally accommodate interstate and interregional trips. These routes
generally serve all urban areas greater than 5,000 population.

Principal arterials in Calumet County include STH 441, STH 32/57, and U.S. 10 and a portion of
STH 114.

Minor Arterials

In conjunction with principal arterials, minor arterials serve cities, large communities, and other
major traffic generators, providing intra-regional and inter-area traffic movement.

Minor arterials in Calumet County include CTH LP, STHs 55 and 114 and U.S. 151, and
portions of CTH KK, CTH N and STH 114.

Major Collectors

Major collectors provide service to moderate sized communities and other intra-area traffic
generators, and link those generators to nearby larger population centers or higher function
routes.

Major collectors in Calumet County include CTHs A, AP,
B, D, G, H, HR, J, JJ, M, N, PP, Q, X, Y and portions of
CTHs BB, E, F, H, HH, KK, Q, T, and NSTH 149(there
was a jurisdictional transfer of STH 149 to CTH HH on
January 1, 2006).

Minor Collectors

Minor collectors collect traffic from local roads and provide
links to all remaining smaller communities, locally
important traffic generators, and higher function roads. All
developed areas should be within a reasonable distance of a       Calumet County Trunk Highway
collector road.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                          Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-5
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Minor collectors include CTHs BB, C, EE, F, K, TLP, S, Y and portions of CTHs BB, E, F, H,
HH, and KK, and Q.

Local Roads

Local roads provide access to adjacent land and provide for travel over relatively short distances.
All roads not classified as arterials or collectors are local function roads.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-6                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
 Map 3-1 Functional and Jurisdictional Road System




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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
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Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-8   Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
  3.3       Traffic Volume Trends

  Annual average daily traffic (AADT) counts are taken every three years for various roadways in
  Calumet County. Counts are calculated by multiplying hourly traffic counts by seasonal, day-of-
  week, and axle adjustment factors. The daily hourly values are then averaged by hour of the day
  and the values are summed to create the AADT count.

  Due to cutbacks in the WDOT traffic counting program in 2005, only principal arterials and
  minor arterials over 5,000 ADT are counted every three years. Minor arterials under 5,000 ADT
  and collectors over 5,000 ADT are counted every six years. Collectors less than 5,000 ADT are
  counted every 10 years. Currently, Calumet County is slated to be counted again in 2007
  (excluding collector roads). In 2010, all functionally classified roads (all roads except local
  roads) will be counted.

  U.S. and State Highway Traffic Volume Trends

  Table 3-3 displays selected AADT counts for U.S. and state highways found in Calumet County.
  Refer to Map 3-1 for additional AADT counts throughout the county.

                                   Table 3-3
           U.S. and State Highway AADT Counts, Calumet County, 1994-
                                20042000-2010
                                                                                     # Change         % Change
                       Location                2000    2004    2007      2010       2000-2010         2000-2010
U.S. 10, between Brillion and Forest Junction  7,300 8,000 6,700 6,500                -800      -11.0%
U.S. 10, just east of STH 55                   6,600 7,600 6,900 5,900                -700      -10.6%
U.S. 151, just east of Chilton                 3,200 2,800 3,400 2,900                -300       -9.4%
U.S. 151, just east of CTH C                   1,700 1,800 1,800 1,600                -100       -5.9%
STH 32/57, between Forest Junction and Hilbert 3,400     NA 3,400 3,400                  0        0.0%
STH 32/57, between Hilbert and Chilton         6,600 7,000 6,100 5,500              -1,100      -16.7%
STH 32/57, between Chilton and New Holstein    6,300 6,500 6,100 5,100              -1,200      -19.0%
STH 55, between Sherwood and U.S. 10           2,500 2,600 3,000 2,500                   0        0.0%
STH 114, just east of CTH N                    8,600 10,900 9,900 10,200             1,600       18.6%
STH 114, just west of Hilbert                  3,900 3,700 3,900 3,800                -100       -2.6%
  Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) Counts, 2000,
  2004, 2007, and 2010.1994, 1997, 2000, and 2004.

  As indicated by Table 3-3, the majority of U.S. and state highways in Calumet County have been
  experiencing decreasesincreases in traffic volumes. The most notable decreaseincrease has
  occurred on STH 32/57, between Chilton and New HolsteinU.S. 10, where traffic volume has
  decreasedincreased by approximately 1970%. The only increase in traffic volumes has occurred
  on STH 114, just east of CTH N, where traffic volume increased by approximately 19%.Overall,
  U.S. 10 also carries the highest amount of traffic when compared to other highways.



  Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                        Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  3-9
  Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
County Trunk Highway Traffic Volume Trends

Table 3-4 displays selected AADT counts for county trunk highways found in Calumet County.
Refer to Map 3-1 for additional AADT counts throughout the county.




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                                                               Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                           Table 3-4
County Trunk Highway AADT Counts, Calumet County, 1994-20042000-
                             2010
                                                                                 # Change        % Change
                            Location                  2000    2004    2010      2000-2010        2000-2010
  CTH KK, east of Darboy                          3,900 5,100 5,400            1,500      38.5%
  CTH PP, just north of Brillion                  2,500 2,800 2,900              400      16.0%
  CTH BB, at Brant                                1,400 1,700 1,600              200      14.3%
  CTH Y, east of Chilton                            650     750     670           20       3.1%
  CTH C, in Brothertown near county border          260     280     150         -110     -42.3%
  CTH H, just west of New Holstein                1,800 1,800 1,200             -600     -33.3%
  CTH HH (formerly STH 149), just west of Kiel    1,800 2,200 1,600             -200     -11.1%
  CTH A, near St. Anna                            1,000 1,000       960          -40      -4.0%
Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) Counts, 1994,
1997, 2000, 2004, and 2010.

As indicated by Table 3-4, only twofour county trunk highway road segments experienced
decreasing traffic volumes from 19942000 to 20042010. The greatest traffic volume increase
was on CTH KK, east of Darboy, which increased by nearly 40300% for the ten-year period. It
is anticipated that traffic volumes in northern Calumet County will continue to increase due to
the significant increases in population that are expected for the area.

Local Traffic Volume Trends

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation also tracks AADT counts on selected local
roadways within cities and villages. Table 3-5 displays some of the counts tracked within local
municipalities. Note that there are many other local streets which are monitored by the WDOT.

                               Table 3-5
      Local Road AADT Counts, Calumet County, 1994-20042000-2010
                                                                           # Change % Change
                     Location                2000   2004     2007    2010 2000-2010 2000-2010
     New Holstein, Wisconsin Avenue       9,000 9,000 8,100 7,800                  -1,200 -13.3%
     Chilton, West Main Street just       4,400 4,200 4,500 4,700                     300   6.8%
        west of Madison Street
     Sherwood, Military Road just         8,900 8,600 10,000 9,300                    400   4.5%
        north of CTH B
     Brillion, North Main Street          6,200 6,500           NA 6,100             -100  -1.6%
     Hilbert, West Main Street            3,100 3,700 3,000 3,200                     100   3.2%
     Stockbridge, West Lake Street        1,000 1,200 1,200             890          -110 -11.0%
     Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) Counts,
     1994, 1997, 2000, 2004, 2007, and 2010.
     *Figures reflect changes from 1997 to 2004, traffic counts were not taken in 1994.


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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Traffic volumes within municipalities have fluctuated remained generally stable from 19942000
to 20042010. ChiltonBrillion and SherwoodStockbridge have experienced the greatest increases
in traffic volumes for the period shown.

3.4       Crash Trends

The total number of vehicle crashes in Calumet County from 19992006 to 20042010 is as
follows, as reported by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation:

      19992006 – 732489
      20002007 – 766544
      20012008 – 671618
      20022009 – 660555
      20032010 – 731453
     2004 – 741

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation evaluated the major intersections on the state
highway system in Calumet County as part of an ongoing, regional, comprehensive intersection
safety analysis study. This review included analysis of reportable crash information from the
Department of Motor Vehicles records.

Intersections evaluated:

         US 10 and STH 55
         US 10 and CTH N
         US 10 and STH 32/57
         US 10 and CTH D
         STH 114 and CTH N
         STH 114 and STH 55/Stommel Rd.

The first two intersections listed (US 10 and STH 55 and US 10 and CTH N) do have a
significant crash history. The crash rate for these two intersections is close to 1.5 crashes per 1
million vehicles entering the intersection. This rate is not unusual for state highway to state
highway and state highway to county highway intersections. However, at both intersections
nearly 70% of all crashes that occurred were angle crashes, and over 50% of these angle crashes
resulted in an injury or fatality. As part of a study, the WDOT evaluated options available to
address the types of crashes that are occurring; one of these options was the construction of
roundabouts at these intersection locations. Roundabouts were installed at these locations. The
roundabout at the intersection of US 10 and STH 55 was installed in 2009 and the roundabout at
the intersection of US 10 and CTH N was installed in 2008.Based on the study results, the
WDOT has installed flashing 45 mph advisory signs on US 10 at both the east and west
approaches to CTH N. Rumble Strips on CTH N have been installed at both the south and north
approaches to US 10 as well as solar powered flashing LED lights above the stop signs. The
WDOT has also determined that the roundabout design at US 10 and CTH N is what they are
going to pursue constructing at the intersection. A 2009 date for construction is tentatively
scheduled. As for the roundabouts at other locations on the US 10 corridor, a roundabout was
installed at the intersection of STH 114 and CTH N in 2011. Roundabouts are scheduled to be

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installed at STH 114 and STH 55/Stommel Road in 2012 and at US 10 and STH 32/57 in 2013at
this time the WDOT is reviewing the feasibility of the roundabout design at two other locations
on US 10 at STH 55 and US 10 and STH 32/57 and US 10. The remaining three intersections at
US 10 and CTH D listed above have has a low crash history, with crash rates well below 1.0
crash per 1 million vehicles entering the intersection, therefore, no improvements are scheduled
for the intersection at this time. The WDOT will continue to monitor thesethis locations.

In 2006 the WDOT conducted a study on STH 114. Residents were concerned about a possible
increase in accidents and wanted more information on what could be done to alleviate some of
the crashes. The study examined the highway between US 10 and Sherwood and concluded that
the WDOT does not recommend any reduction to the posted speed. STH 114 remains an
important regional arterial providing mobility between the Fox Cities and the outlying rural
communities including Sherwood.

The WDOT has taken some steps to ensure this corridor maintains its vital role as a high
mobility corridor. Access was frozen per Wisconsin Statutes 84.25. This means that the current
access is frozen as it was in 2002 and no new access points will be allowed. The WDOT is also
planning some improvements over the next several years. Current plans call for the construction
of roundabouts at the intersections of STH 114 at CTH N and at WIS 55 in 2010.

The WDOT recognizes the rapid growth occurring in Sherwood and the Town of Harrison. That
growth however, requires facilities to safely move people and goods within the region. STH 114
is one of those corridors. The future of STH 114 should change significantly over the next 15
years as growth continues. In June of 2010, the WDOT began to conduct a long-range (25 year)
planning study on this area and a series of stakeholder and public information meetings were
held to discuss planning of this corridor. At the meetings, existing conditions and future traffic
projections were shared by the WDOT. Road and intersection options were also reviewed and
feedback on proposed design options was solicited by the WDOT. The proposed long-range
plan was for STH 114 to be transformed from a two-lane highway to a four-lane highway, which
would cause several homeowners and businesses to be relocated. Due to the number of concerns
raised by municipalities along the route, the WDOT suspended this planning study indefinitely in
August 2011. The WDOT is currently working with the East Central Wisconsin Regional
Planning Commission on a long-term plan that will help define the necessary improvements to
the highway system in this region. This study will identify future growth trends and therefore
help in the creation of appropriate plans to provide facilities that safely move people and goods
within the region on the state highway system. The study is scheduled to begin in 2008 with a
final report in 2010.

3.5       Additional Modes of Transport

Trucking

Trucking is an integral part of the Calumet County economy and depends on a safe and efficient
highway system as well as adequate local roads and streets. The manufacturing industry and the
agriculture industry in the county are particularly dependent on trucking.



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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
According to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation truck operator maps, officially
designated highways in Calumet County include U.S. 10 and 151, STH 32/57, and CTH PP.
There are no state rest areas or private truck parking areas in Calumet County. Table 3-6 details
the top ten exports from Calumet County by tonnage.




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                                      Table 3-6
                  Top Ten Exports by Tonnage, Calumet County, 2005
                         Commodity                                   Tons
                         Printed matter                              3,975
                         Pulp, paper or allied products              5,687
                         Fabricated metal products                   8,681
                         Clay, concrete, glass or stone products     17,078
                         Waste or scrap materials                    28,605
                         Machinery – other than electrical           32,910
                         Farm products                               42,780
                         Primary metal products                      66,294
                         Food or kindred products                    344,364
                         Nonmetallic minerals, esc. fuels            1,754,309
                        Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, 2005.

Air Service

The only airport located in Calumet County is
the New Holstein Municipal Airport. This
airport is identified by the WDOT as a Basic
Utility – B (BU-B) airport, and does not offer
commercial passenger service. This
classification means that the airport is designed
to accommodate aircraft of less than 12,500
pound gross weight, with approach speeds below
121 knots and wingspans of less than 49 feet.
Along with a 3,600 foot paved primary runway,
facilities at the New Holstein Municipal Airport
include a 2,970-foot turf airstrip. In 2004, the
New Holstein Municipal Airport received a               Aerial view of the New Holstein Airport
$200,666 FAA grant ($220,000 total project
cost) that provided grading for a new hangar site, installation of a runway end lighting system,
and replacement and relocation of the airport's rotating navigational beacon. As the New
Holstein Municipal Airport is the only air facility in the county, the improvements are as much a
valuable economic development tool as they are safety enhancements.

At the writing of this document, Calumet County is working with the City of New Holstein to
determine whether the New Holstein Municipal Airport runway should be extended from 3,600
feet to 4,300 feet to allow for corporate jets to land at the airport. A survey of area businesses
conducted in the fall of 2004 revealed a strong desire to utilize the airport if it were expanded.
Of the businesses surveyed, those located outside of the City of New Holstein indicated they
would use the expanded runway more than the businesses located in the city.

According to the WDOT Wisconsin State Airport System Plan 2020, the New Holstein Airport
will remain under its BU-B classification until the year 2020. In terms of passenger service, the

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nearest commercial service airports are in Green Bay at Austin Straubel International and in
Appleton at the Outagamie County Regional Airport. The Outagamie County Regional Airport
is the closest air passenger facility to Calumet County, located in the Town of Greenville,
approximately 10 miles to the northwest. The regional airport serves the Fox Cities Metro Area
and the surrounding counties with commercial airline service. The airport is currently served by
five commercial airlines, and provides 66 flights (arrivals and departures) daily. In addition to
the commercial passenger service, air freight, chartered flight service, car rentals, and aviation
technological services are also provided at the airport.

Private airports are located in Calumet County in the Cities of Brillion and Kiel and the Towns
of Charlestown and Brothertown.

Rail Service

There are several Canadian National rail lines that
travel through Calumet County. Canadian National
is the parent company of Wisconsin Central
Limited, which may also use these lines. Refer to
Map 3-1 for rail line locations.

Another line was once present going north from
Hilbert through Forest Junction to Green Bay, with
a branch also extending through Brillion. This line
has since been abandoned and somemost sections
have been converted to trails. WDOT purchased
the rail line between Saukville and Kiel on January
14, 2005. Calumet County residents and businesses           Rail service is a significant issue for industrial
were concerned about this change and how it would           development
affect their ability to continue rail service.
However, the county’s service comes from Menasha and/or the east and then runs south towards
Kiel. Therefore, the rail purchase would not directly affect county businesses. The Canadian
PacificNational Railroad operates a secondary line between Menasha and Manitowoc. There are
several daily freight trains that use this line, which extends along the north shore of Lake
Winnebago, through the Village of Sherwood, and east to the City of Manitowoc. Most of the
trains provide service to the Anheuser Busch Malting Complex operation located along the Lake
Michigan shoreline in the City of Manitowoc.

Calumet County businesses are encouraged to continue to utilize rail service to help assure the
service is profitable enough to the rail carrier to justify continued service. Companies that
currently use rail are as follows:

         Kiel: Land O’ Lakes, Country Horizon Cooperative
         New Holstein: Milk Specialties, Calumet Feeds and Supplies, Inc.
         Chilton: Worthington Industries, Kaytee, Briess Industries, Chilton Co-Op, Western
          Industries
         Hilbert: Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill
         Sherwood: Sherwood Elevator

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Table 3-7 details the miles of railroad found in Calumet County by municipality.

                                            Table 3-7
                           Railroad Miles, Calumet County, 20042011
                                                                                % of
                                      Municipality              Miles           Total
                              T. Brillion                            0.0          0.0%
                              T. Brothertown                         0.0          0.0%
                              T. Charlestown                         4.3         10.0%
                              T. Chilton                             5.9         13.8%
                              T. Harrison                            7.4         17.2%
                              T. New Holstein                        4.0          9.3%
                              T. Rantoul                             6.3         14.6%
                              T. Stockbridge                         0.0          0.0%
                              T. Woodville                           4.7         10.9%
                              V. Hilbert                             3.2          7.5%
                              V. Potter                              0.6          1.4%
                              V. Sherwood                            0.9          2.1%
                              V. Stockbridge                         0.0          0.0%
                              C. Appleton*                           0.0          0.0%
                              C. Brillion                            0.0          0.0%
                              C. Chilton                             3.0          7.1%
                              C. Kaukauna*                           0.0          0.0%
                              C. Kiel*                               1.0          2.2%
                              C. Menasha*                            0.0          0.0%
                              C. New Holstein                        1.7          3.9%
                              Calumet County                        43.0        100.0%
                            Source: Calumet County Planning Department, 2011. *Data
                            provided is for rail located in Calumet County only.


Water Transportation

Calumet County shares the majority of its western border with
Lake Winnebago. While there are a number of marinas and
boat landings on its shores, there are no commercial ferries or
cruise lines offering passage on the lake.

Calumet County is also relatively close to the Bay of Green Bay
and Lake Michigan. Both of these water bodies offer
commercial services and ports. The Port of Manitowoc handles
bulk commodities, newly constructed yachts, and offers a car
ferry. The Port of Green Bay is served by a major railroad and               Recreational boating is a major
                                                                             waterway use in Calumet County
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several nationally known truck lines providing overnight delivery of goods within a 400-mile
radius.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes

Pedestrian travel is an integral part of the total transportation picture. Many people rely on
walking for exercise as well as for travel from their homes to work, school, or shopping. For the
elderly, children, and those who are disabled, having safe and convenient pedestrian facilities is
often essential to daily activities.

There are several opportunities and designated areas for walking and hiking in Calumet County.
The Brillion Wildlife area, Calumet County Park, High Cliff State Park, and the Ledgeview
Nature Center all have designated trails.

The communities of New Holstein and Kiel boast the Solomon Trail, a paved hiking and biking
trail that connects the two communities. The 2.25four-mile trail runs along STH 32/57 and
under the railroad viaduct. In Kiel, the trail system connects to the River Walk trail, which adds
another four miles of scenic hiking and biking trails.

In the Village of Sherwood, there are 5.77 miles of trails that connect portions of the village’s
downtown area and residential subdivisions. Additional trails are planned and developed in
accordance with new residential subdivision development. The village has a long term trail
development plan that will ultimately connect the village to surrounding communities.

The Friendship State Recreation Trail connects Brillion and Forest Junction along Hwy 10. This
sixfour mile trail passes through woods, scenic farmland, and through the City of Brillion to
Horn Park. The trail will eventually connects with the Fox River Trail in Forest Junction. The
trail can be used for hiking, biking, and horseback riding. No motorized vehicles are permitted
during the hiking, biking, and horseback riding season.

The Fox River State Trail is a limestone, multi-use trail, which is located in an abandoned
railroad corridor. The trail runs east of STH 32/57 from Green Bay to Ott Road, north of Hilbert,
for approximately 26 miles. The trail can be used for hiking, biking, and horseback riding. No
motorized vehicles are permitted during the hiking, biking, and horseback riding season. In
winter, this trail is part of the Calumet County Snowmobile Trail system and snowmobiles are
permitted.

Calumet County is pursuing linking the Solomon Trail to the Fox River State Trail. The county
proposed to run the trail within the Canadian National Rail Line right-of-way as a Rails with
Trails project but the railroad denied that request. An alternative trail route has not been
identified. The county is pursing a bike route as a short-term solution.

Opened in August 2005, the Fox Cities Trestle-Friendship Trail provides a recreational link
between the City and Town of Menasha. The trail features a unique lift bridge over the Menasha
lock. The 1,600-foot long, lighted pedestrian bridge is the longest in Wisconsin and includes a
center pavilion area with seating, and several fishing platforms along the way. The award


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winning trestle project is part of the Friendship Trail that will ultimately run from Stevens Point
to Manitowoc.

Highly scenic low volume rural roads in Calumet County also provide abundant opportunities for
bicycling and bike touring. Attempts have been made to identify those roads most suitable for
biking in the county, but at present, no formal action has been taken by the county to officially
designate bicycle routes. In addition, the Town of Harrison is in the planning stages to provide a
trail that would link High Cliff State Park with the “CE Recreation Trail” along the north side of
CTH “CE” in Outagamie County. A possible route for this proposed trail is State Park Road.
Other trail possibilities are being considered by various citizen and civic groups in the Town of
Harrison. Plans have been discussed to provide walking trails in Harrison that would link
Sunrise Elementary School, Community Park, and several residential subdivisions and
neighborhoods.

In 2007 the Fox River State Trail gets extended from Greenleaf to just north of Hilbert. In
addition, tThe Town of Harrison has planned an extensive local trail system that will connect to
the trail. The City of Menasha, Town of Harrison, and Village of Sherwood are also working
with the Calumet County Parks Department to extend a trail from Menasha to High Cliff State
Park, approximately seven miles. The trail is called the Northshore Extension of the Friendship
State Trail. Some on-street trail routes have already been established.

Public Transit

There are currently limited public transportation systems or bus services in Calumet County.
There are urban bus services available in Green Bay, Oshkosh, Fond du Lac, and there is a Fox
Cities transit system. As the population and density increases in Calumet County, particularly in
the northern portion of the county, such services may become more feasible in the future.

The New Hope Center in Chilton does offer a public transportation option for people traveling
between the Fox Cities and Chilton. The New Hope Center van meets passengers twice a day at
the new Goodwill location in Darboy where passengers are able to make connections to and from
Valley Transit’s Route 911 – E. College Buchanan bus route. The van departs from New Hope
Center in Chilton Monday through Friday arriving at the Goodwill in Darboy. It returns to
Chilton immediately upon loading passengers arriving back at New Hope Center. The van
returns to the Fox Cities in the afternoon, departing from Chilton and arriving at the Goodwill
Darboy location. It then returns to Chilton.

Valley Transit Call-a-Ride taxi service is also available for a portion of Calumet County on
Monday through Saturday. The service area includes the area southeast of Appleton in the Town
of Buchanan north of County KK, west of Hopfensperger, south of Kimberly and east of
Eisenhower and the Town of Harrison south of County KK, east of N. Coop, north of Manitowoc
and west of State Park.

Transportation for Persons with Disabilities

Specialized public transportation services for the elderly, disabled, and other persons with similar
needs for more accessible vehicles is referred to as paratransit. There are currently limited

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services for individuals requiring paratransit in Calumet County. Taxi service is available in
Menasha and other Fox Cities communities, but is limited in most of Calumet County. There is
a volunteer transportation service coordinated through the Calumet County Aging and
DisabilitySenior Resources Center that links volunteer drivers with people in need on a request
basis.

Rustic and Scenic Roads

The Rustic Roads System in Wisconsin was created by the 1973 in an effort to help citizens and
local units of government preserve what remains of Wisconsin's scenic, lightly traveled, country
roads for the leisurely enjoyment of bikers, hikers, and motorists.

Although none are presently designated in Calumet County, the county has a number of roads
which could be candidates for designation. These roads would not only provide an attractive
landscape for motorized and non-motorized touring, their designation could be used as a
promotional tool to attract visitors and visitor-dollars into the county.

Scenic Easements

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation
maintains a scenic easement along portions of
State Highway 55 and U.S. Highway 151. The
easement has been established to protect the
view of the area as seen by the traveling public.
Although the easements vary slightly, the
majority restrict the planting or destruction of
trees that would obstruct or minimize the view,
the erection of large signs, and on one property
the construction of buildings within a specific
distance of the highway. The easements have
been in place since the mid 1960s. The WDOT         Weeks Road Bridge, Manitowoc River, just north
maintains a scenic overlook located at U.S. 151     of Highway 151, Chilton
and STH 55.

Park and Ride Lots

There are currently two park and ride lots available in Calumet County. The first is the
Sherwood park and ride lot 08-01. To reach the Sherwood park and ride, motorists should take
either WIS 55 or WIS 114 and head south on Strommel Road just north of Sherwood. The park
and ride is located immediately to the left. There is a lighted asphalt lot with parking for 18
vehicles. The second lot in the county is lot 08-02. To reach park and ride lot 08-02, motorists
should take US 10 and head north on County N. The park and ride is located immediately to the
right. There is a lighted asphalt lot with parking for 1641 vehicles.
 With the recent installation of a roundabout at US 10 and County N, the WDOT plans to expand
lot 08-02.




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3.6       Existing Transportation Plans

State Plans

Corridors 20202030 and Connections 2030: Wisconsin’s Long Range Transportation Plans
Currently the WDOT is operating under Corridors 20202030. Corridors 20202030 is a part of
WDOT's long-range highway improvement plan designed to provide essential links to key
employment and population centers throughout the state. As part of the planning process,
Wisconsin's highways were classified based on operational and economic factors. Gaps in the
system were identified and improvements scheduled. Since the plan was created in the late
1980's, about 900 miles of new highways have been built to accommodate the network's needs.

One objective of Corridors 2030 is to multi-lane the highways on the backbone corridors by the
year 2030.The plan's goal was to complete all backbone improvements, which will connect all
communities with a population of 5,000 or more to the state highway system by the year 2005.
WDOT is in the process of updating the plan to project the state's needs through 2030.


Corridors 20202030 supports economic development as the highway system assists the state in
meeting its intercity mobility needs. These connections are important for the movement of
goods and services within the state and other market areas outside the state of Wisconsin.
Corridors 20202030 helps create a positive safe and traveling environment allowing business,
industry, agriculture, and tourism to expand in the state.

WDOT conducted a study that evaluated new and expanded manufacturing plant locations in the
state from 1990 to 2001. The results revealed that these new or expanding industrial firms
created over 80,000 jobs in Wisconsin; 90% of these jobs are located within four miles of a
Corridors 20202030 highway, which illustrates the importance of the highway system.

The WDOT is currently developing a long-range transportation plan for the state, called
Connections 2030. Connections 2030 is expected to be approved within the next few years.
This new plan will address all forms of transportation over a 25-year planning horizon:
highways, local roads, air, water, rail, bicycle, pedestrian, and transit and ways to make the
individual modes work better as an integrated transportation system. Connections 2030 will
differ from WDOT's previous planning efforts. Beginning with the release of Translinks 21 in
the mid 1990s, the department has prepared a series of needs-based plans for various
transportation modes.

WDOT officially adopted Connections 2030 in October 2009. WDOT developed Connections
2030 to address all forms of transportation over a 20-year planning horizon: highways, local
roads, air, water, rail, bicycle, pedestrian and transit. Efforts during the next 20 years will focus
on maintaining and enhancing that system to support future mobility and economic growth,
Connections 2030 sets the foundation for Wisconsin’s transportation system with an emphasis
on: safety and security; preserving the existing and future system; optimizing investment in the
system for continued safety, enhanced mobility and efficiency; responding to local, regional,
national and international economic trends to maintain state economic competitiveness;


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considering environmental issues to maintain Wisconsin’s quality of life, and; providing users
with transportation options.

To meet future demands, additional funding will be required. Because priorities and financial
resources for transportation infrastructure needs can vary from budget cycle to budget cycle,
WDOT has developed Connections 2030 to be a road map of policy statements with
recommended implementation actions and priorities (defined by short-, mid- and long-term
activities). The plan is intended to help decision-makers establish transportation funding
priorities.
Connections 2030 will be a policy-based plan. The policies will be tied to "tiers" of potential
financing levels. One set of policy recommendations will focus on priorities that can be
accomplished under current funding levels. Another will identify policy priorities that can be
achieved if funding levels increase. Finally, WDOT may also identify critical priorities that we
must maintain if funding were to decrease over the planning horizon of the plan.

While the final plan will include statewide policy recommendations, some of these
recommendations may differ by specific corridors in the state. In addition to policies related to
each transportation mode, Connections 2030 will also include recommendations on cross-cutting
issues such as economic development, land use, transportation finance and the environment. The
department's goal is to provide a plan that can aid policy-makers in future transportation
decisions. Connection 2030 will be the statewide blueprint for the future.

Connections 2030 has identified a series of multimodal corridors for each part of the state.
When completed, tThe multimodal corridors will accomplish key goals including portraying key
Connections 2030 recommendations, prioritizing investments, and assist the WDOT
Transportation Regions in identifying future segments for more detailed corridor plans. The
following corridors were identified for Calumet County:

         Fox Valley, Milwaukee to Green Bay: This 130-mile corridor is part of a major
          passenger and freight corridor links Green Bay, Appleton, Oshkosh and Milwaukee and
          points further south, including Chicago. It serves the major manufacturing centers in the
          Fox Valley. It is also an important tourist corridor between the population centers in
          Illinois and the recreation areas of northeastern Wisconsin.

         Lake to Lake, Fox Cities to Manitowoc: This 50-mile corridor is part of a passenger and
          freight corridor linking central Wisconsin, the Fox Cities and the Manitowoc-Two Rivers
          area. With the ferry service across Lake Michigan, it also becomes part of an interstate
          corridor connection to west central Michigan and points east.

         Titletown, Milwaukee to Green Bay: This 110-mile corridor is part of a major passenger
          and freight corridor links Green Bay, Milwaukee and points further south, including
          Chicago. It is an important tourist corridor between the population centers in Illinois and
          the recreation areas of northeastern Wisconsin, including Door County.

U.S. 10/USH 441
U.S. 10/USH 441 is a vital regional transportation link serving the Fox Cities urban area
including communities in Calumet, Outagamie, and Winnebago Counties. The WDOT is

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currently conducting a study that evaluates the impacts of expanding U.S. 10/USH 441 from four
to six lanes. The study will also review upgrading U.S. 10/USH 441 interchanges.

The Fox Cities area is one of the fastest growing areas in the state. Traffic volumes have
increased sharply over the last decade. Existing U.S. 10/USH 441 does not have sufficient
capacity to safely handle expected traffic increases and lacks auxiliary lanes, which help preserve
traffic flow between closely spaced interchanges. Construction would not begin until 2011 or
2012 at the earliest, assuming improvements are funded. Calumet County approved resolution
2004-17 in July, 2004, a resolution requesting legislative support for funding of reconfiguration
of U.S. 10. The resolution noted that U.S. 10 is an integral part of the economic development of
Calumet County as well as Manitowoc, Outagamie, and Winnebago Counties. The resolution
also stated the Calumet County Highway Committee felt it is necessary for immediate
consideration by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation with regard to funding for design
and construction due to the increase in traffic volumes and safety concerns.

U.S. 10 Corridor Study
The WDOT is conducting a long-range planning study to address the corridor needs through the
year 2035 for U.S. 10 from Midway Road to the U.S. 10/STH 114 split. WDOT began holding
stakeholders and public informational meetings in spring of 2010.

There are safety concerns throughout the study areas, though they do vary somewhat by location.
As new commercial and residential areas develop, safety and operational issues will occur.
Additional control of access points along all of U.S. 10 may be needed to maintain future
roadway operations and minimize crashes. Intersection improvements may also be necessary to
accommodate the increased traffic.

State Highway 55
STH 55 south of Sherwood has been identified by the WDOT and other planning agencies as a
potentially important corridor for the future in Calumet County. As development continues
along the USH 41 corridor between the Fond du Lac and Green Bay urban areas, preservation of
transportation mobility along the STH 55 corridor may become more important.

State Highway 41 Bypass
Long term the Wisconsin Department of Transportation may need to route traffic away from the
congested State Highway 41 to the east side of Lake Winnebago, through Calumet County.
On February 16, 2010 by Resolution 2009-44, Calumet County requested that the Wisconsin
Department of Transportation consider planning for an alternative eastern route of State
Highway 41. However, the WDOT declined planning at theis time due to upgrades being made
on the existing State Highway 41 in Winnebago County.

Other Studies
In winter of 2007 the WDOT will conduct a corridor preservation and expansion study from US
10 to STH 55, south of junction. Also, in winter of 2007 the WDOT will conduct a preservation
study and look at access controls on US 10 from STH 441 to STH 32/57.




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Regional Plans

Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan, Fox Cities Urbanized Area, 2005
This plan, prepared by the East Central Regional Planning Commission, was a requirement due
to the location of a Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in the Fox Cities urbanized area.
The study area included approximately 274 square miles including the Cities of Menasha and
Appleton and a portion of the Town of Harrison. The plan includes adopted goals, objectives,
and policies, an inventory of existing conditions, a land use plan with several alternatives,
recommendations, environmental review, and a financial plan.

Specific modal recommendations identified in the plan which are located in Calumet County
were as follows:

         CTH AP (Midway Road), CTH N to Kernan Avenue: Town of Harrison jurisdiction,
          proposed project to construct four lane urban section, implementation date of 2010.

         CTH KK, CTH N to STH 55: Calumet County jurisdiction, proposed project to construct
          four lane urban facility, implementation date of 2008.

         CTH LP, CTH AP to US 10: Calumet County jurisdiction, proposed project to construct
          four lane urban facility, implementation date of 2008.

         Eisenhower Drive, CTH AP to US 10/STH 114: Town of Harrison jurisdiction, proposed
          project to construct two lane urban section, implementation date of 2010.

         Lake Park Road, Plank Road to Kensington Drive: City of Appleton jurisdiction,
          proposed project to reconstruct four lane urban section, implementation date of 2007.

         US 10, Appleton to urban area boundary: WDOT jurisdiction, proposed project of
          capacity expansion to four lanes, implementation date not scheduled

The Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan also recommended further study for two areas in
Calumet County. The first was for STH 114, from US 10/STH 114 split to the STH 55/STH 114
split south of Sherwood. The proposed project would be to study a capacity expansion to four
lanes. The second area recommended for further study is CTH N, STH 114 to US 10. The
proposed project would by to study a capacity expansion to four lanes.

The county and the Town of Harrison have asked East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning
Commission to examine the current transportation system in Harrison and develop a
transportation plan so future growth can effectively occur in conjunction with a well planned
transportation network.

STH 441/CTH KK Area Traffic Study, 2000
At the request of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, East Central Regional Planning
Commission worked with local jurisdictions to prepare this traffic area study. The area of the
STH 441 interchange with CTH KK was expected to experience significant development in
coming years. The entire STH 441 corridor has been a magnet for commercial development.

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The study area included portions of both Outagamie and Calumet Counties. The study area was
bounded by College Avenue (CTH CE) on the north, CTH N on the east, USH 10/STH 114 on
the south and Oneida Street (USH 10) on the west. Local governments, including the counties,
the City of Appleton, the Town of Buchanan and the Town of Harrison, worked to update the
proposed land use plan for the area. Information provided in the study includes proposed land
uses, traffic volume forecasts, a safety analysis, as well as a variety of other detailed information.

County Plans

There are no transportation related planning documents solely for Calumet County. The county
does maintain a five year capital improvement plan.

3.7       Planned Transportation Improvements

State Transportation Projects

Six Year Highway Improvement Program: 2006-20102011-2016
The WDOT currently invests approximately $750 million each year towards improving and
rehabilitating roads. The Six-Year Highway Improvement Program details roads that are
scheduled for improvements within each WDOT region. The following are remaining projects
identified for Calumet County as well as known project provided by the WDOT District:

         MainRyan Street, City of Brillion, CTH HR – E CPL. 1.95 miles planned for 2009 to
          20102012. Urban reconstruction of MainRyan Street, Brillion. Urban limits will be
          extended west to NorthwayProgress Dr. Accommodates utility replacement expansion
          by the city. West of NorthwayProgress Dr. to HR will be resurfaced.

         U.S. 10 and STH 32/57 intersection. Construct a roundabout at the current intersection.
          Planned for 2013 to 2016.

         WCPL Sherwood-U.S. 10. Mill and overlay asphaltic pavement. 2.07 miles planned for
          2012.

         Intersection modification, STH 114/55. 0.05 miles planned for 2008 to 20102012.
          Construct a roundabout at the current intersection.Reconstruct intersection of STH
          114/55 north of Sherwood possibly to a roundabout configuration.

         Telulah Avenue overpass. Replace the Telulah Avenue overpass asphaltic approaches
          with concrete pavement. 0.10 miles planned for 2012.

         Sherwood-Kaukauna park and ride reconstruction. Planned for 2012.

     US    10 and CTH N intersection, Town of Harrison, intersection reconfiguration. Planned
          for 2008.



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     US    10 and STH 55 intersection, Town of Harrison, intersection reconfiguration. Planned
          for 2009.

     US    10, Ryan Street, City of Brillion. CTH HR to ECPL. Planned for 2009.

     US    10 and STH 32/57 intersection reconfiguration. Planned for 2010.

     STH     55, Military Road, Village of Sherwood. STH 114 to CTH M. Planned for 2014.

     STH   114 intersection reconfiguration. STH 114 intersection with STH 55. Planned for
          2010.

     STH   114 intersection reconfiguration. STH 114 and CTH N intersection. Planned for
          2010.

     CTH     BB, STH 114 to CTH B. Town of Woodville. STP-Rural railroad minor. Planned
          for 2008.

     CTH     E, STH 32/57 to CTH Y. Town of Chilton and Rantoul. STP-Rural Minor. Planned
          for 2007.

         CTH Y, East Main Street, STH 32/57-Park Street. City of Chilton. STP-Rural Minor.
          Planned for 2007.

County Transportation Projects

The Calumet County Highway Department develops and/or revises a five-year capital
improvement plan every year. The following are planned projects for 20072012 through
20102016.

20072012
    E: CTH E to STH 32/57, Bridge
      Replacement Design
    F: CTH BB to STH 55, Pulverize and
      Overlay (4.9 miles)
    KK: CTH N to Outagamie County Line,
      Pulverize and Overlay (0.96 miles)
    KK: Coop Road Intersection, Design and
      Construct Signal with Outagamie County,
      Appleton, Harrison, Buchanan
    LP: U.S. 10 to Midway Rd, Design 3-lanes
                                                          STH 32/57 road construction summer of
                                                          2004
     G: CTH H to South County Line, Pulverize and
        Binder (1 mile)
     HR: STH 32/57 to USH 10, Overlay Finish (3.4 miles)
     K: STH 32/57 to CTH PP, Pulverize and Binder (4.49 miles)
     KK: Calumet County Line to Brown County Line, Pulverize and Binder (2.49 miles)


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     N: USH 10 to STH 114, Overlay Finish (1 mile)
     Y: STH 32/57 to Park St., Construct with City of Chilton


20082013
    BB: STH 114 to CTH B, Reconstruct with Woodville (2.0 miles)
    C: STH 151 to CTH H, Pulverize and Overlay (2.0 miles)
    E: CTH E to STH 32/57, Bridge Replacement Construction
    H: CTH G to CTH G, Pulverize and Overlay (2.0 miles)
    KK: CTH N to Outagamie County Line, Pulverize and Overlay (0.96 miles)
    KK: Coop Road Intersection, Design and Construct Signal with Outagamie County,
      Appleton, Harrison, Buchanan
    Y: CTH E to CTH PP, Pulverize and Overlay Hot Mix (3.6 miles)
    X: STH 57 to Manitowoc County Line, Pulverize and Overlay Hot Mix (2.1 miles).
   AP: CTH N to Kernan Avenue, Design with Appleton, Harrison (STP Urban)
   G: CTH H to South County Line, Overlay Finish (1mile)
   K: STH 32/57 to CTH PP, Overlay Finish (4.49 miles)
   KK: Calumet County Line to Brown County Line, Overlay Finish (2.49 miles)
   KK: CTH N to STH 55, Design with Harrison, Buchanan, Outagamie County (STP Urban)
   S: STH 55 to STH 114, Overlay Finish (1.24 miles)
   T: Church Rd. to USH 151, Design (1.46 miles)


20092014
    BB: STH 114 to CTH B, Reconstruct with Woodville (2.0 miles)
    BB: CTH B to U.S. 10, Right-of-Way Purchase
    C: STH 151 to CTH H, Pulverize and Overlay (2.0 miles)
    H: CTH G to CTH G, Pulverize and Overlay (2.0 miles)
    J: CTH X to South Urban Limit, Mill Curb and Overlay with City of New Holstein
    LP: U.S. 10 to Midway Rd, Pulverize and Overlay (1.51 miles)
    Lake Park Rd: Plank Rd to Midway Rd, Concrete Pavement Construction with Appleton
    N: Schmidt Rd to U.S. 10, Design Urban with Harrison
    Y: Park St to Breed St, Design Reconstruct with City of Chilton
    Y: CTH E to CTH PP, Pulverize and Overlay Hot Mix (3.6 miles)
   AP: CTH N to Kernan Avenue, Construct with Appleton, Harrison (STP Urban)
   BB: STH 114 to CTH B, Design with Woodville (2.73 miles STP Rural)
   D: USH 10 to Brown County Line, Mill Curb Areas, Pulverize, Overlay (2.3 miles)
   F: Grand Street to USH 151, Design with City of Chilton
   KK: CTH N to STH 55, Design with Harrison, Buchanan, Outagamie County (STP Urban)
   LP: USH 10 to CTH AP, Design with Menasha, Appleton, Harrison
   N: USH 10 to STH 114, Pulverize and Binder (1 mile). Will be completed in coordination
      with WDOT roundabout project.




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20102015
    Midway Rd: N Coop Rd to CTH N, Design and New Construction with Harrison (1.0
      miles)
    BB: CTH F to STH 114, Pulverize and Overlay (7.2 miles)
    G: MB Lane to CTH H, Pulverize and Overlay (4.72 miles)
    H: CTH G to CTH C, Pulverize and Overlay (2.02 miles)
    LP: U.S. 10 to Midway Rd, Pulverize and Overlay (1.51 miles)
    T: Church Rd to CTH X, Pulverize and Overlay (5.73 miles)
    T: Church Rd to U.S. 151, Reconstruct (1.46 miles)


2016
        Eisenhower: U.S. 10 to Midway Rd, Design and New Construction with Harrison (1.5
         miles)
      BB: CTH B to U.S. 10, Reconstruct with Woodville (3.3 miles)
      F: U.S. 151 to Grant St, Design and Reconstruct (0.4 miles)
      G: MB Lane to CTH H, Pulverize and Overlay (4.72 miles)
      H: CTH G to CTH C, Pulverize and Overlay (2.02 miles)
      KK: CTH N to STH 55, Design and Construct with Harrison, Buchanan, Outagamie
         County (STP Urban)
      LP: U.S. 10 to Midway Rd, Construct with Harrison, Menasha
      T: Church Rd to CTH X, Pulverize and Overlay (5.73 miles)
     BB: STH 114 to CTH B, Construct with Woodville (2.73 miles STP Rural)
     J: CTH X to New Holstein South Urban Limits, Pulverize, Overlay ( 1 mile)
     KK: CTH N to STH 55, Construct with Harrison, Buchanan, Outagamie County (STP
         Urban)
     LP: USH 10 to CTH AP, Construct with Menasha, Appleton, Harrison
     N: Schmidt Rd. to USH 10, Design with Harrison
     T: Church Rd. to USH 151, Construct (1.46 miles)
     Y: Park St. to Breed St., Design with City of Chilton


3.8       Transportation Programs

The following are transportation programs, agencies, and activities that are currently in use or
available for use in Calumet County. The following can be used to gather further information
about transportation and to assist in implementation of transportation goals.

State Programs

Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Bureau of Aeronautics
The Bureau of Aeronautics is responsible for accomplishing the WDOT mission in the air mode
of transportation. The Bureau's mandate includes improving aviation safety, developing air
transportation facilities, and providing aviation information and technical expertise to an array of
external and internal customers. The Bureau works closely with federal, state, and local
governments and with aviation industry associations. The Bureau has state permit authority for
airport site approval and tall structures construction. The Bureau provides safety and technical
education programs to aid pilots, flight instructors, and mechanics in meeting FAA regulatory
requirements. For further information contact the WDOT.

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Freight Railroad Programs
The Wisconsin Department of Transportation offers two programs to help preserve and improve
Wisconsin’s freight rail service: The Freight Railroad Preservation Program (FRPP) and the
Freight Railroad Infrastructure Improvement Program (FRIIM). These programs provide local
units of government, industries, and railroads the assistance they need to preserve essential rail
lines and encourage improvements to existing rail lines. Typical projects include track
rehabilitation, spur construction, track acquisition, and storage facility construction. For further
information contact the Bureau of Railroads and Harbors of the WDOT.

Transportation Economic Assistance (TEA) Program
The Transportation Economic Assistance program provides 50% state grants to governing
bodies, private businesses, and consortiums for road, rail, harbor, and airport projects that help
attract employers to Wisconsin or encourage business and industry to remain and expand in the
state. Grants of up to $1 million are available for transportation improvements that are essential
for an economic development project. It must be scheduled to begin within three years, have the
local government's endorsement, and benefit the public. For further information about this
program contact the WDOT, Division of Transportation Investment Management.

Local Roads Improvement Program (LRIP)
Established in 1991, the Local Roads Improvement Program (LRIP) assists local governments in
improving seriously deteriorating county highways, town roads, and city and village streets. A
reimbursement program, LRIP pays up to 50% of total eligible costs with local governments
providing the balance. The program has three basic components: County Highway Improvement
(CHIP); Town Road Improvement (TRIP); and Municipal Street Improvement (MSIP). Three
additional discretionary programs (CHIP-D, TRIP-D and MSIP-D) allow municipalities to apply
for additional funds for high-cost road projects. For further information contact the WDOT.

County Elderly and Disabled Transportation Assistance Program
The County Elderly and Disabled Transportation Assistance program provides counties with
financial assistance to provide transportation services to elderly persons and persons with
disabilities. For further information contact the WDOT.

Recreational Trails Program
Towns, villages, cities, counties, tribal governing bodies, school districts, and incorporated
organizations are eligible to receive reimbursement for development and maintenance of
recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both motorized and non-motorized recreational
trail uses. Eligible sponsors may be reimbursed for up to 50% of the total project costs. Eligible
projects include maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation of
trailside and trailhead facilities and trail linkages, construction of new trails, and acquisition of
easement or property for trails. For further information contact the WDNR.

Safe Routes to School Program
The revised federal transportation act, SAFETEA-LU, signed into law on August 10, 2005,
provides funding to state departments of transportation to create and administer Safe Routes to
School (SRTS) Programs. SRTS programs encourage children ages K-8 to walk and bike to
school by creating safer walking and biking routes. SRTS programs improve walking and biking

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travel options, promote healthier lifestyles in children at an early age, and decrease auto-related
emissions near schools.

SRTS will allow parents and communities to feel better about their children walking and biking
to school by creating a safer environment in the vicinity of the school. This can be achieved
through a variety of ways including new sidewalks and bikeways, traffic calming initiatives,
educating parents and children on pedestrian safety, and creating programs that encourage
students to walk/bike to school such as a "Walking School Bus." In addition, SRTS programs
ease automobile traffic and congestion near schools, and reduce fuel consumption and air
pollution. For further information the WDOT can be contacted.

Regional Transportation Programs

Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan, Fox Cities Urbanized Area, 1997
This plan was completed by the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission. The
report was prepared to meet the requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation
Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) for long-range transportation and land use in metropolitan areas.
Only the extreme northern portions of Calumet County were included in the study area of this
report.

The ISTEA program is now SAFETEA-LU, a federal program. On August 10, 2005, President
George W. Bush signed the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient, Transportation Equity Act: A
Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). SAFETEA-LU authorizes the Federal surface transportation
programs for highways, highway safety, and transit for the five-year period 2005-2009.

County Transportation Programs

Calumet County Highway Department
The primary goal of the Calumet County Highway Department is to provide for a safe and
efficient system of highways throughout the county. Twenty-two staff members at the
department are committed to providing dependable, reliable, cost effective, and quality services
for the taxpayers on 458 lane miles of roadway.

Services are administered and funded by the Highway Department on the county highways and
through contract with the WDOT on the state trunk highways. Wisconsin is one of only a
handful of states that partners with counties on road maintenance of the state and federal
highways that pass through the respective county. The department's primary work consists of the
following: asphalt paving, milling, pulverizing, crack sealing, seal coating, shoulder
replacement/rehabilitation, mowing/brushing, ditch/drainage maintenance, and winter
maintenance.

The department utilizes a computerized pavement management system known as PASER as well
as visual inspections by staff to keep an updated condition report on every mile of county trunk
highway overseen. The PASER software tool helps the department determine which mile of
highway gets what type of maintenance, and, is a vital tool the department uses in budgeting and
prioritizing projects that are included in the department’s five year capitol improvement
program.

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The department is also very proud of the long standing relationships it has with surrounding
counties. The department shares services and equipment with other counties which allows for a
substantial savings and benefits to all involved. Examples of this shared effort are center striping
for Manitowoc County and its townships; paving, seal coating, milling, trucking, and
construction for Manitowoc, Outagamie, Sheboygan, Fond du Lac and Winnebago Counties.

Local Transportation Programs

Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating (PASER)
PASER is a simple method of rating asphalt and concrete roads on a scale of 1 to 10 and gravel
roads on a scale of 1 to 5, based on visual inspection. PASER manuals and a video explain how
and why roads deteriorate, and describe proper repair and replacement techniques. PASER
ratings can be put into an easy to use pavement management software.

A program/tool Calumet County and the towns in Calumet County use to determine budget
priorities for road construction and repair is the "Wisconsin Information Systems for Local
Roads" (WISLR). The WISLR Program is an internet-accessible system that helps local
governments and WDOT manage local road data to improve decision making and to meet state
statute requirements. With Geographic Information System technology, WISLR combines local
road data with interactive mapping functionality. More specifically, WISLR is a clearing house
for local road information, such as surface type, surface year, width, curb, condition, and other
specifications. WISLR generates the data local units of government need to make budget
decisions regarding repair and maintenance. The towns are required to submit the ratings
identified in the WISLR Program to the WDOT every two years.

Roundabouts
Modern roundabouts are the newest form of intersection in the U.S. Several are in operation in
Wisconsin, including a new roundabout in the Town of Harrison, with a second one planned.
Roundabouts provide safe and efficient traffic flow and make use of extensive safety and traffic
research conducted over the past 25 years in other countries. Today's roundabouts are much
smaller than the "traffic circles" of earlier years. Roundabouts move traffic safely through an
intersection because of slower speeds, fewer conflict points, and easier decision-making. Studies
by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety show that roundabouts provide a 90% reduction in
fatal crashes, 76% reduction in injury crashes, 30-40% reduction in pedestrian crashes, and 10%
reduction in bicycle crashes.

3.9       Transportation Trends and Outlook

Future transportation issues and opportunities can be anticipated by extending current and
historic patterns forward and by assessing the interaction between land use and transportation.
Transportation trends are important to consider when drafting local plans and policies.
Transportation and future land use are directly related, and transportation trends have a
tremendous impact on how local governments budget their resources. This also holds true for
county and state governments. The information presented in this report, as well as information
gathered from local Calumet County officials and residents, supports the following transportation
trends:

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Roads and Highways

         Work trip travel times will continue to increase, along with trip length.

         An increasing volume of highway traffic will continue into the future. Related traffic
          control and safety issues are likely to follow.

         Lower density development in rural areas will lead to increased costs of maintaining and
          developing transportation facilities.

         The demand for paratransit services will increase as the general population ages in the
          urbanizing areas of Calumet County.

         The availability of funding for county and local transportation projects will be a primary
          factor in scheduling capital improvements.

         Highway congestion will increase as trips become longer and vehicle ownership
          increases.

         The use of STH 32/57 (north - south) and US 10 (east - west) for local traffic and as
          major statewide connectors will continue to lead to higher traffic volumes.

         STH 55, south of Sherwood, and the potential for use as an alternate corridor to the USH
          41 corridor.

         The growth of commercial development along highway corridors may lead to increased
          traffic congestion at interchanges and at-grade intersections.

         Crash prone intersections will need improvement.

         Routes between cities and villages are likely to continue to grow in traffic volume.

         Concerns raised by local residents are likely to center on controlling traffic speeds and
          intersection safety.

         Major highway intersections will continue to be target locations for new commercial and
          industrial development.

Trails/Recreation

         Demand will increase for regional trail and
          pedestrian facilities similar to the Solomon
          Trail due to increases in development and
          outdoor recreation demands.



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                                                            Solomon Trail
         New trail and park development will be coordinated with new development or roadway
          reconstruction projects.

         User demands for park and recreation facilities will increase.

         Demands for use of public land and recreation facilities will outpace supply.

Airport and Railroad

         Demand for corporate aviation services will increase in concert with growth in regional
          economic development.

         The New Holstein Airport and its ability to provide aviation services to meet growing
          demand will be critical for Calumet County’s future economic development strategy.

         The availability of rail in Calumet County will continue to be used as an economic
          development tool.




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4.        Utilities and Community Facilities
People engage in their community services and facilities everyday: any time a child is taken to
school, a dish is washed, or a bag of trash is put out for collection. All communities address
these needs, however, there are a variety of venues that can be used. In some communities a
public water system is provided while other communities’ residents utilize private wells and
some communities use a combination of both. Not only is there variety in the methods used to
meet different community needs, not all facilities exist within all jurisdictions.

Addressing community service needs is becoming even more challenging for local governments.
In this age of budget deficits and shrinking revenues, municipal governments are constantly
looking for ways to provide needed and expected services with fewer resources. In order to
facilitate wise decisions and policies, it is valuable to estimate the future utility and community
facility needs of the community.

Not only do service provisions need to meet resident demands, the type and cost of community
facilities and services affect property values and taxes and contribute to many aspects of the
quality of life within a community. Quality of life is further attributed to local features such as
parks, schools, utilities, and protective services. These services require substantial investment
supported by local tax bases or user fees. The level of service
is generally influenced by the users ability or interest in paying
for the service. This often results in a trade-off between
lifestyle and services. Take for instance a person who chooses
to live in the town on a 35-acre parcel. This development will
most likely utilize a private sewage disposal system and a
private well. The resident might choose the rural lifestyle over
the convenience of a public water and sewer system.
Conversely, the urban resident might live with more traffic and
less open space in order to be closer to work, schools, libraries,
and hospitals. In rural areas the level of service provided is
generally low but as rural areas develop the demand for services
increases.

This element includes an inventory of existing facilities and
services and provides insight into their condition and level of         Calumet County Courthouse
service. It is important to note that information regarding
utilities, facilities, and services identified within this element may not be all-inclusive.

The following sections discuss the utilities and facilities of Calumet County in more detail.

4.1       County Administrative Facilities and Services

County Public Buildings

The following public buildings are owned and operated by Calumet County and are the primary
sites where county government services are conducted.

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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
         Calumet County Courthouse (located at 206 Court Street, City of Chilton)
          This facility houses most of the county’s departments including the County
          Administrator, Child Support Agency, County Clerk, Emergency Management, Health
          and Human Services Department, Department of Human Services, Senior Resource
          Center, Land and Water Conservation Department, Treasurer’s Office, Register of Deeds,
          Planning Department, Circuit Court, Sheriff’s Department, Corporation Counsel, and the
          Calumet County Jail.

     Calumet    Homestead Rehabilitation Center (located at 1712 Monroe Street, City of New
          Holstein)
          This facility is licensed by the State of Wisconsin as a 101-bed skilled nursing facility
          and provides nursing care at the intensive skilled, skilled, and intermediate levels. The
          interior of the facility offers multiple spacious lounges. Homestead's main lobby houses
          a bird aviary and there are also flower gardens, fish aquariums, walkways, porches, and
          other amenities to provide a comforting environment. The facility also includes an in-
          house chapel and a dining room. A 12-bed secure unit is dedicated to the care of
          residents with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Also located on site is a
          garage.

         Calumet County Parks Department
          A variety of facilities are owned and maintained by Calumet County at park facilities.
          Facilities are owned and maintained at the Calumet County Park, Becker Lake County
          Park, Ledge vView Nature Center, Stockbridge Harbor, and Brothertown Harbor.
          Facilities generally include shelters, restrooms, storage sheds, maintenance facilities, and
          concession areas. Available facilities vary by location.

         Chilton Highway Shop (located at 241 E. Chestnut Street, Chilton)
          This shop is the primary facility for the Calumet County Highway Department. The shop
          includes an office. Adjacent to this facility, located on Park Street, is a storage shed and
          a salt shed.

         Additional Highway Shops (Sherwood, Forest Junction)
          In addition to the Chilton Highway shop, the Highway Department also has a Sherwood
          shop (located at Highway 55 and 114, Harrison) and a Forest Junction shop (located on
          Highway 10, Brillion). BothThis sites includes a steel frame shop as well as salt storage
          sheds. There areis no offices located at thesethis shops.

         Calumet County also owns the following homes and landproperties near the courthouse
          to allow for future expansion if needed.
           Garage (128 Court Street)
           House and garage (228 Court Street)
           House Land (230 Court Street)
           House and shedLand (306 Court Street)


         The Department of Health and Human Services also has a branch office in Appleton,
          however, the space is leased and not owned by Calumet County.

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                                                                        Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
         The Calumet County Aging and Disability ResourceSenior Center leases sites, or
          portions of facilities, throughout the county for use as senior meal sites or for meals on
          wheels programs. Leased sites are found at the following locations:
           Village hall/fire station, Hilbert
           Village/Town hall, Stockbridge
           Senior Citizens Center, New Holstein
           Community Center, Brillion
           Community Center, Sherwood
           Senior Citizens Center, Chilton


County Committees, Commission, and Boards

The following committees, commissions, and boards serve Calumet County. This list also
includes committees, commissions, and boards of which Calumet County is represented for
regional or specific issues.

       Aging & Disability Resource Center/Long            Joint Planning Committee Regarding
        Term Support Advisory Committee                     Intergovernmental Agreement
      Aging & Disability Resource Center                 Land Information Council
        Serving Calumet, Outagamie and Waupaca            Land & Water Conservation Committee
        Counties Advisory Committee                       Legislative Services Committee
      Agricultural & Extension Education                 Local Emergency Planning Committee
        Committee                                           (LEPC)
     Bay Area Agency on Ageing Board of                 Long Term Support Advisory Committee
        Directors                                         Loss Control Committee
     Bay Area Agency on Aging Advisory                   Manitowoc-Calumet Counties Library
        Committee                                           Systems Board
     Board of Health                                     New Holstein Library Board
      Brillion Library Board                             Northeast Wisconsin Regional Economic
      Calumet County Traffic Safety                        Partnership (NEWREP)
        Commission                                       Landfill Standing Committee
     Calumet Homestead Rehabilitation Center             Planning, Zoning and Farmland
        Board                                               Preservation Committee
     Child Care Resource & Referral, Inc.                Protection of Persons and Property
      Chilton Library Board                                Committee
     Civil Rights Compliance Committee                   Public Grounds and Property Committee
      Committee on Appointments                          Regional Ad-Hoc Committee
      Committee on the Rules of Order of the             Revolving Loan Fund Committee
        Calumet County Board of Supervisors               Salary and Personnel Committee
      Committee to Inspect the Jail and Jail            Senior Resource Center Advisory Board
        Register                                         Smart Growth Advisory Committee
      County Children with Disabilities                 Transportation Coordination Study
        Education Board                                     Committee
      County Parks Commission                            USDA Local Work Group
      Criminal Justice Stakeholders Committee            Veolia Hickory Meadows Landfill
      Ethics Inquiry Committee                             Standing Committee
      Finance and Audit/Information Services             Veterans Service Commission
        Committee                                         WI East Central Regional Planning
      FoxComm Fiscal Advisory Board                        Commission (WECRPC)

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        FoxComm User Technical Committee                Wisconsin Works/W-2 Steering Committee
        Glacierland Resource & Conservation              Zoning Board of Adjustments Committee
         Development Council
      Health and Human Services Board
      Heart of the Valley Metropolitan Sewerage
         District (HVMSD)
      Highway Committee
     Human Services Board
     Information Services Committee
      International Trade, Business & Economic
         Development Council (ITBEC)

4.2       Local Administrative Facilities, Services, and Buildings

Town of Brillion

The Brillion Town Hall is located at N8992 Randolph Street. Elected officials include a town
chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, a treasurer, and contracts for assessment
and building inspection services services from a private providers.

The Town of Brillion has a relatively new municipal building located east of Forest Junction
along USH 10. This building is home to a large community meeting space, town offices, town
garage and the fire department. The town also owns a garage for maintenance equipment
storage. This garage is located in Forest Junction. The town has no plans to expand eitherthe
facility. It is anticipated that thesethis facilityfacilities will continue to meet town needs in the
future.

The town has a town board, plan commission and a sanitary board. Town employees consist of
one full time and one halfpart time road maintenance personnel. First responders and fire
fighters all serve the town on a voluntary basis.

Town of Brothertown

The Brothertown Town Hall and town garage are located at W3880 St. Charles Road. Elected
officials include a town chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, a treasurer, and an
assessor. The town has a town board, plan commission, planning and zoning committee, smart
growth committee, and a zoning board of appeals.

There is one full time employee, the town road supervisor. There are approximately fouris a part
time electrical employees and part time snow plow drivers. The town contracts for the part time
services of an attorney and building inspector. The smart growth committee is comprised of
volunteers.

Town of Charlestown

The Charlestown Town Hall is located at N3685 Highway T. Elected officials include a town
chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, a treasurer, and contracts for assessment
and building inspection services from a private providers.

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The town has a town board and a plan commission. Town staff includes a full time road
maintenance supervisor, a part time employee for snow removal and miscellaneous road work,
and another part time individual responsible solely for snow removal.

The town hall is used not only for public meetings, but it also serves as the town polling place.
The Charlestown municipal garage is located adjacent to the town hall. The town has a salt shed
by the municipal garage.

Town of Chilton

The Chilton Town Hall is located at N4695 County Highway BB. The hall includes a town
office and meeting place. The town garage is immediately north of the town hall. Elected
officials include a town chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, treasurer, and
contracts for assessment and building inspection services from a private providers. The town has
a town board and a plan commission.

Town of Harrison

The Harrison Town Hall is located at W5298 State Highway 114. After nearly two years of
planning and construction the new town hall and shop facility was completed in 2006. Elected
officials include a town chairman and four supervisors. The town has an administrator, clerk,
treasurer, administrative coordinator, administrative assistant, planner, road department
superintendent, building inspector, and contracts for assessment services from a private provider.
The town also utilizes a plan commission, park committee, and a citizen’s advisory
committeezoning board of appeals. Other commissions include Darboy Joint Sanitary District
Commission and the Waverly Sanitary District Commission. For more information on the town
visit their web site.

Town of New Holstein

The New Holstein Town Hall is located at 1465 Tecumseh Road. Elected officials include a
town chairman and two supervisors. The town’s clerk and treasurer are also elected. There is
one full time employee who is responsible for road maintenance. One part time individual is
hired to help with snow removal and seven people are hired on a part time basis for elections.
Lastly, the town contracts services for assessments, building inspections, dog census, tire
collection, and garbage and recycling pick up.

The town has a town board, plan commission, a board of review, and is a member of the East
Shore Recycling Consortium.

Town of Rantoul

The Town of Rantoul shares a meeting place with the Village of Potter. What is known as the
town hall is actually called the Village of Potter Village Hall. This building is located at 307
Central Street in Potter. The town garage is also located in the Village of Potter and is located at
320 Central Street.

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Elected officials include a town chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, a treasurer,
and contracts for assessor and building inspection services from private providerscontracted
assessor. The town has a town board and a plan commission. There is one full time employee,
the town road maintenance supervisor. There are part time road maintenance personnel, part
time election inspectors, and a part time cemetery caretaker.

Town of Stockbridge

The Stockbridge Town Hall is located in the Village of Stockbridge at 175 S. Military Rd.
Elected officials include a town chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, a treasurer,
and contracts for assessment services from a private provider and another contractor for building
inspections. The town works with the other towns in the county to contract for special services,
like hauling gravel.

The town has a town board and a planning commission. There is only one full time employee,
which is for road maintenance. There are also two part time employees, one to help with road
maintenance, the other for road maintenance and cemetery maintenance. Two additional citizens
are hired on an “as needed” basis for snow removal.

The town hall is adjacent to the town fire station, and both are shared with the Village of
Stockbridge (both in the Village of Stockbridge). The town garage is located along Hwy 55,
south of the village, and is used to house road maintenance equipment and supplies. In 2010, the
town purchased land in the southeast corner of the State Highway 55 and Campbell Drive for the
development of a new town garage. In June 2011, the town board took action to not pursue the
remodeling of the existing town garage or development of a new town garage.

Town of Woodville

The Woodville Town Hall is located at W3350 County B. Elected officials include a town
chairman and two supervisors. The town has a clerk, a treasurer, contracted building inspector
and an assessor. The town has a town board and a plan commission.

The town hall is used for public meetings and is the polling place. The town shed is located next
to the town hall and is used to store town equipment and items for the Hilbert middle school.

There is only one full time employee who is responsible for road maintenance. Part time
employees plow snow, and there is one part time employee who manages solid waste and
recycling.

Village of Hilbert

The Hilbert Village Hall is located at 26 North 6th Street in Hilbert. Elected officials include a
village president and six trustees. The village has a clerk-treasurer, deputy clerk-treasurer, and
director of public works. The village contracts for assessment services and building inspection
from private providers.


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                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Currently, the village hall houses the clerk’s office, boardroom, Department of Public Works,
nutrition site, Well #1 pump house, and the municipal garage. The village also has a community
center located at Fifth and Cedar Street. The center was built in 1992 and houses the fire
department and contains one large meeting room and one small meeting room. The meeting
rooms are available for anyone to use.

Village of Potter

The Potter Village Hall is located at 307 Central Street in Potter. Elected officials include a
village president and two trustees. The village has a clerk, treasurer, and an assessor and
contracts for building inspection services. Village owned buildings include the village hall,
which is also used by the Town of Rantoul for public meetings, and the sewage treatment plant.

Village of Sherwood

Public buildings and facilities operated by the village include the village hall, community center,
wastewater treatment plant, four lift stations, and maintains onetwo municipal wells as an
emergency back-up water source. Village elected officials include a president and six trustees
and constable. The village has a permanent full staff of fivesix, and one summer employee.
Assessment services are contracted from a private provider. Wastewater and Water Utility
operations are contracted from a private provider. For information about the village visit their
web site.

Village of Stockbridge

The Stockbridge Village Hall and office is located at 116 South Military in Stockbridge. An
office for the village/clerk treasurer is located here as well as a small meeting room. The
remaining portion of the building is leased to a commercial business. The village also has garage
space at the water plant on Lake Street.

Elected officials include a village president and six trustees. The village has a part-time clerk-
treasurer and contracts for assessment and building inspection services from a private providers.
The village has water and a sewer utility. A five-member board governs the water utility and a
five-member commission governs the sewer utility. The utilities share a part-time administrative
position.

City of Appleton

Appleton City Hall is located at 100 North Appleton Street in Appleton. A mayor and 16 part-
time alderpersons make up Appleton's Common Council. This city operates under 17
departments as follows:

                        Assessor's Office                   Library
                        Attorney's Office                   Mayor's Office
                        City Clerk                          Park and Recreation
                        Economic Development                Planning
                        Finance                             Police

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                         Fire                                Public Works
                         Health                              Utilities
                         Human Resources                     Valley Transit
                         Information Services

The Appleton Common Council has six standing committees including community development,
finance, safety and licensing, municipal services, parks and recreation, and utilities. The city
also has a number of additional committees, commissions, and boards. The city also has an
extensive array of public buildings, utilities, facilities, parks, etc. For more information on the
City of Appleton refer to the city website.

City of Brillion

Brillion City Hall is located at 130 Calumet Street in Brillion. Elected officials include a mayor
and nine alderpersons. The city has an administrator, clerk-treasurer, community development
director, attorney, building inspector, and contracts for assessment services from a private
provider.

The city owns and operates the Brillion Community Center (BCC). The center was dedicated in
1970 and was built as a recreational facility and meeting center to be used by residents and
organizations in the community. The BCC contains two swimming pools used both for
recreational swimming and swim team meets, a standard sized gymnasium, racquetball court, TV
lounge room with pool tables, kitchen facilities, and meeting rooms. Meeting facilities include
two conference rooms, assembly room, kitchen, and activity room. For more information about
the city visit their web site.

City of Chilton

Chilton City Hall is located at 42 School Street in Chilton. Elected officials include a mayor and
eight alderpersons. The city has an administrator coordinator, a clerk-treasurer, clerk,
building/plumbing inspector, an attorney, director of public works, public works administrative
assistant, librarian, recreation director, community development director, block grant
administrator, a city clerk-treasurer-administrative coordinator, deputy clerk-treasurer, public
works director, public works administrative assistant, building/plumbing inspector, development
director, block grant administrator, recreation director, library director, fire chief, police chief,
police department administrative assistant, emergency management director and contracts
attorney and for assessment services from a private provider.

Committees, commissions, boards, and other entities serving the city include:

      General Government Committee
      Public Safety Committee
      Public Works Committee
      Culture/Recreation Committee
     Sanitation and Development Committee
      Planning Commission
      Chilton Housing Authority


Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  4-8                         Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
         Library Board
         Board of Appeals
         Redevelopment Authority
         Tree Board
         Cable Communications Advisory Council
         Intergovernmental Boundary Committee – Meets with Town of Chilton and Town of
          Charlestown on a quarterly basis.
         Board of Review
         Chilton Lake District

In 1996, the City of Chilton dedicated its new Community Center/City Hall. This centrally
located facility is fully handicapped accessible and used daily by organizations including the
senior meal siteCalumet County Aging and Disability Resource Center nutrition program, the
Chilton Senior Citizens, the Chilton City Band, and youth groups. For more information about
the city visit their web site.

City of Kiel

Kiel City Hall is located at 621 6th Street in Kiel and provides space for the city’s administrative
facilities. Elected officials include a mayor and six aldermen. The city has an
administrator/clerk, treasurer, building inspector, attorney, and contracts for assessment services
from a private provider.

The Kiel Community Center is located one block south of Third and Fremont Streets. The center
hosts community meetings and the senior nutrition program. The facility can be reserved for
group functions.

The city hall was constructed in 1928 and houses the city administrator’s office, treasurer’s
office, city assessor, utilities, police department, fire department office, public works department,
council chambers, and the city’s two rescue squads. The city street department, located on
Washington Street, provides the community with street maintenance and repairs. The city shop
is used primarily for equipment storage and maintenance. For more information about the city
visit their web site.

City of Menasha

Menasha City Hall is located at 140 Main Street in Menasha. Elected officials include a mayor
and eight aldermen. The Common Council meets the first and third Monday of each month at
7:00 p.m.

City officials include the following:

              Mayor                                  Menasha Utilities, GM
              Council President                      Park and Recreation Director
              Assessor                               Park Superintendent
              Attorney/Personnel Director            Physician
              Clerk                                  Police Chief
              Community Development Director         Public Health Director

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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
              Comptroller                            Public Works Director
              Emergency Directory                    Public Works Superintendent
              Engineer                               Senior Center Director
              Fire Chief                             Treasurer
              Health Sanitarian                      Wastewater Maintenance Supervisor
              Weights and Measures                   Wastewater Plant Manager
              Library Director

Committees, commissions, boards, and other entities serving the city include:

              Administration Committee                Board of Health
              Board of Public Works                   Parks and Recreation Board
              Personnel Committee                     Board of Appeals
              Menasha Utilities Commission            Board of Review
              Plan Commission                         Medical Advisory Board
              Menasha – Neenah Sewerage               Committee on Aging
               Commission
              Police and Fire Commission              Housing Authority
              Landmarks Commission                    Board of Education
              Library Board

The City of Menasha owns, operates and maintains a number of facilities and buildings,
including city hall, two fire stations, library, police department, senior center, swimming pool,
public safety building, and a number of other park and recreation and public utility facilities.
Recent facility projects included a library expansion and renovation of city hall and the police
station. For more information about the city visit their web site.

City of New Holstein

New Holstein City Hall is located at 2110 Washington Street in New Holstein. Elected officials
include a mayor, and eight aldermen. The city has a clerk-treasurer, deputy clerk-treasurer,
attorney, assessor, emergency management director, building/plumbing inspector, library
director, public works director, manager of utilities, and a recreation director. For more
information about the city visit their web site.

4.3       Protective Services

Police Services

Calumet County Sheriff’s Department
The Calumet County Sheriff’s Department                           Police Services
provides police services to all towns in Calumet
County as well the Villages of Stockbridge,            The following police departments serve
Sherwood, Potter, and Hilbert.                         Calumet County:

The Patrol Deputies of the Calumet County                  Calumet County Sheriff’s
Sheriff’s Department are primarily responsible              Department
for patrol of Calumet County and responding to             Appleton Police Department
                                                           Brillion Police Department
                                                           Chilton Police Department
Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  4-10              Kiel Police Department and Trends Report
                                                                     Calumet County Inventory
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                                           Menasha Police Department
                                                           New Holstein Police Department
calls for service. Since the department is a relatively small county Sheriff’s Department, the
deputies are required to specialize in many fields of law enforcement so that quality professional
services are provided to the citizens of Calumet County.

Several of the specialization’s deputies may pursue as an employee of the patrol division are:
school resource officer, field training officer, emergency response team, evidence technician,
crash investigation, water safety patrol, and snowmobile patrol.

The Sheriff’s Department currently has one school resource officer position. The deputy
assigned to this position is currently working in several of the schools in the county, which are
not served by a full time municipal law enforcement agency. This deputy works in the schools
throughout the school year and returns to a patrol position during the summer months.

The Sheriff’s Department currently uses an extensive field-training program. The program lasts
approximately 3-4 months and each new Patrol Deputy must go through the program. There are
currently three Field Training Officer’s (FTO’s) for the sheriff’s department and one supervisor
who coordinates the program.

The Calumet County Sheriffs Department currently has three members assigned to the
Outagamie County multi-jurisdictional response team. The team is working toward a joint effort
based out the Outagamie County Sheriff’s Department. Outagamie County borders Calumet to
the north. The team is comprised of officers from within Outagamie County, including several
cities within that county. This cooperative effort helps reduce costs for all agencies involved.

The Calumet County Sheriff’s Department utilizes specialized evidence technicians. These
deputies are specially trained in the processing, collecting, packaging and storing of evidence.
Whenever evidence needs to be processed one of these specially trained deputies are utilized so
that evidence is properly preserved for trial.

The Sheriff's Department often has to respond to serious motor vehicle crashes. Deputies with
specialized training are often called upon to investigate and sometimes reconstruct the crash.
The department currently has several deputies that are trained in technical accident investigation
and two that are reconstructionists.

The department also has a Water (Boat) Patrol program. Calumet County rests on the eastern
shore of Lake Winnebago, which is one of the largest inland fresh water lakes in the country.
The purchase of equipment for this water patrol program was funded exclusively with donations
from the private sector. The boat patrol provides law enforcement presence on the eastern half
of the lake. The department patrols looking for boaters in distress, looking for safety and law
violations and also provides boating inspections and watercraft operators safety courses.

The Sheriff’s Department currently has two 1998 Polaris Indy snowmobiles which are equipped
to allow snowmobile patrol on groomed snowmobile trails within Calumet County. Snowmobile
patrol deputies teach Department of Natural Resources snowmobile safety certificate classes
each year.

Calumet County Jail

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The Calumet County Jail is part of the court house complex located within the City of Chilton.
The jail budget is overseen by the Protection of Persons and Property Committee of the Calumet
County Board.

The present building was completed in 1979. A renovation of the court house in 1997 included
an expanded Huber Law/Work Release Dorm and revised visiting facilities. The Wisconsin
Department of Corrections has approved the jail for the detention of adult offenders with a
maximum capacity of 54 inmates.

The jail staff consists of a jail administrator, one sergeant, eleven full-time corrections officers,
and seven part-time corrections officers. The Wisconsin Law Enforcement Standards Board
certifies all jail staff as jail officers. Jail officers receive a minimum of twenty-four hours of
annual in-service training to maintain state certification.

Appleton Police Department
The Appleton Police Department has a central office building in downtown Appleton, the facility
was constructed in 1976. The Appleton Police Department adheres to District Team Policing,
which calls for the assignment of officers to three geographical areas in the city. Each district is
supervised by a management team consisting of a captain and four lieutenants. The number of
patrol officers assigned is proportional to the measured workload.

The Appleton Police Department's Police School Liaison (PSL) program is one of the longest
running and well established PSL programs in the State of Wisconsin. There are currently 12
police officers working in City of Appleton schools. In addition to the 12 PSLs, there is a
lieutenant who serves as a coordinator to the program and who also works on a variety of
community initiatives to provide better services to juveniles and their families.

The Public Information Officer (PIO) is the coordinator for the Citizen's Law Enforcement
Academy where, throughout the 13 weeks, citizens are acquainted with all aspects of the
department as well as the rest of the criminal justice system. There is a Young Citizens'
Academy held each summer, which is geared toward middle school students.

The focus of the Resource Development Unit is to provide support services in the area of hiring,
training, professional standards, and general human resources. RDU is staffed with two officers,
one confidential secretary, and a part-time accreditation manager.

The Investigative Services Unit (ISU) is primarily responsible for the investigation of major
felony crimes such as homicide, sexual assault, burglary, robbery, forgery, and fraud. The
investigators assigned to these crimes have developed an advanced level of expertise by
attending specialized training and through years of experience working on complex cases with
colleagues at the state and local level.

Other major units and positions within the department include a community resource unit, crime
analysis, drug enforcement, identification/evidence, accident investigation, bike patrol,
negotiator, special tactics and response team, and field training officer.



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Brillion Police Department
The Brillion Police Department operates from the city hall located at 130 Calumet Street in
Brillion. The department is in continuous operation, with officers on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days
a week, and 365 days a year. The department is made up of seven full-time police officers, three
part-time personal, and one part-time civilian. In addition to general police activities and
response to calls for services, the department actively participates in community-policing
activities, DARE, instruction at the elementary and middle school levels, Crime Stoppers; and
the Calumet County Drug Enforcement Unit.

The Brillion Police Department has mutual aid agreements with Calumet County, Brown County
and Manitowoc County. The department currently has three squad cars.

Chilton Police Department
The Chilton Police Department staff includes a police chief, five full-time officers, and eight
part-time officers for special events. There is also one officer which serves as a school liaison.
An officer is on duty serving the city 24 hours a day. The Department is located in the city hall.
There are mutual aid agreements in place with neighboring communities.is located in the
 Chilton City Hall. The department consists of six full-time officers and seven part-time officers.
The department has one part-time administrative assistant. The six full-time officers consist of
the chief, lieutenant and four patrol officers. Police coverage is 24 hours per day. One officer is
also designated to assist in drug investigations as a member of the Calumet County Drug
Prevention Task Force. The department has two fully equipped squads.

Kiel Police Department
The Kiel Police Department is housed in the city hall on Sixth Street. The city’s police force
consists of 12 employees, seven officers, and five dispatchers. Equipment used by the
department includes two fully equipped squad cars and a variety of other equipment common to
most departments of similar size. The city has no jail facilities of its own, and must depend upon
the use of the Calumet and Manitowoc County jail facilities. Other services offered by the police
department include Kid Care, babysitting program, crossing guards, etc.

Menasha Police Department
The City of Menasha Police Department, located on First Street in Menasha, provides full 24
hour a day public protection service to the community. The department serves approximately
16,200 residents, patrolling 6.33 square miles and 61.57 miles of streets. The department is
staffed by a chief of police, lieutenant of investigation services, three investigative services
officers, two police school liaison officers, one crime reduction officer, records clerk, traffic
clerk, and five police support staff.

The department utilizes five marked patrol vehicles, one evidence vehicle, one community
service van and three unmarked squads. All squads are equipped with Mobile Data Terminals
and each officer is assigned a personal portable radio. Department equipment is updated on a
regular basis and is generally in excellent condition.

The City of Menasha Police Department maintains a Crisis Rescue Team (CRT) to serve
exceptional warrants and to respond to critical incidents involving barricaded individuals,


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hostages and /or armed subjects. The CRT consists of 10 officers who have received specialized
training to deal with these types of situations as a team.

New Holstein Police Department
Department staff includes a police chief, lieutenant, and five officers, of which one is a school
liaison officer. The New Holstein Police Department has an emergency dispatch center. The
center is staffed by one full-time and one part time police administrative assistant 12 hours a day
from 7am. – 7 pm. After 7 pm., radio and telephone dispatching is transferred to the Calumet
County E-911 Dispatch Center.

Tri-Communities Crime Reduction Coalition (TRICOM)
TRICOM is a tax exempt non-profit corporation. TRICOM was formed in January of 1994.
TRICOM's Board of Directors is made up of community volunteers who work or live in the
Northern half of Winnebago County. TRICOM meets on the 3rd Friday of each month at 7:30
A.M. to 9:00 A.M. The meetings are open to the public and are held at the Neenah Police
Department Community Room, 2111 Marathon Avenue, Neenah, WI 54956. For more
information on becoming a TRICOM member, a local police crime prevention officer can be
contacted. The following police agencies participate in TRICOM: Menasha Police Department,
Winnebago County Sheriff's Office, Neenah Police Department, and Town of Menasha Police
Department.




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Fire Protection Services

Appleton Fire Department
The Appleton Fire Department has a staff of
                                                             Fire Protection Services
101 men and women; 97 sworn and four
civilian employees, 87 of whom through the
rank of captain, are represented by the                The following fire departments serve
International Association of Fire Fighters. The        Calumet County:
department provides service from six fire
                                                           Appleton Fire Department
stations located strategically throughout the city
                                                           Neenah-Menasha Fire and Rescue
and has mutual assistance agreements with
most of the surrounding municipalities.                     Department
                                                         Harrison #1 Fire Department
                                                          Harrison #2 Fire Department
In addition to fire suppression, the department
                                                          Hollandtown Fire Department
provides a full range of fire prevention, safety
                                                          Forest Junction Fire Department
education, emergency medical response, and
                                                          Brillion Fire Department
rescue services. It conducts both commercial
                                                          Potter Fire Department
and residential inspections and is responsible
                                                          Hilbert Fire Department
for issuing permits (open burning, petroleum
                                                          Chilton Fire Department
storage tanks, large tents, new business
                                                          New Holstein Fire Department
occupancy, etc). The department also makes
                                                          St. Anna Fire Department
presentations for elementary, middle, and high
                                                          Kiel Fire Department
school students and offers general safety
                                                          Town of Calumet Volunteer Fire
educational programs and fire extinguisher
classes.                                                    Department
                                                          Stockbridge Fire Department
                                                          Town of Brillion Fire Department
In 2000, the City of Appleton Fire Department
combined with the fire departments from the
Cities of Oshkosh, Marinette and personnel from Brown County to form the Northeast
Wisconsin Regional Level A Hazardous Materials Response Team. This team is geographically
the largest in the state and is one of eight state teams designated to assist counties and local fire
departments dealing with chemical emergencies. The City of Appleton Fire Department is the
level B hazardous material response team for Outagamie and Calumet Counties. Along with the
Hazardous Materials Team, a number of members are technically trained in confined space
rescue, rope rescue, water rescue, and structural collapse mitigation and rescue.

Neenah-Menasha Fire and Rescue Department
Neenah - Menasha Fire Rescue was created on January 1, 2003 by the consolidation of the City
of Neenah Fire Department and the City of Menasha Fire Department. Neenah - Menasha Fire
Rescue currently has 68 career employees who are committed to preserving the lives and
property within the Cities of Neenah and Menasha.

The communities are served from four fire stations located in strategic areas to provide for
efficient response to virtually any type of emergency situation, including fire suppression, auto
extrication and ice/water rescue. Additionally, Neenah - Menasha Fire Rescue has mutual aid
agreements with the Cities of Appleton and Oshkosh.

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Harrison #1 Fire DepartmentHarrison Fire Rescue
January 1, 2009, witnessed a consolidation of two fire stations and the first responder group
within the Town of Harrison. The town hired a single Fire Chief to oversee both fire stations and
the first responders. Harrison Fire Rescue provides emergency services to the Town of Harrison,
Village of Sherwood, and part of the Town of Woodville.The Harrison #1 Fire Department
serves the southern portion of the Town of Harrison, the Village of Sherwood, and the southern
half of the Town of Woodville. The fire department facility Station 1 is located at W469 Clifton
Road in the Village of Sherwood. This station is staffed with 30 paid on call volunteer
firefighters and is equipped with one engine, one heavy rescue, one brush truck, one tanker, and
an ATV for wild land fires.The facility and equipment is owned by the Town of Harrison. If
needed, the department will also respond to any major fire located in the Darboy area within the
town boundaries of the Town of Buchanan. The department also assists the county with
snowmobile rescue. The department is equipped with one pumper truck, a tanker truck, and an
equipment van.

Harrison #2 Fire Department
The Harrison #2 Fire Department provides service to the northern portion of the Town of
Harrison, including the Darboy area. Station 2This fire department facility is located at the
northeast corner of Highway 10/114 and Lake Park Road (CTH LP). This station is staffed with
30 paid on call volunteer firefighters and is equipped with one engine, one equipment van, one
brush truck two tankers, and one snowmobile.Major equipment includes three pumper trucks,
two tanker trucks, and one equipment van. In 1997, a new pumper truck was placed into service
to upgrade the fire fighting equipment at the facility. There are approximately 30 volunteer fire
fighters that serve on the department. Each Harrison department has its own chief and command
officers.

Hollandtown Fire Department
The Hollandtown Fire Department provides service to the northern portion of the Town of
Woodville. Most recently purchased equipment by the department includes a water truck in
1999, a new addition to the firehouse in 1999, and a thermal imaging camera in 2000. The
department is served by approximately 16 members.

Forest Junction Fire Department
The Forest Junction Fire Department serves the western half of the Town of Brillion including
the unincorporated Forest Junction area. The department has 22 volunteer fire fighters.
Equipment includes one pumper, two tankers, and various other equipment.

Brillion Fire Department
The Brillion Fire Department is an independent volunteer-based department. It provides contract
service to the Town of Maple Grove and areas east of Bastian Road in the Town of Brillion. The
Brillion Fire Department also participates in the Calumet County Mutual Aid Agreement and has
mutual aid agreements with the Village of Reedsville, Hollandtown, Collins, and Wayside.

The Brillion Fire Department was founded on January 16, 1882 to protect the settlement of
Spring Creek from fire (later the settlement was named "Brillion."). The charter members
gathered enough money to buy a used hand pump from the fire department at Two Rivers,

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Wisconsin. They then reorganized into two different departments - the Hook and Ladder
Company, and the Hand Engine Company. Many years later, resulting in more technological
advances, the two companies reunited to form a stronger department.

Currently the department has 22 volunteer firefighters, three lieutenants, three captains, and three
chief officers. The department has two pumpers, one 1998 Pierce 75 foot heavy duty aerial
ladder, two 1994 Newton 200 gallon tankers, one International heavy rescue truck equipped with
a command light tower and the jaws of life rescue tools, an ATV, and various other rescue
equipment.

Potter Fire Department
The Potter Fire Department serves the Village of Potter, Town of Rantoul, and a small northern
portion of the Town of Charlestown, primarily in the Killsnake Wildlife Area. The department
consists of approximately 25 volunteers. Equipment includes two pumpers, and two tankers, and
one equipment van. The department is also looking into getting a Polaris Ranger with tracks and
a small tank and pump for grassland fires.

Hilbert Fire Department
Located in the Hilbert Community Center, the fire department maintains five fire protection
vehicles. These vehicles consist of two pumpers, two tankers, and one equipment van. The
department is a volunteer department that provides service to the Village of Hilbert as well as
parts of the Towns of Chilton and Woodville. There are 29 volunteer firefighters serving the
department.

Chilton Volunteer Fire Department
The Chilton Fire Department is a volunteer-based, paid on-call department. The department
serves the City of Chilton, Town of Chilton, portions of the Towns of Brothertown and
Charlestown. Volunteer staff includes a fire chief, deputy fire chief, assistant fire chief, battalion
chief, secretary/treasurer, fire fighters, six EMTs, and two paramedics. In March of 2003 the
department received a new Pierce fire truck. The new engine is capable of carrying 2,000
gallons of water, almost twice the amount of the engine it replaced. The department has a total
of three pumpers, two tankers, and one aerial unit. The department also has one all terrain grass
unit and a command/rescue vehicle. There are 40 total members on the fire and rescue squad.
The department also offers emergency medical service.serves the City of Chilton and portions of
the Towns of Brothertown, Charlestown and Chilton. The department has 42 volunteer
firefighters and two members. The equipment fleet consists of one squad/rescue which carries
the “Jaws of Life”, three engines, one engine/tender, one tender, one brush truck and one, 100’
aerial truck. The department is ready to serve 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

New Holstein Fire Department
The New Holstein Fire Department serves the City of New Holstein, the majority of the Town of
New Holstein, and the southern portion of the Town of Charlestown. The department has 32
volunteer firefighters. Major equipment includes two pumpers, one tanker, one aerial unit, one
rescue, and one quick attack pick-up truck.

St. Anna Fire Department


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The St. Anna Fire Department serves the southern half of the Town of New Holstein. The fire
station is located in the Town of New Holstein. The department is staffed by 35 volunteer
firefighters. Major equipment includes three pumpers, two tankers, and an ATV.

Kiel Fire Department
Fire protection for the City of Kiel is provided by the Kiel Fire Department. The current fire
station was constructed in 1980 and is located on Fremont Street. Established in 1892, the Kiel
Fire Department currently has 35 volunteer members for fire protection. Serving the City of Kiel
and portions of the surrounding area, the department also has mutual aid agreements with
Manitowoc, Calumet, and Sheboygan counties which have been in effect since 1970. The
department has three pumpers, one aerial ladder with pumper, and two tankers. In addition, the
department has special equipment such as two all terrain vehicles and a boat. The Kiel facility
also houses the Town of Schleswig fire vehicles.

The Kiel Fire Department also operated two ambulances for the city which are located at city
hall. There are 20 EMTs and four paramedics serving the department.

Town of Calumet Volunteer Fire Department
The Town of Calumet Volunteer Fire Department serves the western one third of the Town of
Brothertown and the Town of Calumet in Fond du Lac County. Department staff includes 58
volunteer firefighters, one paramedic, two EMTs, and 14 first responders. Equipment includes
three pumpers and two tankers as well as various other equipment.

Stockbridge Fire Department
The Stockbridge Fire Department serves the Village of Stockbridge and the Town of
Stockbridge. The department was first organized in 1914. In 1950, the village and the town
began operating the department jointly. The two municipalities cooperatively built the fire
station/community hall in downtown Stockbridge in 1972. In 2003 two more truck bays were
added to the fire station.

There are approximately 34 volunteer firemen and approximately 15 first responders. The first
responders respond to requests for emergency medical services. The fire department has two
pumper trucks, two tanker trucks, and other equipment including portable pumps, generators,
breathing apparatuses, cascade systems, power saws, gas meters, a thermal imaging unit, scene
lights, and ice rescue equipment. The department has a mutual aid agreement with the
surrounding county’s municipalities.

Town of Brillion Fire Department
The town is divided into two districts served by the Town of Brillion Fire Department. District 1
includes all areas east of Bastian Road. District 2 includes all other areas of the town and Forest
Junction. The town’s fire department provides on-call volunteer based fire service. The town
fire department participates in mutual aid agreements with all neighboring towns and the city.
These agreements allow the town to call on additional service should the need arise. The fire
station is located in the town’s municipal building on USH 10. The town fire department
provides 911-based emergency service dispatched by Calumet County.



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Emergency Medical Services

Gold Cross Ambulance Service
Headquartered in Menasha, Gold Cross Ambulance Service serves the Town of Harrison,
Villages of Stockbridge and Sherwood, and the Cities of Appleton and Menasha. Gold Cross has
one ambulance based at Theda Clark Hospital located in Neenah. Another ambulance is based at
Saint Elizabeth Hospital on South Oneida Street in Appleton.

Brillion Gold Cross
Brillion Gold Cross serves the entire Town of Brillion and the City of Brillion and a portion of
the Town of Woodville.

Chilton Fire and RescueCalumet Medical Center Ambulance Service
Chilton RescueCalumet Medical Center Ambulance Service provides service to the greatest
number of communities in Calumet County including the Towns of Rantoul, Chilton,
Stockbridge, Brothertown, and portions of New Holstein, Charlestown, and Woodville. Chilton
rescue also serves the Villages of Hilbert and Potter and the Cities of Chilton and New Holstein.
Twenty four hour paramedic and first responders service is provided.

Kiel Rescue
Kiel Rescue serves the City of Kiel and a portion of the Town and City of New Holstein.

Harrison First Responders
Harrison First Responders is a volunteer group, which serves the Town of Harrison and the
Village of Sherwood. The department was founded and organized in 1995. The department
provides emergency medical treatment and care to persons injured in traffic accidents, home or
farm accidents, and people with medical problems such as heart attacks.

Hilbert/Potter First Responders
The Hilbert/Potter First Responders provide initial medical services to the Village of Hilbert, the
Village of Potter, and parts of the Towns of Woodville and Chilton, and all of the Town of
Rantoul.

Kiel Fire/Ambulance Service
Ambulance services for the City of Kiel are provided by the Kiel Fire/Ambulance Service. The
ambulance facilities are located at city hall. Established in 1938, this volunteer service currently
consists of 20 volunteers (13 EMT-Intermediate and 7 EMT) and provides emergency services to
the City of Kiel, Town of Schleswig, and other portions of Sheboygan, Calumet, and Manitowoc
Counties. Presently, the Kiel Ambulance Service has two ambulances and other specialized
equipment.

Town of Brillion First Responders
The Town of Brillion First Responders also provides emergency services to the Town of
Brillion. There is a fire station in the town. There have been no discussions to change the
existing level of services provided.

Fond du Lac RescueTown of Calumet Volunteer Fire Department First Responders

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Fond du Lac County RescueTown of Calumet Volunteer Fire Department First Responders
provides emergency services to the Town of Brothertown.

New Holstein EMT
The New Holstein Emergency Medical Technicians serve the City of New Holstein, Town of
New Holstein, and the southern portion of the Town of Charlestown.

Town of Charlestown
Emergency medical services in the town are provided by Chilton Rescue, and, some portions of
the town are also serviced by the New Holstein First Responders. Fire protection is provided by
the Potter Volunteer Fire Department, the Chilton Volunteer Fire Department, and the New
Holstein Volunteer Fire Department. There have been discussions about creating a first
responders organization to serve the town as a whole.

Town of Chilton
As of the writing of this plan, the town was discussing whether to have their own first
responders.

Town of Woodville
The town has been discussing establishing a first responders group with the Towns of Harrison
and Buchanan and the Villages of Potter and Hilbert.

Stockbridge Rescue
The Village of Stockbridge has a first responders unit and ice and water rescue.

4.4       School Facilities

The following school districts serve Calumet County.

Brillion School District

Schools within the district include Brillion Elementary School, Brillion Middle School, and
Brillion High School. The district serves the City of Brillion, majority of the Town of Brillion,
and portions of the Towns of Rantoul and Woodville.

There are two private schools in the Brillion district, Trinity Evangelical Lutheran School in the
City of Brillion and Holy Family in the City of Brillion.

Chilton School District

Schools within the district include Chilton Elementary School, Chilton Middle School, and
Chilton High School. The district serves the City of Chilton and portions of the Towns of
Chilton, Rantoul, Stockbridge, Brothertown, small portion of New Holstein, and the majority of
Charlestown. The elementary and middle school was newly renovated and the high school is an
entirely new facility that was completed in 2003.



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Chilton Catholic School is a private school located in the City of Chilton. This school was
completely renovated in 2003. The school is an elementary school providing education for
kindergarten through sixth grade.

Hilbert School District

Schools within the district include Hilbert Elementary School, Hilbert Middle School, and
Hilbert High School. The district serves the Village of Hilbert, Village of Potter, and portions of
the Village of Sherwood and Towns of Rantoul, Woodville, Harrison, and Chilton and southwest
corner of the Town of Brillion.

Private schools within the district include St. Mary’s Catholic School and St. Peter’s Lutheran
School in the Village of Hilbert, Trinity Lutheran School in the Town of Rantoul, and St.
John/Sacred Heart in the Village of Sherwood.

New Holstein School District

Schools within the district include New Holstein Elementary School, New Holstein Middle
School, and New Holstein High School. The district serves the City of New Holstein, the
majority of the Town of New Holstein, and portions of the Towns of Brothertown and
Charlestown.

There is a parochial school, Holy Rosary, in the City of New Holstein. There is also an Amish
school in the Town of New Holstein.

Stockbridge School District

Schools within the district include Stockbridge Elementary School, Stockbridge Middle School,
and Stockbridge High School. The district serves the Village of Stockbridge, the majority of the
Town of Stockbridge, and a small portion of the Town of Harrison.

Kiel Area School District

Schools within the district include Kiel High School, Kiel Middle School, Meeme Elementary,
Zielanis Elementary, and Kiel Integrated Electronic Learning Charter School. The Kiel Area
School District serves the City of Kiel and the southern portion of the Town of New Holstein.

Trinity Lutheran School is a private school located in Kiel.

Kaukauna Area School District

Schools within the district include Dr. H. B. Tanner Elementary, Haen Elementary, Kaukauna
High School, Nicolet Elementary, Park Elementary, Quinney Elementary, and River View
Middle School. The district serves the Village of Sherwood and portions of the Towns of
Woodville and Harrison.




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Kimberly Area School District

Schools within the district include Gerritts Middle School, Janssen Elementary, Kimberly High
School, Mapleview Elementary, Sunrise Elementary, Woodland Elementary and Intermediate
Schools, and Westside Elementary. The district serves portions of the City of Appleton and the
Town of Harrison. In 19962006, the district constructed a new elementary and intermediate
school in the Town of Harrison.

Wrightstown Community School District

Schools within the district include Wrightstown Elementary, Wrightstown High School, and
Wrightstown Middle School. The district serves a small northern portion of the Town of
Brillion.

Menasha Joint School District

Schools within the district include Banta School, Butte des Morts Elementary, Clovis Grove
Elementary, Gegan Elementary, Jefferson Elementary, Maplewood Middle School, Menasha
High School, Nicolet Elementary, and School on the Lake. The district serves the City of
Menasha, Town of Menasha, and a portion of the Town of Harrison.

Appleton Area School District

Schools within the district include the following:

         Appleton Central Alternative School             Huntley Elementary
         Appleton Community Learning Center              Jefferson Elementary
         Appleton E-School                               Johnston Elementary
         Badger Elementary                               Lincoln Elementary
         Berry Elementary                                Madison Middle School
         Classical Charter School                        Magellan Middle School
         Columbus Elementary                             McKinley Elementary
         East High School                                North High School
         Edison Elementary                               Renaissance School
         Einstein Middle School                          Richmond Elementary
         Elementary TAG School                           Roosevelt Middle School
         Ferber Elementary                               Tesla Engineering Charter School
         Foster Elementary                               West High School
         Franklin Elementary                             Wilson Middle School
         Highlands Elementary                            Wisconsin Connections Academy
         Horizons Elementary
         Houdini Elementary

The district serves the City of Appleton, City of Menasha, and a portion of the Town of Harrison.

Table 4-1 details total district enrollment for all districts serving Calumet County from the
1999/20002007/2008 school year to the 2003/20042011/2012 school year.

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                                        Table 4-1
           School District Enrollment, Calumet County, 1999/20002007/2008-
                                  2003/20042011/2012
                                                                                                    # Change             % Change
                                       2007-08        2008-09   2009-10   2010-11   2011-12       07/08-11/12          07/08-11/12
Brillion School District          864         954         960         932       944                           80               9.3%
Chilton School District         1,245       1,206       1,216       1,223     1,210                          -35              -2.8%
Hilbert School District           523         501         495         490       487                          -36              -6.9%
New Holstein School District      658       1,131       1,133       1,135     1,114                          456              69.3%
Stockbridge School District       231         232         215         200       204                          -27             -11.7%
Kiel School District            1,477       1,497       1,490       1,466     1,434                          -43              -2.9%
Kaukauna School District        3,990       4,038       3,989       3,969     3,959                          -31              -0.8%
Kimberly School District        4,202       4,307       4,458       4,532     4,641                          439              10.4%
Wrightstown School District     1,181       1,266       1,318       1,323     1,323                          142              12.0%
Menasha School District         3,750       3,643       3,687       3,745     3,699                          -51              -1.4%
Appleton School District       15,243     15,233       15,235     15,081    15,194                           -49              -0.3%
       Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, January, 20052011.

      Approximately Seven of the elevenhalf of the school districts serving Calumet County have
      experienced declining enrollments while the remaining half ones havehas experienced increases.
      Districts experiencing the greatest increases include the New Holstein, Kimberly and
      Wrightstown School Districts while the New HolsteinStockbridge School District experienced
      the greatest decline in enrollment for the period shown.

      According to the Applied Population Laboratory, of the University of Wisconsin, 69% of
      Wisconsin’s public school districts experienced declining enrollment between 20002001 and
      20052006. However, decline has not been uniform across school districts, as some districts,
      especially ones located in suburban, exurban, and small city areas, have seen substantial
      enrollment increases. Multiple demographic trends (particularly changes in number of births, the
      age structure of the population, and an increasing Hispanic population) have influenced current
      and projected school enrollment.

      Higher Education

      Fox Valley Technical College has a regional center located in the City of Chilton. This regional
      center has five major areas to serve the public: specialized training for business and industry,
      credit classes for technical and associate degrees, continuing education classes for license
      renewals, GED/HSED/GOAL, and hobby classes.

      The University of Wisconsin Fox Valley, located in the City of Menasha, is a two-year campus
      of the University of Wisconsin system. UW-Fox Valley provides the first two years of high
      quality liberal arts studies necessary as a foundation to university arts and science degrees as
      well as specialized professional and occupational degrees. The University also provides four
      year collaborative degree programs in organizational administration, mechanical engineering,
      electrical engineering, and general studies. Recently, UW-Fox Valley has been offering the ACT
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Program which stands for Alternative Careers in Teaching. This program is for students that
have at a minimum attained a bachelor’s degree and would like to teach math or science in
secondary education.

Moraine Park Technical College also serves portions of Calumet County. The college offers a
variety of educational and training opportunities, including more associate degrees and technical
diploma programs at its campus in Fond du Lac. Short-term certificates are also offered.
Additional continuing educational offerings are available at the campus as well as at community-
based instructional centers throughout the Moraine Park Technical College District. Other
offerings include apprenticeship instruction, basic skills education, customized training for
business and industry, and special programs and services for targeted populations. Lakeland
Technical College also serves part of Calumet County.

4.5       Quasi Public Facilities


Libraries

Calumet County is a member of the Manitowoc-
Calumet Library System. Libraries located within
Calumet County include the following:

         Chilton Public Library
         New Holstein Public Library
         Brillion Public Library
         Menasha Public Library
         Appleton Public Library
         Kiel Public Library                               New Holstein Public Library

Churches/Cemeteries

Churches and cemeteries located in Calumet County are listed by municipality in the Appendix.
Refer to local community facility and services maps found at the end of this chapter for the
locations of churches and cemeteries.

Campgrounds

The following campground facilities are located in Calumet County.

         Village of Sherwood: High Cliff State Park campground. There are 112 family sites, 32
          of which have electric. There are also eight group sites. Amenities include a beach in the
          lower park, showers, firewood sales, a concession store, marina, and the High Cliff
          General Store Museum. Within walking distance to golf, a supper club, and ice cream
          shoppe.

         Town of Stockbridge: Calumet County Park, north of County EE. Campground includes
          71 sites (59 electric sites are available). Sites are available along Lake Winnebago, in the

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          woods, and in grassy areas. RVs and tents are welcome at the campground; and
          Lakeview Campground along Ledge Road. There are 70 wooded sites with water and
          30-20 amp electric, 15 non-wooded with water and 50-30-20 amp electric, 15 wooded
          rustic sites with electric, and 17 four-season sites for year round camping. All sites are
          spaced 100 feet apart.

     Town    of Brillion: Camp Forest, Forest Junction, near the intersection of US Highway 10
          and State Highway 57, is a private non-profit campground. Cabins are rented for retreats,
          reunions, picnics, bible camps, etc.

     Town    of Brothertown: There is a private Christian-based camp along Lake Winnebago,
          south of Brothertown Harbor. The camp consists of small cabins.

         Town of Stockbridge: Top of the Ledge Campground along Ledge Road. There are 70
          wooded sites with water and 30-20 amp electric, 15 non-wooded with water and 50-30-20
          amp electric, 15 wooded rustic sites with electric, and 17 four-season sites for year round
          camping. All sites are spaced 100 feet apart.

         There are seven camping sites and event camping at the Calumet County Fairgrounds in
          the City of Chilton which are administered by the Fair Association. A permit is required
          for camping.

Organizations/Clubs

There are a number of organizations and clubs located in Calumet County such as chambers of
commerce, Lions and Lioness Clubs, 4-H Clubs, conservation groups, etc. Coordination with
these groups with regard to planning or implementing programs should be considered and
utilized whenever possible because of the guidance, funding, support, and volunteer efforts the
groups may provide. Civic and other organizations often provide local governments a cost
effective way to leverage tax dollars for community projects.

Boat Landings and Public Access

There are a total of 15 18 water access sites in Calumet County, 13 of which provide access to
Lake Winnebago. Boat landings and public access points available in the county are as follows:

     Lake Winnebago Access
      Brothertown Harbor. As of 2005 this harbor is operated and maintained by Calumet
        County. Facility, which was updated in 2009, includes three launch lanes and limited
        boat and trailer parking.
      Calumet County Park. Facility includes six launch lanes and parking for boats and
        trailers. There are 15 transient boat slips available with no overnight parking.
      High Cliff Marina. Over 100 permanent slips, 15 general transient. Overnight slips
        available.
      Stockbridge Harbor. This modern boat launch facility includes six launch lanes and
        parking for boats and trailers. Boaters may stay on their boats overnight at designated
        docks. Fifteen electrical slips are available.

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         Road access off Driftwood Beach Road, Town of Brothertown
         Road access off Gladwater Beach Road, Town of Brothertown
         Road access off Fire Lane 8between Fire Lanes 7 and 8, Town of Harrison
         Road access at a municipal launch off Windswept Lane, Village of Sherwood
         Road access off Faro Springs Road, Town of Stockbridge
         Road access off Sunset Beach Road, Village of Stockbridge
         Road access off Twilight Beach Road, Town of Stockbridge
         Road access off Quinney Road, Town of Stockbridge
         Road access off Ecker Lakeland Drive, Town of Stockbridge

     Inland Lakes
      Public access for Round Lake, Town of Brillion
      Public access for Becker Lake off Long Lake Road, Town of Rantoul


     Rivers
      Public access for North Branch of the Manitowoc River, Village of Potter
      Public access for Manitowoc River by Calumet County Fairgrounds, City of Chilton
      Public access for Manitowoc River by Leahy Lions Lakeshore Park, City of Chilton


Dams

According to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Dam Safety Program
there are 1519 dams located in Calumet County. According to the WDNR’s database they are
identified as follows:

       Town of New Holstein, small privately owned dam
       Town of Charlestown, large privately owned dam, popularly known as Old Mill Dam
      Town of Charlestown, small privately owned dam
      Town of Stockbridge, small privately owned dam
      Town of Harrison, small privately owned dam
      Town of Harrison, small privately owned dam
      Town of Harrison, small dam owned by Garners Creek Basin Stormwater Utility
      Town of Harrison, known as Heckrodt Pond
      Town of Brillion, large City of Brillion owned dam known as Brillion Ryan Street Dam
      Town of Brillion, large City of Brillion owned dam known as Brillion Hacker Road Dam
     Village of Sherwood, small privately owned dam
      Village of Sherwood, Lakeshore Estates privately owned dam
      Village of Sherwood, small privately owned dam
      Village of Sherwood, High Cliff Golf Course small privately owned dam
      Village of Sherwood, High Cliff State Park, large dam owned by WDNR
      City of Appleton, small city owned dam
      City of Chilton, large city owned dam
      City of Chilton, small city owned dam
      City of Chilton, small city owned dam
     City of Brillion, large city owned dam known as Brillion Ryan Street Dam
     City of Brillion, large city owned dam known as Brillion Hacker Road Dam
      City of Menasha, small privately owned dam


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While limited information is available about each of the identified dams, their locations and
purpose should be known locally, particularly for stormwater management planning purposes.

Post Offices

Table 4-2 details post offices serving Calumet County.

                                                  Table 4-2
                                        Post Offices, Calumet County

                            Post Office                             Location
               Chilton Post Office                     Main Street, Chilton
               Potter Post Office                      Main Street, Potter
               Forest Junction Post Office             South side of US Highway 10
               New Holstein Post Office                Wisconsin Avenue, New Holstein
               Stockbridge Post Office                 State Highway 55, Stockbridge
               Hilbert Post Office                     Main Street, Hilbert
               Kiel Post Office                        Fremont Street, Kiel
               Sherwood Post Office                    Military Road, Sherwood
               Brillion Post Office                    Water Street, Brillion
               Menasha Post Office                     Racine Street, Menasha
               Appleton Post Office                    Franklin Street, Appleton

4.6       Parks, Recreation, and Open Space

State Owned Facilities

High Cliff State Park
High Cliff State Park near Sherwood became part of
Wisconsin's State Park system in 1957, and ranks third among
the State for attendance. Natural features include towering
cliffs that reach 223 feet above Lake Winnebago. A 40-foot
observation tower gives visitors a panoramic view of the lake
and distant communities up to 30 miles away. Open year-
round, the park offers a variety of activities for summer fun and
winter entertainment. The park has a total of 1,1451,175 acres.
The park is located at N7630 State Park Road, Sherwood.

Park activities include fishing, boating, swimming, camping,
hiking, horseback trails, rock climbing, cross country skiing,
                                                                      High Cliff observation tower
snowmobiling, and snowshoeing. A marina provides slips for
95 boats with four launching ramps. Historical features found
at the park include an abandoned quarry, old lime kilns, Indian
effigy mounds, Chief Red Bird monument, and a restored
general store.


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                                                                      Brillion Nature Center trail
Brillion State Wildlife Area
Encompassing approximately 4,800 acres, the Brillion State Wildlife Area lies between Brillion,
Potter, and Hilbert. The site provides habitat for waterfowl, lowland furbearers, and upland
game species. The Brillion Nature Center is part of the Wildlife Area. It is operated by a non-
profit organization, the Brillion Nature Trails Association, Inc. There are eight hiking trails
covering almost six miles. The center has a barn style building used for education and an office.

Killsnake Marsh State Wildlife Area
Approximately three-fourths 4,224 acres of the 5,5007,012 acre Killsnake Marsh State Wildlife
Area is located in eastern Calumet County east of Chilton. The remaining portion lies in
adjacent Manitowoc County. The area provides prime deer habitat and, along the Killsnake
River, habitat exists for waterfowl and lowland furbearers.

Kiel Marsh State Wildlife Area
The Kiel Marsh State Wildlife Area south of Kiel is located at the boundaries of Calumet,
Manitowoc, and Sheboygan Counties. Approximately 315335 acres of the 785843-acre site lies
in Calumet County. The Sheboygan River, the area’s major feature, provides habitat for
waterfowl, lowland furbearers, and some upland game species.

County Owned Facilities

Calumet County Park
Calumet County Park is located on the eastern shore of Lake Winnebago just north of
Stockbridge on County Highway EE. Activities include picnicking, hiking and mountain bike
trails, six lane boat launch facility/safe harbor of refuge with ample boat and trailer parking,
modern toilet facilities and a popular camping area that has 71 campsites which 59 are electric
sites for the modern camping RV. There are also several basic tent camping sites. In winter the
park offers a tube hill with a tow rope, and area for sledding, and cross country ski trails.

Ledge View Nature Center
Ledge View Nature Center is located on Short Road
off County Highway G just south of Chilton and
have the following activities: cave tours, observation
tower, interpretive center, leisure activities, nature
activities, and picnicking.

Stockbridge Harbor
Located on Lake Winnebago on Highway E west of
the Village of Stockbridge, thisStockbridge Harbor
is one of the best boat launch facilities on Lake
Winnebago. It is located on the west end of County        Stockbridge Harbor
Highway E in the Village of Stockbridge. This
recently constructed facility includes six launch/landing lanes, 15 bulkheads for temporary
mooring, ample parking for boats and trailers, modern toilet facilities, small concession area and
picnic area, and access for off shore fishing. The harbor is sized for the construction of 58
additional slips.


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Becker’s Lake
In 2000, a 75-acre plot of land was purchased on the southwest shore of Becker’s Lake is a
newly acquired 75-acre tract of land located in the northeast corner of Calumet County. This
park with be put into reserve for future use. The land was purchased by Calumet County, a grant
from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and donations from private citizens and
organization throughout the region. This area has the potential to be developed into a passive
recreational park with such amenities as hiking trails and shoreline fishing opportunities.
Calumet County Parks has entered into an agreement with the Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources to stat to convert Becker Lake from farm land to park land. The agreement entails the
restoration of prairie and wetlands to encourage wildlife.still undeveloped area will provide some
hiking trails, and access to the southwest side of Becker’s Lake. Some initial development of
this park will take place in the near future.

Calumet County Fairgrounds
The Calumet County Fairgrounds shares a 31-acre parcel with Hobart Park in the southwest
portion of Chilton. The fairgrounds are owned and maintained by the Calumet County
Agricultural Association while the city maintains the park. Facilities include a grandstand and
arena, livestock and exhibition buildings, a pavilion, a number of concession buildings, and a
half-mile dirt track. Park facilities include playground equipment, picnic facilities, concession
stand, band shell, lighted softball field, drinking water and toilets.

Brothertown Harbor
Land for this facility was purchased by Calumet County in 2004. Development of the site is
planned for 2005. The harbor is currently being renovated. There are 23 permanent slips
available.At 1.5-acres, Brothertown Harbor, located on Lake Winnebago approximately eight
miles south of Stockbridge, has been operated and maintained by the Calumet County Parks
Department since 2005. In 2009, the launch was remodeled. This included dredging of the
harbor, three new wider launch lanes, paving of the entire parking area, a new breakwater, new
area lighting, a navigational aid and installation of a permanent pit toilet.

4.7       Locally Owned Parks, Recreation, and Open Space

Community parks and public and private school sites provide a range of recreational activities
for Calumet County residents. According to the Calumet County Outdoor Recreation Plan from
1995, one or more site is within walking distance of over 60% of the county’s population. While
this statistic has likely changed since 1995 it still represents the fact that there are extensive parks
and recreational areas in the county. Detailed within this section are parks and recreation
facilities that are owned and operated by local municipalities.

Town of Harrison

Harrison Athletic Association Park
This 16.5-acre park is located next to the town hall and garage, near the intersection of STH 114
and State Park Road. This park is the largest and most extensively developed recreational
facility owned by the town. Existing facilities include a lighted softball diamond with spectator
seating for 300; press box and scoreboard; and unlighted baseball diamond with spectator seating
for 100; concessions/press box building and scoreboard; a shelter/concessions building; picnic

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facilities; restrooms; lighted tennis, basketball, and sand volleyball courts; sever pieces of
playground equipment; and a sand box with two differs. The Harrison Athletic Association
operates the facilities and ball diamonds. In addition, the Association has been actively involved
with further development of the park.

Darboy Community Park
Darboy Community Park is located on a 17.5-acre tract of land just west of CTH N, adjacent to
the Sunrise Elementary School in Darboy. This park contains softball diamonds, a baseball
diamond, soccer fields, and a community picnic area. In 2004, a large shelter/pavilion; with
restrooms will be built. Development of the Darboy Community Park will be a joint project
between the Towns of Buchanan and Harrison.

Firelane #8
The south end of Firelane #8 is maintained by the Town of Harrison as an improved boat launch
on the north shore of Lake Winnebago. The adjacent gravel area provides parking for
approximately one dozen car-trailer units. During the winter months, Firelane #8 provides a very
important recreational access to Lake Winnebago for snowmobiles and vehicles.

Village of Hilbert

Civic Park
Civic Park occupies a six-acre site and contains two ball diamonds with bleachers, concession
stand, and a storage area. There are also two food stands, a beer stand, a pavilion, bandstand,
restrooms, picnic tables, grills, and playground equipment. There is also a soccer field available.
The park is located between Fifth and Eighth Street on Chestnut Street.

Railroad Park
Railroad Park, located at Fifth and Main Street, is approximately 3/10 acres. This park is
primarily a rest area. It contains a gazebo type shelter, picnic tables, and the community clock.
In the winter the park is flooded to create an ice skating rink.

Village of Potter

Potter Fireman’s Park
The Potter Athletic Association runs a men’s league, children’s little league, and pee wee league
softball. There are two large buildings and a restroom facility located on approximately 15
acres.

Village of Sherwood

Legion Park
Legion Park is located adjacent to the Community Center and Village Garage. The site is 11.4
acres in size and includes play equipment, softball diamond, shelter, and picnic facilities.

Schneider Park
Small site located at the intersection of Spring Hill Drive and Sundown Court.


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Gosz Park
Small site located west of Pigeon Road. This site is open green space and does not have any
additional recreation equipment.

Wannick Choute Park
This is 10 acre site located on Castle Drive is named for a local Native American tribal chief
commonly known as Redbird. The park features a softball diamond, mowed multipurpose field,
pavilion, play ground equipment, and parking lot.

Village of Stockbridge

Legion-Fireman’s Community Park
This 7.4 acre park is located west of Military Avenue and south of Lake Street, and is
immediately adjacent to the Stockbridge Recreational Park. It is privately owned by the
American Legion and the Stockbridge Fire Department. Facilities include a large picnic shelter,
restrooms, tables and grills, drinking water, concession stands, and a lighted and fenced softball
field with bleacher seating.

Stockbridge Recreational Park
This five acre park is located immediately to the south of the Legion-Fireman’s Community
Park. It contains two fenced and lighted tennis courts, a combination basketball and volleyball
court, a play apparatus area, sandbox, and an open play area. Recent additions include a practice
field/baseball diamond and additional play equipment including a spiral slide, a climbing
apparatus and spring animals. There is parking for about 75 cars.

Sunset Park
Formerly known as Village Park and Lake Shore Park, this small park provides access to Lake
Winnebago at Sunset Beach Road. Property adjacent to the park was purchased recently and a
retention wall and a handicapped accessible pier were added. The village provides a portable
restroom during summer months.

Memorial Park
Memorial Park, a 600 square foot passive use park, is the newest park in the village and is also
the smallest. It is located just south of St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

City of Appleton

The City of Appleton owns and maintains the following parks. Due to the extensive facilities
available in the city they are only listed with limited information for reference. For more
information on specific park facilities visit the city’s web site.

         Appleton Memorial Park, between Ballard Road and Mead Street, 139 acres
         Pierce Park, 1205 W. Prospect, 36.2 acres
         Erb Park, 1800 N. Morrison Street, 27.8 acres
         Telulah Park, 1300 E. Newberry Street, 38.3 acres
         Alicia Park, 1301 W. Cedar Street, 12 acres
         Colony Oaks Park, 801 N. Briarcliff Drive, 7.9 acres

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         Green Meadows Park, 65 Pheasant Court, 5.6 acres
         Jaycee Park, 1200 S. Jefferson Street, 4 acres
         Linwood Park, 401 N. Douglas Street, 9.5 acres
         Mead Park, 1430 E. John Street, 8.5 acres
         Summit Park, 2423 N. Summit Street, 5.5 acres
         Houdini Plaza, 100 W. Lawrence Street, open green space
         Arbutus Park, 501 W. Atlantic Street, 3.4 acres
         Derks Park, Kensington Drive and Rail Road, 9.1 acres
         Highview Park, 100 W. Wayfarer Lane, 12.6 acres
         Jones Park, 301 W. Lawrence Street, 5.8 acres
         Lions Park, 1920 S. Matthias Street, 4.4 acres
         Peabody Park, 601 N. Green Bay Road, 16.2 acres
         Veterans Park, 1201 S. Memorial Drive, 2 acres
         City Park, 500 E. Franklin Street, 8 acres
         Einstein Park, 3200 N. Morrison Street, 6.6 acres
         Hoover Park, 600 E. Roeland Avenue, 11.6 acres
         Kiwanis Park, 2315 N. Nicholas Street, 7.8 acres
         Lutz Park, 1320 Lutz Drive, 2.7 acres
         Schaefer Park, 610 S. Buchanan Street, 6.5 acres
         Woodland Park, 1815 S. Schaefer Circle, 8.7 acres

City of Brillion

Horn Park
Horn Park, at 19 acres in size, is Brillion's largest and most diverse park. Located in the
northeast section of the City adjacent to the Brillion Iron Works, it serves as a traditional
community park, providing a variety of recreational opportunities for all age groups.

Most of the park's development is concentrated in the northern portion of the site which is rolling
and tree-covered. A significant number of mature oaks, which are also scattered in other
portions of the park, highlight the area. Another prominent feature is a small manmade pond in
the park's southwest corner. The city has maintained an active tree planting program to ensure
that the park's character is preserved.

Active recreational opportunities are provided by a baseball field with scoreboard located in the
southeast portion of the park, and a play apparatus area that is integrated into the park's wooded
area. Picnic facilities and benches are found primarily in the wooded area but have also been
placed along the pond shoreline so that both of the park's major features can be enjoyed by users.
Support structures include a sheltered picnic area; an enclosed shelter with three serving
windows; an adjacent open-air amphitheater; a restroom facility; and a maintenance shed. A
paved drive loops through the park, providing convenient access to all facilities. Paved parking
areas are conveniently located by the enclosed shelter. Handicap parking is designated. A
lighted paved walkway extends throughout the park.

Heritage Park
Heritage Park, five acres in size, is located in the south-central section of Brillion on the corner
of South Main Street and Fairway Drive, and functions primarily as a neighborhood park for

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residential areas in the south-eastern portion of the community. An elderly housing project is
located immediately south of the park.

Facilities include four lighted tennis courts, playground equipment, shelter building with
restrooms, picnic facilities, a sand volleyball court, and paved parking areas. While some
landscaping has been undertaken, the site retains an open character. The southern portion of the
park contains a baseball diamond with bleachers and a scoreboard.

Peters Park Athletic Field
Peters Park Athletic Field is a six acre parcel located in the west-central portion of Brillion,
adjacent to the Brillion High School football and track area. Primary facilities include a lighted
softball diamond with bleachers; scoreboard and a scorekeeper's booth which is used by the city,
schools, and Brillion Athletic Association; a lighted basketball court; two lighted sand volleyball
courts; and a hard plastic play station. The south-west corner of the field is used as a soccer
field. Support facilities include a concession stand, restrooms, a maintenance/storage shed, and a
sizable parking area. The parking area and concession stand also receive heavy use during
football games and major track meets held at the adjacent high school.

South Park
South Park is a half-acre tract which lies along Spring Creek at the corner of Horn and South
Main Street. It serves as a green space for visitors entering Brillion from the south.

City of Chilton

Hobart Park
Hobart Park, Chilton’s most intensively developed park, is located on the banks of the millpond
in the southern portion of the city. The park lies adjacent to and north of the Calumet County
Fairgrounds. The park provides an attractive picnic area with picnic tables and several grills.
The shelter was recently updated with power and an enclosed serving area. Playground
equipment has also been added to this area. There is a new restroom/fry stand and to the north a
new bandstand has been constructed. A softball field with bleacher seating for 350 spectators
and updated lighting system occupies the eastern portion of the park and is augmented by a
shelter/concession building, restrooms, and play equipment. A boat ramp in the northern portion
of the park allows small boats and canoes to be launched on the millpond. Other facilities
include two exhibition buildings, which are maintained by the Calumet County Agricultural
Association.

Klinkner Park
Klinkner Park is located off of Memorial Drive. The city has undertaken several improvements
to the park in recent years. The park’s focal point is a “Welcome to Chilton” sign complemented
by a floral display. The 5.0-acre park serves primarily as a picnic area. Facilities include picnic
tables, grills, a new shelter with restrooms, updated play equipment, horseshoe pits, and a sand
volleyball court. Off-street parking for about 2025 cars is available near Memorial Drive.
Electricity is available at the open shelter. The park contains the Chilton Veteran’s of Foreign
Wars memorial. A second veteran memorial project is planned.

Leahy Lions Lakeshore Park

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Leahy-Lions Lakeshore Park is located at 139 W. Main and is an attractive 0.4-acre site.
Facilities include a small shelter/restroom building, picnic and play facilities, shoreline fishing
pier, and a boat ramp for canoes and other small boats.

Morrissey Park
Morrissey Park occupies 12.3 acres of land that formerly housed the Chilton High School (which
relocated to the city’s west side in 2003). The park includes the Chilton High School football
field and track, a large community built playground, three tennis courts (one double court and
one single court), a shelter and the city’s skating rink during the winter months. A non-profit
group, Chilton Morrissey Park Project, Inc. raises funds to maintain the playground and is
seeking to add components to the park.

Nennig Park
Nennig Park is located at 224 Dove Ave. and is a 15.5-acre site. The active support of the
Chilton Athletic Club plays a key role in this parks development. Facilities include two three
ball diamonds, two tennis courts, a soccer/football field, basketball court, and a volleyball court.
Other facilities include an indoor/outdoor shelter, refreshment stand, two restroom buildings,
horseshoe pits, picnic tables and grills, sandbox, and a variety of play equipment. The shelter
can accommodate approx. 40 persons and has electricity available.

Brewery Hill
Brewery Hill is a small undeveloped side hill area about an acre in size located on the east side
of Park Street across the street from the library. A unique feature of the site is that a variety of
trees donated by local residents have been planted there, each identified by a small plaque.




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Kiwanis Riverview Park
Located on the south side of East Main Street along the
river, this small 0.8-acre parcel of city owned land
provides access to the river. The park provides passive
recreational opportunities and receives some shoreline
use.

Riverside Park
Riverside Park, located at 139 E. Grand St., is the
newest addition to the city’s park system. The park
occupies a 1.2-acre site along the river and serves
primarily as a small neighborhood park. Facilities
                                                             Kiwanis Riverview Park
include a modest amount of play equipment, a couple
of picnic tables, grills, and sitting benches.

Wetland Behind City Garage
Although not a park site at the present time, a large city-owned wetland located generally south
of the city garage offers excellent potential for creating enhanced wildlife habitat and providing
opportunities for environmental education and other nature study activities. In 2002, the city
acquired an additional 15 acres, expanding its holdings to approximately 35 acres.

The City of Chilton has acquired a piece of property from the school district as a multi-use
recreational facility and recently constructed a skating rink and restroom/shelter facility.
Walkways are also located in the city along the river in the downtown.

City of Kiel

Beach Park
Located on the Sheboygan River behind the Kiel Community Center. This park is primarily used
for passive recreational opportunities.

Belitz Park
Located off of Belitz Drive, in the southwestern portion of the city.

Big Rock Park
This one acre triangular parcel of open space is bordered by Calumet Avenue, Sheboygan
Avenue, and Eighth Street and simply provides the neighborhood playground and picnic
facilities.

Boy Scout Park
This three acre park facility is located south of Fremont Street, along the Sheboygan River. The
Boy Scout Park offers more passive recreation to the public.

Conley Park
Located on the corner of Raider Heights and Dewey Street.


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Duerwaechter Park
This recreational facility is also currently under development and located within the Rockville
subdivision.

Fire Station Park
This one-acre neighborhood recreational area is located on the Sheboygan River behind the Kiel
Fire Station. This park facility is primarily used for passive recreational activities.

Hingiss Park
This 12-acre park is located on 12 acres of floodplain land with 1,000 feet of shoreland on the
south bank of the Sheboygan River. Rising away from the river, the park has an excellent stand
of trees covering a large portion of its area. Recreational opportunities are provided with plenty
of open space for picnicking, walking, and enjoying nature. The park also includes playground
equipment and a shelter for gatherings. The Kiel Jaycees Footbridge, which links downtown
Kiel to Hingiss Park, is one of several ways to access this recreational facility.

Karls Sports Terrace
Located in the River Terrace subdivision, this park facility consists of soccer fields, a pond for
ice skating, a sledding hill, etc. The recreational site also has paved parking facilities.

City of Kiel Park
This nine acre park, located south of the Kiel Middle School includes a variety of playground
and picnic facilities. There is also a shelter available at this park facility.

Kiwanis Park
Located south of East Fremont Street on the Sheboygan River, this four acre parcel of open
space provides both picnic and playground facilities.

Lions Park
This two-acre neighborhood park facility is located on the city’s west side and serves the
community with both picnic areas and active recreational areas. The park also has a shelter
available to the public.

Sisson Park
This four acre community park on the Sheboygan River provides various picnic facilities and
open space for recreational activities.

Triangle Park
Triangle Park is a one acre recreational area located at the intersection of Fourth Street, North
Street, and Calumet Avenue. It is primarily used as an area for passive recreational activities.

Veterans Memorial Park
This one-half acre parcel of open space provides for leisurely recreational activities.

Waack Park
This park facility is located in the Rockville subdivision and is currently under development.


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Solomon Trail (Kiel – New Holstein Trail)
This walking/bike trail is located in the State Highway 57/32 right-of-way and extends from Kiel
to New Holstein. In the future, this trail could continue from Kiel south on the rail corridor.
Portions of the trail are lighted.

City of Menasha

Jefferson Park
Facilities include a main pavilion with a kitchen and restroom facilities, three other shelters, and
picnic areas. The park also features the Jefferson Municipal Pool and a total of 49 boat slips
with access to Lake Winnebago. The park is 28.9 acres in size.

Smith Park
Features a large pavilion with kitchen facilities suitable for large gatherings, tennis courts, sand
volleyball courts, softball diamond, playground equipment, soccer field, basketball court, and a
public garden. Smith Flower Garden is a semi-formal public garden is a popular location for
weddings and wedding pictures. The Memorial Building is also located at this site, which is
used for a variety of functions. The Memorial Building also houses the Menasha Historical
Society, which also maintains this caboose located nearby inside Smith Park. The park is 23.9
acres in size.

Koslo Park
Facilities include a shelter, play equipment, basketball and volleyball courts, and a baseball
diamond that is home to Menasha High School. The park is 12 acres in size.

Clovis Grove Park
Facilities include a shelter with restroom facilities, tennis courts, play equipment, ball fields, a
soccer field, small woods and a sledding hill. The park is 12.5 acres in size.

Pleasants Park
Includes play equipment, softball diamonds, football/soccer fields, and tennis courts. The park is
5.3 acres in size.

Hart Park
The park is 3.9 acres in size. The shelter at the site is primarily designed as a warming shelter
for the park's large skating rink. A lighted basketball court, sand volleyball court, and play
equipment is available in the park. The Menasha Skate Park is located at the east end of Hart
Park.

Barker Farms Park
This park has one softball diamond, play equipment, shelter, tennis court, basketball court, and
sledding. The park is 8.9 acres in size.

Shepard Park
Shepard Park houses a picnic area, play equipment, softball diamond, basketball court, and
restrooms. The park is 3.7 acres in size.


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Municipal Beach
The park is 1.4 acres in size. Facilities include a volleyball court, play equipment, picnic area,
and swimming availability.

Clinton Center Park
Facilities include play equipment and a basketball court. The park is 0.6 acres in size.

Scanlan Park
Facilities include play equipment. The park is 0.5 acres in size.

Winz Park
Facilities include play equipment, basketball and tennis courts. The park is 0.5 acres in size.

Menasha Marina
Facilities include a picnic area, temporary boat docking and slips for 87 boats. The site is a total
of 0.3 acres.

City of New Holstein

Kiwanis Community Park
Located in the southern portion of the city, Kiwanis Community Park is New Holstein's largest
park. Acquisition of additional land has increased the size of this park to 56.19 acres, enabling
the city to develop additional recreational facilities during the past decade. Over the years, the
park’s growth has closely followed master plans prepared by East Central Planning. Located in
the park are two key facilities, the Community Center and the outdoor Aquatic Center.

The 4,100 square foot Community Center has kitchen facilities, two meeting rooms, indoor and
outdoor restrooms, and is used extensively by local organizations and is rented for social
gatherings. The Aquatic Center which opened in 2009 is a zero-depth/beach entry design.
Feature include: two runout slides, a dropslide, floor fountain jet play area, interactive play
feature, a child’s slide, shaded sand play area, a diving board, whirlcove and two lap lanes. The
bathhouse includes men’s and women’s restroom/changing areas, a handicap restroom/family
changing room, a concession stand, and a party/meeting room.Since the 1999 adoption of the
city’s last open space plan, a community center and adjacent lighted ice skating pond, which
provides a dual function as a stormwater detention basin, have been completed.

Other park amenities include: relatively recent projects include two new soccer fields, a fishing
pond with a fishing deck, additional parking, drainage improvements, and lighteding of the
park’s three existing tennis courts and basketball courts, soccer fields, restroom/storage building,
extensive picnic facilities, three open shelters, play equipment, two recreational softball/baseball
diamonds, batting cage, volleyball courts, a nine hold disc golf course, lighted paved walkways
and off street parking lots.. An outdoor swimming pool, restroom/storage building, extensive
picnic facilities, two small canopies, two open shelters, play equipment, two recreational softball
diamonds, four sets of horseshoe pits and shuffleboard courts, volleyball courts, lighted paved
walkways and parking areas are other park facilities. Pedestrian bridges spanning Jordan Creek
are integrated into the walkway system. A The park’s most recent 10.36-acre portion of the park
was developed with native prairie wildflowers and grasses and connects Kiwanis Park with

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Memorial Park. The park’s trail system extends from Hickory Lane on the north side, to Fur
Farm Road on the southside of Memorial park, and connects with adjacent residential
neighborhoods.expansion, presently undeveloped, is slated to become a restored prairie with a
network of walking trails. This key acquisition links the other portions of Kiwanis Park to
Memorial Park.

Kiwanis Park Nature Study Area
The Kiwanis Park Nature Study Area occupies a 2.73-acre parcel of woodland across Hickory
Lane from Kiwanis Community Park. A system of trails traverses the park but no other
development has occurred on the site.

Memorial Park
Donated to the community in 1997, Memorial Park is a recent addition to the city’s park system.
A 7.32-acre wooded tract, the park is located in the southern portion of New Holstein south of
Kiwanis Park. Restrictive covenants which run with the park call for it to remain wooded and
used for nature study. With the acquisition of an intervening parcel, Memorial Park will soon be
linked by trail to Kiwanis Park.

Market Square Park
Market Square Park, at the intersection of Michigan Avenue and Railroad Street, is located in the
historical area of the city known as “Market Square.” The .3 acre park provides an attractive
space for public gatherings, special events, brat fry’s, and other fund raising activities.

Civic Park
Civic Park is located on Park Street in the northern portion of the city. It forms part of a
recreational complex, which also includes Funke Memorial Field and the New Holstein
Elementary School. A canopy of mature trees graces much of the 4.77-acre site. Facilities
include an enclosed pavilion, a large open shelter, two concession buildings, restroom facilities,
picnic tables and grills, a three-sided band shelter, lighted sidewalks, and several pieces of play
equipment. The play equipment, which provides play opportunities for the adjacent elementary
school, has been upgraded within the past few years. Adjacent streets provide ample parking
opportunities for park users.

Funke Memorial Field
Located at the north end of Washington Street, Funke Field lies northwest of Civic Park and
north of the elementary school. The 7.86-acre site is the only park with ball field facilities
lighted for night play. Among the facilities available at Funke Field are two tennis courts,
several horseshoe courts, a baseball diamond and a softball diamond. The lighting for the ball
diamonds, in particular, is quite old and has become increasingly inadequate for night use. The
horseshoe courts are used for adult horseshoe leagues. The park also contains two unlighted
little league diamonds that can double as two temporary soccer fields. A drive behind the
elementary school provides adjacent parking while convenient on-street parking is also available.

Optimist Park
Optimist Park occupies a 13.5-acre site located on Mason Street in the northeastern part of the
city. While the former Honeymoon Hill has long served as a sledding and tobogganing hill for
local residents, in 1995 the local Optimist Club offered to assist the city to further develop the

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site to better accommodate year-round recreational activities. A site plan was subsequently
prepared by East Central Regional Planning to guide additional development of the park.
Present development consists of a shelter/restroom building, an overlook deck, timber staircase,
a park sign, bench, horseshoe pits, landscaping, and a small unpaved parking area. Other
development planned for the park includes picnic facilities, play apparatus, a sand play area,
horseshoe pits, walking trails, a wildflower prairie, and an informal open play area.

Tower Park
Located on the west side of Mason Street across from Optimist Park, Tower Park is a 1.2-acre
site which serves as the location of the city's east water tower. The site has interesting
topography and a well-manicured lawn but provides no recreational facilities. To discourage
children from darting across Mason Street as they run back and forth between the two parks, no
future development is proposed for Tower Park.

“New” Park
In 2004, the city sold Lions Park and purchased a “New” 1.57-acre park located on the south
side of Jordan Avenue in the southeastern portion of New Holstein. The park is intended to
serve as a neighborhood park. The parcel is an open turf area. On-street parking is available.

Town of Brillion

Freitag Memorial Park
The Freitag Memorial Park in Forest Junction is operated by the Forest Junction Civic League.
It is a 24-acre park located on the south side of US Highway 10. Four acres of the park is
maintained for picnicking and children’s playground equipment.

The former elementary school in Forest Junction is operated by a non-profit organization and
offers activities for children in grades 3 through 8. The facility is supervised and is open three
evenings a week.

Limited Park and Recreation Facilities

The following communities have no formally established park or recreation facilities that are
operated or owned by the community.

       Town of Brothertown: There are no town parks.
      Brothertown Harbor is going to be developed as a County Park in 2005.
     
      Town of Charlestown: There are no town parks. There is a county park, Ledge View
        Nature Center, which has a nature center building, caves to explore, and trails. The
        Center is located on Short Road, just south of Chilton. There is one state wildlife area in
        the eastern portion of the Town known as the Killsnake Wildlife Area. This reserve
        comprises 5,1577,012 acres, but only 4,224 acres is located in Calumet County. A
        museum showcasing county historical artifacts is on Irish Road. There is also a private
        recreational area on Redwood Road known as “Outdoors, Inc.”



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         Town of Chilton: There are no town parks. However, there are three recreation
          attractions, all privately owned. There is Gravity Park USA, a motocross and
          snowmobile track, on Hickory Hills Road; Sefelt’s, a mini car facility, on Mueller road;
          and Hickory Hills Country Club, a golf course with restaurant and bar, on Hickory Hills
          Road.

         Town of New Holstein: In St. Anna there are two parks, including the Fireman’s Park
          and the Sportsman Park. The Solomon Trail, a walking trail, is located in the town and
          runs from Kiel to the City of New Holstein.

         Town of Rantoul: There are no town parks. There is a county park at Becker Lake.
          There are various wildlife areas available to the public: Brillion Nature Center, Brillion
          Marsh, and the Killsnake Wildlife Area.

         Town of Stockbridge: There are no locally managed parks. There are two county parks:
          Calumet County Park, Stockbridge Harbor County Park. The State of Wisconsin owns
          20 acres of public land along Ledge Road.

         Town of Woodville: Peanuts Park in Dundas has playground equipment and a basketball
          court. The park is located at the intersection of Brant St. John Road and Dundas Road.

4.8       Trails

Snowmobile Trails
Calumet County snowmobile clubs maintain over 100131 miles of public snowmobile trail. The
county's trail network and interconnecting privately-maintained club trails are readily accessibly
to all portions of the county and link up with trails of surrounding counties as part of a statewide
system. Most public trails are easements across private property.

Cross-Country Skiing
Groomed cross-country ski trails are available at High Cliff State Park (four miles), Calumet
County Park (four miles), and Ledge View Nature Center (2.5 miles). In addition, about six
miles of ungroomed trails exist at Brillion Nature Center.

Bridle Trails
An 8.2-mile long bridle trail is available at High Cliff State Park. Horseback riding is also
allowed along the Friendship State Trail and the Fox River State Trail from Ott Road, north of
Hilbert, to Greenleaf, WI.

Other Trails

         Solomon Trail. This trail links the City of New Holstein to Kiel. The project was a joint
          effort between the two communities. The trail is paved and is approximately four2.25
          miles in length. There are no trailheads. Calumet County is working on plans to connect
          this trail with the Fox River State Trail.



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         Friendship Trail. Runs from City of Brillion to Forest Junction. The Town of Harrison,
          City of Menasha and Calumet County are working on the Northshore extension of the
          Friendship State Trail will be constructed in 2007 or 2008. It will connect the Fox Cities
          to High Cliff State Park. It lies in the City of Menasha, Town of Harrison, and Village of
          Sherwood.

         Fox River State Trail is a limestone, multi-use trail, which is located in an abandoned
          railroad corridor. The trail runs east of Hwy 32/57 from Green Bay to Ott Road, north of
          Hilbert for approximately 26 miles. Calumet County is working on plans to connect this
          trail with the Solomon Trail.being constructed in 2006. It will connect the Green Bay
          area to Calumet County. It runs from the north county line, south to Ott Road just north
          of the Village of Hilbert. It follows the old railroad bed just east of State Highway 32/57.




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4.9       Private Park and Recreational Facilities

Golf Courses
Five golf courses, totaling approximately 640 acres,
are located in Calumet County. These include two
nine-hole courses and three eighteen hole courses.
Deer Run Country Club south of Brillion and
Sherwood Forest Country Club, a newer course in
Sherwood are the two nine-hole courses. Hickory
Hills Country Club, located north of Chilton, and
High Cliff Golf Course and North Shore Country
Club, both located west of Sherwood, each feature 18
holes. Of the five, only North Shore is not available
for use by the general public.
                                                           High Cliff Golf Course
The Shady Rest Driving Range is located on STH
114 just west of State Park Road. This 12-acre privately owned recreational facility is open to
the general public on a seasonal basis.

4.10 Solid Waste Management and Recycling

There are currently two licensed solid waste landfills found in Calumet County:

         Appleton Papers, Inc.Coated LLC, 199-acre landfill, located in the Town of Harrison
         Hickory Meadows Landfill LLC, owned by Veolia Environmental Services, W3105
          Schneider Road, Town of Chilton

According to the Historic Registry of Waste Disposal Sites in Wisconsin, 1999July 2011 update,
there are a number of other waste related sites in the county. A total of 5860 sites area listed for
Calumet County. Most of these sites, however, have limited information or are already
identified as inactive or abandoned. The inclusion of a site on the Registry does not mean that
environmental contamination has occurred, is occurring, or will occur in the future. The
Registry is intended to serve as a general informational source for the public, and state, and local
officials, as to the location of waste disposal sites in Wisconsin.

A search of the WDNR’s Solid and Hazardous Waste Information System identified a total of
6769 active waste management facilities in the county. Activities that occur at facilities include
landfill operation, waste transportation, hazardous waste generation, wood burning, waste
processing, sharps collection, and many more.

Calumet County has no involvement in solid waste or recycling collection, handling, and
disposal. Local municipalities are responsible for providing these services or individual
residents contract for services privately.




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Clean Sweep
Calumet County, through the UW-Extension, has conducted Clean Sweep events. Clean Sweep
programs are held for the disposal of hazardous wastes from farms, businesses, and households.
There are currently two Clean Sweep programs which serve Calumet County. The first program,
which has run since the late 1990’s, is run jointly with Calumet and Manitowoc County every
spring. The second program is an urban program which is provided for the Cities of Appleton,
Menasha and AppletonNeenah and the Towns of Clayton, Buchanan, Harrison, Menasha and
Neenah, but this program can also be utilized by any resident of Calumet County. This program
is also held annually.

Both Clean Sweep programs offered to Calumet County residents are funded through a county
contract with Veolia Hickory Meadows Landfill and by grants. The programs are and are
therefore dependent on this funding for their continued implementation. Currently, there is no
county funding offered for these programs. According to UW-Extension, there is interest in
holding more Clean Sweep events as well as possibly offering a year round facility to handle
applicable wastes in the county.

East Shore Recycling Commission
The East Shore Recycling Commission was started in 1994. Member communities include the
Cities of Brillion, Chilton, Kiel, and New Holstein and the Villages of Hilbert, Potter, and
Sherwood, and the Towns of Brillion, Brothertown, Calumet (Fond du Lac County),
Charlestown, New Holstein, and Rantoul, and Woodville. Communities work together to jointly
negotiate recycling collection and processing contracts with private providers. By working
together these municipalities feel they are offered a better rate on recycling services from
providers. The existing processing and marketing contract for these services will expire in
20072013. The Commission is run with established bylaws and a board which meets as needed.
The Commission has also more recently begun working on recycling education through funds
offered by a grant program at the WDNR.

Town of Brillion

The town contracts with OnyxVeolia Environmental Services to collect refuse on a bi-weekly
basis and recyclables once a month. Waste is hauled out of the county to Omro. The waste is
then transported back to the area and taken to the landfill in the Town of Chilton. The Town of
Brillion is a member of the East Shore Recycling Commission.

Town of Brothertown

The town contracts with Veolia Environmental ServicesOnyx for garbage and recycling pick-up.
Residents are also allowed one bulky item to be picked up once a year. The service is charged to
the resident’s tax bill on a “barrel” basis. The Town of Brothertown is a member of the East
Shore Recycling Commission.




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Town of Charlestown

Garbage is picked up every other week, recyclables once a month, by Veolia Environmental
ServicesOnyx Waste Services out of Sheboygan. There are no garbage or recycling facilities in
the town. The Town of Charlestown is a member of the East Shore Recycling Commission.

Town of Chilton

The Town of Chilton is home to the Veolia ES Hickory Meadows Landfill located at W3105
Schneider Road. The town contracts with Veolia Environmental ServicesOnyx for solid waste
collection and recycling.

The Town of Chilton Landfill, referred to as the Hickory Meadows Landfill, is a privately owned
and operated landfill located in the Town of Chilton near the intersection of McHugh and
Schneider Roads. The landfill, formerly owned by Onyx but now owned by Veolia
Environmental Services, began operations in June, 1999, and according to the Wisconsin
Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), has a total design capacity of nearly 7.5 million
cubic yards of solid waste. The landfill is currently owned by Veolia Environmental Services. It
is anticipated to be full by 2014 under the current permit.An expansion for 14,600,000 cubic
yards of additional airspace has been requested to the WDNR. The landfill is licensed to receive
municipal, institutional, commercial and industrial solid wastes, as well as certain special wastes
including PCB dredge materials (under 50 ppm). The primary service area includes most of
northeastern Wisconsin, but extends into central and northern Wisconsin and other states. In
20032010, the landfill received 500,844828,534 tons of waste from Wisconsin, 2,954 tons from
Illinois, 729 tons from Iowa, and 15,2274,060 tons from Michigan.

Town of Harrison

Garbage and recycling services are provided by a private provider to community residents. The
town does have a drop-off site for yard waste at the town hall and provides yard waste days set
aside for spring and fall clean-ups.

An industrial landfill is located in Section 17 at the intersection of USH 10 and Peters Road.
This site is owned and operated by Appleton Papers. Harrison and Appleton Coated Papers
entered into a landfill agreement in March of 1997. The agreement provides for disposal of
boiler ash and mill sludge from the combined Locks Mill.

Town of New Holstein

Veolia Environmental Services Onyx provides solid waste removal and recycling for the town.
The town contracts for tire removal from a private party. The Town of New Holstein is a
member of the East Shore Recycling Commission.

Town of Rantoul

The town contracts with Veolia Environmental Services Onyx Waste Services for curbside
garbage pick-up. Garbage is picked up every other week and recycling every four weeks.
Recycling bags are provided free of charge to town residents. Garbage is billed once a year and
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added to the tax bills. The Town of Rantoul is a member of the East Shore Recycling
Commission.

Town of Stockbridge

The Town of Stockbridge contracts for waste collection on an every other week basis and
recycling collection once a month. Twice a year (spring and fall) there is a collection for large
items.

Town of Woodville

The drop off site for solid waste and recycling is located one and one half miles north of St. John
on County Highway B. Disposal and handling of collected material is provided by a private
provider. The Town of Woodville is a member of the East Shore Recycling Commission.

Village of Hilbert

Recycling pick-up is provided once a month by an outside provider. The village does provide a
compost site, which is located on North Third Street. The village also provides curbside brush
pick-up and chipping along with leaf pick-up in fall. The village has volume-based garbage
collection in which each resident must have a container. Garbage pick-up is provided weekly.
Services are contracted from a private provider. The Village of Hilbert is a member of the East
Shore Recycling Commission.

Village of Potter

Curbside garbage pick-up is provided to residents every week from a private provider.
Recycling pick-up is provided curbside every other week from the same private provider. The
Village of Potter is a member of the East Shore Recycling Commission.

Village of Sherwood

The village contracts with a private provider for garbage and recycling services. Solid waste is
transferred to a private landfill in the Town of Chilton. The Village of Sherwood is a member of
the East Shore Recycling Commission.

Village of Stockbridge

The village contracts for solid waste and recycling service with private providers. Collection for
both takes place once a week. Solid waste is hauled to the transfer station in Menasha and
eventually to the Valley Trail landfill near Berlin, Wisconsin.

City of Brillion

A private carrier under contract with the City of Brillion collects garbage and recyclables.
Collections are made every Wednesday for garbage and collections vary based on location for
recycling. The costs for pickup and disposal of garbage and recycling are charged as a separate
user charge, and are not included in the tax rate. Yard waste may be disposed of at the city

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compost site daily. The city compost site is located on W. Ryan Street (Hwy 10), behind the
Vocational School. In 2000, the city initiated a curbside leaf pick-up program. In the fall, city
residents may rake leaves onto city streets, along the curb, for pickup. The City of Brillion is a
member of the East Shore Recycling Commission.

City of Chilton

Garbage is picked up every Tuesday and recyclables are picked up every other week. The city
contracts with a private provider for waste pickup and disposal. The city also offers curbside
brush pickup every two weeksthe fourth Monday of each month. Residents need to call city hall
to schedule a pickup. In the fall, city crews also conduct curbside pickup of leaves. Grass
clippings can be disposed of at the city garage located at 908 S. Maple Street. Composting
occurs outside of the city limits. The City of Chilton is a member of the East Shore Recycling
Commission.

City of Kiel

The pickup of solid wastes occurring once every week in the city is provided by a private
provider, which then disposes of it at a landfill in Hilbert. The recycling program for the city
includes curbside pickup of items once every other week. The City of Kiel is a member of the
East Shore Recycling Commission.

City of Menasha

Garbage collection is provided weekly and curbside recycling collection is provided monthly.
Refuse carts are used for garbage collection which allows for automated collection. Brush and
tree limbs will also be collected at the curb once per month. Brush, yard wastes, and recyclables
may be brought to the City Public Works Facility drop-off site during designated hours.

City of New Holstein

The City of New Holstein contracts for curbside solid waste and recycling services from a
private provider. The City of New Holstein is a member of the East Shore Recycling
Commission.

4.11 Communication and Power Facilities

Electric

Calumet County is served by six electric providers including Wisconsin Electric, WE Energies,
Kiel Electric Utility, Menasha Utilities, Wisconsin Public Service, and New Holstein Utilities.
Service areas for electric providers are as follows:

Wisconsin Electric
City of Appleton
City of Menasha, portion
Town of Harrison, portion

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Town of Woodville
Town of Chilton

WE Energies
City of Menasha
Village of Sherwood
Village of Hilbert
Town of Brillion
Town of Brothertown
Portions of Town of New Holstein

Kiel Electric Utility
City of Kiel
Portions of Town of New Holstein

Menasha Utilities
Majority of City of Menasha

Wisconsin Public Service
City of Brillion
City of Chilton
Village of Potter
Village of Stockbridge
Town of Brillion
Town of Rantoul
Town of Chilton
Town of Harrison, portion
Town of Charlestown
Town of Stockbridge
Western portion of Town of Brothertown

New Holstein Utilities
City of New Holstein
Southern portion Town of Charlestown
Eastern portion Town of Brothertown
Majority of Town of New Holstein

Telephone

Calumet County is served by four telephone providers including Ameritech, Century Telephone,
TDS, and Verizon. Service areas are as follows:




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Ameritech
City of Appleton
City of Menasha
Northern portion of Town of Harrison
Northern portion of Town of Woodville

TDS Telecom
Village of Sherwood
Village of Stockbridge
Town of Stockbridge
Remaining portion of Town of Harrison
Remaining portion of Town of Woodville

Verizon
City of Brillion
City of Chilton
City of New Holstein
City of Kiel
Village of Potter
Village of Hilbert
Town of New Holstein
Town of Brothertown
Town of Charlestown
Town of Stockbridge
Portion of Town of Woodville
Town of Rantoul
Town of Chilton
Southern portion Town of Brillion

US Cellular
Town of New Holstein

Century Telephone
Northeast corner Town of Brillion

Natural Gas

Calumet County is served by two primary providers of natural gas.

Wisconsin Public Service
Town of Harrison, southern portion
Town of Brothertown, portions
City of New Holstein
City of Brillion
Town of Brillion
Village of Potter
City of Chilton

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Village of Stockbridge
Village of Hilbert
City of Kiel
Town of Charlestown
Town of Chilton
Town of New Holstein
Town of Rantoul
Portion of Town of Woodville
Town of Stockbridge

WE Energies
Village of Sherwood
Town of Harrison
Portion of Town of Woodville

Unknown
City of Menasha

Telecommunication

The following providers serve Calumet County:

         Time Warner Cable
         TDS Telecom
         Charter Communications

Communication Towers

The siting of new wireless telecommunication towers is a growing issue in the State of
Wisconsin. The need to construct additional towers is being driven by advancements in mobile
telephone technology, additional demand for mobile telephone service, and increased numbers of
service providers competing to supply that increased demand. The popularity of the handheld
digital phone is the primary reason that more towers are needed. These phones require more
towers to operate than the older cellular telephone. The expansion of digital service can also
assist in the ability to access the internet by wireless modem.

During this period of digital service expansion, areas along major highways tend to be targeted
first. Currently, Calumet County is home to 1221 cellular towers. Refer to the following map
for their locations.




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Map 4-1 Community Facilities and Services




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Map 4-2 Emergency Services




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4.12 Sanitary Sewer Service

Sewer Service Areas

There are a total of eight sewer service areas serving Calumet County.

                                      Table 4-2
                    Sewer Service Areas, Calumet County, 20052011
                                 Sewer Service Area           Acres         % of Total
                         Brillion                             1,678               13%
                         Forest Junction                        393                3%
                         Sherwood                             1,672               13%
                         Stockbridge                            780                6%
                         Menasha (Calumet)                    3,602               27%
                         Appleton                             2,028               15%
                         Heart of the Valley                  3,000               23%
                         Total                               13,153              100%
                        Source: Calumet County Planning Department, 2011.

City of Appleton Wastewater Treatment Plant

In 1937 the original Appleton Sewerage Treatment Plant and Interceptor Sewer System was
constructed. This plant provided primary treatment, which meant that the wastewater was only
partially treated before discharge to the Fox River. In the 1960’s water quality surveys began to
show the extent to which our natural waters were being polluted. Appleton led the way in
combating this problem with the expansion of the treatment facilities in the mid-1960’s to
include secondary treatment. The secondary treatment process enabled the city to process its
wastewater more effectively while simultaneously ensuring that this treatment resulted in a
cleaner discharge to the river.

In the 1970’s, the Appleton Wastewater Treatment Plant again began planning for necessary
improvements to meet the requirements of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendment
of 1972 that stated "discharge of pollutants into the navigable water (which include all natural
streams and lakes) be eliminated by 1985".

Construction of the most recent phase of treatment expansion improvements began in 1990 and
were completed in 1994. This latest endeavor has prepared Appleton for the future with greater
efficiencies than ever before. It also enables the Appleton Wastewater Treatment Plant to grow
with the community while continuing to effectively provide the best treatment services possible.
This commitment was recognized when the plant was the recipient of the Environmental
Protection Agency's (EPA) 1999 First Place National Award in the Large Secondary Treatment
Category.




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Pretreatment Program
Appleton has had a federally approved Pretreatment Program since October 5, 1984 when the
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) granted the city authority to implement a
program. This program, which is one of 26 Pretreatment Programs delegated by the WDNR, has
16 diverse industries that fall under its guidance. The need for industrial pretreatment is based
on the fact that most municipal wastewater treatment plants are primarily designed to handle
domestic (household) wastewater. Therefore, pretreatment regulations have been developed as a
means to make industrial wastewater compatible with the treatment works. Currently, the
industrial dischargers represent 24% (over one billion gallons) of the total annual flow that enters
the sewer system leading to the wastewater treatment plant.

City of Brillion Wastewater Treatment Facility

In the Brillion area, sewer service is limited to the City of Brillion and Forest Junction. In the
Town of Brillion, sewer service is limited to Forest Junction. Areas beyond this district, and the
City of Brillion sewer service area, utilize individual on-site waste treatment systems. In 2000,
the ECWRPC updated the sewer service area plans for both Forest Junction and the City of
Brillion. The information provided in this section is from those plans.

Forest Junction Sewer Service Area
The Forest Junction Utility District is the only entity in the Town of Brillion that provides public
sewerage collection and treatment. The District was formed in 1977 by the town to address
numerous problems with on-site system failures related to high groundwater and low soil
permeability.

The Forest Junction Utility District wastewater treatment facility:

         Is located in the northwestern portion of the town.
         Discharges into Plum Creek, a tributary of the Lower Fox River.
         Was originally constructed in 1980 with majority modifications occurring in 1982.
         Uses two stabilization lagoons with periodic agricultural sludge spreading.
         Has a current flow average of 26,700 gallons per day.
         Was designed for a maximum average design flow of 29,000 gallons per day.
         Periodically exceeds recommendations for flow, biological oxygen demand or total
          suspended soils.

The collection system for the Forest Junction Utility District comes mainly from eight-inch
gravity sewers with several sections of four-inch gravity sewers in the mobile home park. A
series of ten-inch collector sewers exist within the central portion of the district to transport
waste to a lift station and then into a six-inch force main directed to the treatment plant. An
additional lift station and four-inch force main exists along Church Street that allows for exiting
and future gravity service in the northern portion of the district. No major problems exist with
inflow and infiltration of clear water due to the relatively young age of the collection system.
However, the district is planning to do some work in the near future to recondition manholes
which have had some infiltration problems, which can affect the capacity and operation of the
treatment plant. Currently there are no plans to improve or expand the service area.


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Brillion Sewer Service Area
The city’s wastewater treatment facility:

         Is located on Washington Street in the southwestern portion of the city;

         Was constructed in 1981 with several minor modifications occurring since its
          construction, and;

         Uses an activated sludge treatment system to process raw sewerage followed with tertiary
          filtrations by sand filters.

Treated effluent is discharged into Black Creek, which flows into Spring Creek, a tributary of the
Manitowoc River. As of June 2001, all sludge is aerobically digested and pumped into one of
nine reed beds for further treatment. The capacity of the reed beds should allow for about ten
years worth of sludge. The final disposal will be according to DNR guidelines. Industrial wastes
from the Brillion Iron Works, Ariens, and Professional Plating, either receive some pre-treatment
or are shipped to other locations for treatment. Although the city provides public sewer, there
are several homes in outlying areas of the city that are still utilizing on-site septic systems.

The city’s existing wastewater collection system consists mainly of eight-inch gravity sewers
with. These sewers lead to larger collectors (10-inch to 15-inch), which, in turn, feed into a series
of 18-inch and 21-inch interceptors located in the central portion of the city. Wastewater is then
pumped from the main lift station to a 14-inch force main for transport into a 21-inch interceptor
that leads to the treatment plant. The main lift station was upgraded in 1995 with new, larger
pumps and a new stand-by generator set. The city jet cleans 1/5 of the entire system each year.

Two lift stations within the system serve existing and future single -family residential
subdivisions located in the southwestern portion of the city. Gravity sewers utilizing the lift
station located near CTH PP will service future areas of undeveloped land in the southwestern
portion of the city. Gravity sewers and the USH 10 lift station will serve lands in the
northwestern portion of the service area. In 2002, a new upsized station replaced the lift station
on USH 10. Additional lift stations may be needed to serve the area adjacent to CTH PP, north of
Spring Creek and the area adjacent of Center Street, west of Glenview.

Waverly Sanitary District

The Waverly Sanitary District serves the northwestern portion of the Town of Harrison and a
portion of the City of Menasha. There are currently four lift stations in the Waverly system. The
backbone sanitary sewer system and water lines were installed along Lake Park Road and STH
114 in 2000 and 2001. Waverly’s system connects with the Town of Menasha Utility District at
the Brighton-Beach lift station, where the wastewater is discharged to the Neenah-Menasha
Sewerage Commission system.




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Darboy Sanitary District

The Darboy Sanitary District encompasses the north central portion of the Town of Harrison.
The district was formed in the early 1970s to deal with the problems of malfunctioning septic
systems and problems with individual wells.

The sanitary sewer collection system for the district was put into operation in 1984. The system
consists primarily of 8-inch PVC gravity sewer pipe. A larger gravity interceptor using 10, 12,
and 15-inch pipes extends generally from south to north with a major sewer line under the Fox
River, through Little Chute and Kaukauna to the Heart of the Valley Treatment Plant. There are
no lift stations or force mains in the present system. Darboy’s main 15-inch interceptedor
extends to a metering system in Combined Locks where the wastewater is discharged to the
major sewer line under the Fox River.

According to the Town of Harrison Comprehensive Plan Update, 2004, the capacity of sewer
lines in the district has been reached. Further development in the Darboy Sanitary District would
need to wait for the construction of an additional sewer line under the Fox River to add capacity
from the Heart of the Valley Treatment Facility. A Facility Study was completed in December
2003 detailing the needed improvements.

New Holstein Utilities

New Holstein Utilities is the locally owned and operated electric, water, water softener and
wastewater utility, serving 2,553 customers in New Holstein and the surrounding area. New
Holstein Utilities was founded more than 89 years ago, by the citizens of New Holstein. The
community’s early founders voted to establish their own city-owned utility to provide light to its
downtown area and to encourage economic development.

Treatment plant was built in 1972-73

City of Kiel

Kiel’s sanitary sewer system is a conventional gravity type with seven lift stations. It has an
advanced treatment system that includes extended aeration Class A bio-solids system. The
effluent from the system is discharged into the Sheboygan River. The current system covers the
entire city and consists of collector sewers, force mains, interceptor sewers, etc. The collector
and force mains are a variety of different sizes. According to the city’s 2002 comprehensive
plan, the existing system is considered adequate and the city has no plans to upgrade it in the
future.

Village of Sherwood Sewer Utility

The entire Village of Sherwood is serviced by sanitary sewer except for several isolated homes
that currently use on-site systems. The village’s wastewater treatment facility was originally
constructed in 1974 and received a major reconstruction in 1998. The treatment plant uses an
oxidation ditch and the activated sludge process to treat sewerage. A reed bed system is used to
provide bio-solids management while the existing lagoons are used for flow equalization.

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Treated effluent is eventually discharged into a tributary of the North Branch Manitowoc River
and Kankapot Creek.

The plant was designed for a maximum monthly design flow average of 728,000 gallons per day.
The existing wastewater collection system for the village is comprised mainly of eight inch
gravity sewers with some segments of 10 and 12-inch gravity lines. Four separate lift stations
transport waste to the treatment plant.

The Sherwood Sewer Service Area Planning Area and Sewer Service Area includes the Village
of Sherwood as well as portions of the adjacent Town of Harrison. With in the Town of
Harrison, there are currently 2-3 customers.

Village of Hilbert

The existing Village of Hilbert wastewater treatment system was constructed in 1980 and was
upgraded in 1996. Influent is pumped from a lift station to a screening and degritting process.
Wastewater flows by gravity into a three ring oxidation ditch. Sludge is wasted to a sludge
storage tank. Effluent passes a final clarification. Alum is added to the oxidation ditch for
phosphorous removal. The plant is designed for an average daily flow of 326,000 gallons per
day (gpd). Average plow is currently at 150,000 gpd.

In 2005, the Village of Hilbert installed a trailer mounted belt press and storage facility at the
wastewater treatment facility. This belt press de-waters the sludge, which is stored until it can be
land spread.

Menasha Sewer Utility

Operated by Menasha Public Works Department.

Town of Menasha Utility District

Provides sewage treatment to the City of Menasha from 9th Street to the north.

Potter Sanitary District

The Potter Sanitary District provides sewer service to the Village of Potter. The district’s
boundaries are the same as the village boundaries. All new development in the village is
required to be connected to service. The treatment system was built in 1969. The facility has a
40,000 gallons per day capacity and is currently being run at half capacity. Recent upgrades
have been made to the treatment facility.

City of Chilton

The City of Chilton’s wastewater treatment plant has a design population of 4,000. A plant
expansion was completed in 2000. Average annual design flow is 0.92 mgd with a peak design
flow of 5.0 mgd. Annual averages include BOD loading at 2,400 lbs/day, TSS loading at 1,910
lbs./day, TKN loading at 190 lbs./day, NH 3 loading at 80 lbs/day, and P loading at 60
lbs./day.The City of Chilton’s wastewater treatment plant was originally constructed in 1940.
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Since that time a few minor upgrades have taken place. The treatment plant has also undergone
major upgrades in 1984, 2000 and the most recent in 2008. With the 2008 upgrade a third
oxidation ditch was added to accommodate industrial growth in the city. The new plant is
designed to the year 2027 and a population of 4,460. Part of the new treatment process was
changed to include biological phosphorus removal. This means less chemicals being added to
the system to remove the phosphorus. With a limit of one ppm, the new system meets and
exceeds the permitted amount allowed to the receiving stream.

The design flow is 1.19 million gallons per day, with a peak flow of 5.0 million gallons per day.
The annual design BOD5 is 3600 pounds per day. The TSS is 1685 pounds per day and the
NH3N has a 268 pound per day design. The phosphorus has a design of 80 pounds per day.

Village of Stockbridge

The village’s wastewater treatment facility is located in the south central portion of the
community, adjacent to Mud Creek. This facility was originally constructed in 1963 with a
major upgrade occurring in 1979. The treatment plant uses an activated sludge treatment system
to process raw sewage. The treated effluent is discharged into a tributary of Mud Creek with
sludge stored on-site and eventually spread on agricultural lands.

The entire village is serviced with sanitary sewer with the exception of four to five existing
houses. The existing wastewater collection system for the village is comprised of mainly eight-
inch gravity sewers except for a short segment of 10-inch sewer which leads from two
interceptors into the treatment plant.

The Utility Commission is working on an upgrade of the plant as it has a capacity of 60,000
gallons per day (gpd) and is treating 30,000 to 40,000 gpd. Plans have been made to increase the
capacity to 120,000 gpd.

In the summer of 2006 the Town of Stockbridge, Village of Stockbridge and the East Central
Wisconsin Regional Plan Commission met regarding the possibility of extending sewer and
water to a portion of the town along the lake north of the village. Following the initial planning
meeting, there was a public meeting. At that public meeting there was not a lot of support for
extending the sewer north of the village (primarily due to cost implications). Due to lack of
support from the residents that were to be part of the proposed sanitary district and the Village of
Stockbridge, public sewer and water is not being pursued at the present time.

4.13 Private On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems (POWTS)

All areas not served by municipal sewer depend upon Private On-site Wastewater Treatment
Systems (POWTS), commonly know as septic systems. The Wisconsin Department of
Commerce (DOC) and Wisconsin Counties are jointly responsible for the regulation and
monitoring of POWTS. In July of 2000 the DOC completed major revisions to the state
Plumbing Code (Comm 83) with the intent of allowing the use of more diverse technology in the
design of POWTS.



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There are several different types of septic systems in use in Wisconsin, all of which have varying
natural soil requirements, and all of which can be found in Calumet County. The most common
installations are as follows.

Conventional septic tank and soil absorption cell systems have the most stringent soil
requirements in that nearly five feet of permeable soil is required for installation. This system
consists of a septic tank that collects all wastewater from the home. There are baffles in the tank
that facilitate the settling of solids to the bottom of the tank, while the partially treated liquid
effluent leaves the outlet of the tank and is further treated by natural soil beneath the absorption
area. Three feet of suitable soil is needed to treat the effluent, and because the system is
completely located below the surface, hence the need for a minimum of five feet of permeable
soil. Typically these systems have the least amount of components and function by gravity.

In-ground pressure distribution systems are only partially similar to conventional systems in that
although they are completely sub-surface, they are never gravity activated other than the sewer
line from the house to the tank. Again, there is a septic tank component where solids settle to the
bottom. Instead of the effluent from the outlet going directly into the absorption area, it is staged
in a pumping chamber until a certain liquid level is attained. At that time it is discharged by a
pump through a small diameter force-main, into even smaller diameter (typically 1–2")
distribution pipes. Pressurization benefits the long term performance and life of the absorption
area because the effluent is distributed evenly throughout, and afterward the system is allowed to
"rest" until the next pumping event. In-ground pressure distribution systems also require
approximately five feet of suitable soil.

The Mound system is one that many people are familiar with. It is mechanically identical to the
in-ground pressure, but is located above the existing grade. This is because where these systems
are sited have very impermeable or "heavy" soils which don’t accept large amounts of septic
effluent. To make up for this lack of permeability, sand is placed above the grade, and then the
distribution pipes (on a stone bedding) are laid out. By the time the effluent moves vertically
through the sand and natural soil, it is treated sufficiently enough to discharge into the marginal
soil below. Mound systems make it possible to treat effluent on soils with as little as 12" of
permeability. Contemporary mounds are installed with narrower dimensions than had been in
the past. These narrower – but lengthened – cells can be landscaped, and no longer require the
large white observation pipes to be above grade as in the past.

The relatively new system-at-grade is identical to the mound, except that there is no sand fill.
Instead, the surface of the ground is broken up by plowing, and then the stone bedding and pipes
are installed directly on the ground. Because there is no sand involved, soil requirements are
greater for this system, but are still less than those for in-ground systems: three feet of permeable
soil.

Finally, for sites that have less than 12" of permeable soil, or where there simply is no room for a
treatment system, a holding tank might be an alternative. A holding tank is not any type of
treatment system, but is a storage vessel for wastewater. These tanks – typically 2,000 to 5,000
gallon capacity – have to be emptied by a licensed septage hauler when full. This can be both a
nuisance and a significant long-term expense to the homeowner. Because of illegal pumping


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activities that have been experienced state-wide, Calumet County does not allow holding tanks
for new construction except in limited circumstances.

The following communities strictly rely on POWTS for sanitary sewage treatment:

         Town of Woodville
         Town of Rantoul
         Town of Chilton
         Town of Stockbridge
         Town of New Holstein

         Town of Charlestown
          Currently there are two subdivisions near the City of Chilton which may test their wells
          and their sanitary systems to determine if they are safe and functioning properly. If the
          wells are found to be unsafe, and the private sewerage systems failing, the subdivisions
          will need to connect to the City of Chilton municipal sewer and water.

         Town of Brothertown
          Six residents north of Artesian Road are on sanitary sewer (from the south, out of Fond
          du Lac County). The remainder of the Town does not have sewer service available to
          them.

4.14 Public Water Supply

City of Appleton Water Treatment Facility

The City of Appleton recently completed construction of a new 24 million gallon per day (MGD)
lime softening Water Treatment Facility. The facility was built to accommodate the growth of
the community and to meet the new water regulations mandated by the Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources (WDNR) beginning in the year 2002. The new facility features pretreatment
with potassium permanganate and powdered activated carbon, lime softening, granular activated
carbon contactors and ultra filtration membranes. It is currently the largest ultra filtration
membrane surface water supply in the United States.

According to the Water Department’s 2002 Public Service Commission Annual Report, the
Appleton water system serves approximately 23,500 residential customers, 1,600 commercial,
and 90 industrial customers. Water is also sold to Grand Chute as well as the Waverly Sanitary
District. All water for the department is from Lake Winnebago. The city has the following five
water storage facilities:

         1964 elevated tank, 2,000,000 gallon capacity
         1988 elevated tank, 1,000,000 gallon capacity
         1951 elevated tank, 500,000 gallon capacity
         1986 elevated tank, 300,000 gallon capacity
         2001 elevated tank, 3,000,000 gallon capacity



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Brillion Municipal Water Utility

The utility was originally organized in 1921. The city contracts with Midwest Contract
Operations, Inc. to provide management, supervision, and certified personnel necessary to
operate and maintain the city’s water utility. The utility provides metered sales to approximately
1,040 residential customers, 104 commercial, and 20 industrial customers. Groundwater is the
sole source of water for the utility. There are currently three wells in service ranging in depth
from 178 to 800 feet. The city has two water storage facilities including an elevated tank built in
1966 with a capacity of 150,000 gallons and another elevated tank built in 1966 with a 200,000-
gallon capacity. The city has approximately 102,000 feet of water main, the majority of which 6
inched in diameter. There are also approximately 175 hydrants in the city.

Menasha Utilities

Menasha Utilities provides water service to the majority of residents in the City of Menasha (9th
Street and south). The utility was organized in 1905. The utility has approximately 4,730
residential, 212 commercial, and 34 industrial customers. The utility’s water supply source is
taken from Lake Winnebago, filtered, and treated at the Water Filtration Plant located on
Manitowoc Street, and distributed to customers through the water distribution system. The
utility has six water storage facilities including the following:

         1947 reservoir, 500,000 gallon capacity
         1967 reservoir, 100,000 gallon capacity
         1988 reservoir, 3,000,000 gallon capacity
         1927 reservoir, 200,000 gallon capacity
         1967 elevated tank, 750,000 gallon capacity
         1929 elevated tank, 500,000 gallon capacity

The utility has approximately 325,400 feet of water main, the majority of which is 6 inch in
diameter. The utility also has 380 hydrants.

New Holstein Utilities

New Holstein Utilities is the locally owned and operated electric, water, water softener and
wastewater utility, serving 2,553 customers in New Holstein and the surrounding area. New
Holstein Utilities was founded more than 89 years ago – by the citizens of New Holstein. The
community’s early founders voted to establish their own city-owned utility to provide light to its
downtown area and to encourage economic development.

The utility was organized in 1912. The water utility has approximately 1,200 residential, 100
commercial, and 8 industrial customers. The sole source of water for the utility is groundwater.
The utility has three wells and five water storage facilities including the following:

         1924 reservoir, 65,000 gallon capacity
         2007 elevated tank, 200,000 gallon capacity
         1948 reservoir, 100,000 gallon capacity
         1971 elevated tank, 250,000 gallon capacity

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         1975 reservoir, 200,000 gallon capacity

The utility has approximately 131,000 feet of water main, the majority of which 8 inch or 6 inch
in diameter. The utility also has 217 hydrants.

Chilton Municipal Water Utility

The utility was organized in 1919. The utility serves approximately 1,280 residential, 181
commercial, and 39 industrial customers. The sole source of water for the utility is groundwater
via three active wells ranging in depth from 180 to 280 feet. The water supply is obtained from
the Silurian Dolomite Aquifer. The city has four water storage facilities including the following:

     1969 elevated tank, 200,000 gallon capacity
     1978 elevated tank, 300,000 gallon capacity
     1979 reservoir, 500,000 gallon capacity


The utility has approximately 149,250 feet of water main, the majority of which is six inch in
diameter followed by 8 inch. The utility also has approximately 230 fire hydrants.

In 2000 the City of Chilton completed a water system evaluation and plan. The evaluation
concluded that the City of Chilton water system is expected to expand. The system will be
extended to serve both new development and existing developments that are currently served by
private wells. A comprehensive evaluation of the water system facilities was conducted to
identify an improvement plan. The plan includes improvements that should be implemented to
meet the current and future needs of the community.

The city has completed development of a new well site, Well #10, located approximately 1.5
miles east of the city limits in the Town of Charlestown. The new well has a capacity of
approximately 500 gpm. Raw water will be pumped to the Well #8 pump house for treatment.
The Chilton Municipal Water Utility, organized in 1919, provides water service to approximately
1,347 residential, 219 commercial and 30 industrial customers. The sole source of water for the
utility is groundwater via three high capacity wells ranging in depth from 180 to 280 feet. The
water supply is pumped from the Silurian Dolomite Aquifer.

The utility softens all the water supplied to the customers of Chilton. The water is treated with
high efficiency ion exchange softeners completely updated in 2010.

The utility has three water storage facilities:
    1969 elevated tank, 200,000 gallon capacity
    1978 elevated tank, 300,000 gallon capacity
    1979 reservoir, 500,000 gallon capacity


The distribution system contains approximately 150,000 feet of water mains, the majority of
which is 6 ince and 8 inch. The system also has approximately 285 fire hydrants.




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Darboy Joint Sanitary District No. 1

The water system for the Darboy Sanitary District was put into operation in 1984. The district
has approximately 3,325 residential and 120 commercial water utility customers. Approximately
75% of the utility’s water supply is from groundwater while the remaining 25% is purchased
from the Village of Kimberly. The utility currently has three wells in service and two water
storage facilities. One water storage facility is a reservoir that was built in 1995 with a 500,000-
gallon capacity. The other facility is an elevated tank that was constructed in 1996 with a
300,000-gallon capacity. The utility has approximately 341,000 feet of water main, the majority
of which is plastic and 8 inch in diameter. The utility also has approximately 677 hydrants. To
support easterly growth, the sanitary district anticipates the construction of a new east side water
tower (300,000 gallons) in approximately 2008.

Hilbert Municipal Water Utility

The utility was organized in 1941. The utility has approximately 409 residential, 79 commercial,
and 3 industrial customers. The sole source of water for the utility is groundwater. The utility
currently has two active wells. Water storage facilities include a new tower built in 2004 with a
200,000-gallon capacity and a reservoir built in 1940 with a capacity of 83,000 gallons. The
utility has approximately 53,600 feet of water main, the majority of which is 6 inch in diameter.
The utility also has 74 hydrants. The village has a wellhead protection plan in place.

City of Kiel Utilities

The utility was organized in 1905. The utility provides water to approximately 1,330 residential,
118 commercial, and 10 industrial customers. The sole source of water for the utility is
groundwater, specifically the Silurian-Dolomite aquifer. The utility has three active wells and
two water storage facilities. One facility is an elevated tank built in 1971 with a 200,000-gallon
capacity and the other is an elevated tank built in 1986 with a 200,000 gallon capacity. The
utility has approximately 143,700 feet of water main, the majority of which is 6 inch or 12 inch
in diameter. The utility also has 270 hydrants.

Village of Sherwood Water Utility

The utility was organized in 1974. The primary water source for the Village of Sherwood is an
interconnection to the City of Appleton, which began on July 1, 2010. The village maintains one
well as an emergency back-up water source. The utility has approximately 9501002 residential,
and 42 commercial customers, and 11 public authority customers. The sole source of water for
the utility is from groundwater. The utility has two wells and two operating storage facilities.
Water storage facilities include a 1975 standpipe with a 100,000-gallon capacity, a 1992
reservoir with a 20,500-gallon capacity, and a 2000 elevated storage tank with a 200,000 gallon
capacity, and a 305,000 gallon Harvestore storage tank installed in 2009. The utility has
approximately 118,99397,000 feet of water main in the village, the majority of which is plastic
and 6 and 8 inches in diameter. Outside Sherwood, there are approximately 19,307 feet of water
main, the majority being 12 inches in diameter. The utility also has 194262 hydrants.




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Village of Stockbridge Water Utility

The utility was organized in 1996. MCO located in Menasha provides the utility with
management and certified personnel to operate and maintain the system. The utility has
approximately 294 residential, 28 commercial, and 2 industrial customers. The sole source of
water for the utility is groundwater. The utility has two active wells and two water storage
facilities. Water storage facilities include a 1995 standpipe with a 150,000-gallon capacity and a
1995 reservoir with a 44,000-gallon capacity. The utility has approximately 54,000 feet of water
main and 88 hydrants.

Other than routine maintenance, no improvements or upgrades are anticipated to be needed in the
next five to ten years. The village has a wellhead protection plan and ordinance. It identifies
existing features that may potentially cause contamination, and contains actions to address them.

Waverly Sanitary District

The utility was organized in 1972. In 2002 the district built a new office and shop facility. The
district provides water to approximately 1,145 residential, 38 commercial, and two residential
customers. All of the district’s water is purchased from the City of Appleton. The district
therefore has no pumping stations, wells, or water storage facilities. The district does have
approximately 157,620 feet of water main and 324 hydrants. The district connects to the City of
Appleton system on Midway Road, approximately 450 feet west of Southfield Drive. The
district is currently evaluation options for a second connection to the Appleton system.

Town of Brillion

Forest Junction, and the City of Brillion are the only portions of the town served by a municipal
water system. The remainder of the town is not served by a public water system. The source of
water for residents outside Forest Junction and the City of Brillion is private on-site wells.

Private Wells

The following communities rely entirely on private wells for water service.

         Village of Potter
         Town of Woodville
         Town of Brothertown
         Town of Rantoul
         Town of Chilton
         Town of Stockbridge
         Town of New Holstein
         Town of Charlestown

The City of Chilton has developed a new well site, Well #10, located approximately 1.5 miles
east of the city limits in the Town of Charlestown. A well head protection plan was adopted in
the summer of 2004. The new well has a capacity of approximately 500 gpm and a pump
station. Raw water will be pumped to the Well #8 pump house for treatment.

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4.15 Stormwater Management

Calumet County has adopted a Post-Construction Stormwater Management and Erosion Control
StandardsOrdinance, Chapter 10, Article III of the Calumet County Code of OrdinancesSection
115 of the County Subdivision Ordinance. The ordinance requires that certain construction sites
obtain a stormwater management permit from Calumet County prior to construction. Each
permitted construction site must develop a stormwater management plan demonstrating that best
management practices (BMPs) such as wet detention basins, grassed swales and bioretention
facilities will be designed, installed and maintained to handle the stormwater generated from the
additional impervious surfaces. BMPs must reduce the amount of total suspended solids in the
stormwater, protect groundwater, control peak discharge and infiltrate runoff.The intent of the
standards is to protect property and structures from damage caused by increased rate of surface
water runoff resulting from land development activities in the unincorporated areas of Calumet
County. The standards apply to all major subdivisions and only those minor subdivisions where
Planning Department personnel determine that the proposed development will have a significant
impact on the environment. The standard requires that post-development peak flow rates must
not be any greater than the pre-development peak flow during a 24-hour, 2-year, and 100-year
storm event.

Calumet County Zoning Ordinance Section 7.09, which
establishes a Surface Water Drainageway Overly District
(SWDD), provides another measure in stormwater management.
The purpose of the district is to preserve and protect surface water
drainageways from any alteration that would affect water quality,
flood storage, and the flow capacity of the drainageways.

City of Appleton
The City of Appleton is served by an extensive system of storm
sewers. The city has traditionally collected and transported
stormwater from residential, commercial and industrial areas to
the Fox River. As the city grew, areas further and further away
from the Fox River were developed requiring longer and larger
storm sewers. It became more cost-effective to route these flows     Stormwater drainage
to creeks tributary to the Fox River. On the north side of the city,
stormwater was routed to Apple Creek. On the southeast side of the city, stormwater was routed
to Garners Creek.

The city has been televising storm sewers on a regular basis since the mid-1980’s, and currently
televises approximately thirty miles of storm sewer each year. The city also performs an annual
visual inspection of all manholes and storm sewer inlets in streets prior to street paving. To
remove pollutants from city streets, the City of Appleton has been utilizing street sweepers for
many years. The city has also chosen to construct ponds to collect the stormwater runoff from
lands being developed. In some cases, individual ponds are constructed for each development
project. In other cases, a regional pond is constructed to serve several projects. The city has also
formed a stormwater utility.


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City of Brillion
The city has a Stormwater Drainage Facilities Code (Sec. 86-169) that requires developers to
obtain permits and provide drainage facilities adequate to serve development. These facilities
may include curb and gutter, catch basins and inlets, storm sewers, road ditches, open channels,
water retention structures and settling basins. Under the code, culverts must be designed to
accommodate the ten-year storm and shall be sized so that the 25-year storms do not cause
flooding of the adjacent roadway. Stormwater swales and ditches may be sized for from 25-year
to 100-year frequency storms, depending upon the estimated amount of damage that would be
incurred by adjacent properties if flooding did occur. City staff is currently reviewing the
Stormwater Drainage Facilities Code and may recommend modifications to better protect the
city. The city budgets approximately $10,000 per year for stormwater system maintenance and
minor repairs as part of the operating budget.

City of Chilton
The majority of the city is served by the municipal stormwater systemfacilities. The system
consists of curb and gutter, manholes, inlets of various pipe sizes along with open ditches,
culverts, and open channels sized adequate for the area. The city has also created a stormwater
plan policy for new development which collect stormwater runoff in detention ponds. The city
has recently constructed a regional detention pond that collects the runoff in the Chilton Business
Park. The city sweeps streets monthly and cleans all manholes and inlets in the fall to remove
pollutants before entering the waterways.

City of Kiel
The city is provided with a storm water sewer system. The present system of curbed streets and
sewer drainage was developed by the gradual extension of the major drainage systems in the city.
There haven’t been any drainage problems within the city indicating that the existing system is
adequate at this time. There are no plans to improve the storm sewer system in the near future,
but the city will continue to monitor areas that may be more susceptible to flooding.

City of Menasha
The vast majority of the City of Menasha includes stormwater sewers for stormwater
management. The City of Menasha is subject to the requirements of the Environmental
Protection Agency’s Storm Water Phase II Regulations. The city is required to obtain a
discharge permit for stormwater through the WDNR.

City of New Holstein
No information available.

Village of Hilbert
The village constructed a detention pond in 2004 to assist in control of stormwater in a new sub-
division in the village.

Village of Potter
Curb and gutter is provided in the village on Main and Central Streets and limited curb and
gutter are provided on remaining streets. Calumet County provides street sweeping on curb and
gutter streets once per year.


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Village of Sherwood
The village has several stormwater management plans. In 2005 there are plans for a detention
basin, Meadowcliff Pond project.

         Golf Course Road Storm Water Study
          At the request of the village, McMahon Associates, Inc. recently conducted a storm water
          study within the Golf Course Road area. The approximate study area boundaries are
          Pigeon Road to the west, Village’s corporate limits to the north, Stommel Road to the
          east, and State Park Road to the south. The study was completed in June 2003.

Village of Stockbridge
Much of the stormwater in the portion of the village along USH 55 drains into a creek. While
streams flow hard in storms, they have done an adequate job in carrying stormwater away from
developed areas. There are some areas of the village which experience problems due to
stormwater.

Town of Brillion
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town. The town has experienced flooding and adverse stormwater runoff in certain areas of the
town. Forest Junction, in particular, has had stormwater problems. It is believed the problems
are associated with poor ditch maintenance and filling by some residents.

Town of Brothertown
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town. The town experiences flooding problems during periods of heavy rain on Lakeshore Drive
and Harbor Drive.

Town of Charlestown
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town.

The only area of the town which consistently experiences spring flooding is near W849
Aebischer Road in the northeast corner of a wetland known locally as the “Aebischer Swamp”.

Town of Chilton
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town.

Town of Harrison
Except for a triangular piece of land near the intersection of CTH AP and Lake Park Road, the
entire portion of the town west of Lake Park Road have been zoned as Surface Water
Drainageway Overlay District.

A substantial part of the Garner’s Creek drainage basin is located in what is now, or may
become, a rapidly developing part of the Fox Cities Area. Recognizing the need to develop a
comprehensive stormwater management plan to address existing stormwater problems, and to
avoid the creation of new problems as development proceeds, the Garner’s Creek communities

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contracted with a consultant to complete a comprehensive Stormwater Management Plan for
developing areas in the Garner’s Creek drainage basin. The southern part of the Garner’s Creek
drainage basin lies within the Town of Harrison.

Town of New Holstein
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town.

Limited flooding occurs at the northwest edge of the City of New Holstein. The flooding has
caused crop damage. It appears the flooding is due to the City of New Holstein channeling
stormwater into the town.

Town of Rantoul
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town.

Town of Stockbridge
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town.

The town has experienced some flooding problems along Fairy Springs Road, Rockland Beach
Road, and Mayflower Lane. On steep slopes the town installs rip-rap to control erosion.

Town of Woodville
Ditches, culverts, and local topography are the primary stormwater management tools for the
town.

4.16 Health Care Facilities

Major medical facilities found in and surrounding Calumet County include:

     Calumet   County Homestead Rehabilitation Center, New Holstein
      Appleton Medical Center, Appleton
      Bellin Hospital, Green Bay
      Calumet Medical Center, Chilton
     St. Elizabeth Hospital - Rehabilitation, Menasha
      St. Elizabeth Hospital, Appleton
      St. Nicholas Hospital, Sheboygan
      St. Vincent Hospital, Green BayAppleton Medical Center, Appleton
      Thedacare, AppletonTheda Clark Medical Center, Neenah
      Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Appleton


Calumet Homestead CareRehabilitation Center

This facility is county owned and operated and is located at 1712 Monroe Street in New
Holstein. The facility is licensed by the State of Wisconsin as a 10190-bed skilled nursing
facility and provides nursing care at the intensive skilled, skilled, and intermediate levels. The

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entire facility is Medicare certified. A multidisciplinary approach is used for the management of
medically complex conditions. Physical, occupational and speech therapy are offered onsite to
residents and outpatients. Short-term stays are available for rehabilitation or respite care. A 12-
bed secure unit is dedicated to the care of residents with Alzheimer's disease and related
dementias. The specially trained staff of this unit works closely with each resident to provide
activities and programs to manage behaviors and changing needs. Hospice and end of life care is
also available.

Stanton Place, City of Chilton

The Housing Authority of the City of Chilton owns and operates Stanton Place, an independent
living center for the elderly. Stanton Place is a single-story, 32-unit apartment building
providing independent living for the elderly. This complex was constructed in 1983. Three of
the apartments are designed especially for use by handicapped residents.

Willowdale Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, New Holstein

There are a total of 5049 beds at this facility. A variety of services are provided including
physical and occupational therapy, speech and language pathology, nursing, and mental health
services.

Willowpark Residence Assisted Living Facility, New Holstein

There are a total of 45 rooms at this facility. The residence provides alternative living for the
adult active senior. Twenty-four hour caring staff is available to assist residents.

4.17 Day Care Facilities

According to the State of the Region Report, 2003, from the East Central Wisconsin Regional
Planning Commission, Calumet County has 18 county regulated childcare providers, 20 state
licensed facilities, three nursery/preschool programs, and three school-age programs.

Commercial day care facilities and licensed facilities found in Calumet County include:

     The    Children’s Center, Chilton

     Propson      Day Care, Chilton

     Trinity    Lutheran Day Care, Hilbert

     Shelly’s     Growing Years, Stockbridge

     St.   Peter’s Lutheran Early Child Care, Hilbert

     Kiel   Cooperative Pre-School, Kiel



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     Circle  of Friends Child Learning Center, can accommodate 84 children, six weeks of age
          and older, City of Brillion

     Christ    the Rock Church, Town of Harrison

     Kid’s    Land, Town of Harrison

     The   Outer Limits Youth Outreach, located in the former elementary school in Forest
          Junction, offers activities and tutoring three evenings a week to children in grades 3
          through 8.

     The  Town of Brothertown has one day care facility. It is Sunshine Days Day Care at
          N2768 Lakeshore Drive (operated by Tim Tasch).

     One   day care operation exists in the Town of Rantoul. Day care is available at Trinity
          Lutheran at N6081 West River Road in the Town.


There are two private, in-home day care operations in the Town of Chilton: The Jim Kolbe
home at the intersection of State Road and Olivian Road, and, the John Horst residence on State
Highway 57.

Note: Due to the extensive number of facilities located in the Cities of Menasha and Appleton
they are not listed.

Day Child Care Information from Calumet

According to the Calumet County Health and Human Services Department, Calumet County has
three county regulated child care providers. The Calumet County certified licensed child care
provides are: Patricia Pyne, Town of Harrison; Nicole Winkers, Town of Woodville, and;
Jennifer Bolz, Town of Harrison.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family ServicesChildren and Families,
there are approximately 32 state licensed day child care providers in Calumet County. Facilities
are as detailed in the following table.




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                                           Table 4-3
                           Day Child Care Facilities, Calumet County

                     Child Care Facilities with a Capacity Greater Than 20 Children
    Facility Name                                 Street                  City                 Capacity
    Chatterbox Child Learning Center Inc.         1110 Fremont St         Kiel                        35
    Circle of Friends Learing Center LLC.         333 W National Ave      Brillion                    84
    Circle of Friends Learing Center LLC.         1180 Province Ter       Menasha                    110
    Happy Hour Nursery School                     44 W Washington St      Chilton                     13
    Inspire Dreams Learning Center                453 E Brooklyn St       Chilton                     95
    Kidzland 2 LTD                                W5483 Hwy KK            Appleton                    90
    Kidzland LTD                                  W6127 Lorna Ln          Appleton                    63
    Little Inspirations Childcare Center          740 Lake Park Rd        Menasha                     85
    Shelly's Growing Years Child Care             203 N Military Rd       Stockbridge                 30
    YMCA School Age Care - Janet Berry            3601 S. Telulah Ave     Appleton                    60
    YMCA School Age Care - McKinley               1125 E. Taft            Appleton                    34
    YMCA School Age Care - Sunrise                N9301 Cty N             Appleton                    32
    YMCA School Age Care - Woodland               N9085 N Coop Rd         Appleton                    60

                    Child Care Facilities with a Capacity Less Than 20 Children
   Facility Name                               Street                   City          Capacity
   Angel Corner Daycare                        30 Welcome Circle        Appleton               8
   Care A Lot Child Care                       N9651 Clover Ridge Trail Appleton               8
   Bunnies and Bears Day Care                  2600 S Greenview St      Appleton               8
   Eternal Love Lutheran Preschool             1011 E Midway Rd         Appleton             16
   Imagine Family Child Care                   N9665 Handel Dr          Appleton               8
   Joyful Noise FCC                            118 E Hoover Ave         Appleton               8
   Karen's House                               611 S Madison St         Chilton                8
   Kiddie Korner Family Day Care               W5297 Hwy 114            Menasha                8
   Little Peeps In-Home Child Care             27 Welcome Cir           Appleton               8
   Mai's Love & Care                           2625 Wheatfield Ct       Appleton               8
   M.T. Nest Family Home Child Care            1120 E Layton Ave        Appleton               8
   One Room School House                       N4423 Olivia Ct          Chilton                8
   Park and Play Family Day Care               515 Park St              Chilton                8
   Robin's Nest Day Care                       126 Robin Ave            Chilton                8
   Sunshine Days Child Care                    N2768 Lake Shore Dr      Chilton                8
   The Children's School                       415 E Hoover Ave         Appleton             12
   Tracy's Tiny Tots                           W5741 Skippers Ln        Appleton               8
   Turtle and Friends Day Care                 W4826 Guernsey Dr        Sherwood               8
   Winkers Family Daycare                      W3219 Dundas Rd          Kaukauna               8
   Source: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family ServicesChildren & Families, April
   2004October 2011.




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4.18 Utilities and Community Facilities Programs

The following are utility and community facility programs, agencies, and activities that are
currently in use or available for use in Calumet County. The following can be used to gather
further information about utilities and community facilities and to assist in implementation of
goals.

State Programs

Community Development Block Grant for Public Facilities (CDBG-PF)
The Wisconsin CDBG Public Facilities Program is designed to assist economically distressed
smaller communities with public facility improvements. Eligible activities include, but are not
limited to, publicly-owned utility system improvements, streets, sidewalks, community centers.
Federal grant funds are available annually. The maximum grant for any single applicant is
$750,000. Grants are only available up to the amount that is adequately justified and
documented with engineering or vendor estimates. For further information contact the
Wisconsin Department of Commerce, Division of Community Development.

Tax Incremental Financing (TIF)
TIF can help a municipality undertake a public project to stimulate beneficial development or
redevelopment that would not otherwise occur. It is a mechanism for financing local economic
development project in underdeveloped and blighted areas. Taxes generated by the increased
property values pay for land acquisition or needed public works. The Wisconsin Department of
Commerce or the Wisconsin Department of Revenue should be contacted for further
information.

Rural Community Assistance Program
The Rural Community Assistance Program (RCAP) is administered by the Wisconsin
Community Action Program Association (WISCAP) to assure safe drinking water and sanitary
waste disposal for low- and moderate-income rural Wisconsin communities. The Wisconsin
RCAP provides comprehensive services and technical assistance to small, low- to moderate-
income rural communities from problem-identification through implementation of acceptable,
affordable solutions. RCAP services enable community staff to develop capacity to implement
water, wastewater and solid waste projects and assists the community in coordinating efforts
with consultants and government agencies. For further information contact WISCAP.

Clean Water Fund Program
Funds are available to protect water quality by correcting existing wastewater treatment and
urban storm water problems and preventing future problems as per s. 281.58 and 281.59, Wis.
Stats. Cities, towns, villages, counties, town sanitary districts, public inland lake protection and
rehabilitation districts, metropolitan sewerage districts, and federally-recognized tribal
governments are eligible to apply. Eligible projects include construction of treatment works,
sewer systems and interceptors necessary to prevent violation of discharge permits, meet new or
changed discharge limits, correct water quality or human health problems in unsewered areas, or
projects for the treatment of urban storm water runoff. Low interest loans are available for
planning, design and construction of wastewater treatment projects and urban storm water runoff


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projects approved by the department. For further information contact the WDNR, Bureau of
Community Financial Assistance.

Municipal Flood Control Grant Program
Provide 70% cost-sharing grants to cities, villages, towns and metropolitan sewerage districts to
acquire or flood-proof structures, purchase easements, restore riparian areas, or construct flood
control structures. Applications would be ranked based on avoided flood damages, restoration or
protection of natural and beneficial functions of water bodies, use of natural flood storage
techniques or environmentally sensitive detention ponds and enhanced recreational opportunities.
For further information contact the WDNR.

Regional Programs

Assessing Telecommunication Infrastructure in Northeast Wisconsin
In 2006 the Bay Lake Regional Planning Commission and East Central Regional Planning
Commission were funded to complete a study of an 18 county region for telecommunication
infrastructure. The study is designed to identify the gaps where technology infrastructure is
unavailable or insufficient to support the needs of current and future companies. The study will
identify providers of telecommunications, map these resources, identify local services and
pricing, assess the competitive environment and customer satisfaction, and provide comparative
analysis. For further information either planning commission can be contacted.

4.19 Utilities, Community Facilities, and Services Trends and Outlook

         National projections prepared by the Federal Aviation Administration indicate that the
          number of passenger enplanements and aircraft operations are expected to double from
          their current levels by the year 2015 at all levels of airport classifications. This demand
          could have significant impact locally with the New Holstein airport.
         Schools and school districts will continue to seek new ways to share services and reduce
          expenses in order to deal with continued declining enrollment.
         The trend for solid waste and recycling coordination and regionalization will continue in
          the face of higher disposal costs.
         Increased public interest in more county coordinated Clean Sweep collections for
          hazardous waste materials.
         Local government budget constraints will drive the need for intergovernmental
          cooperation for services and programs.
         County POWTS programs will has expanded due to additional state requirements to
          inventory and monitor the maintenance of all POWTS within their jurisdiction.
         Increased development in rural areas may create the need for increased public service
          allocations such as police and fire protection.
         Infrastructure planning and growth coordination will be primary in development
          considerations as “cost effectiveness determinations” will drive planned growth
          infrastructure improvements and the corresponding location of development.




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5.        Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural
          Resources
Calumet County has abundant natural, cultural, and agricultural resources. These resources are
highly valued assets touching every segment of life; drinking water and surface water, safe air to
breathe, healthy habitats for terrestrial and aquatic species, forests, open spaces, fertile soils,
wetlands, and a list of additional items too numerous to mention. The resource base also
includes the parks, trails, scenic areas, Niagara Escarpment, and other outdoor places people rely
on for recreation and connection to the natural environment. One could argue that people are as
much a natural resource as water. Nowhere is the impact of resource management felt more than
in the growth management process where all resource issues, both human and natural, must be
balanced in view of economic growth and environmental preservation.

While Wisconsin’s natural resources benefit each community, they are also susceptible to
internal and external forces. For example, the increasing human demands of a growing state
population increase consumption of water, land, and raw materials. Our natural resources
generally do not increase to meet this extra demand. Additionally, unplanned or poorly planned
development patterns in the last several decades are often the result of a demand for “healthy
country living”, which is transforming our rural landscapes. This rural migration along with the
expansion of the urban fringe, forces local governments to consider expanding their services to
meet the demands – sometimes costing more than will be recovered in new tax base revenues.

There are many state and some federal regulations designated to protect Wisconsin’s natural
resources. Some state laws, including those for floodplains, shorelands, and wetlands, establish
minimum use and protection standards that must be adopted and administered by local
governments. But not all natural resources are protected by state law. Local governments
throughout the state have the flexibility to plan for and develop their own local ordinances to
deal with the unique land use issues and conflicts in their communities and to protect the natural
resources they value most. As population growth, land consumption, and technological
improvements continue, communities need to take on the additional role of stewards and
protectors of these resources.

The levels of resource protection, the density of new development, and the services that support
new growth pose questions that ultimately impact the resource base. Land development patterns
are directly linked to the natural, agricultural, and cultural resource bases of each community.
Therefore, these features need to be considered before making any decisions concerning future
development within a community. Development must be carefully adjusted to coincide with the
ability of the agricultural, natural, and cultural resource base to support the various forms of
urban and rural development. This balance must be maintained to prevent the deterioration of
that underlying and sustaining base, because these resources make each community unique.
These features promote civic pride and often create a sense of place.

The following sections discuss in more detail those features that impact the natural and cultural
environment of Calumet County.


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5.1       Soils

The use and management of soil has many impacts on the communities within Calumet County.
Soil forms the foundation that all other ecosystems depend upon – plant life, wildlife, streams,
wetlands, and lakes. Soils may also pose limitations to land use in activities such as agricultural
production, forestry, building development, and road construction.

Calumet County is located at the convergence of several major habitat types. The county
contains three different ecological landscapes as defined by the WDNR. Calumet County is
located in a tension zone. The tension zone separates the mixed conifer-hardwood forests of the
north from the prairie/savanna/hardwood forests of the south. Many plant and animal species
occupy ranges roughly delineated by the tension zone. The following ecological landscapes are
found in Calumet County and partially dictate soils found in the county.

Northern Lake Michigan Coastal
Covering only a small portion of northern Calumet County, primarily the Town of Harrison, this
area is influenced by the Lake Michigan climate and contains gently rolling to flat topography
with clay and loam soils. Land cover in this landscape is now dominated by agriculture, but
urbanization is increasing dramatically, particularly for the Town of Harrison.

Central Lake Michigan Coastal
Covering northeast and much of central Calumet County, this area is also influenced by the Lake
Michigan climate and is characterized by generally flat topography with clay and silt loam soils.
Land cover is primarily urban and agricultural.

Southeast Glacial Plains
Covering south and southwest Calumet County this area is characterized by gently rolling to flat
topography with clay or silt loam textured soils on till plain. Land cover is primarily urban and
agricultural.

A soil survey for the county was completed by the United States Department of Agriculture, Soil
Conservation Service. There are seven major soil associations found in Calumet County. These
soil associations are composed of multiple soil types that are grouped into associations that can
be used to compare the suitability of large areas
for general land uses. Soil associations are
groupings of soils that share a distinctive pattern
of soils, relief, and drainage.

Kewaunee-Manawa-Poygan

These soils are the most dominant in Calumet
County. These soils were formed from glacial
till and are nearly level to sloping, well drained
to poorly drained, and have a dominantly clayey
subsoil and substratum.                               Suitability for cropland is partially dependent
                                                      upon soils found in Calumet County


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These soils are well suited to cropland, however many areas require surface drainage and/or
subsurface drainage to produce high yields. Controlling water erosion, improving drainage, and
maintaining tillage and fertility are the major management concerns. These soils are not well
suited to development. Roads are subject to frost heaving during winter months. Percolation
rates are slow and many areas are saturated with water at less than five feet during wet periods
causing severe limitations for septic tank absorption fields.

Hochheim-Larmartine-Mayville

These soils were also formed from glacial till and are generally found in the southern and
western areas of the county. These soils are the second most common in the county. They are
characterized as being nearly level to moderately steep, well drained to somewhat poorly
drained, and loamy throughout.

This association is well suited to cropland. Erosion control practices are needed on the uplands
and drainage is needed in the lower areas to produce high yields. The uplands of these soils are
well suited to community development.

Granby-Oakville-Tedrow

These soils are only found in the extreme northwest corner of the county, primarily in the City of
Menasha. Soils are identified as nearly level to sloping, well drained to poorly drained, and are
dominantly sandy throughout.

These soils have a poor potential for crops. Most of the soils are used as woodland and wildlife
habitat. Controlling blowing soil, improving drainage, and maintaining fertility are the major
management concerns for these soils.

Channohon-Whalan-Kolberg

These soils are located along the Lake Winnebago shoreline from the Village of Sherwood south
to the Village of Stockbridge. These soils are gently sloping, well drained, loamy soils, with a
dolomite substratum. These soils have fair to poor potential for cropland use and good potential
for woodland use.

Wasepi-Plainfield-Boyer

These soils, similar to the Channohon-Whalan-Kolberg association, are also primarily located
along the Lake Winnebago shoreline from the Village of Sherwood south to the Village of
Stockbridge. A small portion of this soil type is also located in the northeast corner of the
county. These soils are nearly level to moderately steep, excessively drained to somewhat poorly
drained, and are sandy and loamy soils.

Houghton-Palms-Willette

These soils are generally found along the county’s eastern and southern border. They’re
identified as being nearly level, very poorly drained organic soils.


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This association is not well suited to cropland. Wet soils and a short growing season caused by
late spring and early fall frosts restrict the type of crops that can be grown. This association is
not well suited to community development because of wet soil conditions and flood hazards.

Pella-Mundelein-Shiocton

These soils are exclusively located along the western border of the City of Brillion. They are
identified as nearly level and gently sloping, somewhat poorly to poorly drained, and are
dominantly loamy throughout.

These soils, if drained, have good potential for cultivated crops such as corn and hay. Some
undrained soil is used for pasture or as wildlife habitat.

                                                Table 5-1
                                   Prime Soils, Calumet County, 2004
                                     Not   Prime      Prime if Drained                     Prime Farmland
       Municipality               Prime Farmland    and/or Not Flooded         Total          as % of Total
    T. Brillion                  2,697.2  5,522.4              13,073.6     21,293.2                25.9%
    T. Brothertown         5,345.6 12,828.3                    5,375.4     23,549.2                    54.5%
    T. Charlestown         7,664.1   6,998.7                   5,606.8     20,269.6                    34.5%
    T. Chilton             2,047.9 11,341.5                    7,541.5     20,930.9                    54.2%
    T. Harrison            2,461.8   6,982.1                  11,213.1     20,657.0                    33.8%
    T. New Holstein        5,949.0   8,230.3                   6,161.3     20,340.7                    40.5%
    T. Rantoul             4,097.0   8,678.3                   8,025.3     20,800.5                    41.7%
    T. Stockbridge         3,774.5 12,383.7                    5,369.3     21,527.5                    57.5%
    T. Woodville             735.7   9,285.6                  10,990.4     21,011.6                    44.2%
    V. Hilbert                 0.0     255.4                     458.9        714.3                    35.8%
    V. Potter                 66.0     137.8                     126.7        330.5                    41.7%
    V. Sherwood              448.3     749.9                     973.5      2,171.7                    34.5%
    V. Stockbridge           223.4     877.7                     971.5      2,072.6                    42.3%
    C. Appleton*              53.2   1,567.0                     441.7      2,061.9                    76.0%
    C. Brillion              242.8     602.9                     866.9      1,712.6                    35.2%
    C. Chilton               394.2   1,309.7                     881.0      2,584.9                    50.7%
    C. Kiel*                  20.1     128.8                      96.3        245.2                    52.5%
    C. Menasha*              262.1     104.2                     614.3        980.5                    10.6%
    C. New Holstein          178.6     792.2                     579.6      1,550.3                    51.1%
    Calumet County        36,661.5 88,776.4                   79,367.0    204,804.9                    43.3%
     *Data are for land in Calumet County only.
     Source: Calumet County Planning Department.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-4                              Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                           Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                               Figure 5-1
                                  Prime Soils, Calumet County, 2004

                                                                        Prime if
                                                                        Drained
                                                                       and/or Not
                                                                        Flooded,
                                                                         38.8%




                            Prime
                          Farmland,
                           43.3%


                                                                 Not Prime,
                                                                  17.9%


                              *Data are for land in Calumet County only.
                              Source: Calumet County Planning Department.




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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
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Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-6   Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Map 5-1 Soils




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report   Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-7
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Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-8   Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Table 5-1, Figure 5-1, and Map 5-1 display information regarding prime agricultural soils in
Calumet County. Prime Farm Soils are identified by the Natural Resource Conservation Service
as those soils with the fewest limitations for agriculture operations. Limitations to agriculture
include high erodibility, extreme wetness, low moisture holding capacity, and low productivity.
Soils characterized as “prime when drained” would be well suited to agriculture if extreme
wetness can be overcome with drainage. Prime farm soils are prevalent throughout the county.
Several towns have more than 50% of the land area in prime farm soils. Many towns have over
90% of lands designated as prime soils if the soil is drained. Over 43% of the soil in Calumet
County as a whole is considered prime farm soil.

5.2       Agriculture & Farmland

Farming in Wisconsin and in Calumet County has undergone considerable change in the last few
decades. Detailed below are some of the most notable statistics and trends found in Calumet
County with regard to agriculture.

         According to the Census of Agriculture, there were 814733 farms in 19972002 and
          733732 in 20022007, a decrease of approximately 10% for the period.

         For the same period, 19972002 to 20022007,
          the amount of land in farms
          decreasedincreased by 4811,343 acres in
          Calumet County.

         The average size of farms increased from
          184205 acres in 19972002 to 205207 acres in
          20022007. The average size of farms in the
          State of Wisconsin in 20022007 was 204194
          acres.

         In 19972002, there were approximately          Calumet County local farm.
          51,31554,579 cattle and calves in Calumet County. In 20022007 that figure increased to
          54,57960,705.

         In 19972002, there were nine16 farms with 500 or more cattle or calves. In 20022011,
          that figure increased to approximately 20-2516 farms.

         In 20022007, most farms in Calumet County were between 50 to 179 acres. There were
          approximately 21 farms of 1,000 acres or more and approximately six farms of 2,000
          acres or more.

Some more recent information indicates that the number of dairy herds continue to decline in the
county, to 207180 in 20062011. Total cow numbers increased slightly. The number of cows per
herd has increased significantly to approximately 116158, primarily due to the addition of
Holsum I (and Holsum II is not yet reflected in available figures). In 20062011, Calumet County
was third inled the state in production per cow for the second year in a row with production per
cow at over 20,00022,900 pounds.

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-9
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
As indicated by the above trends, the number of farms continues to decrease while the size of
farms is increasing. For Calumet County this trend has resulted in a relatively small loss of total
land in farms. Agriculture will continue to be central to the rural culture, economy, and
landscape of Calumet County.

According to the 20022007 Census of Agriculture the top four livestock items in Calumet
County are cattle and calves, mink and their pelts, layerspheasants, and colonies of beeshogs and
pigs. Calumet County ranks 2723rdth out of 72 counties in Wisconsin for the number of cattle
and calves, third15th for mink, and 1454th in the state for pheasantslayers and 44th for colonies of
beeshogs and pigs.

Forage (land used for all hay and hayage, grass silage, and greenchop) is the county’s top
ranking production crop item, followed by corn and soybeans. According to the 20022007
Census of aAgriculture, forage production ranks 3735th in the state, corn ranks 4039th, and
soybean production ranks 2429th. Corn for grainsilage and all wheat for grain were the fourth
and fifth greatest items in the county, ranking 1813th and 11th seventh in the state, respectively.

Table 5-2 details the amount of farm and cropland found in Calumet County.

                                          Table 5-2
                           Farm and Cropland, Calumet County, 2004
                                                              Other                  % of Farm & Cropland
       Municipality                Farm         Cropland   Land Use       Total          of Total Land Use
  T. Brillion              498.8      13,869.0              6,927.7    21,295.5                           67.5%
  T. Brothertown           387.1      15,482.6              7,679.3    23,549.0                           67.4%
  T. Charlestown           316.2      10,864.2              9,089.2    20,269.6                           55.2%
  T. Chilton               444.1      15,747.7              4,738.6    20,930.4                           77.4%
  T. Harrison              434.5      12,237.2              7,985.0    20,656.7                           61.3%
  T. New Holstein          399.5      12,726.4              7,215.4    20,341.3                           64.5%
  T. Rantoul               511.1      13,659.3              6,630.1    20,800.6                           68.1%
  T. Stockbridge           392.6      14,692.7              6,442.0    21,527.3                           70.1%
  T. Woodville             498.1      16,436.4              4,077.1    21,011.6                           80.6%
  V. Hilbert                 3.8         322.1                388.6       714.5                           45.6%
  V. Potter                  3.7         142.1                184.5       330.4                           44.1%
  V. Sherwood               10.9         601.3              1,560.4     2,172.6                           28.2%
  V. Stockbridge            34.4       1,264.8                773.7     2,072.9                           62.7%
  C. Appleton*               3.9         392.5              1,665.3     2,061.8                           19.2%
  C. Brillion                6.7         351.0              1,354.8     1,712.5                           20.9%
  C. Chilton                24.4         879.7              1,679.9     2,584.1                           35.0%
  C. Kiel*                   1.9          75.1                168.3       245.3                           31.4%
  C. Menasha*                2.4         125.1                853.2       980.6                           13.0%
  C. New Holstein            8.8         295.4              1,246.2     1,550.3                           19.6%
  Calumet County         3,983.0    130,164.5              70,659.3   204,806.9                           65.5%
  *Data are for land in Calumet County only.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-10                               Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                             Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
  Source: Calumet County Planning Department.

Agriculture Connections

Agriculture not only produces food and fiber, but is also linked to many other components of the
economy. Agriculture supports equipment and implement manufacturers, dealers, and repair
technicians, the vegetable and meat processing industries, the construction trade, trucking,
veterinary services, genetic research, and many others.

Agriculture is intimately connected to Wisconsin’s
culture and heritage. Barns, cows, fields, and silos
paint the scene that so many define as Wisconsin’s
rural character. Farm families include some of the
earliest settlers of many areas and provide a sense of
continuity to a community. Public opinion surveys
conducted by the American Farmland Trust, the
U.S. Department of Agriculture, the American Farm
Bureau, Wisconsin counties, some Calumet County
towns, and other local units of government show
that Wisconsin citizens place a high value on the
presence of agriculture and agricultural lands.          Calumet County dairy farm.


Agriculture has many considerations relative to the natural environment, both positive and
negative. Farms provide green space, wildlife habitat, enhanced groundwater recharge, and
nutrient recycling. Farms can also be sources of soil erosion, polluted runoff, groundwater
contamination, odors, and shoreline damage to stream bank areas.

Agriculture is connected to other land uses, and is a significant contributor to the overall
development pattern. The distance from farm related services, markets for farm commodities,
processing industries, and other critical
land uses can determine the long term           Farmland and Land Use
success of an agricultural area. Certain
recreational land uses, like hunting and        The development dynamic created between
snowmobiling, benefit from the presence         farms and rural residential development has
of agricultural lands.                          impacts on land values, property taxes, and the
                                                overall development pattern. A farmers “right
Agriculture is also linked to some              to farm” is often at issue when farmland areas
significant transportation issues.              are encroached by rural residential
Agriculture brings large vehicles to rural      development. In Calumet County, 65.5% of
roads including farm equipment and heavy        land is either cropland or in some type of farm-
trucks. These rural roads are rarely            related use. Calumet County utilizes a Growth
constructed to handle the size and weight       Management policy to limit the number of rural
of such large vehicles. This often              land divisions in an effort to manage the rate of
contributes to traffic issues, the posting of   non-agricultural growth, to promote more
weight limits, and increased local              efficient growth patterns, and to minimize
expenditures for road maintenance.              public costs of non-agricultural growth in non-
                                                incorporated areas.

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                        Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-11
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Farmland Preservation

The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection manages a Farmland
Preservation Program to help towns, municipalities, and the counties to develop exclusive
agricultural areas and manage land use. The program works by assisting counties in creating
county agricultural preservation plans. These plans typically lay the groundwork for exclusive
agricultural zoning districts which then designate preferred agricultural operating areas. Farmers
participate by signing an individual, long-term agreement that stipulates the terms of land use as
exclusive agriculture. The farmland preservation program provides state income tax credits to
farmers who meet the program's soil and water conservation standards and who designate their
land use for agricultural purposes only.

In 2009, the farmland preservation program was revised, and many farmers were not eligible to
renew their agreements. Currently, in order to receive a credit, a farmer's land must either be in a
state approved Agricultural Enterprise Area or be in a farmland preservation zoning district.

In December 2011, the Wisconsin Department of Revenue reported that there were 40 claims in
Calumet County for tax year 2010 in the amount of $23,620 covering 6,229 acres under the old
Farmland Tax Relief Program (farmland preservation agreements that were entered into prior to
July 1, 2009). The new Farmland Preservation Program (farmland preservation agreements that
were entered into on or after July 1, 2009 or owns a farm located in an area designated in a
certified exclusive agricultural/farmland preservation zoning ordinance) had 156 claims in
Calumet County for tax year 2010 in the amount of $186,142 covering 24,733 acres. Therefore,
in 2010, a total of $209,762 was claimed in tax credits in Calumet County covering 30,962 acres.

Because the old Farmland Tax Relief Program is being phased out, fewer and fewer claims will
be made under the program. However, the number of acres under the new Farmland
Preservation Program will increase as farmers sign farmland preservation agreements as part of
an Agricultural Enterprise Area and as communities implement exclusive agricultural/farmland
preservation zoning. Table 5-3 compares details land enrolled in the farmland preservation
programs in Calumet County to its surrounding countiesfor each Calumet County town.

                              Table 5-3
    Comparative Farmland Preservation, Calumet County and Selected
                       AreasTowns, 20042010
                                                     # of
                              Municipality      Claimants       Credit       Acreage
                      Calumet County                 196      $209,762         30,962
                      Brown County                   638      $599,483         92,775
                      Fond du Lac County             980    $1,208,800        172,998
                      Manitowoc County               688      $805,854        108,900
                      Outagamie County               323      $294,505         46,981
                      Sheboygan County               518      $563,157         79,310

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-12                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                         Winnebago County                       117       $109,974        19,082
                        Source: Calumet County Planning Department. Unknown includes
                        preservation contracts with no listed town location and contracts which
                        include land in more than one townWisconsin Department of Revenue,
                        December 2011.

    In Calumet County, there are approximately 14,000 acres under farmland preservation
    agreements. The Town of Brothertown has the greatest acreage of farmland under farmland
    preservation agreements followed by the Town of Chilton. The Town of Harrison and
    Woodville have the fewest number of acres enrolled in the program, although both communities
    each had over 60% of their total land use in farm and cropland use.

    As of 20052011, there were approximately1,379950 participants in Calumet County Farm
    Service Agency programs including, but not limited to, conservation reserve and enhancement
    programs, farm loan programs, and the milk income loss program.

    Agricultural Land Sales

    The sale of agricultural land is tracked by the Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service for every
    county in the state. Table 5-4 details agricultural land sales trends for Calumet County.

                                       Table 5-4
            Agricultural Land Sales, Calumet County, 1999-20032006-2010
                                                                                              # Change % Change
                                                 2006    2007     2008      2009        2010 2006-2010 2006-2010
Ag Land Continuing in Ag Use
   Number of transactions                     18         11      16      11               13               -5           -27.8%
   Acres sold                              1,401       525      920     665              654             -747           -53.3%
   Dollars per acre                      $3,459 $3,749 $4,169 $5,308                  $5,111           $1,652            47.8%
Ag Land being Diverted to Other Uses
   Number of transactions                       2         -       -         -                 -            NA                 NA
   Acres sold                                 97          -       -         -                 -            NA                 NA
   Dollars per acre                      $14,141          -       -         -                 -            NA                 NA
Total of All Ag Land
   Number of transactions                     20         11      16      11               13               -7           -35.0%
   Acres sold                              1,498       525      920     665              654             -844           -56.3%
   Dollars per acre                      $4,151 $3,749 $4,169 $5,308                  $5,111             $960            23.1%
     Source: Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service, 1999-20032006-2010.

    For agricultural land continuing in agricultural use, the dollar amount per acre has increased by
    nearly 10050% from 19992006 to 20032010. Based on the data provided, no land transactions
    have been recorded since 2006 where The average dollar per acre was approximately $2,844 in
    2003. This is, however, significantly less than the average per acre for agricultural land has
    beenbeing diverted to other uses, which was $4,103 in 2003. The total number of transactions
    and amount of agricultural land sold has been decreasing in the county.



    Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-13
    Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Farmland Use Value Assessment

Wisconsin farms are facing other social, economic, and political issues as well. Some of the
most significant include soaring property values and the related property taxes, the cost of health
insurance coverage, and a growing set of federal, state, and local regulatory programs. In 1974,
the State Legislature amended the Rule of Uniform Taxation (Article VIII, Section 1.) in the
Wisconsin Constitution to permit the preferential treatment of agricultural land. The 1995-1997
Budget Act changed the standard for assessing agricultural land in Wisconsin from market value
to use value.

The goal of this legislation, known as use value assessment, is to protect Wisconsin’s farm
economy and curb urban sprawl by assessing farmland based upon its agricultural productivity,
rather than its potential for development.

Specifically, the value of agricultural land for assessment purposes was changed from market
value to use value. In a use value assessment system, the use of the land is the most important
factor in determining its assessed value.

Use value in Wisconsin is specific to land only. The use value legislation passed in 1995
requires that the assessed value of farmland be based on the income that could be generated from
its rental for agricultural use. Income and rental from farming are a function of agricultural
capability. Because any land could theoretically be used for agricultural purposes, statutes and
administrative rules limit the benefit of use value assessment to only those lands that qualify as
“land devoted primarily to agricultural use.”

The implementation of use-value assessment in Wisconsin has helped farmers maintain lower
property taxes on their agricultural land. As an example, equalized values for agricultural lands
in Calumet County were $88,984,700 in 1999, or 5.3% of total equalized value. The equalized
values dropped to $23,573,000 in 2003, which represents 1.0% of the total equalized value. The
total equalized value of real estate in Calumet County increased by approximately 40% from
1999 to 2003. Although the actual market value of agricultural land as represented by land sales
increased significantly, the impact of use value assessment is the reason for the decreasing
percentage in the overall total of equalized value.

Agriculture in Wisconsin

According to the Wisconsin Agriculture Statistics Service, farm income in Wisconsin reached an
all time low in recent years, yet agriculture remains Wisconsin’s largest industry sector
contributing $18.515.16 billion in revenueeconomic contributions each year and 174,000about
354,000 jobs to the state economy. Based on cash receipts received for commodities, milk, field
crops and vegetables, and livestock are the most significant components of Wisconsin’s
agricultural economy.

                                  Table 5-5
        Cash Receipts for Agriculture Commodities State of Wisconsin,
                                  20012010


Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-14                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                          Commodity                 Thousands of Dollars           Percent of Total
           Milk                                                     4,147,199                  46.2%
           Field Crops and Vegetables                               2,509,049                  28.0%
           Livestock                                                1,348,387                  15.0%
           Fruit and Specialty Crops                                  561,750                   6.3%
           Poultry and Eggs                                           401,158                   4.5%
           Total                                                    8,967,543                100.0%
          Source: Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service.
          Field crops and vegetables include: food grains (wheat), feed crops (barley, corn, hay, oats),
          tobacco, oil crops (soybeans), all vegetables (beans (dry), potatoes, snap beans, cabbage (fresh),
          cabbage (processing), carrots (fresh), sweet corn (processing), cucumbers, onions, green peas.
          Livestock includes: meat animals (cattle and calves, hogs, sheep and lambs, honey,
          aquaculturetrout, mink pelts).
          Fruit and specialty crops include: apples, cherries, cranberries, strawberries, maple products,
          peppermint, spearmint, greenhouse and nursery, Christmas trees.

Farm income varies from year to year and is reported annually by the University of Wisconsin –
Madison Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. In 2002, farm income (when
adjusted for deflation) was at its lowest level since farm statistics have been recorded in 1955.
Farm income was expected to slowly improve in 2003 based on climbing milk prices, higher
corn and soybean prices, and various other factors. However, this has not been the case.

Organic Farming and Fresh Markets

According to the USDA National Organic Standards Board (NOSB), organic agriculture is
defined as “an ecological production management system that promotes and enhances
biodiversity, biological cycles, and soil biological activity. It is based on minimal use of off-
farm inputs and on management practices that restore, maintain, or enhance ecological harmony.
The primary goal of organic agriculture is to optimize the health and productivity of
interdependent communities of soil life, plants, animals, and people.”

Organic food is the fastest growing part of the consumer food market, with especially rapid
growth in produce and dairy products. According to the University of Wisconsin, Center for
Integrated Agricultural Systems, organic farming is a rapidly growing and relatively profitable
niche for many farmers in Wisconsin. Wisconsin farmers are leaders in organic food production,
particularly in dairy. Wisconsin boasts the thirdsecond-most organic farms in the country,
behind California and Washington. Wisconsin leads the nation with dairy producers raise
2223% of the nation’s all organic dairy farmsmilk cows. According to the “Economic Impact of
Organic Sector in Wisconsin and Beyond,” Wisconsin organic farms gernerated nearly $1000 in
net profit per cow in 2009 while farmers receiving conventional prices for their milk lost $147
per cow, and they enjoy a price premium ranging from 80-115% over conventionally produced
milk. Calumet County is estimated to have approximately nineseven certified organic farms.
There may also be a number of more organic farms that are not certified. There are currently
two businesses listed as certified for organic processing (Briess Malt and Ingredients Company –
Chilton and Thiel Cheese & Ingredients – Hilbert)seven farms selling organic milk and two more
farms a few months from certification. Two other farms sell organic crops. Overall, organic
agriculture in Wisconsin and Calumet County seems likely to continue to grow, however, even
Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-15
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
with rapid growth organic agriculture will likely remain a minor part of the overall food system
in Wisconsin for some time to come.

In addition to organic farming, fresh markets contribute to the overall agricultural industry in the
State of Wisconsin and locally. According to the Fresh Market Vegetable Program of the
University of Wisconsin, there are over 1,500 fresh market vegetable growers currently raising
and marketing their vegetables in Wisconsin. This puts Wisconsin 8th in the nation for the
number of fresh market vegetable farms. The value of fresh vegetables in the state was $21.8
million from the 1997 Census of Agriculture ranking Wisconsin 6th in the nation for its value of
fresh vegetables. Nearly 200 farmers markets are located in various Wisconsin cities and the
number of markets is increasing annually.

5.3       Forests and Woodlands

Wisconsin's forests are ecological, economic, and social treasures. Forests provide raw materials
for the forest products industry and a setting for the tourism industry, two leading sectors of both
state and local economies. Forests also provide a venue for hunting, fishing, hiking, and many
other recreational activities enjoyed by residents and tourists. Forests purify and maintain the
quality of our water resources and provide habitat for a variety of plants and animals, including
threatened and endangered species that make their homes nowhere else. Forests also help to
balance the effects of global warming and air pollution by producing oxygen and storing carbon.

In terms of land use and real estate, woodland areas are highly valued property features as
reflected by the price of woodland acreage and the location of new housing. In addition, the
implementation of use value assessment for agricultural lands has impacted the woodland parcels
by transferring valuation through deferred impact on agricultural lands. Housing within wooded
areas has the potential to cause fragmentation of habitat for many wildlife species. Development
can disrupt the travel routes for wildlife through corridors and increase nuisance issues between
people and animals.

In Calumet County, approximately 14.5% of the total land use is woodland. Map 8-1, Calumet
County Existing Land Use displays the 29,682 acres of woodland areas scattered throughout the
county. The Town of Charlestown, with 28.1% of its total area in woodlands, has the highest
percentage of woodland among Calumet County communities. Most of the large woodland
blocks are associated with large natural resource and wetland areas such as the Brillion Wildlife
Area and the Killsnake Wildlife Area. There are small blocks of upland woodlands held in
private ownership throughout the county. According to the DNR Forester for Calumet County, a
tension zone passes through the county which separates the vegetation found in northern
Wisconsin from southern Wisconsin. The tension zone includes numerous species found in both
areas of the state.

                                               Table 5-6
                                    Woodlands, Calumet County, 2004




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-16                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                                             % of Total           % of Total
                        Municipality         Woodlands   Local Land Use     County Land Use
                  T. Brillion               3,089.8              14.5%                      1.5%
                  T. Brothertown            3,646.7              15.5%                      1.8%
                  T. Charlestown            5,695.6              28.1%                      2.8%
                  T. Chilton                1,582.4               7.6%                      0.8%
                  T. Harrison               2,514.4              12.2%                      1.2%
                  T. New Holstein           3,948.9              19.4%                      1.9%
                  T. Rantoul                2,976.9              14.3%                      1.5%
                  T. Stockbridge            3,390.0              15.7%                      1.7%
                  T. Woodville              2,084.2               9.9%                      1.0%
                  V. Hilbert                     8.5              1.2%                      0.0%
                  V. Potter                      6.3              1.9%                      0.0%
                  V. Sherwood                 143.4               6.6%                      0.1%
                  V. Stockbridge              169.9               8.2%                      0.1%
                  C. Appleton*                  27.4              1.3%                      0.0%
                  C. Brillion                 112.6               6.6%                      0.1%
                  C. Chilton                    87.1              3.4%                      0.0%
                  C. Kiel*                       9.8              4.0%                      0.0%
                  C. Menasha*                 113.8              11.6%                      0.1%
                  C. New Holstein               75.1              4.8%                      0.0%
                  Calumet County           29,682.8                                        14.5%
                 *Data are for land in Calumet County only.
                 Source: Calumet County Planning Department.




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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Table 5-7 details the amount of land enrolled in the Managed Forest Law program in Calumet
County.

                              Table 5-7
   Enrollment in Managedment Forest Law, Calumet County, 20042011

                                                Open    Closed                     % of
                      Municipality              Acres    Acres     Total    County Total
                T. Brillion               38.0        143.0       181.0           5.0%
                T. Brothertown            77.8        577.3       655.1          18.2%
                T. Charlestown              0.0     1,140.4    1,140.4           31.6%
                T. Chilton                10.0         99.0       109.0           3.0%
                T. Harrison                 0.0       207.6       207.6           5.8%
                T. New Holstein           40.6        333.7       374.4          10.4%
                T. Rantoul                  0.0       119.0       119.0           3.3%
                T. Stockbridge            89.0        495.8       584.8          16.2%
                T. Woodville              46.0        188.0       234.0           6.5%
                Calumet County           301.4      3,303.9    3,605.3         100.0%
               Source: Calumet County Planning DepartmentWisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

   Managed Forest Law Program Trends

   Increasing property values, increasing property taxes, a growing interest in forest
   management, and many other factors have led to increased interest in the Managed Forest
   Land (MFL) program throughout the State of Wisconsin. In Calumet County, MFL
   applications submitted to the WDNR for consideration totaled 3,5323,605 acres in
   20042011. The acreage total has increased slightly over the past fivesix years. In
   20032004, applications included 3,3903,532 acres, which was closer to the 5-year average
   of about 3,400 acres per year since 1999. Equalized values for forestry lands increased
   from $9,485,400 in 1999 to $16,146,800 in 2004 to $31,777,000 in 2011. As property
   taxes on forestry parcels and recreational lands continue to climb, growth in MFL
   enrollments is expected to continue.



Wisconsin Forests

Forests have been vital to the quality of life in Wisconsin, providing opportunities for sportsmen,
tourists, and recreationists. Forests are also essential to the protection of ground and surface
water resources. According to the draft Wisconsin Statewide Forest Plan (WDNR, 2004),
Wisconsin’s forests cover 16 million acres, or 46% of the state’s land area. While the public
sector and the forest industry own significant forest acreage, most of the state’s forest land
(57%), is owned by private non-industrial landowners. Thirty percent of the state’s forests are
owned by the public sector, with federal holdings accounting for 10%, state holdings 5%, and
county governments, municipalities, and school districts totaling 15%. Accounting for the

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balance of the forest resource, Wisconsin’s tribes own 2% of the state’s forests, corporations own
4%, and the forest industry owns 7%.

Urban Forests

Urban forests consist of all the trees and other vegetation in and around a community. This
includes not only tree-lined streets, but also trees in home landscapes, school yards, parks, river
banks, cemeteries, vacant lots, utility rights-of-way, and anywhere else trees can grow. Shrubs,
flowers, vines, ground cover including grasses, and a variety of other wild plants and animals are
also components of the urban forest system. Urban forest resources are found in Calumet
County’s cities and villages as well as its unincorporated rural hamlets. Urban trees provide
functions and benefits with respect to stormwater management and temperature regulation.
Urban trees provide energy savings through shading and by reducing the effects of “heat islands”
that come from paved surfaces.

Several Calumet County communities have been
recognized by the National Arbor Day Foundation
with the “Tree City USA” designation including
Appleton, Brillion, Chilton, Kaukauna, Menasha,
New Holstein, and Sherwood.

5.4       Topography

The topography of Calumet County is that of a
high undulating plain sloping towards Lake
Michigan in the eastern and central portions of the   Typical terrain of Calumet County
county. A more abrupt incline slopes towards
Lake Winnebago along the western edge of the county. The glacier activity of the past greatly
influenced the topography of the county. According to the USDA, Soil Conservation Service,
the highest point in Calumet County is 1,128 feet above sea
level. The lowest point of Calumet County is 688 feet.

5.5       Geology

The bedrock and glacial geology of Calumet County play a
crucial role in planning for future development. Geological
features directly influence other natural resources like
topography, soils, surface water, and groundwater. Geology is
an important consideration for development activities, and areas
of concern include structural stability, groundwater interaction,
and the provision of non-metallic minerals.

According to a map of the bedrock geology of Wisconsin,
prepared by the University of Wisconsin Extension and the
Geological and Natural History Survey, Calumet County is               Niagara Escarpment bedrock
characterized by three bedrock types. Dolomite rock of the             features at High Cliff State
Silurian Formation underlies the majority of Calumet County.           Park.


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Maquoketa Formation, rocks of dolomite and shale, is found along the Lake Winnebago
shoreline and in the northern portion of the county. Sinnippee Group, rocks of dolomite with
some limestone and shale, can be found in the extreme northwest corner of the county.

Niagara Escarpment

The following information was obtained from The Niagara Escarpment, Inventory Findings
1999-2001 and Considerations for Management, Final Report, 2002 as reported by the
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources.

The Niagara Escarpment is the steep face of a 650-mile sickle-shaped cuesta (bedrock ridge) that
runs from the northeastern United States south of Rochester, New York, across portions of
southeastern Canada, and then southward north and west of Lake Michigan to southeastern
Wisconsin. The primary bedrock type is dolomite. The Escarpment is made of rock that was
originally deposited as sediment on an ancient sea floor that existed about 430 to 450 million
years ago. The present day cliffs were formed over millions of years through the differential
erosion of rocks of different hardness and enhanced by the action of glaciers during the last ice
age. In Wisconsin, the Escarpment extends for over 230 miles, from Rock Island, off the
northern tip of the Door Peninsula, south to northern Waukesha and Milwaukee Counties. The
Escarpment is discontinuous in Wisconsin and differs in elevation and amount of exposure from
one end to the other.

Niagara Escarpment outcrops in Calumet County are concentrated in the southwestern two-thirds
of the county, especially along the east shore of Lake Winnebago, with scattered outcrops in the
northeast (see Map 5-2).

The geology of the Escarpment greatly influences its ecological attributes. One example is the
presence of karst, or solution features of the bedrock, that allow organic matter to accumulate.
Cold air and sometimes water move through the fractured bedrock creating unique microhabitats.
Many highly specialized species, such as rare terrestrial snails, are found in these microhabitats.

The study also documented 241 occurrences of rare species and natural communities. Of these,
106 were animal occurrences, 99 were plants, and 36 were natural communities and other natural
features. Nineteen were Class 1 occurrences, 28 were Class 2, and 194 were Class 3. Each of
these occurrences relies strongly upon the unique features of the Escarpment in order to sustain
itself, and they are generally not found in other areas of Wisconsin. In some cases, the elements
are globally rare.

Threats and Management Considerations
The Niagara Escarpment Report details a number of current threats that were identified during
the inventory and from other reports. These threats are as follows.

         Land use issues, conflicts, problems, including land use plan and existing regulation
          conflicts.




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         Development - Identified as one of the most pressing threats to the escarpment is
          residential development. The construction of homes and related infrastructure may
          fragment the sensitive habitats or destroy them.

         Road Construction - Higher capacity roads will likely result in increased development.
          Habitat may also be fragmented or destroyed.

         Mining, Quarrying - Can result in several impacts including direct habitat destruction or
          fragmentation, and alteration to hydrology and microclimate of the escarpment.

         Tower Areas - May effect bird populations and result in loss of scenic beauty of the area.

         Recreation - Increased visitation to the area can result in overuse of trails and
          development of unauthorized trails.

         Invasive/Exotic Species - As habitats become more fragmented and disrupted, invasive
          species can be introduced.

         Hydrologic Disruption - New construction or development can affect groundwater
          infiltration that helps support springs, sinkholes, caves, and other karst features.

         Groundwater Contamination - Groundwater is the key source for potable water and its
          contamination can affect water movement and habitats.

         Administrative Inconsistency - The escarpment is of regional significance and crosses
          many borders, making it difficult to manage effectively.

The escarpment was also identified in the State of Wisconsin Land Legacy Report. The report
was an assessment by the WDNR of the state’s protection needs for conservation and recreation
lands over the next 50 years. The report does not detail when or how a land legacy place will be
protected.

In late 2011 State Assemblyman, Al Ott, Forest Junction, drafted proposed legislation that would
help allocate stewardship dollars for the preservation of the Escarpment. It is anticipated the
draft bill will go to the Legislature in 2012 for a vote. If successful, the county may have more
opportunities to preserve critical sites which are not the best suited for development.

Karst Geology

A karst feature is an area or surficial geologic feature subject to bedrock dissolution so that it is
likely to provide a conduit to groundwater, and may include areas with soils less than 60 inches
thick over bedrock, caves, enlarged fractures, mine features, exposed bedrock surfaces,
sinkholes, springs, seeps, swallets, and depressional areas with no surface drainage. More
specifically, in Calumet County acidic rain water dissolves the dolomite limestone and creates
fissures, holes, caves, and other karst features. As stated, these features then act as a conduit,
allowing rain and other matters to quickly reach the water table.


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Some of Calumet County’s groundwater problems (high levels of nitrates and bacteria) can be
attributed to the fact that it has so many karst features, thereby allowing fertilizers, septic
seepage, etc. to rapidly make contact with groundwater. Due to the features, coupled with areas
of thin soils, many areas in the county are highly susceptible to groundwater contamination.

It is challenging to determine where all the features are located. In that such features tend to be
covered with some amount of soil, the features are difficult to locate. In order to improve
groundwater quality, wise land use choices on or near karst features is a must. Near sinkholes it
is recommended a berm be installed to minimize a direct runoff into the sinkhole. Other
practices, such as rain gardens, are encouraged to help slow runoff and provide some degree of
filtration.

5.6       Metallic and Non-Metallic Mineral Resources

Wisconsin Administrative Code NR 135 required
that all counties adopt and enforce a Non-metallic
Mining Reclamation Ordinance that establishes
performance standards for the reclamation of active
and future non-metallic mining sites, but not
abandoned sites. It is intended that NR 135 will
contribute to environmental protection, stable non-
eroding sites, productive end land use, and
potential to enhance habitat and increase land
values and tax revenues.

According to the East Central Wisconsin Regional       Abandoned non-metallic mine
Planning Commission,the Calumet County
Planning Department there were approximately 2023 active non-metallic mining sites, one
reclaimed site and five abandoned sites located in Calumet County (see Utilities and Community
Facilities element) in 20052011. NineSeven of the 2023 sites are located in the Town of
Brothertown. Of the 2023 active mining sites, eight18 are limestone sites, twofour are sand and
gravel sites, and 10one areis a gravelsand only sites.

The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission administers the Wisconsin Statutes,
Chapter NR 135, non-metallic mining reclamation program for Winnebago, Outagamie,
Shawano, Waupaca, and Calumet Counties. The Calumet County Non-Metallic Mining
Reclamation Ordinance was adopted in 2001. All site operators are required to apply for a
permit and must prepare and submit a reclamation plan.

5.7       Wetlands

The hydrology of soils, or the amount of water saturation present, largely determines the soil
characteristics and the corresponding types of plant and animal communities living in and on the
soil. Wetlands may support both aquatic and terrestrial species. The prolonged presence of
water creates conditions that favor the growth of specially adapted plants (hydrophytes) and
promotes the development of characteristic wetland (hydric) soils.


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Wetlands may be seasonal or permanent
                                              Wetlands Defined
and are commonly referred to as swamps,
marshes, fens, or bogs. Wetland plants and
                                              According to the United States Environmental
soils have the capacity to store and filter
                                              Protection Agency, wetlands are areas where
pollutants ranging from pesticides to
                                              water covers the soil, or is present either at or
animal wastes. Wetlands provide storage
                                              near the surface of the soil all year or for
of flood waters preventing damage to
                                              varying periods of time during the year,
developed areas. Wetlands can make lakes,
                                              including during the growing season. Wetlands
rivers, and streams more clean, and
                                              can be recognized by the presence of 3 features:
drinking water safer. Wetlands also
                                              1. Wetland hydrology, or varying degrees of
provide valuable habitat for fish, plants,
                                                  saturated conditions.
and animals. In addition, some wetlands
                                              2. Hydrophytes, or specially adapted plants
can also replenish groundwater supplies.
                                                  that favor the prolonged presence of water.
Groundwater discharge from wetlands is
                                              3. Hydric soils, or soils that contain
common and can be important in
                                                  characteristics that confirm the long term
maintaining stream flows, especially during
                                                  presence of wetland hydrology.
dry months.

                                        The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
                                        (WDNR) has inventory maps for wetlands two acres
                                        and larger, which have been mapped on Map 5-2,
                                        Environmental and Water Features. In general, the
                                        wetlands information is helpful during development
                                        review, during resource planning, when evaluating
                                        design, or when performing impact assessment. The
                                        wetland information may need to be field verified for
                                        specific location and parcel information as the
                                        digitization process used to create the maps
  Wetland in Killsnake Wildlife Area    inadvertently creates error in exact field boundaries.
                                        The maps should be consulted whenever communities
review development proposals in order to preserve wetland functions and to ensure regulatory
compliance. Table 5-8 and Figure 5-2 detail the amount of wetland found in each community in
Calumet County.




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                                                Table 5-8
                                     Wetlands, Calumet County, 2004

                                                                              Percent
                                    Municipality           Acreage            of Total
                              T. Brillion                     2,953.5           10.9%
                              T. Brothertown                  2,946.8           10.9%
                              T. Charlestown                  7,087.9           26.1%
                              T. Chilton                      1,857.6             6.8%
                              T. Harrison                     1,164.6             4.3%
                              T. New Holstein                 3,301.1           12.2%
                              T. Rantoul                      3,898.7           14.4%
                              T. Stockbridge                  1,320.6             4.9%
                              T. Woodville                    1,822.9             6.7%
                              V. Hilbert                         25.2             0.1%
                              V. Potter                          88.0             0.3%
                              V. Sherwood                        82.6             0.3%
                              V. Stockbridge                    106.7             0.4%
                              C. Appleton*                       11.2             0.0%
                              C. Brillion                       137.4             0.5%
                              C. Chilton                        152.4             0.6%
                              C. Kiel*                           12.5             0.0%
                              C. Menasha*                        41.3             0.2%
                              C. New Holstein                   110.4             0.4%
                              Calumet County                 27,121.2          100.0%
                              *Data provided are for land in Calumet County only.
                              Source: Calumet County Planning Department.

In Calumet County, there are 27,121 acres of wetlands, or about 13.2% of the entire land area.
The Town of Charlestown leads Calumet County communities with 26.1% of its land area as
wetland, most of it located in the Killsnake Wildlife Area.

Due to the significant environmental functions served by wetlands, there is a complex set of
local, state, and federal regulations which places limitations on the development and use of
wetlands (and shorelands). Laws have slowed the destruction of wetlands, but they continue to
be destroyed and degraded. Wisconsin now has about half of the 10 million acres of wetlands
present in 1848. The WDNR has regulatory authority over filling, dredging, draining, and
similar activities in most Wisconsin wetlands. Counties are mandated to establish shoreland-
wetland zoning districts for wetlands near lakes, rivers, and streams. In addition, the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers has authority over the placement of fill in wetlands connected to federally
navigable waterways, while the USDA incorporates wetland preservation criteria into its crop
price support programs. Therefore, prior to placing fill or altering a wetland resource, the
appropriate agencies must be contacted to receive authorization.


Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  5-24                                Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
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                            Figure 5-2
Percentage of Total County Wetlands by Municipality, Calumet County,
                               2004


                                   30.0%
                                                                                           26.0%
                                   25.0%
    Percentage of Total Wetlands




                                   20.0%
                                                                                                                                                                             14.3%
                                   15.0%                                                                                                                12.1%
                                               10.8%                   10.8%
                                   10.0%                                                                     6.8%                                                                                                         6.7%
                                                                                                                                4.3%                                                                   4.8%
                                   5.0%

                                   0.0%
                                                      n                                                          n                                            in                  l
                                                    io                   wn                  wn              lto                  on                      e                    ou                          ge             lle
                                              ill                      to                  to             hi                   ris                    ls t                  nt                        id               vi
                                            Br                       er                  es                                 ar                     Ho
                                                                                                                                                                          a                        br                d
                                       T.                        h                   l                  C                                                             R                         ck                 oo
                                                               ot                  ar              T.                T.
                                                                                                                        H
                                                                                                                                              ew                   T.                         o                  .W
                                                             Br                  Ch                                                                                                      St                     T
                                                          T.                  T.                                                       T.
                                                                                                                                          N                                           T.

Source: Calumet County Planning Department. Only for municipalities with 4% or more of county total.

5.8                                  Basins and Watersheds

Wisconsin has redesigned its natural resource management approach around the concepts of eco-
regions, areas of similar character and structure typically related to drainage basins or
watersheds. This shift in approach recognizes that working with the natural structure and
function of resources, as opposed to strictly political or social boundaries, will provide more
successful results.

Basins and watersheds are interconnected areas of land draining from surrounding ridge tops to a
common point such as a lake or stream confluence. All lands and waterways can be found
within one watershed or another. Calumet County is located within four basins in Wisconsin.

                                    Lakeshore Basin: The Lakeshore Basin encompasses three entire counties - Door,
                                     Kewaunee, and Manitowoc - as well as parts of Brown and Calumet.

                                    Lower Fox River Basin: The Lower Fox River Basin is comprised of six watersheds and
                                     covers most of Brown, eastern Outagamie, northern Calumet, and small sections of
                                     Winnebago Counties.

                                    Upper Fox River Basin: The Upper Fox River Basin includes all of Marquette County
                                     and portions of Adams, Calumet, Columbia, Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Winnebago, and
                                     Waushara Counties.


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         Sheboygan River Basin: The Sheboygan River Basin covers is located in portions of five
          counties including Calumet, Manitowoc, Sheboygan, Fond du Lac, and Ozaukee.

There are a total of 16 watersheds in Calumet County. Table 5-9 shows each watershed and the
total acreage in Calumet County. Refer to Map 5-2 for watershed locations in Calumet County.

                                              Table 5-9
                                  Watersheds, Calumet County, 2004

                                      Watersheds                Acreage        % of Total
                Cedar Creek                                       9,150.0           3.6%
                East River                                        1,700.5           0.7%
                Garners Creek                                     4,297.7           1.7%
                Kankapot Creek                                  13,810.4            5.4%
                Killsnake River                                 28,464.5          11.2%
                Lake Winnebago East                             26,323.9          10.3%
                Lake Winnebago                                  49,521.1          19.5%
                Manitowoc River                                     215.9           0.1%
                North Branch Manitowoc River                    46,496.7          18.3%
                Pine Creek                                      19,810.9            7.8%
                Plum Creek                                        8,511.0           3.3%
                Sheboygan River                                 11,283.7            4.4%
                South Branch Manitowoc River                    28,902.8          11.4%
                Unnamed 1                                           102.9           0.0%
                Unnamed 2                                           241.7           0.1%
                Unnamed 3                                         5,552.2           2.2%
                Total                                         254,385.8            100%
               Source: Calumet County Planning Department. Total includes Lake Winnebago.

Calumet County has one active Priority Watershed Program for the Lake Winnebago East
Watershed. The program was completed in December, 2003. The Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources selects specific watersheds to concentrate clean-up efforts aimed to control
non-point sources of water pollution (runoff). A management plan is developed for the
watershed and the DNR supplies financial support for its implementation. The County Land and
Water Conservation Department is responsible for implementation of the plan when active.

5.9       Floodplains

For planning and regulatory purposes, a floodplain is normally defined as those areas, excluding
the stream channel, that are subject to inundation by the 100-year recurrence interval flood event.
This event has a one-percent chance of occurring in any given year. Because of this chance of
flooding, development in the floodplain should be discouraged and the development of park and
open space in these areas encouraged. The floodplain includes the floodway and flood fringe.
The floodway is the portion of the floodplain that carries flood water or flood flows, while the

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flood fringe is the portion of the floodplain outside the floodway, which is covered by waters
during a flood event. The flood fringe is generally associated with standing water rather than
rapidly flowing water.

Wisconsin Statute 87.30 requires counties, cities, and village to implement floodplain zoning. In
addition, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has developed flood hazard data.
Under the authority of the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, FEMA conducted studies to
determine the location and extent of flood lands and the monetary damage risks related to the
insurance of urban development in flood land areas. Table 5-10 details the acreage of
floodplains found in each community in Calumet County as delineated by FEMA.

                                           Table 5-10
                             Floodplains, Calumet County, 20042011

                                                                                          % of
                              Municipality               Acreage               County Total
                     T. Brillion                          4,395.8                      15.1%
                     T. Brothertown                       2,642.8                       9.1%
                     T. Charlestown                       9,224.3                      31.6%
                     T. Chilton                           1,952.7                       6.7%
                     T. Harrison                             62.2                       0.2%
                     T. New Holstein                      2,060.5                       7.1%
                     T. Rantoul                           4,269.3                      14.6%
                     T. Stockbridge                         243.3                       0.8%
                     T. Woodville                         3,133.9                      10.7%
                     V. Hilbert                               0.0                       0.0%
                     V. Potter                              112.5                       0.4%
                     V. Sherwood                              3.3                       0.0%
                     V. Stockbridge                         172.2                       0.6%
                     C. Appleton*                             0.0                       0.0%
                     C. Brillion                            348.9                       1.2%
                     C. Chilton                             378.6                       1.3%
                     C. Kaukauna*                             0.0                       0.0%
                     C. Kiel*                                10.4                       0.0%
                     C. Menasha*                              0.0                       0.0%
                     C. New Holstein                        173.5                       0.6%
                     Calumet County                      29,184.1                     100.0%
                    *Data provided are for land in Calumet County only.
                    Source: Calumet County Planning Department.

According to the Calumet County All-Hazard Mitigation Plan completed in 2005, there are a
total of 868 structures in the designated floodplain boundaries in all of Calumet County.


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However, it is assumed that this number is now higher since the Flood Insurance Rate Map
(FIRM) was revised in February 2009.

5.10 Surface Water Features

Calumet County possesses tremendous water features, primarily in Lake Winnebago. Most of
the county’s western border is shared with the lake. At 49,314.7 acres in Calumet County, Lake
Winnebago accounts for 19.7% of the county's total land area. Of Calumet County’s surface
water totals, Lake Winnebago comprises 97.2% of all the surface water. Of the remaining 1,442
acres of surface water, there are only four small, natural inland lakes, two millponds, four rivers,
and numerous streams and creeks. Lake Winnebago, like most surface water features, provides
tremendous fish and wildlife habitat, tourism and recreation opportunities, scenic beauty, and for
many, a sense of peace and quiet and connection to the natural world. Typically the water
features also attract higher density residential developments. Beyond Lake Winnebago, surface
water comprises less than one-half of one percent of the total land use. Please refer to Map 5-2
for the locations of Calumet County’s surface water features.

                                        Table 5-11
                      Lakes, Ponds, and Rivers, Calumet County, 2004

                                                                                  Percent
                                          Feature                Acreage          of Total
                     Becker Lake                                     39.1            0.1%
                     Boot Lake                                        8.7            0.0%
                     Grass Lake                                      25.7            0.1%
                     Lake Winnebago                              49,314.6           97.2%
                     North Branch Manitowoc River                   230.1            0.5%
                     Round Lake                                      12.1            0.0%
                     South Branch Manitowoc River                   320.2            0.6%
                     Spring Creek                                     1.7            0.0%
                     Unnamed                                        782.7            1.5%
                     Total                                       50,735.0          100.0%
                     Source: Calumet County Planning Department.




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                              Table 5-12
 Lakes, Ponds, and Rivers by Municipality, Calumet County, 20042011*

                                                                               % of
                                Municipality           Acreage          County Total
                      T. Brillion                         101.9                  7.1%
                      T. Brothertown                      119.3                  8.3%
                      T. Charlestown                      224.6                 15.6%
                      T. Chilton                          108.4                  7.5%
                      T. Harrison                          72.3                  5.0%
                      T. New Holstein                     121.0                  8.4%
                      T. Rantoul                          435.2                 30.2%
                      T. Stockbridge                       66.3                  4.6%
                      T. Woodville                         49.2                  3.4%
                      V. Hilbert                            0.0                  0.0%
                      V. Potter                             8.4                  0.6%
                      V. Sherwood                          49.4                  3.4%
                      V. Stockbridge                        5.8                  0.4%
                      C. Appleton*                          8.6                  0.6%
                      C. Brillion                          10.1                  0.7%
                      C. Chilton                           29.3                  2.0%
                      C. Kaukauna*                          0.0                  0.0%
                      C. Kiel*                              0.5                  0.0%
                      C. Menasha*                          30.0                  2.1%
                      C. New Holstein                       2.6                  0.2%
                      Calumet County                    1,442.9                100.0%
                     *Does not include Lake Winnebago.
                     Source: Calumet County Planning Department.

Lakes

Lake Winnebago
Lake Winnebago is the largest inland body of water
in the state of Wisconsin. Lake Winnebago is
254,122 acres with a maximum depth of 21 feet and
an average depth of 15.5 feet. It is approximately 30
miles long and 10 miles wide. The Lake Winnebago
System is one of the nations top walleye fisheries. A
total of 81 species of fish have been identified in the
lake. Lake Winnebago also has the largest viable
population of sturgeon in the world. Lakes Butte
des Morts, Winneconne, and Poygan are known as               Lake Winnebago
the Upriver Lakes and are attached by the Fox and
Wolf rivers.

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Becker Lake
Becker Lake is a 31.2-acre seepage lake with an intermittent outlet to Grass Lake and an
intermittent inlet from Long Lake in Manitowoc County. The drainage basin covers 14.5 square
miles. The maximum depth is 51 feet with a mean depth of 15 feet. There are 0.98 miles of
shoreline. Northern pike and largemouth and smallmouth bass are present and panfish are
common.

Boot Lake
Boot Lake is a landlocked 9.7-acre seepage lake. The maximum depth is 15 feet and mean depth
is six feet. There are 0.62 miles of shoreline. Northern pike, largemouth bass, and panfish
comprise the fishery.

Chilton Millpond
Chilton Millpond is an impoundment of the South Branch of the Manitowoc River, located in the
City of Chilton. The millpond covers 8.9 surface acres, has a maximum depth of six feet, and a
mean depth of three feet. Total shoreline is 0.81 miles. Northern pike, largemouth bass,
smallmouth bass, and catfish are present and panfish are common.

Round Lake
Round Lake is a landlocked seepage lake covering 10.0 surface acres. The maximum depth is 55
feet and the mean depth is 30 feet. The total shoreline length is 0.55 miles. Largemouth bass,
panfish, and trout are common in the lake.

Grass Lake
Grass Lake is essentially a northern bog lake in a southern setting, surrounded by farmland. It is
the only lake of its type in Calumet County. The area is a significant nesting area for many
species of duck and geese. No fish are common or present at this lake.

Hayton Millpond
Hayton Millpond is an impoundment of the South Branch of the Manitowoc River and covers
26.6 surface acres. The maximum depth is six feet and the mean depth is two feet. The
shoreline totals 2.05 miles. A few northern pike and panfish are present, but carp, bullheads, and
sucker and minnow species are predominate.

Rivers and Creeks

Black Creek
Black Creek is an intermittent stream that seasonally flows into the Brillion Marsh. It flows
through the Town and City of Brillion. It offers little to no fishery potential or other forms of
aquatic recreation. Black Creek flows past a golf course.

Hilbert Tributary
The Hilbert Tributary, a hard water stream, originates near Hilbert and flows northeasterly
through this community before draining into the North Branch at the west end of the Brillion
Marsh. The Hilbert wastewater treatment plant outfall is on the Hilbert Tributary. The stream is
classified as a limited forage fishery.

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Map 5-2 Environmental and Water Features




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Cedar Creek
Cedar Creek is a small shallow stream originating from the outlet of Mud Lake and flowing
northwesterly for 7.2 miles to eventually drain into the South Branch of the Manitowoc River.
Cedar Creek is surrounded by Hayton Marsh for its last two miles and is located in the Town of
Charlestown.

Garners Creek
Garners Creek is located in northwest Calumet County in the City of Appleton. Much of the
northwest quadrant of the Town of Harrison lies within the drainage area of Garners Creek.

Plum Creek
Plum Creek is located in the Town of Brillion. The creek flows in a southern direction and is
just to the east of Forest Junction. The creek then turns west, going under STH 57, ending just to
the west of the Forest Junction area.

Jordan Creek
Jordan Creek originates southeast of New Holstein and flows northerly for 1.2 miles, partly
through the east side of New Holstein, before draining into Pine Creek.

Kankapot Creek
Kankapot Creek, located in the Town of Woodville, flows north into the Lower Fox in
Kaukauna.

Pine Creek
Pine Creek is a stream located in the county that receives few non-point and no point source
discharges. The creek is located in the Towns of New Holstein and Charlestown. Jordan Creek
is a tributary of Pine Creek.

Spring Creek
Spring Creek originates north of the City of Brillion and flows more than five miles generally
southwesterly before draining into the North Branch of the Manitowoc River. This stream flows
through most of the Brillion Marsh, which provides breeding habitat for many wildlife species.

Stony Brook
Stony Brook is a tributary of the South Branch
of the Manitowoc River. The creek originates
from a wetland area in the Town of Stockbridge
and flows southeast until joining the Manitowoc
River.

Killsnake River
The Killsnake River originates northwest of
Brant and flows easterly 14 miles before joining
the North Branch of the Manitowoc River.
Many shorebirds as well as waterfowl make use
of this river and its adjoining wetlands.            Looking east on the Killsnake River near Chilton



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Manitowoc River North Branch
The North Branch of the Manitowoc River flows for nearly 10 miles from its origin west of
Brillion Marsh to its confluence with the South Branch to form the main stem of the Manitowoc
River. Wetland complexes located along upper portions of the steam are attractive to ducks,
pheasant, deer, and small game mammals.

Manitowoc River South Branch
The South Branch of the Manitowoc is the largest river or stream in Calumet County. It
originates in the northeastern tip of Fond du Lac County and flows 22 miles before joining the
North Branch to form the main stem of the Manitowoc River. Two impoundments, Hayton Pond
and Chilton Millpond are on this river. Pine Creek, Cedar Creek, and the Killsnake River are the
major tributaries. Common fish species include smallmouth bass, northern pike, pumpkinseed,
bullhead, and carp.

East River
The East River is located in the northeast corner of the county in the Town of Brillion. The river
is part of the East River Watershed with only a small loop of the river located in Calumet
County.

Sheboygan River
The upper reaches of the Sheboygan River lie in the very southeast corner of Calumet County.
The river is located entirely within the Kiel Marsh Wildlife Area and collects water in the
northern reaches of the Sheboygan River Watershed.

The following creeks are all located in western Calumet County and flow into Lake Winnebago.

         Mill Creek, Town and Village of Stockbridge
         Mud Creek, Town and Village of Stockbridge
         Roberts Creek, Town of Stockbridge
         Johnson Creek, Town of Stockbridge.
         Brothertown Creek, Town of Brothertown




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5.11 Groundwater

Groundwater is a limited resource,
and both its quality and quantity are
important characteristics. These
characteristics are primarily
influenced by local geology and
local land use. Precipitation
percolates through the soil and
bedrock where it eventually reaches
a saturated zone known as an
aquifer. It is from these aquifers
that wells draw their water. (Refer
to Map 5-3 for an aquifer
vulnerability map and Map 5-4a for
a water table elevation and
groundwater flow map.)

According to the Calumet County
Land and Water Conservation
Department, most residents receive
there drinking water from
groundwater found in the fractured
bedrock layer call the Silurian
Aquifer. of the groundwater in
Calumet County is stored in
fractured bedrock. Wells tap these
fractures to access the water.

Pollutants in groundwater are an
issue of high concern in Calumet
County. One common groundwater pollutant is nitrates. Nitrates are odorless, colorless, and
tasteless and are the result of decaying organic matter. Nitrates are found in animal and human
waste and are also found in fertilizers. Nitrate levels of less than two parts per million are
considered naturally occurring and levels of two to 10 parts per million are considered elevated
levels due to human activities. A nitrate level over 10 parts per million is considered unsafe for
infants and is the enforcement standard. Private well testing results indicate that 32% of samples
take from Calumet County wells from 2004 – 2010 have nitrate levels greater than 10 parts per
million. An additional 30% have elevated levels. In some areas, such as areas located in the
county’s Groundwater Protection Area (see map 5-4b), 76% of samples have tested for elevate or
unsafe levels of nitrates.
According to testing completed in 2004 in Calumet County, 26% of results were greater than 10
parts per million. In 2005 this percentage decreased to 10%.

Another common pollutant that wells are tested for are coliform bacteria. Coliform bacteria are
considered indicators of the presence of more harmful bacteria. Another common groundwater
pollutant is bacteria. Tests are completed for the presence of coliform bacteria which is an

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indicator for the presence of more harmful bacteria. Sites that are positive for coliform are then
tested for E. coli bacteria. Any level of E. coli bacteria is considered harmful because it is found
in animal and human waste. Private well testing results taken from 2004 - 2010 indicate that
25% of samples tested positive for coliform bacteria and 5% were also positive for E. coli. Any
positive result is considered unsafe for consumption.
According to 2004 testing in Calumet County for bacteria, 31% of sites were unsafe for coliform
and 7% were also unsafe for E. coli. In 2005, these percentages were 27% and 10% respectively.

Calumet County is particularly susceptible to groundwater contamination because fractured
dolomite underlies most of the county. These fractures allow water and pollutants to move more
efficiently and rapidly. There are also several large areas of the county which have thin soils
over bedrock. Pollutants spread, stored, or spilled on thin soils can easily move through the thin
soil layer and enter the groundwater. Unused wells can serve as direct pipelines to the
groundwater. Contaminants at or near the surface, such as animal and human wastes or lawn and
agricultural fertilizers, can enter the groundwater easily through unused wells and sinkholes.

Water moves very rapidly through the
fractures in the bedrock, making it
difficult to determine the source of
contamination. However, most wells
obtain water from less than one mile
from the well itself. In some instances,
depending on depth and pumping
capacity of the well, this radius can
extend beyond 2 miles in the Silurian
Aquifer. In addition, water is
influenced by recent land use
activities. Well contaminations where
well owners reported brown water
coming out of faucets have occurred as
recently as within 24 hours of a rain
event. Groundwater movement
through the fractured dolomite is
multidirectional. Thus, it is difficult to
trace the specific path and origin of
pollutants.

Calumet County draws all of its water
from the same aquifer (the Silurian
Niagara Dolomite). Thus, all areas and
all wells are susceptible to some
extent. The source of contamination is
often less than one mile from the well itself. This water is influenced by activities on the surface
that occurred in the last year or two. Groundwater movement through the fractured dolomite is
multidirectional. Thus, it is difficult to trace the specific path and origin of pollutants.



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Some potential solutions have been identified to deal with Calumet County’s groundwater issues
as follows.

         Proper abandonment of unused wells.
         Test your water once a year. Pick up a sample bottle at the Calumet County Land and
          Water Conservation Department in Chilton.
         Identify karst features and shallow soils.
         Avoid nutrient and chemical application near sinkholes, exposed bedrock, areas of
          focused infiltration and other karst features (<300 ft upslope).
         Plant a permanent vegetative buffer of grasses or hay near karst features to better filter
          runoff.
         Divert runoff away from sinkholes or exposed bedrock in road ditches. If possible,
          properly close sinkholes in road ditches (cost sharing may be available).
         Install a berm upslope of the sinkhole to divert runoff.
         Encourage farmers to have and follow a nutrient management plan.
         Encourage non-compliant sanitary waste disposal systems to be brought into compliance
          with current codes.
         Encourage farmers to adopt conservation practices the improve water quality including
          but not limited to:
           Barnyard runoff designs
           Conservation Plans (erosion control plans)
           Proper design and siting of manure storage systems and compost piles
           Close failing or leaking manure storage systems
           Prescribed grazing of livestock
           Continue to educate landowners on issues.

     Proper  abandonment of unused wells.
     Avoid   fertilizer and chemical use near sinkholes (<300 ft. upslope).
     Install a berm upslope of the sinkhole to divert runoff.
     Plant a permanent vegetative buffer of grasses or hay to better filter runoff.
     Proper citing of manure storage and compost piles.
     Water testing to be conducted once a year.
     Dig a deeper well.
     Continue to educate landowners on issues.




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      Groundwater Terms

      Precipitation percolates through the soil and bedrock where it eventually reaches a saturated
      zone known as an aquifer. It is from these aquifers that wells draw their water.

      The process of precipitation moving through the soil and bedrock and into an aquifer is
      known as groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge maintains the quantity of water in
      an aquifer.

      The natural process of recharge can be altered by land use and development. Impervious
      surfaces, or surfaces that prevent precipitation from soaking into the ground like buildings
      and pavement, affect the rate of recharge and quantity of available groundwater. Certain
      human uses of the land can carry harmful substances to a groundwater aquifer leading to
      groundwater contamination. There are many potential sources of contamination including
      manure, yard and agricultural fertilizers, road salt, failing septic systems, leaking
      underground storage tanks, and vehicle emissions.




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Map 5-3 Aquifer Vulnerability




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Map 5-4a Water Table Elevation and Groundwater Flow




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Map 5-4b Calumet County Groundwater Protection Area




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5.12 Water Quality

Surface water and groundwater quality in Calumet County are influenced both by natural and
developed conditions. Development factors that influence water quality include point and non-
point sources of water pollution, the amount of impervious surface in a watershed, the potential
pollution sources related to a particular land use, and the degree to which mitigation measures
have been used. Natural factors that influence water quality include soils, geology, topography,
climate, vegetation types, and the water cycle.

Clean Water Act and Impaired Waters, Section 303(d)

Section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act requires each state to periodically submit a list of
impaired waters to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for approval. Impaired waters
are those that are not meeting the state's water quality standards. The WDNR last submitted an
updated list to EPA in April 20042010. EPA approved the list of impaired waters in September
20042010. The next updated list is due to be submitted to EPA on April 1, 20062012.

The following are identified impaired waters as submitted and approved in 20042010 by the
WDNR and EPA for waters in Calumet County.

         North Branch of the Manitowoc River
           Pollutants: Sedimentation, phosphorus
           Impairments: Destruction habitat, dissolved oxygen
           Identified as a warm water sport fishery
           The river is identified as a mediumlow priority


         Pine Creek
           Pollutants: PCB
           Impairments: Fish consumption advisory
           Identified as a warm water sport fishery with PCB contamination, a fish consumption
             advisory is in effect, the waterway is identified as a highlow priority.

         Jordon Creek
           Pollutants: PCB
           Impairments: Fish consumption advisory
           Identified as a warm water sport fishery
           Waterway is identified as a highlow priority


         South Branch Manitowoc River (confluence with North Branch to Chilton)
           Pollutants: PCB
           Impairments: Fish consumption advisory
           Identified as a warm water sport fishery
           River is identified as a mediumlow priority


         Unnamed tributary to South Branch Manitowoc River (T18N, R19E, Secs 11,14, 23 and
          24)
           Pollutants: Sedimentation


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                                                                Impairments: Destruction
   Water Quality Terms                                           habitat
                                                                Identified as a limited forage
   Pollution that comes from a discharge pipe is                 fishery
   known as point source pollution. Municipal                   Waterway is identified as a new
   waste water treatment plants and industries                   addition to the list and is a low
   must obtain permits in order to discharge                     priority
   treated or processed water to a surface water
                                                            Manitowoc River
   body.
                                                              Pollutants: PCBs
                                                              Impairments: Contaminated
   As precipitation and snow melt run across the
   surface of the land, they can pick up sediment              sediment
                                                              The river is identified as a low
   and other pollutants from the ground. This
   polluted runoff is known as non-point source                priority
   pollution. Construction site erosion, municipal
                                                            Plum Creek
   stormwater runoff, and uncontrolled
                                                              Pollutants: Sedimentation
   agricultural runoff are the three primary sources
                                                              Impairments: Degraded
   of non-point source pollution.
                                                                habitat, elevated water
   Hard surfaces, like buildings and pavement,                  temperature
                                                              The creek is identified as a high
   that prevent precipitation from soaking into the
   ground are known as impervious surfaces.                     priority
   Impervious surfaces prevent groundwater
                                                            Kankapot Creek
   recharge, increase the speed of runoff, and
                                                              Pollutants: Phosphorus,
   increase the temperature of runoff.
                                                                sedimentation
                                                              Impairments: Degraded habitat
   Measures taken to offset the negative impacts
                                                              The creek is identified as a high
   of point source or non-point source pollution
   are known as mitigation. For example,                        priority
   preserving the natural vegetation along a
                                                            East River
   shoreline can mitigate the impacts of
                                                              Pollutants: Unspecified metals
   impervious surfaces near a body of water.
                                                              Impairments: Chronic aquatic
                                                                toxicity
                                                              The creek is identified as a low
               priority

         Lake Winnebago
           Pollutants: Mercury, PCB, phosphorus, sedimentation
           Impairments: Contaminated fish tissue, degraded habitat, Ddissolved oxygen,
             eutrophication, fish consumption advisory
           The lake is identified as a low/medium priority


Exceptional and Outstanding Resource Waters

Wisconsin has classified many of the state’s highest quality waters as Outstanding Resource
Waters (ORWs) or Exceptional Resource Waters (ERWs). Chapter NR 102 of the Wisconsin

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Administrative Code lists the ORWs and ERWs. The WDNR conducted a statewide evaluation
in the early 1990s to determine which waters qualified for ORW and ERW classification.

According to the WDNR and maps updated as of 1999, there are no exceptional or outstanding
resource waters in Calumet County.



Point Source Discharges

The WDNR regulates municipal, industrial, and significant animal waste operations discharging
wastewater to surface or groundwaters through the Wisconsin Pollutant Discharge Elimination
System (WPDES) permit program. Permits are issued for a maximum five year time frame.
They establish the performance standards for the wastewater treatment systems and set numeric
criteria the discharger must meet. The permit is the discharger's approval to discharge a set
quantity of wastewater at a specific location.

As of 20052010, there arewere currently seventhree industrial and five large dairy concentrated
animal feeding operations (CAFO) WPDES permit holders in Calumet County. They are:

       BelGioioso Cheese, Inc., Harrison
       Brillion Iron Works, Inc., Brillion
      Foremost Farms USA Coop, Chilton
     Thiel Cheese and Ingredients, LLC, Woodville
      White Clover Dairy, Inc., HarrisonDallmann East River Dairy, Brillion
      Shiloh Dairy, Brillion
      Schneider Farms, Woodville
      Wholesome DairyHolsum-Irish, Rantoul
      Holsum-Elm, Chilton


As of 20052010, there arewere currently eight municipal WPDES permit holders in Calumet
County. They are:

         Brillion Wastewater Treatment Facility
         Chilton Wastewater Treatment Facility
         Forest Junction Sanitary District
         Hilbert Wastewater Treatment Facility
         New Holstein Wastewater Treatment Facility
         Potter Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility
         Sherwood Wastewater Treatment Facility
         Stockbridge Wastewater Treatment Facility

Non-Point Sources of Pollution

As precipitation and snow melt run across the surface of the land, they can pick up sediment and
other pollutants from the ground. This polluted runoff is known as non-point source pollution.


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Construction site erosion, municipal stormwater runoff, and uncontrolled agricultural runoff are
the three primary sources of non-point source pollution.

Animal Waste Facilities
One of the most significant potential groundwater contamination sources is animal waste. Both
storage and spreading of animal waste can contaminate groundwater if not done properly.

Animal waste storage facilities currently in use range from manure pits dug 50 years ago to
newly engineered and installed storage structures. The State of Wisconsin regulates livestock
operations with 1,000 animal units or more and those livestock operations with less than 1,000
animal units that have discharges that significantly affect water quality. Animal waste contains
chlorides, nitrogen, and phosphorus, among other pollutants. Through NR 243 Wis. Adm. Code,
some of the worst sites in the state have been addressed, but significant animal waste problems
remain. The WDNR has codified statewide performance standards that apply to agricultural
operations of various types and sizes. These performance standards include:

         Manure management prohibitions.
         Nutrient management.
         Manure storage.
         Soil loss from riparian fields.

Implementation of the standards and prohibitions will occur primarily through the counties,
although the WDNR will be the main implementation authority for state permitted facilities.

All livestock and poultry operations in Wisconsin, regardless of size, must abide by the four
common-sense manure management prohibitions. These prohibitions are required by NR151.
The purpose of these prohibitions is to protect water quality from adverse impacts related to
manure discharges by encouraging practices that should become common-sense for every
producer.

1.       No overflow of manure storage facilities.

2.       No unconfined manure piles in water quality management areas (within 300 ft. of a stream,
         1000 ft. of a lake, or areas where the groundwater is susceptible to contamination).

3.       No direct runoff from a feedlot or stored manure into waters of the state.

4.       No unlimited livestock access to waters of the state where high concentrations of animals
         prevent the maintenance of adequate sod cover or self-sustaining vegetation.

Wellhead Protection

The goal of wellhead protection is to prevent potential contaminants from reaching the wells that
supply municipal water systems. This is accomplished by monitoring and controlling potential
pollution sources within the land area that recharge those wells.



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Wellhead protection planning is administered by the WDNR as required by the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the 1986 amendments to the Federal Safe Drinking
Water Act. Wellhead planning is encouraged for all communities, but is required when any new
municipal well is proposed.

The general process of community-level wellhead protection planning includes:

1.     Forming a planning committee.
2.     Delineating the wellhead protection area.
3.     Inventorying potential groundwater contamination sources.
4.     Managing the wellhead protection area.

The Villages of Sherwood, Stockbridge, and Hilbert and the Cities of Chilton and New Holstein
have completed wellhead protection plans.

5.13 Air Quality

In order to evaluate the quality of the air and to protect the public health, a series of National
Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) have been developed by the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) as established in section 109 of the Clean Air Act. According to the
Wisconsin Air Quality Report, as prepared by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
(WDNR), the air pollutants affecting Wisconsin include sulfur dioxide, suspended particulate
matter, carbon monoxide, ozone, oxides of nitrogen, lead, sulfates, and nitrates. Calumet County
is considered an attainment area, which is an area that meets the NAAQS defined in the Federal
Clean Air Act.

While compliance with NAAQS is not likely to become a concern in Calumet County, there are
localized air quality issues that commonly face rural areas. Concerns with airborne particulates,
or dust, may also be a concern where residential land use is in close proximity to extraction
operations or agricultural operations. Outdoor burning can lead to air quality problems in a
particular neighborhood if garbage or other materials that release toxic substances are burned, or
if burning occurs in a densely populated area. Issues might arise from improper open burning,
improper use of burning barrels, or the improper use of outdoor wood burners (furnaces).

5.14 Environmental Corridors & Sensitive Areas

Designated State Natural Areas

State Natural Areas (SNAs) protect outstanding examples of Wisconsin's native landscape -
often the last refuge for rare plants and animals. Natural Areas are valuable for research and
educational use, the preservation of genetic and biological diversity, and for providing
benchmarks for determining the impact of use on managed lands. As such, they are not intended
for intensive recreation. State Natural Areas are designated by the Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources. There are two State Natural Areas in Calumet County. Map 5-2,
Environmental and Water Features, and Map 5-3, Natural and Ecological Areas, designate the
location of natural and environmental features.


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High Cliff Escarpment
High Cliff Escarpment features both shaded and exposed cliff habitats along the Niagara
Escarpment, talus slopes supporting wet-mesic forest, more than a mile of Lake Winnebago
shoreline, and outstanding examples of conical and effigy mounds in the level woodland above
the escarpment. High Cliff gets its name from the limestone cliff of the Niagara Escarpment,
which parallels the eastern shore of Lake Winnebago. This ledge extends northeasterly to the
Door County peninsula and on to Niagara Falls, New York. At the escarpment summit are
vertical cliffs up to 25 feet high that contain fragile fern, bulblet fern, leaf cup, cliff stickseed,
and long-beaked sedge. The talus slope below the cliff is composed chiefly of small, flat rocks,
although some areas of large limestone boulders occur, and many seepages emanate from the
rocks. The undisturbed forest on the slope is composed of sugar maple, basswood, white ash,
green ash, elm, hackberry, and butternut. Closer to the lake, willows and cottonwood gradually
appear. A rich herbaceous layer includes wild ginger, great water-leaf, false rue anemone,
squirrel-corn, toothwort, and Canada violet. High Cliff Escarpment is owned by the DNR and
was designated a State Natural Area in 1982.

Stockbridge Ledge Woods
Stockbridge Ledge Woods features a mature forest situated on the top of the Niagara
Escarpment. The forest is dominated by large sugar maple, American beech, basswood, remnant
burr oaks, and especially white oak. The escarpment in this vicinity was probably prairie
savanna at one time for many prairie species persist along and near the ledge. Its position atop
the escarpment affords a scenic view of Lake Winnebago. There is a good diversity of tree sizes
and an equally diverse under story. The herbaceous layer includes wood anemone, blue cohosh,
nodding trillium, trout-lily, may-apple, bellwort, early meadow-rue, Missouri goldenrod,
Pennsylvania sedge, thimbleweed, shooting-star, and hepatica. Cream gentian (Gentiana alba),
which has been defined by the state as a threatened species, has been recorded in the area.
Additional rare species would probably be found with more inventory work. Ephemeral ponds
are present throughout the flat crest of the outcrop. Stockbridge Ledge Woods is owned by the
DNR and was designated a State Natural Area in 2002.

Land Legacy Places

At the request of the Natural Resources Board, the Department of Natural Resources undertook a
study to identify places that would be critical in meeting Wisconsin's conservation and recreation
needs over the next 50 years. The study did not address how or when these “Legacy Places”
should be protected or who should be responsible for implementing protection measures. The
outcome of the three-year effort was a Land Legacy Report that catalogues the results of the
study.

Land Legacy Places identified by the report as being located or partially located in Calumet
County include the following.

         Manitowoc – Branch River. Originating in a series of vast wetlands on the east side of
          the Niagara Escarpment, the Manitowoc River flows through a landscape of farm fields
          and forests before entering Lake Michigan. A key tributary, the Branch River, adds
          considerable volume. In its upper reaches, the river and its tributaries act as ecological
          connections between the wetlands that dominate the Killsnake, Brillion, and Collins

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          Marsh State Wildlife Areas. These Wildlife Areas provide over 15,000 acres of wildlife
          habitat and associated recreation opportunities. Maintaining the surrounding landscape in
          agriculture would help ensure that these properties meet their recreation and ecological
          potential. Further downstream the river bottoms support extensive fish spawning habitat
          and are important to nesting and migrating waterfowl.

          This river system supports several rare aquatic species, including greater redhorse and
          wood turtles. The river acts as a travel corridor for many species moving from the large
          wetlands upstream down to the Lake Michigan shore and the large protected properties of
          Woodland Dunes and Point Beach State Forest.

          Sections of this river system could provide trails for the Ice Age Trail corridor. Canoeing
          opportunities are best along middle and lower sections of the river. Increased stocking of
          various strains of steelhead in the late 1980s resulted in an outstanding stream fishery in
          the spring and fall seasons. At present, anglers are hampered by a lack of access to these
          rivers. The Manitowoc River has a few public access points, but access on the Branch
          River is limited to road crossings. Better access on both streams would allow anglers and
          other users to more fully enjoy these waters.

         Niagara Escarpment. This linear, high ridge provides many of the state’s most
          spectacular views and is the logical means to link many existing protected areas on and
          near the Escarpment. Ellison Bluff, Red Banks Alvar, Carlsville Bluff, High Cliff State
          Park, Lake Winnebago and Horicon Ledge are some of the best-known places along the
          Escarpment. Given its length and proximity to the Fox River Valley cities, it is one of the
          most frequently visited features in the state and there is considerable interest in protecting
          additional areas to meet conservation and recreation needs.

          Given the numerous rock outcrops, cliffs, and talus slopes, the Escarpment also harbors
          some very unusual habitats that in turn support many uncommon species. Pockets of
          ancient cedar trees, cold springs, and areas where cool air gently flows out of the rocky
          hillsides are scattered along the Escarpment. These fragile microhabitats support delicate
          ferns, flowers, and maybe most notably, a diverse array of extraordinarily rare snails.

          Areas along the Escarpment have relatively thin soil deposits as a result of glacial
          scouring and little post-glacial deposition. These soil conditions, combined with the
          fractured nature of the dolomite, can lead to groundwater contamination problems.

Other State Natural Areas and Ecological Sites

Brillion Marsh Wildlife Area
Brillion Marsh, a state owned wildlife area, is the
largest wetland in the watershed. The total acreage of
the marsh is 4,802 acres. The marsh is used
extensively by the public for hunting, trapping, dog
trailing and training, snowmobiling, and nature
observation. The area is managed for waterfowl.
Numerous wetland and wildlife species use the area

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during migrations as well as summer residents like osprey, sand hill cranes, great blue herons,
and many grassland species like bluebirds and short-eared owls.

Hayton Marsh
Hayton Marsh, known locally as the Hayton Swamp, is located in westerneastern Calumet
County, six miles east of Chilton. The area is wet, but has little to no standing water. Its low
elevation keeps it too wet to farm.

Killsnake Wildlife Area
The center of the area includes the confluence of the Killsnake River, the South Branch of the
Manitowoc River, and Cedar Creek. Carp and bullheads are the most common fish species, with
northern pike, rock bass, white sucker, fathead minnow, creek chub, and other forage minnows
also present. The Killsnake Wildlife Area also supports a large number of waterfowl on its
numerous small ponds and streams as well as other grassland birds on the grassed uplands
contained within the property boundaries. Supported grassland bird species include the rare bob-
o-links, meadowlarks, upland sandpipers, short-eared owls, pheasants, and many other species
that depend upon grasslands to survive. Approximately 75%, 4,224 acres, of the 7,012 acre
wildlife area is located in Calumet County.

Kiel Marsh Wildlife Area
Located south of the City of Kiel, this 804843 acre state-owned natural area occupies land in
Manitowoc, Calumet, and Sheboygan Counties. Approximately 335 acres are located in
Calumet County. The habitat consists of brush, marsh, forest, and open water. Recreation
opportunities are available including canoeing and fishing. There is also an abundance of
wildlife including waterfowl, furbearers, northern pike, panfish, great blue herons, and black
terns.

Grass Lake Bog
Located south of the City of Brillion in the Town of Rantoul, this 240 acre site features a wild
pothole lake surrounded by extensive wetlands, including cattail and reed canary grass
monotypes, willow and alder thickets, tamarack swamp forest, and scrubby bog. The site is
privately owned.

Ludwig Mesic Forest
The forest is located south of Stockbridge on the east side of Ledge Road near its intersection
with CTH F. This privately owned 30 acre parcel contains a southern mesic forest. Dominant
species of the old growth forest include sugar maple, American beech, and basswood. A good
diversity of tree size classes and under story herbs are found at the site.

Steffen Woods
This private holding 50 acre site is located on the north side of CTH H east of the South Branch
of the Manitowoc River in the Town of Brothertown. The site features a southern mesic forest,
which grades into a swamp forest near the river.

Shady Lane Hardwood Swamp
This swamp is an 80 acre parcel in the Town of Stockbridge. The privately owned site features a
southern wet-mesic forest and a hardwood swamp of basswood and black ash.

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Sperber-Krueger Woods
This privately owned 150 acre site in the Town of Woodville features a floodplain (wet-mesic)
forest near the North Branch of the Manitowoc River. There are a number of sizeable trees
found at the site.




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Map 5-5 Natural and Ecological Areas




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5.15 Wildlife Habitat

                                                Wildlife habitat is any natural community with adequate food,
                                                water, and cover to sustain a species of wildlife. The Calumet
                                                County landscape provides habitat for a variety of birds,
                                                mammals, amphibians, reptiles, aquatic and terrestrial
                                                invertebrates, and fish. Wildlife habitat is connected to many
                                                other natural resources including forests, wetlands, open space,
                                                and surface water, so healthy wildlife populations are good
                                                indicators of the overall health of the environment.

                                                About 80 % of Calumet County’s land area is forest or cropland.
                                                Whitetail deer and wild turkey thrive in this environment, using
                                                the forest for shelter and the fields for feeding. These species are
                                                so abundant that they can cause occasional crop damage. Many
                                                bird species also benefit from the interface between forest and
  Deer on Ledge Road                            open space. Red-tailed hawks, Cooper’s hawks, and other
                                                predatory birds nest in the woodlands and feed in the open
                                                country.

Wetland habitat covers approximately 13.2% of the county, including the Brillion, Killsnake, and
Kiel Marsh Wildlife Areas. The combination of open water, grasses, shrubs, and brush provide
enough variety of cover and food sources to sustain a diversity of species. Birds, in particular,
thrive in this habitat. Countless species of migratory waterfowl migrate and use these wetlands
as vital stopping grounds. Sand hill cranes are common, while uncommon species like ospreys
and even the rare whooping crane have been spotted in the county’s wetlands.

The Niagara Escarpment, with its unique geology and topography, is home to rare plants and
animals. The cliffs and talus slopes are crucial for rare land snails and hibernating bats. Even
common species such as turkeys, rabbits, foxes, and deer rely on the undeveloped stretches of
escarpment for cover. Small mammals use the cracks and crevasses in the cliffs for dens and
hiding places.

Lake Winnebago, a large and shallow freshwater habitat, supports approximately 81 species of
fish. Popular sport fish include walleye and yellow perch and more rare fish found in the lake
include lake sturgeon and sauger. The Lake Winnebago system sustains one of the largest
populations of lake sturgeon in the world. This prehistoric fish, which date back 100 million
years to the time of the dinosaurs, appears to be threatened over most of its range but is still quite
common here. The sauger, a close relative to the walleye, was once a popular sport fish but
experienced a severe population decline in the 1980’s. A ban on sauger harvest and efforts to
enhance its spawning habitat has brought back hope for this species.

Wildlife Watching and Economic Benefits

In April of 2005 the St. Paul Pioneer Press newspaper reported on the increasing economic
effects of wildlife watching. According to the article, wildlife watching is on the rise while

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hunting and fishing continue to decline. Women with children and aging baby boomers appear
to be leading the wildlife watching trend, a potential economic boon that more businesses and
communities are looking to capitalize on.

Wildlife watchers refers to people whose primary purpose in going outdoors is to observe,
photograph or feed birds, fish, and other animals. Increasingly, more people are doing it,
according to state and federal surveys which is fueling nature-based tourism and festivals that
some communities see as an opportunity to grow without adding buildings. More than $400744
million is spent in Wisconsin annually on wildlife watching, according to the latest survey by the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. There are rRoughly 4671 million U.S. residents participated in
wildlife watching activitiesbirders in the United States, according to the most recent2006 U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service study, which found that the hobby accounted for $3245.7 billion in
total wildlife watching expendituresretail sales nationwide in 2001. The study also reports that
4139% of Wisconsinites say they are wildlife watchersbirders, some casual backyard birders and
others who log many miles for their hobby.

5.16 Threatened and Endangered Species

Wisconsin's Natural Heritage Inventory (NHI), established in 1985 by the Wisconsin Legislature,
is maintained by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources' (WDNR) Bureau of
Endangered Resources. The NHI program is responsible for maintaining data on the locations
and status of rare species, natural communities, and natural features in Wisconsin. The
Wisconsin NHI program is part of an international network of inventory programs that collect,
process, and manage data on the occurrences of natural biological diversity using standard
methodology.

Wisconsin's Natural Heritage Inventory program's three objectives are to: collect information on
occurrences of rare plants and animals, high-quality natural communities, and significant natural
features in Wisconsin; standardize this information, enter it into an electronic database, and mark
locations on base maps for the state; and use this information to further the protection and
management of rare species, natural communities, and natural features.

According to NHI mapping for Calumet County, the following rare species and natural
communities are found in the county. The dates following the occurrence name notes the most
recent year the occurrence was recorded in the county.


Aquatic OccurrencesAnimals

Animal
   Yellow Rail, Coturnicops noveboracensis, 1991
    Northern Cricket Frog, Acris crepitans
    Henslow’s Sparrow, Ammodramus henslowii
   Side-swimmer, Crangonyx gracilis, 1994
   Banded Killifish, Fundulus diaphanous, 1964**
   Greater Redhorse, Moxostoma valenciennesi, 1979**
   Blanchard's Cricket Frog, Acris crepitans blanchardi, 1982**


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         Bat Hibernaculum, Bat hibernaculum
         Red-shouldered Hawk, Buteo lineatus
         Black Tern, Chlidonias niger
         Gorgone Checker Spot, Chlosyne gorgone
         Yellow Rail, Coturnicops noveboracensis
         Bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus
         Herp Hibernaculum, Herp Hibernaculum
         Pickerel Frog, Lithobates palustris
         Migratory Bird Concentration Site, Migratory Bird Concentration Site
         Greater Redhorse, Moxostoma valenciennesi (being considered for delisting in February
          2012)
         Dentate Supercoil, Paravitrea multidentata
         Thin-lip Vallonia, Vallonia perspective

Plants

         Short's Rock-cress, Arabis shortii
         Ram's-head Lady's-slipper, Cypripedium arietinum, 1891
         Yellow Gentian, Gentiana alba (being considered for delisting in February 2012)
         Prairie Parsley, Polytaenia nuttallii
         Snow Trillium, Trillium nivale

Natural Communities

       Dry cliff
     Open Bog, 1982
     Shrub-carr, 1982
      Emergent mMarsh, 1982
      Floodplain fForest, 1979
      Moist cliff, 1983
      Northern wWet fForest, 1982
      Open bog
      Shrub-carr
      Southern mesic forest
      Talus forest


Terrestrial Occurrences

Animal

     Land Snail, Succinea bakeri, 1998
     Land Snail, Catinella gelida, 1998
     Bat Hibernaculum, Bat hibernaculum, 1986
     Dentate Supercoil, Paravitrea multidentata, 1996
     Thin-lip Vallonia, Vallonia perspective, 1998
     Broad-winged Skipper, Poanes viator, 1990
     Northern Ringneck Snake, Diadophis punctatus edwardsii, 1986


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Plants

     Snow   Trillium, Trillium nivale, 1995
     Yellow   Gentian, Gentiana alba, 1992
     Prairie Parsley, Polytaenia nuttallii, 1848
     Short's Rock-cress, Arabis shortii, 1994


Natural Communities

     Dry Cliff, 1983
     Moist Cliff, 1983
     Talus Forest, 1999
     Southern Mesic Forest, 2000

**Aquatic and terrestrial resources identified in the WDNR’s Wisconsin’s Strategy for Wildlife Species of
Greatest Conservation Need completed in 2005. This report provides further information on the
particular species identified. Available information includes general location of occurrences, threats and
issues, and priority conservation actions.

5.17 Historic and Cultural Resources

Preserving important aspects of our past gives us a sense of continuity and meaning and historic
preservation efforts often foster community pride. Because cultural resources provide an
important window to the past, many Wisconsin residents seek to retain those resources that make
their communities distinctive. The presence of these resources also creates a level of respect for
those individuals who formed the character of the community new residents now enjoy.

In addition to maintaining a community’s distinctive character, cultural resource preservation can
lead to tangible economic benefits. For example, by retaining and emphasizing historic heritage,
tourism can increase. In urban areas, where the deterioration of central-city neighborhoods has
resulted in a decline in property values, preservation offers a positive alternative to continued
decay. In many cases, overall neighborhood improvement and investment in rehabilitation has
led to increased real estate values and municipal tax revenues.

Overall, planning for cultural resource preservation can have several benefits. The cultural
resource section of a comprehensive plan can serve as the first step in a cultural and historic
preservation effort. This section can also be used as a base for a more detailed analysis of
historic preservation at a later date.

Calumet County History

Calumet County was organized in 1836 under the laws of Wisconsin Territory. In 1840,
Calumet County’s territory was declared non-existent and it reverted back to Brown County. It
was re-established in 1842 when the Act declaring Calumet County non-existent was rescinded.




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Calumet County derived its name from a Menominee Indian Village lying on the east shore of
Lake Winnebago. The name means ‘peace’ and signifies the Indian Pipe of Peace. Traces of
prehistoric Indian mound builders can be found today as evidence of their earlier occupation.

The county seat, originally located in Stockbridge, was moved to Chilton in 1856. The county’s
economy was based on agriculture and later on manufacturing. In 1839, Congress granted the
Brothertown Indians rights of citizenship and in 1843 the Stockbridge Indians received similar
recognition.

Records show that the first County Board meeting was held in 1851. The first courthouse and
jail in the City of Chilton was a wooden structure built circa 1860 at the present site.

Historic Places

State and National Register
The National Register of Historic Places recognizes properties of local, state, and national
significance. Properties are listed in the National Register because of their association with
significant persons or events, because they contain important information about our history or
prehistory, or because of their architectural or engineering significance. The National Register
also lists important groupings of properties as historic districts. In addition, the National Park
Service highlights properties that have significance to the nation as a whole by conferring them
the status of National Historic Landmark.

The Wisconsin State Register of Historic Places parallels the National Register. However, it is
designed to enable state-level historic preservation protection and benefits. Most of the
properties in Wisconsin listed in the National Register are also listed in the State Register.

According to the Wisconsin Historical Society there are 10 sites located in Calumet County that
are on the National and State Register, which are detailed below. The period of significance
indicates the length of time when a property was associated with important events, activities or
persons, or attained the characteristics that qualify it for register listing.

         City of Chilton, Calumet County Courthouse. Listed on the State and National Register
          in 1982. The architectural style is described as classical revival. The period of
          significance is from 1900-1924.

         City of Chilton, Chilton Post Office. Listed
          on the National Register in 2000. Identified
          as a colonial revival architectural type. The
          period of significance is 1940.

         City of New Holstein, Herman C. Timm
          House. Listed on the State and National
          Register in 1996. Herman C. Timm was a
          successful New Holstein grain merchant. He
          was also elected as the first president of the
          Village of New Holstein in 1901 and founded
                                                           Herman C. Timm house, New Holstein.
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          the State Bank of New Holstein the very next year. The building is a single dwelling
          with a described architectural style of Greek revival. The period is 1850-1899.

         Town of Charlestown, Aebischer Site. Listed on the National Register in 1985. Site is
          identified as prehistoric, 9000-9999 BC. The site is related to agriculture and animals.
          There are no buildings or structures at the site.

         Town of Stockbridge, site located in Calumet County Park. Listed on State and National
          Register in 1997. Site is identified as a ceremonial site, with graves and burial sites. The
          site is identified as a prehistoric site.

         Town of Stockbridge, Stockbridge Harbor. Listed in the State and National Register in
          1998. From about 1100 to 1200 A.D, a large Native American village existed on the
          north side of the harbor. Pottery uncovered at the site indicates that two tribes lived
          together in the village—Effigy Mound Builders and Late Woodland agriculturalists.

         Town of Stockbridge, Stockbridge Indian Cemetery. Listed on the National Register in
          1980. The period of significance is 1850-1874 and 1825-1849.

         Town of Brillion, Haese Memorial Village Historic District. Listed in the State and
          National Register in 1982. The architectural style is early commercial. The period of
          significance is 1874-1884. There are nine total buildings in the district.

         Town of Harrison, High Cliff Mounds. Listed in the National Register in 1997. Site is
          identified as a ceremonial site, with graves and burial sites. The site is identified as a
          prehistoric site.

         Town of Brothertown, Ridge Group. Listed in the National Register in 1978. The site is
          identified as funerary, camp, and mortuary with a period of significance of 1499-1000
          AD.




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Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory (AHI)
The Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory (AHI), provided by the Wisconsin Historical
Society, lists historical and architectural information on properties in Wisconsin. The AHI
contains data on buildings, structures, and objects that illustrate Wisconsin’s unique history. The
majority of properties listed are privately owned. Listed properties convey no special status,
rights, or benefits. This inventory could be used by the county and its communities as another
source for information on historical or architecturally important sites.

Identified below are the communities located within or partially within Calumet County and the
number of AHI sites found within the respective community.

         City of Appleton, 1,817
         City of Brillion, 24
         City of Chilton, 170
         City of Kiel, 52
         City of Menasha, 1,170
         City of New Holstein, 75
         Village of Hilbert, 27
         Village of Potter, 0
         Village of Sherwood, 33
         Village of Stockbridge, 16
         Town of Brillion, 45
         Town of Brothertown, 41
         Town of Charlestown, 44
         Town of Chilton, 27
         Town of Harrison, 84
         Town of New Holstein, 45
         Town of Rantoul, 44
         Town of Stockbridge, 17
         Town of Woodville, 34

Museums, Monuments, and Other Attractions

Tayco Street Bridge Museum, City of Menasha
Located at Tayco and Main Street, Menasha, the museum includes historic photos and artifacts
bringing the job of a bridge-tender to life. The museum is open May through October during
navigational season from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. For further information call (920) 751-5155.

Kiel Area Historical Society House, City of Kiel
Located in Kiel, on Fremont Street, this historic house contains period furnishings and area
artifacts. Open house tours are offered throughout the year. For more information contact the
Kiel Historical Society President Vickie Anderson at (920) 894-2126.

Calumet County Historical Museum
Located just one mile south of Chilton on STH 32/57, the Calumet County Historical Museum is
open from Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day. The museum is home to thousands of
artifacts that chronicle the history of Chilton and Calumet County. Some of the highlights

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include old-time dental equipment, photographs of Chilton in the early 1900s, a large, stained-
glass church window and pews, and a number of dresses and other fashion pieces from the
1920s.

The Pioneer Museum
Located on Railroad Street in New Holstein, visitors
will find the Pioneer Museum. The Pioneer Museum
is packed with displays, photographs, and artifacts of
early New Holstein community life. Highlights
include a diorama of how the city was laid out in its
early years, an unusual collection of buttons from
clothing, and a room displaying engines produced at
Tecumseh (originally called the Lauson Company)
throughout the years.

The Portland Church and Cemetery                        Pioneer Museum, New Holstein.
The Portland Historic Site is located on CTH E, three
miles west of STH 57/32 and three miles east of Stockbridge at STH 55, and maintains an old,
New England-style church and historic cemetery.

A restored New England style church and an adjacent community cemetery make up the site.
That is all that remains of a once thriving community that has nearly vanished. The community
was once represented by the Brant Paptis Church, the Twain School (today a private home),
stores, and a post office. The church, built by Joseph Trevor, is a fine example of New England
architecture. It served Methodist-Episcopal faith communities. The cemetery holds the grave
sites of three soldiers who fought in the War of 1812, and 45 soldiers who fought in the Civil
War.

Ariens Company Museum
The museum is located at 109 Calumet Street in Brillion. The Ariens Company Museum,
established in 2003, celebrates decades of Ariens history, looks at the evolution of technology
and innovation, and allows visitors to learn about the family behind the machines.

Brillion History House
The Brillion History House, the Green Hotel, was Brillion's first hotel, built by F. F. Green - the
son of Asaph Green, a Chilton pioneer - in 1872. It was originally located on the southern
portion of the Brillion Public School property. In 1969 the Brillion Historical Society took over
the Green Hotel to house Brillion's historical artifacts, and moved it from its original location on
Main Street, to its current Francis Street location. Visitors of the Green Hotel can learn about
Brillion through its various displays and pictures.

High Cliff General Store Museum
The High Cliff General Store Museum shares the history of the park in one of the original
buildings from Sherwood's past. The park contains artifacts and other historical items from a
time when Sherwood was a mining community. Visitors can purchase ice cream, candy, and
other items while examining the items in the museum. The High Cliff General Store Museum is
open noon to 5:00 p.m., Friday through Sunday from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

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Historic Bridges of Calumet County
Calumet County is home to numerous bridges, some over 100 years old, which contribute to the
historical and cultural features of the county. Most of these bridges are made from hand laid
stone or concrete. Some of the most notable historic bridges of the county include the following:

         Man-Cal Road: Built in 1922, a 24’ wide bridge over a tributary to the East River.
          Located 1.2 miles east of the junction with STH 57.

         Irish Road: Built in 1920, a 17’ wide bridge
          over the north branch of the Manitowoc River.
          Located 0.8 miles south of the intersection of
          Irish Road and STH 57.

         Lemke Road: Built in 1918, a 19’ wide bridge
          over the Killsnake River. Two miles north of
          the junction with USH 151.

         Hayton Road: Built in 1900, a 27’ wide bridge
          over Pine Creek. Approximately 0.1 miles          Irish Road Bridge, Town of Brillion
          south of the junction with CTH T.

         Weeks Road: Built in 1900, an 18’ wide bridge over the south branch of the Manitowoc
          River. Located 0.1 mile north of the junction with USH 151.

         Charlesburg Road: Built in 1930, a 22’ wide bridge over Pine Creek. Located 0.2 miles
          west of the junction with CTH T.

         Grand Street (City of Chilton): Built in 1927, a 30’ wide bridge over the south branch of
          the Manitowoc River. Located 0.2 miles east of the junction with STH 57.

         Killsnake Road: Built in 1925, a 27’ wide bridge over the Killsnake River. Located 2.7
          miles west of the junction with STH 57.

         Mud Creek Road: Built in 1930, a 19’ wide bridge over Mud Creek. Located 0.7 miles
          west of the junction with STH 55.

5.18 Community Design

Community design as a cultural resource helps explain the origins and history of how a given
community looks, feels, and functions in the present day. Components of the origin of
community design include historic settlement patterns, resource use (like mining, farming, and
forestry) in rural areas, the industries and businesses that influenced urban areas, transportation
features and traffic flow patterns, natural features like rivers, lakes, and wetlands, and the
heritage and values of the people that lived in a community in the past and that live there today.
These factors might be expressed through street layout, building architecture, landscaping,
preservation of natural features, development density, and other components of development

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design. The design of a community as seen today might also be influenced by community
decisions including the use of zoning and subdivision controls, the establishment of parks and
other community facilities, the use of historic preservation, and in some cases, the use of land
use planning. One Calumet County example of community design includes the Village of
Hilbert. The village draws much of its settlement pattern and history from the railroad located in
the community.

5.19 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Programs

The following are agricultural, natural, and cultural resource programs, agencies, and activities
that are currently in use or available for use in Calumet County. The following can be used to
gather further information about agricultural, natural, and cultural resources and to assist in
implementation of related goals.

State Programs

Agricultural Enterprise Area (AEA)
Farmers in Calumet County may receive tax credits through the State of Wisconsin Department
of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) Agricultural Enterprise Area (AEA)
program. {Note: It should be noted not to confuse the DATCP AEA program with the
Agricultural Enterprise land use classification used throughout this document.}The designation
of an AEA is voluntary and can be initiated by land owners or local governments by filing a
petition with DATCP. At a minimum, the land subject of the petition must be identified as being
in a farmland preservation area in the county’s Farmland Preservation Plan, be a contiguous land
area, and primarily be used for agriculture. If the land is in an AEA, part of a Farmland
Preservation Agreement, and meets eligibility and conservation requirements, the farmer can
receive a tax credit of $5 per acre. Land in an AEA does not have to have Exclusive Agricultural
or Farmland Preservation zoning. However, the tax credit is increased to $10 per acre when the
land is both in an AEA and zoned Exclusive Agricultural or Farmland Preservation.

Lake Planning Grant
Funds are available to collect and analyze information needed to protect and restore lakes and
their watersheds. Types of projects include physical, chemical, biological, and sociological data
collection, water quality assessment, and watershed evaluation including county-wide or regional
initiatives. Contact the WDNR for further information.

Lake Protection Grant
Funds are available to protect and improve the water quality of lakes and their ecosystems.
Grants are available for purchasing land or easements, restoration of wetlands, development of
local regulations to protect water quality, lake improvement activities called for in a Department
approved plan, and countywide lake classification. Contact the WDNR Regional Lakes
Coordinator for more information.

Non-Point Pollution Abatement Program
Funds are available to improve water quality by limiting or ending sources of non-point source
(run-off) water pollution by providing financial and technical assistance to landowners, land
operators, municipalities, and other governmental units. Governmental units within designated

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priority watersheds and priority lakes are eligible to apply. Eligible projects are watersheds and
lakes where: 1) the water quality improvement or protection will be great in relation to funds
expended; 2) the installation of best management practices is feasible to abate water pollution
caused by non-point source pollution; and 3) the local governmental units and agencies involved
are willing to carry out program responsibilities. Efforts are focused statewide in critical
watersheds and lakes where nonpoint source related water quality problems are most severe and
control is most feasible. Rural landowners and land operators located in selected priority
watersheds and priority lakes can contact their county land conservation departments to explain
the program and have the landowner/land operator sign for cost sharing best management
practices. Non-rural landowners and land operators can contact their municipal government
offices. A watershed or lake project normally has a 10-12 year time frame: two years for
planning and eight to 10 years to implement best management practices. Contact the WDNR
Regional Environmental Grant Specialist for further information.

Wisconsin Historical Preservation Tax Credits
One of the benefits of owning a historic property in Wisconsin is the ability to participate in
federal and state income tax incentives programs for rehabilitation of historic properties. There
are currently three programs available to owners of properties that are either listed in, or
determined to be eligible for listing in, the state or national registers of historic places. The three
programs are:

1.     Federal 20% Historic Rehabilitation Credit.
2.     Wisconsin 5% Supplement to Federal Historic Rehabilitation Credit.
3.     Wisconsin 25% Historic Rehabilitation Credit.

The State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Division of Historic Preservation should be contacted
for further information.

Regional Programs

Niagara Escarpment Resource Network (NERN)
The Niagara Escarpment Resource Network (NERN) is an assembly of stakeholders interested in
the land use and ecology surrounding the Niagara Escarpment. As part of the initial work for the
NERN, the Bay-Lake Regional Planning Commission drafted an Inventory and Assessment of
the Resources of the Niagara Escarpment in Wisconsin, 2000. This document describes existing
conditions, provides background information, examines development pressures, and includes
planning and preservation recommendations. For further information visit the NERN web-site or
contact at Network.

Lakeshore Natural Resource Partnership (LNRP)
The LNRP is a unique citizen initiative that promotes and facilitates local community efforts to
preserve and improve the local environment. LNRP does this by fostering community
partnerships, awarding grants, and promoting and supporting activities to further the
understanding of the natural resources of the Lakeshore Basin.




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County Programs

Purchase of Agricultural Conservation Easement (PACE) Program
In March 2011, Calumet County adopted Article I of Chapter 36 of the Calumet County Code of
Ordinances (Purchase of Agricultural Conservation Easement Program). The PACE program is a
way of paying farmers for their willingness to accept a deed restriction on their land that limits
future development for non-agricultural purposes. The land owners are compensated for the fair
market value of their land, based on the difference between what it could be sold for on the open
market with no restrictions and what it can be sold for once an easement is placed on the land.
The application process is competitive with the most productive and best-suited land being
accepted into the program, subject to funding availability. Cash from the sale of the
conservation easement can be used for reducing debt, lowering operating costs, improving or
expanding farm operation, college education, retirement, etc.

East Winnebago Priority Watershed Project (EWPWP)
Funded by the WDNR and implemented by the Calumet County Land and Water Conservation
Department, the EWPWP was begun in 1989 when the impact of agricultural non-point pollution
on Lake Winnebago surface water quality was identified as a serious problem. The project has
offered landowners cost-sharing to implement land management practices that reduce soil
erosion, minimize runoff of manures and crop nutrients, and limit construction site impact on
surface waters.

The EWPWP is one of the most successful priority watershed projects in the state. Calumet
County has been able to implement a high number of projects to improve the watershed.
December 31, 2003 was the last day of the EWPWP.

Land and Water Resource Management (LWRM) Program
Wisconsin Statutes (Chapter 92.10) requires each county to prepare a LWRM plan as a condition
of state grants through the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection
(DATCP). This planning process was adopted in October of 1997. It is intended to be more
comprehensive by including local citizen input into the county’s local natural resource
management issues. This program is managed by the Calumet County Land & Water
Conservation Department.

Calumet County Groundwater Guardian Program
The mission of the programs is to develop a statewide constituency to promote stewardship and
sound management of groundwater resources. The Wisconsin Groundwater Guardian Programs
seeks to promote the adoption of the Groundwater Guardian program in Wisconsin communities,
provide assistance to currently participating communities, and help Groundwater Guardian
communities communicate with and learn from each other's activities. For further information
on the program in Calumet County contact the Calumet County UW Extension.

Calumet County Cooperative Extension
Cooperative Extension develops practical educational programs tailored to local needs and based
on University of Wisconsin knowledge and research. County-based Extension educators are
University of Wisconsin faculty and staff who are experts in agriculture and agribusiness,


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community and economic development, natural resources, family living, and youth development.
For more information on services contact the Calumet County Cooperative Extension.

Calumet County Land and Water Conservation Department (LWCD) Additional Programs

          Farmland Preservation Program Conservation Compliance: This is a state mandated
          cross-compliance rule that requires all landowners receiving a tax credit through this
          program meet the State Performance Standards for Soil and Water Conservationmaintain
          cropland soil erosion rates at “tolerable” levels (as defined by NRCS technical standards).
          The LWCD is responsible for writing and updating conservation plans for landowners
          yearly. The LWCD is also required to spot check 20% to 25% of the program
          participants each year. This program is administered jointly between the LWCD and the
          Planning and Zoning Department.

          Animal Waste Rule NR-243: This is a DNR regulatory program that operates on a
          complaint-driven basis. The DNR must investigate complaints and determine if an
          operation is causing a significant water quality problem. If so, the DNR issues a Notice
          of Discharge to the landowner, which requires adoption of animal waste runoff control
          practices. The owner is directed to the LWCD to obtain technical assistance. The
          LWCD recommends the practices needed to solve the problem and will design and
          supervise the installation of those practices. Cost sharing is offered through DATCP.

          Animal Waste Storage Ordinance: This county ordinance became effective in 1989. It is
          designed to prevent water pollution by requiring all new manure storage facilities or
          modifications to existing storage facilities be designed and built according to NRCS
          technical standards. A landowner is required to obtain a permit from the LWCD on all
          plans, and the work done must be inspected by LWCD staff prior to utilization.

          Wildlife Damage and Abatement: The LWCD maintains a contract with USDA-APHIS-
          ADC to provide landowner services through this program. The program deals with crop
          damage caused primarily by deer and geese but will offer consulting services on other
          nuisance species. Abatement measures are emphasized and always required as a first
          step. Crop damage is also reimbursed, with a deductible amount that applies. The
          program is currently funded through a $1.00 fee on all hunting licenses, a $12.00 charge
          for bonus deer tags, and other monies from the federal government.

Local Programs

New Holstein Historical Society
The New Holstein Historical Society was founded in 1974 by a number of descendants of the
original settlers. They were interested in the preservation of the history of New Holstein. The
Society is affiliated with the Wisconsin State Historical Society, and has been active in
promoting history through educational tours, cemetery walks, book publications, and more. The
Society operates the Pioneer Corner Museum and is in charge of the Timm House restoration
effort. Several publications relating to New Holstein history are available from the Society.
Member benefits include free admission to properties and events, an annual newsletter, advance


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purchase rights to new publications, and an invitation to the annual dinner program. For further
information contact the Society.

Brillion Historical Society
The mission of the society is "to develop, maintain, and update a written and recorded history of
the Brillion area, and to collect artifacts relative to that history, so that present and future
generations may be able to study and take pride in the Brillion area heritage." The Society
operates the Brillion Historical Museum and History House. They also sponsor the annual
Christmas Tree Display and Holiday Open House. For further information contact the Society.

Calumet County Historical Society
The Society operates the Calumet County Historical Museum. Meetings are held four times a
year. For further information contact the Society.

Haese Memorial Village Historical Society
The Haese Memorial Village Historic District, located at the corner of Milwaukee St. and
Randolph St. in Forest Junction, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.
For further information contact the Society.

High Cliff Historical Society
From 1895 to 1956, a limestone quarry and a kiln to extract the lime from the stone operated at
the present site of High Cliff State Park. The lime kilns and other structures are still standing
along the Lake Winnebago shoreline, as is the general store from the community that was built
around the kilns. The Society strives to preserve the historical area. For further information
contact the Society.

Kiel Area Historical Society
Membership is open to locals, non-residents, businesses, and corporate members. The Society
operates the Kiel Area Historical Society House on Fremont Street and celebrates Founder's Day.
For further information contact the Society.

5.20 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resource Trends and Outlook

The following are anticipated trends with regard to agricultural, natural, and cultural resources
for Calumet County.

Agriculture Trends

         Increased pressure to convert farmland to other uses resulting in a continued loss of
          farmland, particularly near cities and villages.

         The size of the average farm will continue to show moderate increases.

         Dairy herd sizes will continue to increase.

         Expect an increase in the number of large “commercial” type farms, especially dairy.


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         Decreased interest in farmland preservation programs.

         Increased interest in specialty farming.

         Increased interest in “value-added” businesses to complement small dairy and general
          farming operations.

         Farmers will be retiring in greater numbers resulting in potential greater losses of farms.

Natural Resources Trends

         Growing demand to supply adequate water for human consumption, agriculture, and
          industry.

         Continuing need to site new municipal wells.

         Increasing pressure on groundwater quality by various land uses.

         Continuing need for improved groundwater quality and quantity data.

         Continuing pressure to develop shoreland areas.

         Increasing use of publicly accessible waters by growing numbers of recreationists.

         Increasing threat of invasion of exotic species.

         Continued pressure to alter or eliminate wetlands for commercial development, highway
          construction, etc.

         Continued loss of wetland acres, but at a slower pace.

         Continued state-level priority to protect and acquire unique natural habitats.

         Growing interest in land trusts and conservation easements for the preservation of unique
          natural areas.

         The price of forest land sold for recreational purposes will continue to increase.

         Continuing demand for non-metallic minerals for state, county, and local road
          improvement projects.

         The price of non-metallic minerals will increase with the increasing difficulty of
          obtaining permit approvals.

         Increasing difficulty in siting new, non-metallic mines due to development in rural areas.

         Increasing pressure to develop the Niagara Escarpment.

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         Increasing need for continued groundwater education.

Cultural Resource Trends

         The recognized value of historic and cultural resources will grow, demanding more
          attention to their preservation.

         The community design features that express rural character and small town atmosphere
          will be increasingly challenged in areas that experience significant growth.




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6.        Economic Development
The nature of economics is cyclical, based on a combination of factors including product life
cycles, applications of technology, government interventions, and a host of other indicators.
Because of this, development will happen in a community whether or not it is planned; the
community will experience economic changes whether or not they are desired changes. The
advantage of comprehensive planning is that a community can anticipate these changes and
guide development to the best of its abilities and capacities. Consequently, each plan is unique
and tailored to each community’s needs and desires.

Economic development planning is the process by which a community organizes, analyzes,
plans, and then applies its energies to the tasks of improving the economic well-being and quality
of life for those in the community. This can be done by addressing issues ranging from
enhancing community competitiveness, establishing industrial policy, encouraging sustainable
development, providing infrastructure, enhancing worker training, and improving overall quality
of life. All of these issues affect residents within a community and are addressed directly or
indirectly in this comprehensive planning process. In the world of private business, planning is
an essential part of a company’s ability to sustain profitability, stability, and growth. Calumet
County also uses planning to achieve a balance of stability and growth.

The reason to plan for economic development is straight-forward: economic development helps
pay the bills. It requires working together to maintain a strong economy by creating and
retaining desirable jobs which provide a good standard of living for individuals. Increased
personal income and wealth increase the tax base, so a community, county, or state can provide
the level of services residents expect. A balanced, healthy economy is essential for community
well-being. Economic development expenditures are a community investment. They leverage
new growth and redevelopment to improve the area. Influencing and investing in the process of
economic development allows community members to determine future direction and guide
appropriate types of development according to their values.

Successful plans for economic development acknowledge the significance of:

1.    Knowing your region’s economic function in the global economy
2.    Creating a skilled and educated workforce
3.    Investing in an infrastructure for innovation
4.    Creating a great quality of life
5.    Fostering an innovative business climate
6.    Reinventing and digitizing government
7.    Taking regional governance and collaboration seriously

For these reasons, it is important in the planning process to identify the county’s economic
characteristics or resources. These characteristics include: the labor force, employment by
industry, unemployment characteristics, and income characteristics. Assessment of these
characteristics and resources provide insight into the historical and current economic situation in
the county, thereby providing direction for planning the future of the economic base.


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This section provides an economic profile of Calumet County and its communities and also an
assessment of local economic strengths and weaknesses, employment forecasts, local economic
base, and applicable economic trends.

6.1       Labor Force and Employment Analysis

Civilian Labor Force

The labor force, by definition of the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, includes
those who are either working or looking for work, but does not include individuals who have
made a choice not to work (retirees, homemakers, and students), nor does it include institutional
residents, military personnel, or discouraged job seekers.

Labor force participation increases and decreases with changes in labor market conditions. Table
6-1 displays the civilian labor force estimates for Calumet County and Wisconsin from
19992006 to 20032010.

                              Table 6-1
Civilian Labor Force Annual Averages, Calumet County and Wisconsin,
                        1999-20032006-2010
                                                                                             % Change
                                        2006    2007      2008      2009           2010      2006-2010
       Calumet County
       Labor Force                   25,502    25,648    25,611    25,631       25,356            -0.6%
       Employment                    24,467    24,456    24,520    23,641       23,651            -3.3%
       Unemployment                   1,035     1,192     1,091     1,990        1,705            64.7%
       Rate                              4.1       4.6       4.3       7.8          6.7           63.4%

     Wisconsin
     Labor Force           3,077,096 3,099,456 3,087,331 3,100,503 3,062,636       -0.5%
     Employment            2,932,482 2,951,001 2,936,749 2,829,348 2,807,301       -4.3%
     Unemployment            144,614    148,455     150,582    271,155  255,335    76.6%
     Rate                         4.7        4.8         4.9        8.7      8.3   76.6%
    Source: Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, WORKnet, Local Area Unemployment
    Statistics, Bureau of Workforce Information, 1999-2003 2006-2010.

From 19992006 to 20032010 the labor force of Calumet County increaseddecreased by
approximately 110.6%, while the labor force of the State of Wisconsin increaseddecreased by
nearly the same rate at 6.50.5%. The unemployment rate for the county and the state hit a high
in 2009had been continually increasing for the period shown, butwith the county experiencing
experienced a slight better unemployment rates than the state improvement in 2003.




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Unemployment Rates

The number of persons unemployed in the county includes not only those who are receiving
unemployment benefits, but also any person who actively looked for a job and did not find one.
Unemployment rates throughout 2003 for Calumet County and Wisconsin are shown in Figure
6-1.

                              Figure 6-1
       Monthly Unemployment Rates, Calumet County and Wisconsin,
                              20032010

          12.0
                              10.3     10.1
                    10.0
          10.0
                  8.8      8.5                  8.7
                                     8.3                8.2     8.4     8.1
                                                                                 7.8
           8.0                                7.1                                          7.1      7.0       7.2      7.1
                                                      6.8     6.8
                                                                      6.4      6.1
                                                                                        5.4      5.5       5.6      5.5
           6.0


           4.0


           2.0


           0.0
                   JAN      FEB      MAR      APR MAY         JUN     JUL      AUG       SEP      OCT      NOV       DEC

                                                      Calumet County        Wisconsin

      Source: Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, WORKnet, Local Area Unemployment
      Statistics, Bureau of Workforce Information, 20032010.

Throughout 20032010, Calumet County consistently had an unemployment rate lower than the
State of Wisconsin’s. Calumet County’s unemployment rates decreasedare also fairly consistent
throughout the year. During January, February, and March the rates were somewhat higher, a
trend that is typical in Wisconsin due to increased unemployment during winter months.

Educational Attainment

Table 6-2 displays the educational attainment level of Calumet County and Wisconsin residents
who were age 25 and older from 2005-2009in 2000. The educational attainment level of persons
within a community is often an indicator of the overall income, job availability, and well being
of the community. Lower educational attainment levels in an area can also be a hindrance to
attracting certain types of businesses, typically those that require high technical skills and upper
management types of positions.



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                                Table 6-2
    Educational Attainment of Persons Age 25 & Over, Calumet County
                      and Wisconsin, 20002005-2009
                                                    Calumet County            Wisconsin
                                                              Percent of             Percent of
   Attainment Level                                Number         Total   Number          Total
   Less than 9th grade                               1,049         3.6%   140,614         3.8%
   9th to 12 grade, no diploma                       1,422         4.9%   265,194         7.2%
   High school graduate (includes equivalency)      11,245       38.7% 1,266,330         34.3%
   Some college, no degree                           5,308       18.2%    755,347        20.5%
   Associate degree                                  2,915       10.0%    325,610         8.8%
   Bachelor's degree                                 5,280       18.1%    628,494        17.0%
   Graduate or professional degree                   1,872         6.4%   311,718         8.4%
   Total persons age 25 and over                    29,091      100.0% 3,693,307        100.0%
   Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, STF-32005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
   Estimates, 2000.

In 2000From 2005-2009, approximately 8791.5% of residents of Calumet County age 25 and
over received their high school diploma and/or had further education. This figure has increased
from 19902000 which was approximately 8087%. For the State of Wisconsin from 2005-2009in
2000 this figure is slightly less than Calumet County with 8589%; in 19902000 the figure for the
state was 7985%. Overall, the 2005-20092000 educational attainment levels in Calumet County
are very similar to those for the state as a whole.

Travel Time to Work

For most of the general population, the location of their home is dependent upon the location of
their work. Knowing the amount of time people are willing to travel to work can serve as an
indication for future locations of housing and/or economic development.

Table 6-3 displays the travel time to work for Calumet County, its municipalities, and the State
of Wisconsin in 2000. Due to the data being unavailable for the 2012 plan amendment, the chart
was not updated.




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                                     Table 6-3
             Travel Time to Work, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 2000

                    Less than         5 to        10 to        20 to       30 to         40 to 60 or more Worked at
                    5 minutes 9 minutes 19 minutes 29 minutes 39 minutes 59 minutes               minutes    home
T. Brillion                 47        139           170         122          151           52          31       67
T. Brothertown              18          65          270         142           84           90          39       88
T. Charlestown              42        119           109          36           15           56          14       21
T. Chilton                  44        125           187          84           60           51          16       88
T. Harrison                 73        367        1,358          788          313          126          98      136
T. New Holstein             90        152           269          85          131           67           9       73
T. Rantoul                  24          66          151          58           39           33          18       80
T. Stockbridge              35          76          163         174          183           78          32       41
T. Woodville                39          58          157         126           64           19          25       87
V. Hilbert                  41          54          185         121          110           83          13         3
V. Potter                   17           7           49          10           15             9          4         0
V. Sherwood                 32          34          234         306          139           28          43       32
V. Stockbridge              16          20           66          70           96           37          23       11
C. Appleton*              153         657        3,244          987          407          148          96       68
C. Brillion               254         446           221         170          266          151          41       39
C. Chilton                314         531           283         218          122          235          90       28
C. Kiel*                    23          35           51          33           14           13           0         2
C. Menasha*                 16          39          155          72            6           22          26         6
C. New Holstein           353         464           467         160           89           87          41       61
Calumet County          1,631       3,454        7,789        3,762        2,304        1,385         657      931
Wisconsin             135,194 398,697          917,206      531,628     307,835      181,568      113,181  105,395
   *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are only for portion in Calumet County.
   Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-3, 2000. Only included workers age 16 and over.

  In 2000, the majority of residents in Calumet County had a travel time to work of 10 to 19
  minutes as was also the case for the State of Wisconsin as a whole. It is also worth noting that in
  some communities a significant number of individuals worked from home.

  Household Income

  The household income within an area can offer some additional insight regarding the local
  economy, types of jobs in the area, further the understanding of commuting patterns, and help
  further define the local economic base. Table 6-4 displays the 2000 household incomes for
  Calumet County and its municipalities as reported by the 2005-2009 American Community
  Survey 5-Year Estimates2000 Census.




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                                     Table 6-4
           Household Income, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 20002005-2009
                    Less than $15,000 to $25,000 to $35,000 to $50,000 to $75,000 to $100,000 to $150,000 to $200,000 Median
  Municipality      $14,999    $24,999    $34,999    $49,999    $74,999    $99,999    $149,999    $199,999     or more Income
T. Brillion                 17            18             66       120       176       104               93              0            24   $59,417
T. Brothertown              45            50             48        98       155        79              102              9             3   $55,956
T. Charlestown               9            38             21        59        74        57               24              1             6   $55,764
T. Chilton                  18            40             26        77       153       133               49             19             4   $63,618
T. Harrison                 40           198            167       293       521       747              694            201           118   $82,733
T. New Holstein             47            68             46        92       149        81               92             23             3   $61,157
T. Rantoul                  13            17             23        66        76        39               33              7             5   $58,281
T. Stockbridge             41            39               57        90       143        99              88             39            12   $60,227
T. Woodville               15            30               44        52        98        44              44             15             3   $58,359
V. Hilbert                 55            37               99       105        90        83              20              8             2   $41,964
V. Potter                   6             0                9        10        34         5               9              8             0   $55,625
V. Sherwood                47            36               49        56       175       261             266             64            48   $87,619
V. Stockbridge             12            17               13        79        71        64              43              5             2   $59,615
C. Appleton*            3,382         2,829            3,025     4,286     6,062     4,125           2,753            799           818   $51,723
C. Brillion              137           187            103          131       323       207            148               0             0   $51,948
C. Chilton               149           187            120          239       260       423             23              25            54   $53,611
C. Kaukauna*             598           692            805          841     1,469       984            649              91            32   $52,286
C. Kiel*                 274           116            194          254       338       249            138               6            15   $46,579
C. Menasha*            1,031           792          1,168          974     1,419       852            506             137            89   $42,086
C. New Holstein           57           197            319          270       462       122             59               6             0   $44,317
Calumet County         1,047         1,578          1,622        2,648     4,138     3,490          2,326             550           322   $61,655
Wisconsin            256,800       241,587        248,252      342,199   470,449   309,448        255,323          65,719        56,735   $51,569
        *Municipality crosses at least one county line, data provided are for entire municipality.
        Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
        EstimatesSTF-3, 2000.

        According to the 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates2000 Census, the
        median household income for Calumet County was $52,56961,655. This figure is somewhat
        higher than the State of Wisconsin’s median of $43,79151,569. Within Calumet County,
        municipality median household incomes ranged from a low of $38,40141,964 to a high of
        $66,09487,619.

        6.2       Economic Base Analysis

        Employment by Industrial Sector

        The employment by industry within an area illustrates the structure of the economy.
        Historically, the State of Wisconsin has had a high concentration of employment in
        manufacturing and agricultural sectors of the economy. More recent state and national trends
        indicate a decreasing concentration of employment in the manufacturing sector while


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employment within the services sector is increasing. This trend can be partly attributed to the
aging of the population and increases in technology.

Table 6-5 displays the number and percent of employed persons by industry group in Calumet
County and the State of Wisconsin for from 2005-20092000.

                               Table 6-5
   Employment by Industry, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 20002005-
                                                             Calumet County              Wisconsin
                                                                     Percent of               Percent of
                            Industry                        Number       Total        Number       Total
  Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining        852       3.5%         71,537      2.5%
  Construction                                                1,660       6.9%        180,213      6.3%
  Manufacturing                                               7,281     30.0%         543,797     18.9%
  Wholesale trade                                               940       3.9%         90,430      3.1%
  Retail trade                                                2,137       8.8%        333,950     11.6%
  Transportation and warehousing, and utilities                 978       4.0%        130,006      4.5%
  Information                                                   386       1.6%         58,303      2.0%
  Finance, insurance, real estate, and rental and leasing     1,317       5.4%        183,540      6.4%
  Professional, scientific, management, administrative,
     and waste management services                            1,464       6.0%        214,548            7.5%
  Educational, health and social services                     4,274      17.6%        620,826           21.6%
  Arts, entertainment, recreation,
     accommodation and food services                          1,659       6.8% 234,795                   8.2%
  Other services (except public administration)                 812       3.4% 114,928                   4.0%
  Public administration                                         473       2.0%    96,523                 3.4%
  Total                                                      24,233     100.0% 2,873,396               100.0%
                                                  2009
Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates
STF-3, 2000.

The greatest percentage of employment for Calumet County was in the manufacturing industry
(33.330%), followed by educational, health, and social services (15.317.6%). When compared to
the State of Wisconsin, Calumet County is very similar except for a higher concentration of
employment in manufacturing and less employment in educational, health, and social services.

Employment by Occupation

The previous section, employment by industry, described employment by the type of business or
industry, or sector of commerce. What people do, or what their occupation is within those
sectors, is displayed in Table 6-6 and also reveals factors that make up the economy of Calumet
County.




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                            Table 6-6
Employment by Occupation, Calumet County and Wisconsin, 20002005-
                                                                  Calumet County       Wisconsin
                                                                         Percent of         Percent of
                             Occupation                          Number       Total Number       Total
  Management, professional, and related occupations                8,119    33.5% 937,433      32.6%
  Service occupations                                              2,663    11.0% 456,097      15.9%
  Sales and office occupations                                     5,456    22.5% 709,379      24.7%
  Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations                         321      1.3%   28,422      1.0%
  Construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations     2,215      9.1% 243,103       8.5%
  Production, transportation, and material moving occupations      5,459    22.5% 498,962      17.4%
  Total                                                           24,233   100.0% 2,873,396   100.0%
                                                2009
   Source: U.S. Census Bureau of the Census, 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year
   EstimatesSTF-3, 2000.

Note that figures represent an employee’s occupation within an economic sector. For example,
23.722.5% of employed persons work in the sales and office occupation. However, they could
be working in sales and office occupations in the manufacturing sector, the agriculture sector, or
in retail. Figures only represent their occupation, not the overall economic industry or sector
they work in.

As indicated by Table 6-6, the occupation with the greatest percentage of employment in
Calumet County from 2005-2009for 2000 was management, professional, and related
occupations. This was closely followed by production, transportation, and material moving
occupations. The State of Wisconsin also had the greatest percentage of employment in
management, professional, and related occupations, however the second greatest portion of
employment for the state was in sales and office occupations.

Location Quotient

Location Quotient is a useful tool in looking at the composition of the area economy in
comparison with a larger area. In this case Calumet County was chosen to be compared to the
United States as opposed to the state where manufacturing, agriculture, and forest products
location quotients may be skewed due to Wisconsin’s specialization in these areas.

To interpret location quotients, the closer to one the location quotient ratio is, the closer to the
national average in that type of employment. If an area has a number greater than one, then it is
well above the national average in that industry employment and has a “niche” industry. Niche
industries are strong performers in the local economy. These industries should be focused on for
additional ways to provide growth. It is also exporting that product or service to the region or
beyond. If the location quotient is less than one then it is less than the national average in
industry employment and is only serving local demand.




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NAICS is the North American Industry Classification System. An industry classification system
is used by statistical agencies to facilitate the collection, tabulation, presentation, and analysis of
data relating to establishments. NAICS is erected on a production-oriented conceptual
framework that groups establishments into industries according to similarity in the process used
to produce goods or services. Under NAICS, an establishment is classified to one industry based
on its primary activity. NAICS was developed jointly by Canada, Mexico, and the United States
to provide comparability in economic statistics. It replaced the Standard Industrial Classification
(SIC) system in 1997.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Tthe largest location quotients in Calumet
County indicating a larger employment number than the United States is NAICS 333112, animal
production and aquaculturemachinery manufacturing, with a location quotient of 14.2915.47.
This industry includes milking dairy cattle, dairy cattle farming, milk production, calf
production, dairy heifer replacement production, etc. The next industries that could be
considered niche when compared to the nation are NAICS 333, machinery manufacturing
(11.66)This industry is represented by companies such as Ariens, Tecumseh Power, Amerequip,
and M-B Companies. The next industries that could be considered niche when compared to the
nation are NAICS 112, animal production (9.84); NAICS 311, food manufacturing (4.465.18);
and NAICS 332, fabricated metal product manufacturing (3.853.58). Activities within NAICS
112333, are represented by companies such as Ariens, Amerequip, and M-B Companiesanimal
production, include milking dairy cattle, dairy cattle farming, milk production, calf production,
dairy heifer replacement production, etc. Within NAICS 311, food manufacturing companies
such as Kaytee Products, Milk Products, Briess Industries, Thiel Cheese and Ingredients, and
Sargento Foods are representative. NAICS 332 is represented by companies such as Western
Industries, Professional Plating, and American Finishing Resources.

Those industries that are closest to one include NAICS 485, transit and ground passenger
transportation (1.75); NAICS 713, amusements, gambling and recreation (1.66); NAICS 321,
wood product manufacturing (1.58); NAICS 484, truck transportation (1.57); NAICS 447,
gasoline stations (1.45); NAICS 238, specialty trade contractors (1.29); NAICS 623, nursing and
residential care facilities (1.16); and NAICS 812, personal and laundry services (1.05).NAICS
444, building material and garden supply stores (1.78); NAICS 423, merchant wholesalers,
durable goods (1.66); NAICS 447, gasoline stations (1.47); NAICS 337, furniture and related
product manufacturing (1.34); NAICS 445, food and beverage stores (1.18); NAICS 115,
agriculture and forestry support activities (1.15); NAICS 236, construction of buildings (1.00);
NAICS 722, food services and drinking places (0.98); NAICS 441, motor vehicle and parts
dealers (0.94); and NAICS 484, truck transportation (0.93).




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Average Annual Wages

The wages that are provided by a particular industry in a particular area can offer several
insights. Higher wages within an industry, when compared to neighboring areas, can indicate a
strong economic segment. That wage can also be used to attract commuters and new residents,
which in effect will consume products in the area. Lower than average wages can also indicate a
lower quality of life in the area or a lack of qualified labor. Table 6-7 displays the annual
average wages by economic division for Calumet County in 20022011.

                                 Table 6-7
         Average Annual Wage by Industry, Calumet County, 20022011
                                                                          Annual      Percent of
                                        Econom ic Division              A verage            State
                                                                           W age        A verage
                            All industries                               $33,049            83%
                            Natural resources & m ining                  $31,951           104%
                            Construction                                 $37,588            77%
                            Manufacturing                                $45,336            90%
                            T rade, transportation, utilities            $28,903            85%
                            Financial activities                         $35,453            67%
                            Professional & business services             $42,397            91%
                            Education & health                           $31,513            74%
                            Leisure & hospitality                         $8,862            61%
                            Other services                               $14,133            62%
                            Public administration                        $34,535            83%
                         Source: Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, WORKnetBureau of Workforce
                         Information, CoveredQuarterly Census of Employment & Wages, August 20032011.

The manufacturing industry in Calumet County offers the highest average annual wage, followed
by the construction industryprofessional and business services. The natural resources industry
was the only industry in Calumet County that had an annual average wage greater than the State
of Wisconsin’s average.

Commuting Patterns

The county labor force includes all employed and unemployed residents who live in the county,
even though they may travel out of the county for work. It is important to recognize that workers
are a valuable resource that should be retained within the county to the greatest extent possible.
Table 6-8 displays the commuting patterns for Calumet County. Due to the data being
unavailable for the 2012 amendment, the chart was not updated.




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                                        Table 6-8
                         Commuting Patterns, Calumet County, 2000
                                                         Live in      Travel to
                                                Calumet County Calumet County       Net
                                Area                   Work in:          From: Commute
                      Outagamie County                    6,739          1,611   -5,128
                      Winnebago County                    3,423            570   -2,853
                      Manitowoc County                      713          1,968    1,255
                      Sheboygan County                      632            433     -199
                      Brown County                          598            467     -131
                      Fond du Lac County                    494            614      120
                      Waupaca County                         69             30      -39
                      Milwaukee County                       33             23      -10
                      Portage County                         14             22        8
                      Dodge County                           13             11       -2
                      Elsewhere                             234            163      -71
                      Work in Calumet County              8,951          8,951        0
                      Total                              21,913         14,863   -7,050
                      Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-3, 2000.

Approximately 7,000 more workers leave Calumet County for work than come to the county for
work. Calumet County loses the majority of its labor force to Outagamie County, followed by
Winnebago County. Calumet County does attract 1,255 workers from Manitowoc County.

According to the 1990 Census, of the 17,270 workers in the county at the time, approximately
9,060 worked in another county while 8,146 worked in Calumet County. Therefore, in 1990
approximately 47.2% of workers lived and worked in Calumet County and by 2000 this figure
decreased to 40.8%.

Manufacturing Industry

According to the 2005-2009 American Community 5-Year Estimates, Mmanufacturing is a large
part of the Wisconsin economy, and it is more so in Calumet County. While 22.218.9% of the
Wisconsin population is employed in the industry, the greatest percentage of employment in
Calumet County was in manufacturing (33.330.0%). SevenFour of the ten largest employers in
Calumet County are in manufacturing. The industry averages 65 jobs per establishment, which
is greater than the U.S. industry average of 39 jobs per establishment and greater than the State
of Wisconsin average of 48 jobs per establishment for the manufacturing industry.

By far the largest of those industries, in terms of employment, is the machinery manufacturing
and food manufacturing sectors. Machinery manufacturing is the largest employment industry
and makes up 13.710.9% of all the jobs in the county. This makes up 1,6441,102 employees.
The food manufacturing sector accounts for 7.37.0% of the total jobs. The Location Quotient
(LQ) section also confirms that the machinery manufacturing and food manufacturing sector are

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highly specialized industries in Calumet County and these firms produce more than they
consume. Machinery manufacturing had a LQ of 14.2911.66 and food manufacturing had a LQ
of 4.465.18.

Machinery manufacturing is the industry with the largest employment per establishment in
Calumet County, averaging 235 jobs per establishment. Machinery manufacturing, since the
year 2001, was faced with the largest loss in employment in Calumet County. The machinery
manufacturing industry has decreased the most in industrial presence in Calumet County since
2001, going from making up 21.9% of total employment in 2001 to 13.710.9% in 20052010.
Between 2001 and 2010, Tthe sector dealt with a loss of 6861228 jobs, or 29.447.3% of the
employment in the industry. This made up a total of 56.4% of all employment losses in the
county. Food manufacturing, as stated in the Employment Forecast section, is one of the
industries expected to add employment into the economy.

A partnership between the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership (WMEP), the
Wisconsin Technical College System, and the Wisconsin Department of Commerce released a
study in September of 2005 analyzing the manufacturing sector “driver industries” for
Wisconsin. The study is entitled, “The Wisconsin Manufacturing Study: An Analysis of
Manufacturing Statewide and in Wisconsin’s Seven Economic Regions.”

Driver industries are those that are heavily concentrated by numbers in a region and produce
more than can be consumed locally. Industry clusters, firms in the same industry that have close-
buy sell relationships with other industries in the region use common technologies, or share a
specialized labor pool that, together provide the driver industries a competitive advantage or the
same industries in other geographic areas, form around these driver industries. Twenty-three
driver industries were identified with seven identified for the East Central Region, which
includes Calumet County. Those industry drivers are:

         Dairy Product Manufacturing
         Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills
         Converted Paper Product Manufacturing
         Manufacturing and Reproducing Magnetic and Optical Media
         Electrical Equipment Manufacturing
         Other Electrical Equipment and Component Manufacturing
         Other Transportation Equipment Manufacturing

The driver industry that is predominant in Calumet County is Dairy Product Manufacturing. The
study lists top firms within this industry cluster that are a key component to Northeast
Wisconsin’s economy. Some of the firms listed that have a presence in Calumet County include
Land O’Lakes, Inc (Kiel); Foremost Farms USA Cooperative (Branch, Town of Chilton); Milk
Products, LLC (Chilton); Thiel Cheese & Ingredients (Town of Woodville); and Sargento Foods
(Branch, Hilbert).

This important sector, primarily the industry clusters of machinery manufacturing and food
manufacturing, should be supported to retain the existing businesses and the employment these
firms provide. The jobs contained within these sectors are some of the highest paying jobs in
Calumet County with average annual wages nearly $10,000 more than other sectors.

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Agriculture Industry

Agriculture plays a major role in economic development in Wisconsin as well as in Calumet
County. It includes hundreds of family-owned farms, related businesses and industries that
provide equipment, services and other products farmers need to process, market, and deliver food
and fiber to consumers. The production, sales, and processing of Calumet County’s farm
products generates employment, economic activity, income, and tax revenue.

Cows still outnumber residents in Calumet County. With over 230 dairy farms and several large
dairy manufacturing plants, all of which are supported by a complex infrastructure, the dairy
industry continues to be the economic mainstay of agriculture in the county. A steadily
increasing cash grain, vegetable, and horticultural industry lend diversity and economic stability.

In 20042011, the University of Wisconsin Extension, with economic supporting data from an
economist, supplied information on just how important agriculture is to the overall Calumet
County economy. Provided are some of the most notable impacts from agriculture in the county.

         Agriculture provides jobs for 2,4074,093 Calumet County residents, over 1319% of
          Calumet County’s total workforce.

         Every new job in agriculture generates an additional 0.41.08 jobs in Calumet County.

         Agriculture accounts for $338.1 million$1.17 billion in economic activity, accounting for
          about 1537% of Calumet County’s total economic activity.

         Agriculture contributes $68.5253.3 million to the county’s total income, 8.523% of the
          county’s total income. (This includes wages, salaries, benefits and profits of farmers and
          workers in agricultural-related businesses.)

         Agriculture pays about $7.223.8 million in taxes. (This figure does not include all
          property taxes paid to local schools.)

         Individuals or families own 87.386.6% of the farms in the county. Family-owned
          partnerships own 6.47.8%, family-owned corporations own 5.65.1%, and non-family
          corporations own 0.70.5%.

         Calumet County’s top commodities include milk ($51.6117.3 million), grains ($24.3
          million), cattle and calves ($13.317.5 million), grains ($11.4 million), vegetables ($1.7
          million), and nursery and greenhouse ($840,000)other animals and animal products
          ($2.79 million), and other crops and hay ($1.86 million).

As reported by the University of Wisconsin Extension, dairy is the largest part of Calumet
County’s agriculture economy. Calumet County milk producers and the dairy industry
generatescontribute $142.9124.3 million in business sales to the county’s economy. One dairy
cow generates approximately $2,1543,475 in on-farm salesdirect income to producers in


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Calumet County and about $15,00021,000 to $17,000 of economic activityin total sales at the
state level. There are currently seven plants that process diary products in Calumet County.

Horticulture is a growing industry in Calumet County. The production of landscape trees and
plants as well as landscape and grounds maintenance is rapidly growing segments of county’s
agriculture industry. Greenhouses, tree farms, nurseries, sod farms, and other horticultural
businesses add to the diversity of agriculture in the county. Horticulture generates $8.42.75
million in county economic activity, providing 178 full-time jobs and many seasonal jobs.

Tourism Industry

Tourism has the ability to play a vital role in the regional and county economy. Some businesses
can benefit highly from increased tourism. The following information was obtained from the
Wisconsin Department of Tourism regarding the Calumet County tourism industry for
20052010.

            Calumet County ranks 63rd62nd in the State (of 72 counties) for traveler spending.

            Travelers spent an estimated $3635.8 million in Calumet County in 20052010.

            Summer is the biggest season and generated traveler expenditures amounting to $1314
             million. Fall travelers spent $98.1 million, winter travelers spent $76.6 million, and
             spring visitors spent $7.1 million.

            Traveler spending in 20052010 supported 918845 full-time equivalent jobs, an increase
             decrease of 1.2% from 20042009.

            In 19941997 travelers spent $1618.8 million in Calumet County. In the year 20052010
             travelers spent $3635.8 million, representing an increase of 12291%.

It is anticipated that Calumet’s tourism industry will continue to grow significantly over the
planning period.

Agricultural Tourism

In an article provided by James Maetzold, National Alternative Enterprises and Agritourism
Leader with the USDA/NRCS, titled “Nature-Based Tourism & Agritourism Trends: Unlimited
Opportunities”, rural tourism is identified as having increased rapidly over the last two decades.
Many factors have contributed to this trend including people taking more and shorter trips, more
traveling by car, combining business travel with vacations, people looking for new experiences,
traveling as a family, and looking to “get back to their roots”. Agritourism is defined as an
alternative enterprise where you invite the public onto your farm or ranch. It can also be defined
as "a set of activities that occur when people link travel with the products, services, and
experiences of agriculture." The product itself can be an "experience." Agritourism
opportunities can fit into a number of categories:

             Farm markets and specialty products             Floriculture

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           Product processing                            Education
           Fairs, festivals, and special events          Heritage and culture
           Horses and other farm animals                 Arts and crafts
           Unique dining experiences                     Farm/ranch stays
           Wildlife and fish                             Tours and touring
           Nature based recreation                       Pick, cut, gather, or grow your own

It is anticipated that agritourism opportunities will increase in the county over the planning
period.

Major Employers

Manufacturing is a major economic sector for Calumet County as well as Wisconsin. The top 10
employers in Calumet County, according to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce
Development, are detailed below. Most of the top employers are in the manufacturing sector.

1. Payroll Alternative, Inc., temporary help services, 1,000+ employees.
2. Tecumseh Power Co., engine equipment and manufacturing, 500-999 employees.
31. Ariens Co., lawn and garden equipment manufacturing, 500-999 employees.
2. Aerotek Inc., engineering services, 500-999 employees.
43. Brillion Iron Works, Inc., iron foundry, 500-999 employees.
4. Kaytee Products, Inc., animal food manufacturing, 250-499 employees.
5. Calumet County, government services, 250-499
    employees.
6. Kaytee Products, Inc., animal food manufacturing, 250-
    499 employees.Endries International Inc., hardware
    merchant wholesalers, 250-499 employees.
7. Western Industries, Inc., metal stamping, 250-499
    employees. Walmart, discount department stores, 100-249
    employees.
8. Amerequip Corp., farm machinery and equipment
    manufacturing, 100-249 employees.
9. Buechel Stone Corp., stone mining and quarrying, 100-
    249 employees.
108. Calumet Medical Center, Inc., hospital, 100-249
    employees.
9. Chilton Public School, elementary and secondary schools,
    100-249 employees.                                           Kaytee Products, Inc.
10. School District of New Holstein, elementary and
    secondary schools, 100-249 employees.

Tax Incremental Financing Districts

Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) can help a municipality undertake a public project to stimulate
beneficial development or redevelopment that would not otherwise occur. It is a mechanism for
financing a local economic development project in underdeveloped and blighted areas. Taxes
generated by the increased property values pay for land acquisition or needed public works.

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According to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue TIF Value Limitation Report for 20052011,
the following municipalities within, or partially within, Calumet County utilize TIF districts.

         Village of Hilbert, onetwo TIFs established 1996, 2007
         Village of Sherwood, one TIF established 1992
         City of Appleton, six TIFs established in 1980, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2007,
          2009
         City of Chilton, onethree TIFs established in 1992, two in 2005
         City of Kaukauna, three TIFs established in 2000, 2003, 2006
         City of Kiel, threeone TIFs established in 1988, 1990, 1992
         City of Menasha, ten TIFs established in 1986, 1987, 1990, 1997, two in 1998, 2003, two
          in 2005, 2006, 2007
         City of New Holstein, two TIFs established in 1994, 20002007

Map 6-1 details the locations of TIF districts in Calumet County.

Industrial Parks

Due to the high level of manufacturing industries in Calumet County and surrounding areas,
having land available for industrial development is important for economic growth in this sector.
Table 6-9 displays the name and acreages of industrial parks currently found in Calumet County
as reported in 20042011.

                                                   Table 6-9
                          Industrial Parks, Calumet County, 20042011
  Municipality           # Parks        Industrial Park Name Total Acreage Acreage Available Lots
C. New Holstein             1     New Holstein TIF #1                   99                30
                                                                        99                30
C. Chilton                  1     Chilton Business Park                130                29 18
                                                                       130                29
C. Appleton                 1     Southpoint Commerce Park
                                  Phase 1                               47                17 13
                                  Phase 2                       approx. 60        approx. 60 12
                                  Phase 3                       approx. 30        approx. 30 12
                                  Industrial Area              approx. 220       approx. 220 70
                                                                       357               327
V. Hilbert                  1     Hilbert Industrial Park               13               1.5    3
                                                                        13               1.5
Totals                          4                                      599               388
Source: Calumet County Planning Department, 20042011.

In addition to those industrial parks listed in Table 6-9, the Town of Harrison and Village of
Hilbert are each in the preliminary stages of business park development.

Railroads and Economic Development


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In December 2005, Canadian National issues a letter
to rail users on its Menasha-Kiel line notifying them
that service would be reduced from five to three days
per week. Businesses who received this letter
notified various government officials in Calumet
County of their concerns about continued rail service.
Representatives from Calumet County and from the
Cities of Chilton, New Holstein, and Kiel met in
January, 2006 to form a plan of action in response to
this issue.

The plan of action included surveying businesses on
                                                             Calumet County rail service
the Menasha-Kiel line to develop a profile of existing
county rail users, to understand their current usage of rail and future usage of rail, the importance
of rail to their location in Calumet County, and the extent costs of transportation plays in their
transportation choices.

The following are some of the facts and findings from the survey showing the importance of
railroads to the economy of Calumet County.


         A total of 16 businesses were sent surveys and 11 responded.

         The 16 companies along the Menasha-Kiel line may only represent 1.7% of the total
          companies in the county, but they employ approximately 13.6% of the county’s
          workforce.

         On average respondents use truck service 63.3% of the time and rail service 36.2% of the
          time.

         Shipping solely by truck is estimated by respondents to cost 213% higher than shipping
          solely by train.

         Approximately 70% of current rail users will expand their rail service in the next five
          years.

         Of a total of ten respondents, 64% indicated that lack of rail would influence their
          decision to stay in Calumet County.




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Environmentally Contaminated Sites for Commercial or Industrial Use

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources (WDNR) urge the clean up of environmentally contaminated commercial or industrial
sites to utilize the lands for more productive uses. According to the WDNR, Calumet County
has a variety of sites that are in need of clean up or where clean up is underway.

According to the WDNR’s Bureau of Remediation and Redevelopment Tracking System there
are five types of environmentally contaminated sites in Calumet County. They are classified as
follows:

         Spills: A discharge of a hazardous substance that may adversely impact, or threaten to
          adversely impact, public health, welfare, or the environment. Spills are usually cleaned
          up quickly.

         LUST: A Leaking Underground Storage Tank that has contaminated soil and/or
          groundwater with petroleum. Some LUST cleanups are reviewed by the WDNR and
          some are reviewed by the Wisconsin Department of Commerce.

         ERP: Environmental Repair (ERP) sites are sites other than LUSTs that have
          contaminated soil and/or groundwater. Examples include industrial spills (or dumping)
          that need long term investigation, buried containers of hazardous substances, and closed
          landfills that have caused contamination. The ERP module includes petroleum
          contamination from above-ground (but not from underground) storage tanks.

         General Property: This module containing records of various milestones related to
          liability exemptions, liability clarifications, and cleanup agreements that have been
          approved by the WDNR to clarify the legal status of the property.

         VPLE: A Voluntary Property Liability Exemption (VPLE) is an elective process in which
          a property owner conducts an environmental investigation and cleanup of an entire
          property and then receives limits on future liability for that contamination under s.
          292.15, Wisconsin Statutes. An individual, business, or unit of government can receive
          the liability exemption after a completed cleanup is approved.

According to the WDNR, there is are 99one spill sites, 3122 ERP sites, 18five LUST sites,
sevenzero general property sites, and onetwo VPLE site in Calumet County. All of these sites
are identified by the DNR, Bureau of Remediation as open sites. Open sites are those still in
need of clean up or where clean up is still underway. Some of the sites identified may offer
opportunities for economic or industrial development. These sites should be examined in greater
detail to evaluate their potential.




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Map 6-1 Economic Development




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6.3       Employment Forecast

An important feature of determining the economic health and future of Calumet County and its
communities is to determine the amounts and types of jobs currently available as well as make
predictions for the future. Calumet County has economic features unique to the county yet
similarities to the region in which it is located. The county not only has ties locally, but
statewide, and nationwide. Trends that occur in the United States or internationally will affect
the State of Wisconsin and eventually trickle down to local level economies.

In AugustJuly of 20042010, the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (WDWD)
released statewide long-term (20022008 to 20122018) employment and economic projections.
Many of the projections and estimates provided will likely affect the local, or at least the
Calumet County, economy.

Wisconsin is expected to add 394,00083,670 jobs between 20022008 and 20122018, a growth of
132.7%. In addition to newly created jobs, another 706,000702,000 job openings are anticipated
due to replacement needs. In order to fill all these job openings, Wisconsin will continue to need
people with a variety of skills, interests, and educational backgrounds.

All major economic sectors are expected to add jobs,Professional and business services with
education and health services is the major economic sector expected to add the most jobs leading
the way followed by education and health servicestrade, transportation, and utilities. Although
mManufacturing has lost jobs in recent years this sector is expected to havelose about
9,00051,000 more jobs in between 2008 and 20182012 than in 2002. Manufacturing industries
projected to add the most jobs are plastics and rubber products, food, and wood products.
Manufacturing industries expected to lose the most jobs are paper, apparel, and primary metal.

The top occupations expected to have the most job openings are retail salespersons, cashiers,
waiters/waitresses, retail salespersons, customer service representatives, and food
preparation/serving workers, and registered nurses. The top occupations with anticipated losses
are secretaries (except legal/medical/executive), word processors/typists, door-to-door
sales/vendors, stock clerks/order fillers, and electrical/electronic equipment assemblers.

Northeast Wisconsin (NEW) Economic Opportunity Study
Believing that workforce development and economic development are inextricably linked, the
Fox Valley Workforce Development Board, in partnership with the Bay Area Workforce
Development Board and other agencies, commissioned an economic development study of a 16
county area in Northeast Wisconsin, including Calumet County. A significant portion of the
study focused on the future economy of northeast Wisconsin and what is needed to get there.
According to the study, in a future economy a skilled workforce is imperative. Creativity and
innovation coupled with entrepreneurship and risk capital generate high value-added products.
These products yield higher margins, better pay, and more community wealth.

Northeast Wisconsin must move to a new economy model. In order to do that, it needs to: 1)
raise the skill level of its workforce, 2) create high value-added products, 3) collaborate across
all sectors, 4) plan economic development for the region, and 5) promote an attractive image to

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retain and attract skilled workers and new economy businesses. Northeast Wisconsin needs to
build new economy industry clusters based upon the existing industry set and create new
industries in the region. The study provides further detail on the future economy for the region
and details challenges and actions to be taken.

Calumet County Business Retention and Expansion Survey

In the fall of 2004 the County Planning Department conducted a Business Retention and
Expansion Survey to collect data on existing businesses in Calumet County. There were 41
businesses surveyed in Calumet County outside of the cities and villages. Cities and villages
were to conduct the surveys themselves. There was a broad base of industries represented by the
survey including service, construction, agribusiness, sales, manufacturing, retail, and
management professional. Most of the businesses surveyed (61%) were established prior to
1980 with only seven businesses created after 1980.

The following are some of the key findings from the survey:

         The report estimated that between 2001 and 2020 a total of 35 new businesses can be
          expected to open.

         63% of businesses had purchased, built, or significantly remodeled buildings. 37%
          planned to expand within the next three years with 40% planning to expand in Calumet
          County.

         40% of businesses indicated they would be expanding their workforce over the next five
          years increasing employment by 25% percent.

         Participants were asked to characterize their business sector, as a whole, to be growing,
          stable, or in decline. Most businesses felt their sector was growing (44%) or stable
          (43%). Only 13% felt their business sector was in decline.

         Participants were then asked if they anticipated having a larger, similar, or smaller share
          of their market in the coming years. Responses were highly optimistic. Approximately
          half (51%) of respondents expected to have a larger market share, while the other half
          (49%) expected their share to remain the same. No businesses anticipate a decline in
          their market share.

         98% of survey businesses rated their community as an “Excellent” or “Good Place” to do
          business. 55% feel that climate has improved over the past three years.

         56% of surveyed businesses have used technical or applied employee training programs
          from Fox Valley Technical College, Fox Cities Workforce Development Center,
          Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership, or other institution.

         34% have used management training from Fox Valley Technical College, a University of
          Wisconsin college, Small Business Development Center, Fox Cities Chamber of
          Commerce, or other institution.

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         Employers reported the average annual employee turnover rate is 5.7% as reported by
          participating businesses, which is lower than the 20% national average and 18% Midwest
          average. 1

         52% of businesses recruit from Calumet County. An additional 28% recruit from
          Calumet County and neighboring counties to find their workforce.

Calumet County Economic Development Strategic Plan

In 2011, the Planning, Zoning and Farmland Preservation Committee approved the Calumet
County Economic Development Strategic Plan. The plan was developed in response to a
recommendation in the Calumet County Year 2025 Smart Growth Plan and to the Calumet
County Board of Supervisors Strategic Plan.

The plan will serve as a guide for economic development in Calumet County for the next five
years. It focuses on seven strategic issues: Business Retention, Expansion and Attraction;
Entrepreneur and Small Business Development; Business Cluster Development- Diverse
Agriculture; Workforce Development; Tourism; Community Development; and
Transportation/Infrastructure.

1. Business Retention, Expansion and Attraction
Business retention and expansion programs are a very important aspect of a successful
economically-sound community. Keeping up with businesses in your community is the key to
keeping them there and helping them expand. Business attraction is equally important to bring
new businesses into the county and help grow the economy or compliment other businesses.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue will be to develop a business retention and expansion
program; partner with a neighboring economic development agency to promote the county and
region; create a regional revolving loan fund with neighboring counties; create a local equity
fund to support new or expanding businesses; create an Emergency Disaster micro-loan fund;
and develop an Industrial Development Agency that will serve as a loan agency in the county.

2. Entrepreneurs and Small Business Development
Calumet County may have several large businesses that employ many people in the county, but
local economies are generally driven by small businesses and entrepreneurs. Small businesses
create local jobs, increase the local tax base and improve the quality of life for residents. Small
businesses are vital to a community’s economic health and are usually unique to the area. In
Calumet County, there are over a thousand small businesses that enhance the quality of life here.

Small businesses are typically started by entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs are individuals who are
extremely motivated and are focused people in businesses for themselves. Entrepreneurs are also
innovators who dream up new products and new ideas. Most entrepreneurs require training and
technical assistance, as well as capital, to succeed in business.

1
 U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. 2004. “Latest BLS Employee Turnover Rates.”
Nobscot Corporation website.
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Having a small business support system in place is a critical component for a community’s
economic development initiatives. Calumet County is fortunate enough to have support for small
businesses in each community. Elected officials, community development professionals and
business groups are common in the county and help promote small businesses to the best of the
capabilities through their limited resources and staff.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue is to explore the concept of a business incubator;
develop small business workshops; create a buy local program; and create a business
improvement grant program.

3. Business Cluster Development – Diverse Agriculture
Opportunity awaits Calumet County in diverse agriculture. Many businesses in the county are
already discovering that niche agribusinesses prove to be very successful when operated
correctly and proactively.

Diverse agriculture can be defined as running a business different than the traditional dairy
farming and cropping. Niche agribusinesses such as organic farming, farm petting zoos, pumpkin
patches, viticulture, fish farms, road side stands selling jams, and apple orchards are a few of the
diverse agriculture opportunities that people are seeing in Calumet County.

Calumet County has a rich, rooted history in agriculture that has been profitable for many years.
Many farmers are branching off from the traditional dairy and crop farming to hobby farming
that is turning out to be just as profitable.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue will be to study the concept of a certified Farm
Market Kitchen; conduct a cluster and supply chain development plan; secure funding for an
Agribusiness Research Park; and develop a marketing group for niche agribusiness owners.

4. Workforce Development
Workforce development is a very important aspect of economic development in every
community. A successful business will have skilled employees who can help move their business
forward. This will not only help the business, but the community as a whole.

With the support of local governments and other workforce training organizations, it is possible
to improve a business’s profitability dramatically. Programs such as lean training, specific skills
training or just improving the whole company on the basics skills will pay off in the long run.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue will be to develop a semi-annual job fair for the
county; study the future effects of the aging workforce; and work with area businesses to ensure
there is adequate affordable housing in the county for workers.

5. Tourism
Tourism is a growing sector in Calumet County as it has been steadily increasing each year.
Tourism will continue to grow as more and more people are choosing to stay closer to home
while on vacations and with more people taking “day trips” to destinations close to their homes.
Calumet County is quickly being known for our agri-tourism attractions with many tourists

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looking to “get back to the farm” and enjoy the rural atmosphere. Agri-tourism works perfectly
with Calumet County’s growing agribusiness cluster.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue will be to hire a consultant to develop a marketing
plan; coordinate promotion efforts with the Calumet County Parks Department; target tourist and
recreational businesses that could flourish in Calumet County; and increase the marketing budget
to allow for more promotion.

6. Community Development
Community development is the process or effort of building communities on a local level with
emphasis on building the economy. There are many different aspects of community development
but downtown development is a vital one.

Downtowns are a critical part of any vibrant community. An active downtown encompasses
community spirit, profitable businesses and a gathering place for all. More and more
communities are coming to the realization that a successful downtown will add a lot for
residents, visitors and business owners.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue will be to work with local Chamber of Commereces
to develop workshops and educational opportunities for businesses; and continually work with
communities on downtown development.

7. Transportation/Infrastructure
An efficient and effective transportation infrastructure is important for local communities to
sustain a successful business climate in their respective areas. Just as important is the
infrastructure that is set up to support it. Highway, rail, and air are the main types of
transportation infrastructure that serve Calumet County. A strong telecommunications
infrastructure is also important to economic development in the county. Rural businesses must
have the infrastructure to remain successful. Calumet County is fortunate to have fast wireless
broadband, various cellular phone companies with service in the area, cable and telephone. There
have been numerous entrepreneurs who have taken the initiative to bring these resources to the
county to enhance their business.

Some key initiatives for this strategic issue is to develop a group of community leaders that
follow transportation issues in the county; continuously monitor rail services; encourage road
improvements and promote the New Holstein Municipal Airport as an economic development
tool.

6.4       Economic Development Programs

The following are economic development programs, agencies, and activities that are currently in
use or available for use in Calumet County. The following can be used to gather further
information about economic development and to assist in implementation of economic
development goals.




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State Programs

Wisconsin Department of CommerceEconomic Development Corporation
The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC)Department of Commerce
(WDOC) has several grant programs and services available to communities or businesses within
communities. The federally funded Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program
can be used for housing, economic development, and public facility improvements. The
WDOCWEDC also offers many more business assistance and financing programs as well as
economic development news and statistics. For further information contact the WDOCWEDC.

USDA, Wisconsin Rural Development Programs
The Wisconsin Rural Development Program has many services that are available to rural
communities and their residents. Some programs and services available include: community
development programs, business and community programs, rural housing and utilities services,
and community facility programs. For further information contact Wisconsin Rural
Development.

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development
The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (WDWD) is a state agency charged with
building and strengthening Wisconsin's workforce in the 21st century and beyond. The
Department's primary responsibilities include providing job services, training, and employment
assistance to people looking for work, while working with employers on finding the necessary
workers to fill current job openings.

Under the WDWD umbrella, a wide variety of employment programs can be found which range
from securing jobs for the disabled, assisting former welfare recipients as they make a transition
into work, promoting 72 22 job centers, linking youth with the jobs of tomorrow, protecting and
enforcing workers’ rights, processing unemployment claims, and ensuring workers compensation
claims are paid in accordance with the law. For further information contact the DWD.

Regional Programs and Projects

Northeast Wisconsin (NEW) Economic Opportunity Study
Believing that workforce development and economic development are inextricably linked, the
Fox Valley Workforce Development Board, in partnership with the Bay Area Workforce
Development Board and other agencies, commissioned an economic development study of a 16
county area in Northeast Wisconsin, including Calumet County. The study was completed by
NorthStar Economics in October 2004. For further information contact the Fox Valley
Workforce Development Board.

New North, Inc.
In December of 2005 the New North brand was unveiled. The New North brand is designed to
showcase the regions assets and includes a total of 18 counties, including Calumet County. This
brand is a reflection of a strategic focus aimed at moving the region from the old economy to the
new economy. In addition to working together to promote and help expand existing economic
development efforts, New North, Inc. will concentrate on fostering regional collaboration,
focusing on targeted growth opportunities, supporting an entrepreneurial climate, encouraging

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educational attainment, encouraging and embracing diverse talents, and promoting the regional
brand. For further information visit the New North, Inc. web-site.

Fox Cities Economic Development Partnership
The Fox Cities Economic Development Partnership (FCEDP) is a business attraction
organization comprised of the municipalities, organizations, and utilities interested in the
economic growth of the Fox Cities area. Its mission, along with that of the Fox Cities Chamber
of Commerce and Industry, is to foster the Fox Cities' economic development by creating and
implementing marketing programs that promote the area as an attractive location for business
and industry. For further information contact the partnership.

Northeast Wisconsin Regional Economic Partnership
Calumet County is a member of the Northeast Wisconsin Regional Economic Partnership
(NEWREP). NEWREP focuses primarily on businesses engaged in research, development, or
manufacture of advanced products. It can also help knowledge-based operations or any business
that uses advanced technology production processes, systems, or equipment in traditional
manufacturing operations. NEWREP has $5 million in tax incentives available through the
Wisconsin Department of Commerce Technology Zone Program to help stimulate the
development of technology-based infrastructure and increase venture financing for companies.
There are many other financial programs available. For further information contact the
Wisconsin Department of Commerce or visit the NEWREP web-site.

Economic Development Strategy
The Fox Cities Economic Development Partnership applied for a Wisconsin Department of
Commerce community block grant to engage in an economic development feasibility study that
included research on the potential for a regional business park. Calumet County applied for the
funding on behalf of the collaborative partners, and was granted $475,000 for phase one of a
three-phase study.

The strategy is being prepared by S.B. Friedman & Company with coordination from the
counties involved, the Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and Industry (FCCCI), and the Fox
Cities Economic Development Partnership (FCEDP). The first phase of the study has been
completed. For further information contact any of the groups involved.

Ignite Fox Cities: A Blueprint for Economic Prosperity
The Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and Industry, along with Garner Economics, LLC,
developed a report and recommendations for the Fox Cities region. This economic development
strategy will position the Fox Cities region to become a strong economic development region
that will grow and prosper.

Northeast Wisconsin Global Trade Strategy
The Bay Lake Regional Planning Commission and East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning
Commission, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic Development
Administration, is creating a global strategy for businesses in Northeast Wisconsin that will
identify specific industry clusters who would benefit from exporting to specific counties.

Lakeshore Industry Cluster

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This project has developed to maximize business development opportunities in the Lakeshore
region through the implementation of an Industry Cluster Initiative, engaging area industries in
the process, to more fully understand the flow of goods and service, barriers to business, assets to
be leveraged, workforce development needs and other issues and opportunities that can lead to
industry growth and employment. The Industry Cluster Initiative in the Lake Shore Sub Region
of The New North, consists of the counties of Manitowoc, Calumet, Kewaunee, Sheboygan and
Door. Four Industry Clusters have been identified to be part of the Initiative – Manufacturing,
Energy, Tourism and Food (Agriculture).


Ecosystem Services Valuation
Ecosystem Services Valuation, Practical Applications for Fox-Wolf Basin Ecosystems Report,
by the Fox Wolf Watershed Alliance, in conjunction with the Department of Natural Resources
and area partners, looks at specific ecosystem services, such as fishing and tourism, and
evaluates the effect of water quality on the economics of those services. This project has an
anticipated completion date of summer 2006.

Assessing Telecommunication Infrastructure in Northeast Wisconsin
In 2006 the Bay Lake Regional Planning Commission and East Central Regional Planning
Commission were funded to complete a study of an 18 county region for telecommunication
infrastructure. The study is designed to identify the gaps where technology infrastructure is
unavailable or insufficient to support the needs of current and future companies. The study will
identify providers of telecommunications, map these resources, identify local services and
pricing, assess the competitive environment and customer satisfaction, and provide comparative
analysis. For further information either planning commission can be contacted.

County Programs

Calumet County Planning, Zoning, and Land Information Office
The Calumet County Planning, Zoning, and Land Information Office serves as a clearinghouse
for tourism information and maps. The Department hosts the county tourism website,
www.travelcalumet.com; does various activities to attract visitors to the county; and also assists
communities with miscellaneous tourism related events. The Department also has an economic
development specialist available. The Department also works on regional tourism projects
through the International Trade, Business, and Economic Development Council (ITBEC). That
Council promotes regional partnerships and promotions with member counties. Currently
Calumet, Fond du Lac, Kewaunee, and Winnebago Counties are members of the East Central
Wisconsin ITBEC.

Calumet County Business Revolving Loan Fund Program
Calumet County, through its partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Commerce,
administers a Business Revolving Loan Fund Program. This business loan program is designed
to create new employment, retain and expand existing businesses, and provide business loans on
a companion basis with other financing resources such as public sector loans or other
government loan programs. Eligible activities include acquisition of land, buildings, machinery
and fixed equipment, site preparation and installation of equipment, construction, expansion,
rehab or removal of existing buildings, and working capital (inventory and direct labor costs

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only). For more information on this program contact the Calumet County Planning, Zoning, and
Land Information Office.

Calumet County Tourism Association
The mission of the Calumet County Tourism Association (CCTA) is to promote Calumet County
as a tourist destination by increasing public awareness, thus helping improve the county’s
economic environment. CCTA is a volunteer group that is funded through membership dues and
is responsible for such items as the annual visitor’s guide.

Calumet County Economic Development Organizations
There is a lack of a formal countywide economic development organization in Calumet County.
The ad hoc Calumet County Economic Development Group has been meeting as a group since
2001; however, this group is an informal roundtable whose purpose is communication and
education. Many in the group have cited the improvement in communication throughout the
county, but a more proactive stance has not been undertaken by the group.

There are nine business association groups that are represented in the county.

         Brillion Chamber of Commerce
         Chilton Chamber of Commerce
         Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and Industry
         Fox Cities Visitor and Convention Bureau
         Heart of the Valley Chamber of Commerce
         Kiel Area Association of Commerce
         New Holstein Chamber of Commerce
         New Holstein Economic Development Corporation
         Stockbridge Area Business Association

The largest of the group by membership and budget is the Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and
Industry with over 3,0001,300 business members. The Fox Cities Chamber comprises of the
Cities of Appleton, Kaukauna, Menasha, and Neenah; the Villages of Hortonville, Kimberly,
Sherwood, and Little Chute; and, the Towns of Clayton, Grand Chute, Harrison, Greenville, and
Menasha. It offers its members research, survey and demographic data, site selection and
development assistance, legislative development, professional development, recognition
programs, worker recruitment, training and educational resources, business attraction and
retention services, and networking opportunities. In Calumet County, they serve only the Cities
of Appleton and Menasha, the Village of Sherwood, and the Town of Harrison.

The next largest is the Heart of the Valley Chamber. The Heart of the Valley Chamber serves
the communities of Combined Locks, Darboy, Dundas, Freedom, Forest Junction, Greenleaf,
Hollandtown, Kaukauna, Kimberly, Little Chute, Sherwood, and Wrightstown. It offers
networking opportunities and social outings, marketing, business referrals, newsletters,
promotions, ribbon cuttings, business awards, sponsorships, health insurance, cell phone service,
legislative development, and educational programs. Of these communities, those in Calumet
County are Darboy, Dundas, Forest Junction and Sherwood.

The next group of chambers, Brillion, Chilton, New Holstein, and Kiel, are all about the same

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size and offer about the same membership benefits. The membership benefits offered are a
group health insurance rate and opportunities for marketing, promotion, social events, and
available property listings. The New Holstein Economic Development Corporation is a group
that was formed to help industrial development in the city. The Stockbridge Area Business
Association is not set up as a chamber, but as an association of businesses seeking to better
market and promote the Stockbridge area.

6.5       Economic Development Trends and Outlook

The following are anticipated trends for Calumet County with regard to economic development
for the planning period.

         Calumet County’s tourism industry will continue to grow substantially and will become a
          more dominant sector of the overall county economy.

         The manufacturing and agriculture industry will continue to be a major sector of the
          Calumet County economy.

         Increasing farm sizes and opportunities for niche markets such as organic farming will
          continue to change the agriculture industry in Calumet County.

         Calumet County will continue to be an attractive location to live, however commuting out
          of the county for work will continue at a high rate.

         The aging of the workforce will slowly change and drive the need for new workers.

         The demand for service industries will increase to deal with the changing population.

         Local municipalities will become increasingly competitive to secure new business and
          industry in order to increase tax revenues.




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7.        Intergovernmental Cooperation
In general terms, intergovernmental cooperation is any arrangement by which officials of two or
more jurisdictions coordinate plans, policies, and programs to address and resolve issues of
mutual interest. It can be as simple as communicating and sharing information, or it can involve
entering into formal intergovernmental agreements and sharing resources such as equipment,
buildings, staff, and revenue. It can even involve consolidating services, jurisdictions, or
transferring territory.

Many issues cross jurisdictional boundaries, affecting more than one community. For example,
air, water, and wildlife pass over the landscape regardless of boundaries so that one jurisdiction’s
activities with regard to air, water, and wildlife impact other jurisdictions downwind or
downstream.

Today, increased communication technologies and personal mobility mean that people, money,
and resources also move across jurisdictions, as quickly and freely as air and water. Persons
traveling along roadways use a network of transportation routes, moving between jurisdictions
without even realizing it.

Frequently, the action of one governmental unit impacts others. Increasingly, we have come to
the realization that many vital issues are regional in nature. Watersheds, economic conditions,
commuter patterns, housing, media markets, and effects from growth and change are all issues
that spill over municipal boundaries and impact the region as a whole. Communities are not
islands. For example, the health of the cities of Calumet County and the health of Calumet
County as a whole are interconnected.

Wisconsin has over 2,500 units of                 Calumet County Intergovernmental
government and special purpose districts          Coordination
defined as follows:
                                                  Calumet County has 3536 units of government
         72 counties                             and special purpose districts.
         190 cities
         395404 villages                               67 Cities
         1,2651,257 towns                              9 Towns
         426443 school districts                       4 Villages
         16 technical college districts                11 School Districts
         Sanitary districts, drainage                  4 Sanitary Districts
          districts, lake protection districts,         1 Lake Protection District
          metropolitan sewage districts, etc.
                                                  ThreeFour of Calumet County’s cities,
                           th
Wisconsin ranks 13 nationwide in total            Appleton, Kaukauna, Kiel and Menasha, and
number of governmental units and third            Kiel, each partially lie in twomultiple counties.
nationwide in governmental units per
capita. Calumet County is home to 3536 different units of government or special purpose
districts. ThreeFour of Calumet County’s cities each have portions in other counties. Having so
many governmental units allows for very local representation and means that Wisconsin and

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county residents have numerous opportunities to participate in local decision-making. However,
the sheer number of governmental units with overlapping decision-making authority presents
challenges. More governmental units can make communication, coordination, and effective
action more difficult, creating a greater potential for conflict. Instead of communicating ideas
within one jurisdiction, communication needs to move across multiple jurisdictions and involve
multiple boards, commissions, committees, executives, administrators, and citizens. Goals
between communities may differ and present challenges. More governmental units may also
mean unwanted and wasteful duplication in the delivery of community services. Cooperation
can help avoid this.

Intergovernmental Cooperation Benefits

There are many reasons intergovernmental cooperation makes sense. The following are some
examples:

         Cost savings – Cooperation can save money by increasing efficiency and avoiding
          unnecessary duplication. Cooperation can enable some communities to provide their
          residents with services that would otherwise be too costly.

         Address regional issues – By communicating and coordinating their actions, and working
          with regional and state jurisdictions, local communities are able to address and resolve
          issues which are regional in nature.

         Early identification of issues – Cooperation enables jurisdictions to identify and resolve
          potential conflicts at an early stage, before affected interests have established rigid
          positions, before the political stakes have been raised, and before issues have become
          conflicts or crises.

         Reduced litigation – Communities that cooperate are able to resolve issues before they
          become mired in litigation. Reducing the possibility of costly litigation can save a
          community money, as well as the disappointment and frustration of unwanted outcomes.

         Consistency – Cooperation can lead to consistency of the goals, objectives, plans,
          policies, and actions of neighboring communities and other jurisdictions.

         Predictability – Jurisdictions that cooperate provide greater predictability to residents,
          developers, businesses, and others. Lack of predictability can result in lost time, money,
          and opportunity.

         Understanding – As jurisdictions communicate and collaborate on issues of mutual
          interest, they become more aware of one another’s needs and priorities. They can better
          anticipate problems and work to avoid them.

         Trust – Cooperation can lead to positive experiences and results that build trust between
          jurisdictions.



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         History of success – When jurisdictions cooperate successfully in one area, the success
          creates positive feelings and an expectation that other intergovernmental issues can be
          resolved as well.

         Service to citizens – The biggest beneficiaries of intergovernmental cooperation are
          citizens for whom government was created in the first place. They may not understand,
          or even care about, the intricacies of a particular intergovernmental issue, but all
          Wisconsin residents can appreciate their benefits, such as costs savings, provision of
          needed services, a healthy environment, and a strong economy.

This element will contain information regarding existing plans or agreements between Calumet
County, its municipalities, and other jurisdictions. In addition, the element identifies existing or
potential conflicts, as well as processes to resolve such conflicts relative to cooperative planning
and decision making between the county, municipalities, and other governmental units. The
following sections also demonstrate instances of existing cooperative situations and delineate
new opportunities for communities to explore.

7.1       Multi-Jurisdictional Plan Building Process

In order to facilitate meaningful
                                                Geographical Complexities of
opportunities for intergovernmental
cooperation, the Calumet County                 Planning
ComprehensiveSmart Growth Plan and 13
local plans were partially built utilizing      The location of municipal boundaries
coordinated approach to plan                    significantly complicates the plan development
development. The county was responsible         process as multiple units of government have
for all mapping and GIS data development        vastly different ways of providing public
for all communities in the county, not just     services and facilitating growth management
those communities participating in the          administration. However, multi-jurisdictional
plan development process. The level of          planning also promotes coordinated regional
effort in data coordination to enable the       geographic information systems development,
mapping products was a large and                promotes inter-municipal coordination of data
significant effort that involved all            and ideas, facilitates cooperative discussion of
communities in Calumet County. The              land use, growth regulation, and shared
data collection and mapping project also        services, and promotes efficiency in plan
involved Winnebago, Outagamie, and              development and implementation.
Manitowoc Counties as county
jurisdictional boundaries are crossed with local municipal growth.

In terms of actual plan development, all communities in Calumet County were represented
through the Calumet County Advisory Committee (CAC) which consisted of at least two
representatives from the Calumet County Planning and Zoning Committee, one representative
and an alternate from each of the Planning Commissions of all Calumet County communities,
and two citizens appointed by the County Board Chairperson. This Committee’s main
responsibility was to develop the county plan and provide the framework (goals, objectives,
policies, and recommendations) for both the county and for the local participating communities.


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The CAC was in charge of developing county plan recommendations in conjunction with
coordinated land use and regulatory policy as administered both at the local and county level.

Incorporated community comprehensive plans are part of the county plan. However, a city or
village plan is adopted separately and has autonomous authority for regulation and
administration within its respective border.

7.2       Status of Planning in Neighboring Counties and Communities

Brown County
                                               Calumet County Proximity
Calumet County shares a portion
of its northern border with
Brown County, specifically the
Town of Holland.

The Brown County Planning
Commission has completed a
recommended draft of the Brown
County Smart Growth Plan. The
existing Brown County
Comprehensive PlanYear 2020
Land Use and Transportation
Plan was adopted by the Brown
County Planning Commission in
19962004 and was not in
compliance with the new
Wisconsin Statutes for
comprehensive plans. The
update process was initiated in
May of 2002 and completed in
October 2004. The plan is titled
Brown County Smart Growth
Plan - Vision for Great
Communities. The Town of
Holland adopted the Town of
Holland Comprehensive Plan in
April 2005.

Manitowoc County

Manitowoc County shares its border with the entire eastern Calumet County border. Manitowoc
County communities sharing a border with Calumet include the Towns of Maple Grove,
Rockland, Eaton, and Schleswig, and the City of Kiel.

At the writing of this report, Manitowoc County adopted the Manitowoc County 20-Year
Comprehensive Plan in December 2009has not initiated a planning process for a Smart Growth

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compliant plan. The City of Kiel completed a compliant plan in 2002. The Town of Maple
Grove’s comprehensive plan was adopted in November 2009, the Towns of Rockland and
Schleswig adopted their plans in September 2009, and the Town of Eaton’s plan was adopted in
October 2009No other communities sharing a border with Calumet County have completed
comprehensive plans.

Sheboygan County

Sheboygan County is located south of Calumet County. A small portion of Sheboygan’s
northern border, particularly the Town of Russell, shares its border with Calumet County.

Sheboygan County adopted its comprehensive plan, “Common Vision: Sheboygan County
Comprehensive Land Use Plan 2010-2030,” in December 2009is in the pre-development stages
of completing a comprehensive plan. The Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources chapter
has been completed. The county is working with local municipalities to complete their plans.
Approximately five municipalities should have plans done within a year and three other plans are
currently in progress. Several communities have also completed plans and some are just starting
the process. The county will incorporate these local plans into a county level plan. It is
anticipated that county level planning efforts will increase in 2007. The Town of Russell’s
comprehensive plan was adopted has not yet completed a comprehensive planin July 2008.

Fond du Lac County

Fond du Lac County is located south of Calumet County. The Town of Calumet is the only Fond
du Lac community sharing a border with Calumet County.

To date, Fond du Lac County and the Town of Calumet havehas not completed a Smart Growth
compliant comprehensive plan. The Town of Calumet has submitted their plan to the state for
review and approval.

Winnebago County

Winnebago County is located to the west of Calumet County; however, only a small portion of
their northern borders are shared due to the location of Lake Winnebago which makes up the
majority of each counties respective western and eastern border. Although a majority of Menasha
is located in Winnebago County, there are approximately 9801014 acres (2619% of the total city
land area) located in Calumet County. Menasha is participateding in the Calumet County Smart
GrowthComprehensive Plan and adopted the City of Menasha Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan in
August 2008to update the city’s previous comprehensive plan.

Winnebago County adopted a comprehensive plan in March of 2006.

Outagamie County

Outagamie County is located to the north of Calumet County. Outagamie County communities
sharing borders with Calumet County include the City of Appleton, City of Kaukauna, and the
Town of Buchanan. Similar to Menasha in Winnebago County, The City of Appleton occupies

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2,061 acres (0.81% of Calumet County’s total land area). Appleton completed a comprehensive
plan in 1996March 2010.

The Outagamie County Planning Department has initiated cComprehensive pPlanning efforts
for the countywide plan was adopted in March 2008..

7.3       Existing Intergovernmental Relationships

There are a total of 15 fire departments,
                                               Local Cooperative Assistance
eight first responder departments, and four
ambulance providers serving Calumet            Mutual aid agreements exist between
County. The majority of these departments      communities throughout the county to address
serve more than one community and has          police, fire, and ambulance services. Mutual aid
service areas which cross municipal            agreements allow communities to share
borders, and some cross county borders.        equipment and resources in the event of need.
The service area boundaries of most of         Various informal and formal agreements also
these services are based more on need and      exist between communities throughout the
development patterns rather than on            county to address sharing services and facilities
municipal boundaries. The coordination         such as parks, public works equipment, road
and provision of these services are based on   maintenance, and snowplowing.
a variety of different intergovernmental
agreements.

The following is an inventory and description of intergovernmental agreements and service
relationships that affect communities in Calumet County beyond the standard agreements for
mutual aid. Most of the background information and relative information to the service
provisions are discussed in Chapter 4, Utilities and Community Facilities.

Utilities and Community Facilities

Police Protection
The Calumet County Sheriff’s Department provides law enforcement services to all towns and
villages in Calumet County. The Town of Harrison has contracted with the Calumet County
Sheriff’s Department for an additional forty hours of service per week beyond the standard
protection allocation provided by the Sheriff’s Department. The Villages of Hilbert and
Stockbridge contract for an additional 10 hours and seven hours, respectively. These contractual
arrangements have been ongoing for several years.

The Calumet County Sheriff’s Department is also a member of the Lake Winnebago Area
(MEG) Metropolitan Enforcement Group Unit, a four county drug enforcement unit. The
Department also coordinates with Outagamie, Brown, and Winnebago Counties on the
FoxComm project. This project involves linking 33 Law Enforcement Agencies, 72 Fire
Districts, and 33 EMS Districts together with one common Computer-Aided Dispatch System
(CAD).

The Chilton Police Department has also signed an agreement with the county to intermittently
use the county gas pump at the County Highway Garage in Chilton. This saves the City of
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Chilton money and also provides the county an additional police presence at the Highway
Garage, particularly at night.

Fire Protection and Emergency Services
Fire protection services as well as ambulance and first responder services in Calumet County
extensively utilize intergovernmental provision of service. Provider service areas are generally
not based on municipal boundaries, but on where services are needed. Many providers have
service contracts with multiple municipalities. Refer to Map 4-2 in the Utilities and Community
Facilities Chapter for fire protection and emergency service provider service area boundaries.

Stormwater Management
The Village of Combined Locks and Buchanan in Outagamie County and the Town of Harrison
in Calumet County cooperated to create the Garner’s Creek Stormwater Utility in October of
1998. The utility was formed to address frequent stormwater problems in the village and town
and helped avoid litigation between these communities.

Public Sewer
The Heart of the Valley Metropolitan Sewerage District was established in 1974 to treat
wastewater from the City of Kaukauna, the Villages of Little Chute, Kimberly, and Combined
Locks, and the Darboy Sanitary District. The Darboy Sanitary District serves the north central
portion of the Town of Harrison.

A gravity flow interceptor sewer line extends generally from south to north with a major sewer
line under the Fox River, through Little Chute and Kaukauna to the Heart of the Valley
Treatment Plant. Darboy’s main interceptor sewer extends to a metering system in Combined
Locks where the wastewater is discharged to the major sewer line under the Fox River. Most of
the major trunk mains (larger than an 8” line) in the Darboy system are in the Town of Buchanan
in Outagamie County.

The Waverly Sanitary District is located in the northwestern portion of the Town of Harrison.
The district boundaries run along the north shoreline of Lake Winnebago to Oneida Street, then
north to the Appleton corporate limits, serving areas of Menasha and Appleton. Waverly’s
system connects with the Town of Menasha Utility District at the Brighton-Beach lift station,
where the wastewater is discharged to the Neenah-Menasha Sewerage Commission system.

In spring of 2006 the Village of Stockbridge and the Town of Stockbridge began meetingmet to
determine if it was feasible to extend sewer service from the village into the town. The matter is
being researched. The two municipalities have planned held a public informational meeting
regarding the matter in Junefor summer of 2006. It was recently determined by the town to no
longer pursue the sewer extension at this time. The Village of Stockbridge did not feel it was in
their best interest to extend sewer and promote development in the town when so much
developable land is available in the village and because the long-term availability of potable
water from the village wells is currently unknown. However, the village would be willing to
entertain requests for wastewater conveyance for private septic system problems. Also, several
of the residents that were to be part of the proposed sanitary district were not in support of the
project. The county encourages that the two communities continue to communicate on this
matter in case the need to extend sewer arises in the future.

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In the Town of Brothertown there is some sewer along the lakeshore at the far southern end of
the town. This service is extended from Fond du Lac County.

Public Water
In 2003, the Darboy Sanitary District contracted with the Village of Kimberly for up to 1,100
gallons of water per minute to assure a future water supply for the District. This water supply
will support the District’s ultimate growth boundary without any expansion to the District’s
system.

The water for the Waverly Sanitary District is purchased from the Town of Menasha Utility
District and the City of Appleton. The Waverly Sanitary District is in the process of converting
to the City of Appleton as the primary water supplier. The Waverly Sanitary District serves
portions of the Town of Harrison and the City of Menasha through inter-municipal agreements.

School Districts
At a Municipal Leaders Meeting held in 2005, opportunities for developing relationships
between school districts and local governments were discussed. Suggested opportunities include
the following.

         Shared insurance pool for health, life, etc.
         Coordination with police departments and police school liaisons.
         Snowplowing coordination.
         Coordination of maintenance shop services.
         Shared equipment purchases.
         Coordination on paving.
         Cooperative agreements on the use of recreational facilities or meeting rooms.
         Cooperation on training of staff.

The City of New Holstein and the New Holstein School District have worked together to
purchase a lawn aerator. The City of Appleton and Appleton School District have also worked
together on many issues including liaison officers, equipment sharing, utilization of facilities,
land purchases, joint training, and joint purchasing.

East Shore Recycling Commission
The East Shore Recycling Commission was started in 1994. Member communities include the
Cities of Brillion, Chilton, Kiel, and New Holstein and the Villages of Hilbert, Potter, and
Sherwood, and the Towns of Brillion, Brothertown, Calumet (Fond du Lac County),
Charlestown, New Holstein, and Rantoul, and Woodville. Communities work together to jointly
negotiate recycling collection and processing contracts with private providers. By working
together these municipalities feel they are offered a better rate on recycling services from
providers. The existing processing and marketing contract for these services will expire in
20072013. The Commission is run with established bylaws and a board which meets as needed.
The Commission has also more recently begun working on recycling education through funds
offered by a grant program at the WDNR.



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Boundary Agreements

In addition to the agreements listed below, the City of Menasha and City of Appleton also have a
boundary agreement.

Town of Harrison and City of Appleton
The Town of Harrison and the City of Appleton have established an inter-municipal agreement
under Wisconsin Statutes 66.30 and 66.027. The agreement allows the communities to do the
following:

         Establish fixed boundaries;
         Facilitate orderly development in the town and the city;
         Eliminate current litigation and avoid future litigation;
         Provide for cost effective governmental services to the citizens of the town and the city;
          and
         Promote harmony between the two municipalities.

Within the agreement, the city agrees not to annex any territory east of Coop Road and South of
Manitowoc Road for a period of 50 years. The town agrees to not contest any annexation of
property within the territory west of Coop Road and North of Manitowoc Road. The agreement
also details information on property owner involvement, use of referendums, sanitary service,
financing, and additional timeframes with regard to possible future annexations. The agreement
was put into effect in 1999 and is applicable for 50 years.

Town of Harrison, City of Menasha, and the Waverly Sanitary District
The Town of Harrison, City of Menasha, and the Waverly Sanitary District have established an
inter-municipal agreement under Wisconsin Statutes 66.027, 66.30, and 66.028. A boundary is
established under the agreement in which city may annex without town objection. This area is
known as the city growth area. Territory is also established as a town growth area in which the
city shall not accept any petition for annexation. The town growth area is generally described as
territory east of Lake Park Road. The agreement also details zoning, building permit,
construction, and sewer service requirements for both the town and city growth areas. The
agreement was established in 1999.

City of Chilton, Town of Chilton, Town of Charlestown, and Calumet County
The City of Chilton, Town of Chilton, Town of Charlestown, and Calumet County have
established an intergovernmental agreement under Wisconsin Statutes 66.0301. The agreement
was established for the following primary purposes:

         Provide a mechanism and forum to discuss and plan for the orderly development and
          boundary issues of territory adjacent the city, approximately 1.5 miles beyond the city
          boundary, into the towns. Area is described as the growth area.

         Provide appropriate and cost effective services in the growth area.

         Include the county and representative in zoning of the growth area.


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         Control urban sprawl by preventing unplanned development and protecting natural
          resources.

         Promote and jointly plan highway improvements.

         Provide for land disposal of bio-solids from the city’s sewage treatment plant in the
          towns and provide for town cooperation with the city in developing and drilling new
          municipal wells.

The agreement details zoning, sanitary, annexation, and general planning issues in the growth
area and establishes a Joint Planning Committee. The city and tTown of Charlestown agree to
share financial and maintenance responsibility for specific roads in the growth area. The towns
agrees to permit land disposal of bio-solids in accordance with DNR rules and will not object to
the city locating additional wells in the towns. Any new development in the growth area will
require municipal services and therefore annexation to the city. The agreement went into effect
in 2001, renewed in 2007, and has a term of five years, 10 years for water and sewer service, and
shall be renewed by agreement between the city, town, and county.

County Transportation Services

The Calumet County Highway Department provides a variety of services to municipalities in
Calumet County. Typical services that are contracted from the department by municipalities
include paving, signing and pavement marking, snow and ice control, sweeping, drainage
improvements, patching, and a variety of other maintenance and construction services. The
Calumet County Highway Department also provides services to other county departments
including the courthouse, sheriff’s department, and to county parks.

Another example of transportation services and intergovernmental cooperation involves the CTH
KK area. In an effort to relieve congestion in the CTH KK/Coop Road area, Calumet County
entered into an agreement spring of 2005 with the City of Appleton which specifies the county
would pay Appleton to construct that portion of Midway Road between Coop Road and
Eisenhower Drive, and, Appleton agreed to install that portion of Eisenhower Drive between
County Highway KK and Midway Road. Construction was completed in 2006should occur in
2006.

County Health Related Services

Providing public health, hospice, and home health care services and assistance are is a services
typically provided by counties. The Calumet County Health and Human Services Department
provides thesethis services to county residents in addition to home health care and hospice
services. , but tThe department also performs some intergovernmental functions. For example,
the department has a memorandum of understanding with the City of Appleton to provide
additional follow up for newborns needing Bright Futures services. By state statute the
department can also provide mutual aid to other public heath department members in our
surrounding area in a health related emergency. In addition, Calumet County Public Health
partners with neighboring health departments as part of the Fox Cities Healthcare Partnership to
work on health care priorities in our region. The department is in multiple collaborative efforts

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with other local health departments as well as other agencies. members of the area bioterrorism
consortium in a health related emergency. Members of the consortium include the Cities of
Menasha, Appleton, Neenah, Oshkosh and Counties of Winnebago, Green Lake, Waushara, and
Outagamie. The Calumet County Health Department also partners with neighboring county
health departments, the Fox Cities Health Care Consortium, to work on health priorities in the
region.

In 2006 the Calumet County Medical Examiner began an agreement with Fond du Lac County to
provide autopsy services when needed, approximately 13-14 procedures per year. This work had
formerly been completed in Milwaukee. Several other counties are exploring the idea of a
consortium with Fond du Lac County for these services.

7.4       Wisconsin Intergovernmental Agreement Statutes

The following state statutes allow for or relate to intergovernmental cooperation in Wisconsin.

66.0301 - Intergovernmental Cooperation

Wisconsin Statute, 66.0301 permits local agreements between the state, cities, villages, towns,
counties, regional planning commissions, and certain special districts, including school districts,
public library systems, public inland lake protection and rehabilitation districts, sanitary districts,
farm drainage districts, metropolitan sewerage districts, and sewer utility districts, Indian tribes
or bands, and others.

Intergovernmental agreements prepared in accordance with s. 66.0301, formerly s. 66.30, are the
most common form of agreement and have been used by communities for years, often in the
context of sharing public services such as police, fire, or rescue. This type of agreement can also
be used to provide for revenue sharing, determine future land use within a subject area, and to set
temporary municipal boundaries. However, the statute does not require planning as a component
of any agreement and boundary changes have to be accomplished through the normal annexation
process.

66.0307 - Boundary Changes Pursuant to Approved Cooperative Plan

Under Section 66.0307, Wisconsin Statutes, combinations of municipalities may prepare
cooperative boundary plans or agreements. Each city, village, or town that intends to participate
in the preparation of a cooperative plan must adopt a resolution authorizing its participation in
the planning process.

Cooperative boundary plans or agreements involve decisions regarding the maintenance or
change of municipal boundaries for a period of 10 years or more. The cooperative plan must
include a plan for the physical development of the territory covered by the plan; a schedule for
changes to the boundary; plans for the delivery of services; an evaluation of environmental
features and a description of any adverse environmental consequences that may result from the
implementation of the plan; and address the need for safe and affordable housing. The
participating communities to the plan must hold a public hearing prior to its adoption. Once


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adopted, the plan must be submitted to the Wisconsin Department of Commerce for state
approval. Upon approval, the cooperative plan has the force and effect of a contract.

66.0309 Creation, Organization, Powers and Duties of Regional Planning Commissions.

Wisconsin Statute 66.0309 permits local governments to petition the governor to create a
regional planning commission (RPC). If local support for a commission is unanimous, the
governor may create it by executive order. The governor may also create a commission if local
governments representing over 50% of the population or assessed valuation of the proposed
region consent to the creation. Commission members are appointed by either local governments
or the governor.

State Statutes require the RPC to perform three major functions:

         Make and adopt a master plan for the physical development of the region.

         If requested by a local unit, report recommendations to that local unit on the location of
          or acquisition of land for any of the items or facilities which are included in the adopted
          regional master plan.

         Make an annual report of its activities to the legislative bodies of the local governmental
          units within the region.

RPC’s are also authorized to perform several other functions, however, by law; they serve a
strictly advisory role. The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission serves the
Counties of Calumet, Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Marquette, Menominee, Outagamie, Shawano,
Waupaca, Waushara and Winnebago. All of Calumet County and its municipalities are served
by the Commission except for the City of Kiel which is served by the Bay-Lake Regional
Planning Commission.

Extraterritorial Plat Review and Zoning

Cities and villages that have adopted a subdivision ordinance or official map can exercise
extraterritorial plat approval jurisdiction for three miles beyond the corporate limits of a first,
second, or third class city and one and one-half miles beyond the limits of a fourth class city or
village. Specifics relative to Extraterritorial Plat Review can be found under Wis. Stats.
S.236.02(5). Classes of municipalities are based on population, but a municipality does not
move up a class until it takes action to do so. Based on 2005 population estimates, aAll
municipalities in Calumet County are fourth class cities except for the Cityies of Kaukauna and
Menasha which isare a third class cityies and the City of Appleton which is a second class city.

Any city of village that has a plan commission may exercise extraterritorial zoning power in the
unincorporated areas surrounding the city or village. The extraterritorial zoning power may be
exercised in the unincorporated areas located within three miles of the corporate limits of a first,
second or third class city, or within one and one-half miles of a fourth class city or village.
Extraterritorial zoning may be initiated by a city or village adopting a resolution and providing
notice of the extraterritorial area to be zoned. The city or village may unilaterally adopt an

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interim zoning ordinance to preserve existing zones or uses for up to two years while a
comprehensive zoning plan is being prepared. A joint committee, consisting of three city or
village plan commission members and three town members must approve of the plan and
regulations by majority vote. Extraterritorial zoning is not commonly used in the State of
Wisconsin.

Annexation

Wisconsin Statute, 66.021, Annexation of Territory, provides three petition methods by which
annexation may occur. Annexation involves the transfer of one or more tax parcels from a town
to a city or village. Cities and villages cannot annex property without the consent of landowners
as required by the following petition procedures:

1.    Unanimous Approval - A petition is signed by all of the electors residing in the territory and
      the owners of all of the real property included within the petition.

2.    Notice of intent to circulate petition (direct petition for annexation) - The petition must be
      signed by a majority of electors in the territory and the owners of one-half of the real
      property either in value or in land area. If no electors reside in the territory, then only the
      landowners need sign the petition.

Annexation by referendum - A petition requesting a referendum election on the question of
annexation may be filed with the city or village when signed by at least 20 percent of the electors
in the territory. Calumet County cities and villages have grown and will likely continue to grow
through the use of annexation.

7.5       Intergovernmental Plans and Programs Currently in Use

The following programs and agencies, which involve intergovernmental relations, are utilized in
Calumet County.

State Programs

Wisconsin Towns Association (WTA)
Wisconsin Towns Association (WTA) is a non-profit, non-partisan, statewide organization
created under s. 60.23(14) of the Wisconsin Statutes to protect the interests of the state's 1,264
towns and to improve town government. In 2004 WTA celebrated its 57th year of service to
town governments and the state's 1.6 million town residents. The association is organized into
six districts and is headquartered in Shawano. WTA relies on regular district meetings, an annual
statewide convention, publications, participation in cooperative training programs, and other
means to support the goal of keeping grassroots government strong and efficient in Wisconsin.
Calumet County towns are active participants in the Wisconsin Towns Association. For further
information contact the WTA.

League of Wisconsin Municipalities
The League of Wisconsin Municipalities is a non-profit association of municipalities. First
established in 1898, the League acts as an information clearinghouse, lobbying organization and

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legal resource for Wisconsin municipalities. Its membership consists of 378 villages and all of
the 190 cities in the state. Calumet County cities and villages participate in the League of
Wisconsin Municipalities. For further information contact the League.

Wisconsin Counties Association
The Wisconsin Counties Association (WCA) is an association of county governments assembled
for the purpose of serving and representing counties. The direction of the organization is one
that is determined by the membership and the WCA Board of Directors consistent with the
parameters set forth by the WCA Constitution. For further information contact the WCA.

Wisconsin Partnership
The State of Wisconsin offers local government contract purchasing, technical advice, data and
financial assistance to more efficiently provide government services and increase cooperation.
At the Wisconsin Partnership web-site a variety of information is provided to help local
governments become more cost-effective. For further information visit the web-site or contact
the Wisconsin Department of Administration, Division of Intergovernmental Relations.

Regional Programs

East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission
The Commission is the official comprehensive planning agency for the East Central Wisconsin
Counties of Calumet, Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Marquette, Menominee, Outagamie, Shawano,
Waupaca, Waushara and Winnebago. Services provided by the Commission include
comprehensive and land use planning; transportation improvement and corridor planning; open
space, recreational and environmental planning; economic development; demographic
information and projections; technical assistance to local governments; geographic information
services and aerial photography distribution. For further information contact the Commission.

Bay Lake Regional Planning Commission
The Bay-Lake Regional Planning Commission is a public agency that has been established to
provide planning service on area-wide issues, to represent local interests on state and federal
planning program activities, and to provide local planning assistance to communities in the Bay-
Lake Region. The Bay-Lake Regional Planning Commission was established by Governor
Patrick Lucey in 1972 by Executive Order 35 and covers the counties of Brown, Door, Florence,
Kewaunee, Manitowoc (including City of Kiel which is partially located in Calumet County),
Marinette, Oconto and Sheboygan in northeastern Wisconsin. For further information contact
the Commission.

Northeast Wisconsin Regional Economic Partnership (NEWREP)
NEWREP consists of 16 counties in Northeast Wisconsin, from Fond du Lac County to Florence
County. NEWREP has been designated as one of eight multi-county Technology Zones in
Wisconsin. Tax credits are available for high-tech businesses planning to expand or locate in
each Technology Zone. NEWREP has $5 million in tax incentives available over a 10-year
period, which began in 2002. Qualification for tax credits is based on the investment spending in
the business, jobs created or retained, wages for jobs created, and property taxes. For further
information visit the NEWREP web-site or contact the Wisconsin Department of Commerce.


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Fox Cities Economic Development Partnership (FCEDP)
FCEDP is a business attraction organization comprised of the municipalities, organizations and
utilities interested in the economic growth of the Fox Cities area. Its mission, along with that of
the Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and Industry, is to foster the Fox Cities' economic
development by creating and implementing marketing programs that promote the area as an
attractive location for business and industry. For further information contact FCEDP.

International Trade and Economic Development Council (ITBEC)
ITBEC is organized through the Wisconsin Counties Association and encourage counties to
work cooperatively on economic development and tourism projects. Calumet County is a
member of the Wisconsin East Central ITBEC. Other counties in this ITBEC are Fond du Lac,
Kewaunee, and Winnebago. For further information contact the Wisconsin Counties
Association.

Northeast Wisconsin Stormwater Consortium (NEWSC)
The mission of NEWSC is to facilitate efficient implementation of stormwater programs locally
and regionally that will both meet WDNR and EPA regulatory requirements and maximize the
benefit of stormwater activities to the watershed by fostering partnerships and by providing
technical, administrative, and financial assistance to members. For further information contact
the Consortium or the WDNR.

Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance (FWWA)
FWWA is an independent nonprofit organization that identifies issues and advocates effective
policies and actions that protect, restore and sustain the water resources of the Fox-Wolf River
Basin. For further information contact the Alliance.

Glacierland RC&D
RC&D is a non-biased, rural development program focusing on the conservation, development
and utilization of area resources to improve the standard of living. It joins forces with
individuals, agencies and groups to improve the social, economic and environmental
opportunities of the local area. The RC&D program was established by federal legislation in
1962. This act directs the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to help units of government
conserve and properly utilize all resources in solving local issues. Citizens who are aware of the
opportunities first hand provide leadership and work together to set program priorities. A variety
of individuals, government agencies, organizations, environmental groups and business
institutions provide assistance to these people in accomplishing their program goals. For further
information contact the RC&D program.

County Programs

Calumet County Municipal Leaders Group
This group is comprised of all city mayors, village clerks, and town chairpersons in Calumet
County. They meet quarterly to discuss ways to cooperate better and share services. The group
is organized through the County Administrator’s Office, which can be contacted for further
information.

7.6       Intergovernmental Cooperation Trends and Outlook

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The following intergovernmental trends
are anticipated during the planning period        Efficiency of Services
within Calumet County.
                                                  Government will continually face the pressures
         Intergovernmental cooperation           to provide more services to meet the demands
          will continue to increase as state,     of growth in an environment of decreasing
          county, and local operating             federal and state aid, and local pressure to
          budgets become more restrictive         reduce taxes.
          and partnerships are pursued.

         As more jurisdictions create comprehensive plans and share them with surrounding
          communities, new opportunities for intergovernmental cooperation will become apparent.

         Growing communities without growth management staff may need to address
          administrative applications, joint management, or shared services and staff with other
          communities for building inspection or land use permitting procedures.

         The sharing of employees, equipment, and facilities will increase locally to meet demand
          at reduced costs.

         The use of boundary agreements and extraterritorial review tools will increase as
          development pressures increase near municipal borders.

         The level of success with intergovernmental agreements will have a direct relationship
          with the level of trust between communities.

         School districts within Calumet County will face challenges to maintain expected
          educational standards in the face of enrollments fluctuation and anticipated budget
          declines.

         Economic development efforts will require leveraging the strengths of the county as a
          region rather than an uncoordinated, individual focus on a community level.

         Successful intergovernmental cooperation will require sustained commitment and
          investment by all affected parties to produce value over time.




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8.        Land Use
Evaluating land use entails broadly classifying how land is used. Land use analysis then assesses
the impacts on community development patterns based on land ownership, development controls
and regulations, and the market forces that drive development. Each type of land use has its own
characteristic that can determine compatibility, location, and preference to other land uses. The
maps developed in the planning process (especially the existing land use map) are used to
analyze the current development pattern, and serve as the framework for formulating how land
will be used in the future.

The land use element of the comprehensive planning process is typically the most interesting and
emotionally sensitive to local residents and landowners. This is largely due to the fact that land
use and private property rights are often directly intertwined with land use management and
regulation. Land use regulations, topography, community infrastructure, private market
demands, ownership patterns, and resource management all contribute to the character of the
community as it is known today.

A primary function of this land use element is to help assess the development pattern and how it
potentially impacts future land use. The analysis should result in some perspective as to how the
components of land use relate to each other, and develop some ideas on land use management
that is compatible and desirable for Calumet County’s long term development pattern. To
accomplish this, one must consider a range of ideas and opinions relative to land use, property
rights, and community values. Because land use is a people-oriented process, personal opinions,
desires, and attitudes, and legal and political considerations all have land use impacts. Some of
these variables have been discussed in earlier sections and will be used as a reference; other
aspects will be discussed as the preferred land use plan is developed.

8.1       Existing Land Use
                                                       Land Use Inventory
(Please note that the existing land use data in this
chapter was not updated as part of the January        Existing land use as of 2004 was
2012 amendment process.) Table 8-1, Figure 8-1,       inventoried by the East-Central
and Map 8-1 detail the existing land uses found in    Wisconsin Regional Planning
Calumet County. The land use pattern in Calumet       Commission using aerial photography,
County consists of rural towns containing mostly      other existing maps, field verification,
agricultural land and scattered residential           and input from local communities. The
development, along with several small                 existing land use inventory incorporates
incorporated communities providing centers for        land use classifications that were
commerce, services, and cultural resources. There     determined to best represent the
are vast differences between the northern portions    character and features of the county
of the county where the Town of Harrison, City        while being classified consistently
of Menasha, and City of Appleton are growing at       throughout the East-Central planning
rates well beyond any other areas of the county.      region.
As an example, the Town of Harrison averaged
150 new housing units from 1990 to 2002, and 276 new housing units per year from 1999 to
2002. The proximity of the Town of Harrison to the rapidly growing Fox River Valley has

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resulted in Harrison (and the northern tier of Calumet County) evolving into an urbanizing area.
Currently, the Town of Harrison is pursuing incorporating a 4.6 square mile portion of the town
to a village due to the urbanized nature of the area, which contains approximately 7,375
residents.

According to the 2004 Harrison Comprehensive Plan, the farming economy and the status of the
Town of Harrison farmers (age and the financial feasibility of heirs to continue farming) leaves
development as the most financially viable option for many of the remaining farm owners. This
is quite a different land use pattern than the central and southern portions of the county that are
predominantly rural, agricultural areas with small urban centers. To represent that point, one
only needs to review lot creation (both certified survey maps and subdivision plats) in 2003 as a
refection of the county development activity. The three towns on the county’s northern tier
(Harrison, Woodville, and Brillion) had 216 new lots created, whereas the southern tier towns
(Brothertown, Charlestown, and New Holstein) had 58 new lots created. Nearly four times as
many lots created in the northern portion of the county than in the southern portion, and the
Town of Woodville had only one lot created in 2003. The rate of growth and the location of
development have vastly different impacts in the county. However, the recent economic
downturn in the economy and subsequent decline in new home construction has caused the rate
of growth to decline in recent years. For example, only 57 lots were created in 2010 in Calumet
County.

                                                  Intensive uses, including both urban and rural
   Land Use and Lake Winnebago                    residential, commercial, industrial,
                                                  recreational, and institutional uses, occupy only
  Calumet County possesses tremendous             4.8% of the county’s land area. Base features,
  water features, primarily in Lake               including waterways, roads, and railroads
  Winnebago. Most of the county’s western         occupy another 5.5% of the land area. The
  border is shared with the lake. Of the          county’s dominant land use is farm and
  county’s 254,121.6 acres, 49,314.7 acres        cropland, contributing 65.5% of the county’s
  (19.4%) is Lake Winnebago. Of the               total land use. As indicated on Map 8-1,
  Calumet County’s surface water totals,          cropland and other agricultural land/pasture is
  Lake Winnebago comprises 94.7% of all           found extensively throughout the county. A
  the surface water. For planning purposes,       simple comparison with the Prime Soils map in
  the land use calculations in this chapter       Chapter 5 can help discern the relationship of
  typically exclude Lake Winnebago’s              agricultural activity in Calumet County with
  surface water acreage to allow a direct         environmental features that can support it.
  focus on actual land use.                       Cropped farm land has planning implications
                                                  different than other types of agriculture due to
                                                  the relationship with soils, so the existing land
use map displays cropland as one classification and ‘open other land’ as another classification.
See the Appendix for a complete description of the existing land use classifications.

Forestlands also contribute a significant portion to the county’s total land use with 14.5% of total
land use. Forestland areas are concentrated within the Brillion, Killsnake, and Kiel Marsh
Wildlife Areas as well as areas adjacent the county’s many rivers and streams. Forestland is also
scattered throughout the county in smaller tracts, generally where farmland or other use of the
land may be difficult due to slopes or wetlands and where landowners have chosen to leave the

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area in a natural state. In addition, the small woodland tracts are often highly valued for
recreational purposes in addition to residential development. The woodland tracts have grown in
value higher than the agricultural lands due to both use value assessment for agriculture and the
market demands related to prime investment properties.

Residential land use makes up an additional 3.6% of total land use in the county. Residential
land use includes single family, multi-family, mobile homes, and farm residences. Single family
homes are the dominant residential use in the county with other forms of residential use
contributing less than 4% to total residential uses. As the existing land use map shows,
residential land use is most concentrated within the county’s cities and villages. There is a
significant amount of rural residential found throughout the county. The rural residential uses
are generally located along county highways, town roads as well as along the shoreline of Lake
Winnebago.

Transportation and utilities, which includes roads, highways, and railroads, make up
approximately 4% of the county’s total land use. All remaining land uses found in Calumet
County contribute less than 2% of the total uses.

                                           Table 8-1
                            2004 Existing Land Use, Calumet County
                                      Feature                   Acreage           % of Total
                Residential                                    7,372.74              3.6%
                 Single Family Residential                      7,103.4              3.5%
                 Multi-Family                                      181.5             0.1%
                 Mobile Home                                        87.8             0.0%
                Commercial                                         790.6             0.4%
                Industrial                                      1,036.6              0.5%
                 Quarry                                            470.5             0.2%
                Institutional                                      588.2             0.3%
                Transportation & Utilities                      8,426.3              4.1%
                Farm & Cropland                               134,147.6             65.5%
                Forestlands                                    29,682.8             14.5%
                Recreational                                    2,431.4              1.2%
                Open/Other                                     17,557.7              8.6%
                Water                                           2,773.1              1.4%
                Total*                                       204,806.91            100.0%
                Source: Calumet County Planning Department, 2004. *Does not include Lake Winnebago.




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                                              Figure 8-1
                                  Existing Land Use, Calumet County


                                                     Forestlands,     Recreational,
                                                       14.5%             1.2%          Open/Other,
                                                                                          8.6%

                                                                                        Water, 1.4%

                                                                                        Residential, 3.6%

                                                                                         Commercial,
                                                                                           0.4%


                                                                                         Industrial, 0.5%

                                                                                           Institutional,
                                                                                              0.3%
                                    Farm &
                                Cropland, 65.5%                                  Transportation &
                                                                                  Utilities, 4.1%



                                 Source: Calumet County Planning Department, 2004.


                                                  Land Use Connections

      Land use is integrated with all elements of the comprehensive planning process. Changes in land
      use are not isolated, but rather are often the end result of a change in another element. For
      example, development patterns evolve over time as a result of population growth, the development
      of new housing, the development of new commercial or industrial sites, the extension of utilities
      or services, or the construction of a new road.

                                                     Implementation
                                Population                                     Issues &
                                & Housing                                      Opportunities


                          Economic                                                Utilities & Community
                          Development                Land Use                     Facilities



                            Intergovernmental                               Agricultural, Natural
                            Cooperation              Transportation         & Cultural Resources




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Map 8-1 Land Use




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8.2       Land and Resource Management

Land and resource management is comprised of several components that significantly affect land
use. The type of land ownership has a direct correlation to how that property is managed, and
how lands may be used in the future. As resource management takes place under both private
and public land ownership, the type of public and private resource management programs
utilized are primary to evaluating the impact on land use. Understanding the correlations
between land use and land management are necessary to evaluate why or how lands are regulated
the way they are (or how they should be). Generally speaking, evaluating land use with land
management, regulation, and environmental features will allow correlation between the existing
conditions that create our landscape and the features we find valuable in Calumet County. The
bridge to the future will be when those conditions we value, such as the county’s rural and small
community character and natural resources, are managed in concert with land management and
regulation to achieve economic development and natural resources preservation.

In Calumet County, the public land is mainly
owned by the State of Wisconsin. The High           Public Land Ownership Per
Cliff State Park, along with the Brillion,          Capita
Killsnake, and Kiel Wildlife areas comprise a
large majority of the public land acreage. The      In Calumet County, there are
county also owns a significant acreage which        approximately 12,71411,920 acres of
are not designated under a specific resource        publicly owned land, or .3124 acres of
protection program, however they are county         public land per person. As a percentage
controlled and will most likely remain as           of overall public land acreage per capita,
county resource land in the future. These lands     Calumet County ranks 4950th out of
are owned by Calumet County for the purpose         Wisconsin’s 72 counties. Forest County
of natural resource management and also             ranks first in the state with
include land within the Calumet County Park         378,594375,758 acres (37.740.4 acres
managed for natural environments and passive        per person), while
recreation uses.                                    MenomineeMilwaukee ranks last with
                                                    16,60016 acres (.002 acre per person).
                                                    Source: 2003-20042011-2012 Wisconsin Blue Book
The following are the most common land and
resource management tools used in Calumet
County. Some of the following information, such as farmland preservation and managed forest
law data was discussed in the Agriculture, Natural, and Cultural Resources Chapter of this
document. The data was also included here as well to allow ease of use by the reader.

Farmland Preservation ProgramWorking Lands Initiative

The Wisconsin Working Lands Initiative, created in 2009, provides participating landowners
with an opportunity to claim farmland preservation tax credits. The tax credits are income tax
credits that are applied against tax liability. Tax credit amounts are:
     $5.00 an acre for farmers with a farmland preservation agreement signed after July 1,
        2009 and located in an agricultural enterprise area.
     $7.50 an acre for farmers in an area zoned for farmland preservation.


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     $10.00 an acre for farmers in an area zoned and certified for farmland preservation in an
         agricultural enterprise areas, with a farmland preservation agreement signed after July 1,
         2009.
Landowners must be residents of Wisconsin and must meet other eligibility criteria to claim the
credit, including compliance with state soil and water conservation standards. farmland
preservation program provides state income tax credits to farmers who meet the program's
requirements. Farmers qualify if their land is zoned or if they sign an agreement to use their land
exclusively for agricultural purposes. The landowner must own 35 acres or more, and produce
gross farm profits of $6,000 in the previous year. Public access is not required. Table 8-2
compares land enrolled in farmland preservation programs in Calumet County to its surrounding
counties.details the amount of farmland being preserved under the program in towns in Calumet
County.




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                             Table 8-2
 Comparative Farmland Preservation Agreements, Calumet County and
                 Selected Areas Towns, 20042010
                                                      # of
                               Municipality      Claimants         Credit       Acreage
                      Calumet County                   196        $209,762      30,962
                      Brown County                     638        $599,483      92,775
                      Fond du Lac County               980      $1,208,800    172,998
                      Manitowoc County                 688        $805,854    108,900
                      Outagamie County                 323        $294,505      46,981
                      Sheboygan County                 518        $563,157      79,310
                      Winnebago County                 117        $109,974      19,082
                     Source: Calumet County Planning DepartmentWisconsin Department of Revenue,
                     December 2011. Includes data from the old Farmland Tax Relief Program and the new
                     Farmland Preservation Program.

Managed Forest Law Program

The Managed Forest Law (MFL) program can ease the property tax burden for Wisconsin
forestland owners who wish to manage their woodlands. The MFL program is intended to foster
timber production on private forests, while recognizing other values. MFL participants pay
property taxes at a reduced rate. A portion of the foregone taxes is recouped by the state at the
time the timber is harvested. The Wisconsin Department of Revenue estimates MFL program
participants can reduce their property tax an average of 80% after paying harvest taxes.

The MFL program is open to all private landowners with at least 10 acres of woods or forestland
that meet three requirements:

         80% of the land must be productive forestland capable of producing wood products (can
          grow at least 20 cubic feet of wood per acre per year).

         Forests must cover 80% of the land. A forest is an area currently forested or will soon be
          regenerated to forests.

         The minimum average width of the enrolled land is no less than 120 feet.

The MFL program requires a contract period of either 25 or 50 years. Participation in the MFL
program requires an approved, written forest management plan and an application fee. To get
the lowest annual property tax rate, landowners must allow the public to access the land. Access
on these “open” lands is only for hunting, fishing, hiking, sightseeing, and cross-country skiing.
Landowners may choose to “close” land to public access. However, there are limits to the
number of acres per municipality (city, town, or village) that may be designated as closed. The
tax rates on “closed” land are higher as well. Table 8-3 details the use of the MFL program for
towns in Calumet County.


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                            Table 8-3
  Managed Forest Law Agreements, Calumet County Towns, 20042011
                                                Open    Closed                     % of
                      Municipality              Acres    Acres     Total    County Total
                T. Brillion               38.0        143.0       181.0           5.0%
                T. Brothertown            77.8        577.3       655.1          18.2%
                T. Charlestown              0.0     1,140.4    1,140.4           31.6%
                T. Chilton                10.0         99.0       109.0           3.0%
                T. Harrison                 0.0       207.6       207.6           5.8%
                T. New Holstein           40.6        333.7       374.4          10.4%
                T. Rantoul                  0.0       119.0       119.0           3.3%
                T. Stockbridge            89.0        495.8       584.8          16.2%
                T. Woodville              46.0        188.0       234.0           6.5%
                Calumet County           301.4      3,303.9    3,605.3         100.0%
               Source: Calumet County Planning DepartmentWisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

There is a total of approximately 3,5003,600 acres of forestland enrolled in the MFL program in
Calumet County. The majority of MFL land is closed to the public and only 11.58.4% is open
for public use. The Town of Charlestown has the greatest amount of land enrolled in the MFL
program in the county, followed by the Towns of Brothertown and Stockbridge.

Land Trusts

A land trust is a nonprofit organization that, as all or part of its mission, actively works to
conserve land by undertaking or assisting in land or conservation easement acquisition, or by its
stewardship of such land or easements.

There areis currently noone land trust easements in Calumet County, the Allan Voskuil Wildlife
Preserve located in the Town of Chilton. , but there are Local land trust organizations in place
includeing the North East Wisconsin Land Trust (NEWLT) and Glacial Lakes Conservancy
(GLC). GLC works with the county to help implement their PACE Ordinance, a code to help
purchase agricultural conservation easements. National land trust organizations are also
available for use in Calumet County.




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Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report   Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-11
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Map 8-2 Natural Resource Management




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Overall, lands that are enrolled in a resource management program or that are managed in a way
that would allow logical assessment for future land use can then be compared to the existing
development pattern for analysis. The process of land use planning will use this information to
help build classifications of preferred land use that will ultimately build the county plan. As an
example, the lands currently enrolled in the farmland preservation program can be viewed as
possible lands that will be agriculturally orientated in the future. This information helps the town
and town landowners to discern not only the land use situation now, but also view the potential
future land use, assuming the conditions and program enrollment stay the same. Table 8-4
displays all the ownership acreages that impact land use.

                          Table 8-4
Natural Resource Management Ownership, Calumet County, 20042011
                                      City, Village,   Conservation   County    State/WDNR
             Municipality             Town Owned            Groups    Owned           Owned              Total
        T. Brillion                    154          55                    0              2,664          2,873
        T. Brothertown                  15           0                    0                  0             15
        T. Charlestown                  21          30                    0              4,737          4,788
        T. Chilton                       1           0                  106                  0            107
        T. Harrison                     16           0                    0                861            877
        T. New Holstein                  6         132                    0                348            486
        T. Rantoul                      35         500                   74              2,796          3,405
        T. Stockbridge                  11          97                  185                 43            336
        T. Woodville                    74           0                    0                  0             74
        V. Hilbert                       7           0                    0                  0              7
        V. Potter                        6           0                    0                  0              6
        V. Sherwood                     17           0                    0                220            237
        V. Stockbridge                   3           5                    0                  0              8
        C. Appleton*                     0           0                    0                  0              0
        C. Brillion                     90           0                    0                  0             90
        C. Chilton                      20           0                    0                  0             20
        C. Kaukauna*                     0           0                    0                  0              0
        C. Kiel*                         4           0                    0                  0              4
        C. Menasha*                    430           0                   37                  5            472
        C. New Holstein                 60           0                    0                  0             60
        Calumet County                 959         819                  402             11,685         13,864
       *Only includes land in Calumet County.
       Source: Calumet County Planning Department.




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8.3       Supply, Demand, and Price Trends of Land

Equalized Valuation

The equalized value of real property provides insight into land pricing and is a vital component
to the provision of public facilities and services. The increase in real property in a community
and the county allows for additional tax revenue necessary to fund public facilities and service
programs in the county.

Equalized values are based on the full market value of all taxable property in the state, except for
agricultural land. In order to provide property tax relief for farmers, the value of agricultural
land is determined by its value for agricultural uses rather then for its possible development
value, which is termed a “use value” system, rather than one based on full market value.

Table 8-5 details the total equalized values for Calumet County from 19992007 to 20032011 by
land category.

                                   Table 8-5
           Equalized Valuation, Calumet County, 1999-20032007-2011
                                                                        Ag Forest Undeveloped                     Total
 Year          Residential      Commercial Manufacturing Agricultural    & Forest    & Other*                Real Estate
  2007 $2,596,111,600 $354,243,500     $78,044,900 $26,269,900 $17,473,500 $130,370,900 $3,202,514,300
  2008 $2,672,312,400 $362,560,400     $77,722,400 $27,004,700 $30,406,200 $140,014,500 $3,310,020,600
  2009 $2,719,536,900 $404,514,900     $83,655,200 $27,219,100 $28,465,700 $143,268,800 $3,406,660,600
  2010 $2,692,295,100 $433,349,000     $86,581,100 $26,811,900 $30,502,200 $150,651,900 $3,420,191,200
  2011 $2,670,182,900 $443,774,400     $92,622,500 $25,416,300 $31,777,000 $155,023,300 $3,418,796,400
Source: Wisconsin Department of Revenue, Statement of Changes in Equalized Values by Class and
Item, 1999-20032007-2011. *Includes farm sets, right-of-ways, marshes, swamps, thickets, bogs and wet
meadowsswamp, waste, and other land.

The total equalized value of real estate in Calumet County increased by approximately 406.8%
from 19992007 to 20032011. Residential development contributes the greatest portion of total
equalized value for the county, nearly 8078% of the total for 20032011.

Agricultural Land Sales

The sale of agricultural land is tracked by the Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service for every
county in the state. Table 8-6 details agricultural land sales trends for Calumet County.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                              Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-15
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                        Table 8-6
             Agricultural Land Sales, Calumet County, 1999-20032006-2010
                                                                                                     # Change % Change
                                                      2006     2007       2008       2009      2010 2006-2010 2006-2010
 Ag Land Continuing in Ag Use
    Number of transactions                     18         11      16      11                     13              -5           -27.8%
    Acres sold                              1,401       525      920     665                    654            -747           -53.3%
    Dollars per acre                      $3,459 $3,749 $4,169 $5,308                        $5,111          $1,652            47.8%
 Ag Land being Diverted to Other Uses
    Number of transactions                       2         -       -         -                      -             NA                NA
    Acres sold                                 97          -       -         -                      -             NA                NA
    Dollars per acre                      $14,141          -       -         -                      -             NA                NA
 Total of All Ag Land
    Number of transactions                     20         11      16      11                     13               -7          -35.0%
    Acres sold                              1,498       525      920     665                    654             -844          -56.3%
    Dollars per acre                      $4,151 $3,749 $4,169 $5,308                        $5,111             $960           23.1%
      Source: Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service, 1999-20032006-2010.

     For agricultural land continuing in agricultural use, the dollar amount per acre has increased by
     nearly 10050% from 19992006 to 20032010. The average dollar per acre was approximately
     $2,8445,111 in 20032010. Based on the data provided, no land transactions have been recorded
     since 2006 whereThis is, however, significantly less than the average per acre for agricultural
     land has been being diverted to other uses, which was $4,103 in 2003. The total number of
     transactions and amount of agricultural land sold has been decreasing in the county.

     Forest Land Sales

     Table 8-7 details forestland sales for Calumet County from 19982006 to 20012010.

                                         Table 8-7
                   Forestland Sales, Calumet County, 1998-20012006-2010
                                                                                                           # Change        % Change
                                                       2006     2007      2008       2009      2010       2006-2010        2006-2010
Forest Land Continuing in Forest Use
   Number of transactions                                  9        7      8      6      6                         -3          -33.3%
   Acres sold                                             78       83     59     28    180                        102          130.8%
   Dollars per acre                                   $2,409   $3,241 $3,234 $4,554 $3,477                     $1,068           44.3%
Forest Land being Diverted to Other Uses
   Number of transactions                                  1          -          -      -           -              NA               NA
   Acres sold                                              1          -          -      -           -              NA               NA
   Dollars per acre                                  $20,300          -          -      -           -              NA               NA
Total of All Forest Land
   Number of transactions                                10        7         8          6         6                 -4         -40.0%
   Acres sold                                            79       83        59         28       180                101         127.8%

     Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-16                                     Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                        Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Dollars per acre                         $2,636 $3,241 $3,234 $4,554 $3,477                                 $841            31.9%
      Source: Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service, 1999-20022006-2010.

  The total number of forestland acres being sold in the county has decreased increased by
  8.9127.8% from 19982006 to 20012010. The value per acre has also decreasedincreased. In
  general, there are relatively few overall transactions of forestland occurring in Calumet County.

  Wisconsin Realtors Association Information

  The Wisconsin Realtors Association (WRA) is one of the largest trade associations in the state.
  Headquartered in Madison, the WRA represents over 12,00014,000 realtors statewide who are
  involved in virtually all aspects related to the sale, purchase, exchange or lease of real estate
  property in Wisconsin.

  The primary purpose of the WRA is to further the quality of the real estate industry in Wisconsin
  by promoting the competent practice and professionalism of realtors. In addition, the association
  represents its membership in legislative efforts to keep housing affordable in Wisconsin and
  protect the private property rights of citizens throughout the state.

  The WRA also provides information on property sales. Table 8-8 details information on
  residential property sales for Calumet County from 19992005 to 20022010.

                                 Table 8-8
     WRA Residential Sales Data, Calumet County, 1999-20022005-2010
   Residential Property Types Sold                2005       2006       2007            2008           2009            2010
  Single Family                                    293        337        316              320            288            267
  Condo                                             18         12         17               21              9             13
  Waterfront                                        18         19         16               12             14             15
  New Construction                                 126         75         57               54             42             40
  Zero Lot Line                                      4          4          9                3              4              5
  Farms                                              4         10          3                2              1              5
  Total Residential Properties Sold                463        457        418              403            358            345

  Total Properties With Public Water               427        398        376              356            322            311
  Total Properties With Public Sewer               428        398        374              356            321            309

  Average Selling Price                        $168,038   $174,157   $178,097     $169,712        $158,091       $165,857
  Source: Realtors® Association of Northeast Wisconsin Realtors Association.

  As indicated by the table, the total number of residential properties being sold in Calumet County
  has consistently been decliningincreasing since 20051999. The number of single family
  residential sales has declinedincreased by 308.8% while the number of hobby farm sales has
  increased by approximately 60%. The average selling price for residential property has also
  decreasedincreased, 10.61.3% for the period shown. These trends support Calumet County’s
  overall characteristic as a desirable as a place to live.



  Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                    Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-17
  Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
The WRA also provides information on vacant land sales for the county. This information is
particularly noteworthy because it provides an indication of how much land is demanded for new
construction or new development.

                             Table 8-9
  WRA Vacant Land Sales Data, Calumet County, 1999-20022005-2010
            Vacant Land Sold                      2005       2006      2007          2008           2009          2010
 Total Vacant Land Sold                             30         28        31              22            16             15

 Total Properties With Public Water                 22         14        25              12            11              8
 Total Properties with Public Sewer                 20         13        25              11            11              8

 Average Selling Price                          $62,248   $133,616   $39,962     $67,345        $94,142       $89,545
Source: Realtors® Association of Northeast Wisconsin Realtors Association.

The average selling price for vacant land in the county has increased by 22.543.9% percent from
19992005 to 20022010. This rate of increase was greater than price increases for existing
residential property, providing an indication that vacant land may be more desirable and have a
greater demand than developed property. The total amount of land sold has decreasedvaried for
the years shown, however there is consistently a high number of lots that are sold with sewer and
water facilities.

Certified Survey Maps (CSM) and Plat Reviews

The number of Certified Survey Maps (CSM) and plat reviews taking place provides another
indication on the number of land transactions and the overall demand for land in Calumet
County. Table 8-10 and 8-11 detail this information from 19942001 to 20032010 in the
unincorporated areas of the county. The data represents the numbers of lots created only and is
not an indicator of actual development or sales.

A Certified Survey Map (CSM) is defined as a survey performed according to state standards for
the purpose of sub-dividing land into four or less parcels, or for the purpose of establishing
property boundaries. A CSM is represented graphically by a map drawn to scale, usually
reviewed and approved by a local authority and presented for recording and filing. After this
instrument is recorded, the land is henceforth described by the CSM number, lot number, volume
and page where recorded, and name of the county.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-18                                  Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                  Table 8-10
              CSM/Lots, Calumet County Towns, 1994-20032001-2010
                                                                            10-Year
    Municipality          2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Average
 T. Brillion          5      7    10      5      6      5     14          4        1         2          5.9
 T. Brothertown      25     14    11     19      5      6      3          3       15         7         10.8
 T. Charlestown       7      4     1      8      3      1      4          1        2         2          3.3
 T. Chilton          18     10     9     13      8     11      8          3        9        11           10
 T. Harrison         16     30    29     30      6     18     28         10       22         5         19.4
 T. New Holstein     12      6    21     16      5      9     19          2        3         8         10.1
 T. Rantoul           7      5     5      7      3      7      1          3        4         3          4.5
 T. Stockbridge       9     18    18     22     32     10     16          9        4        18         15.6
 T. Woodville         2      6     1      8      9      4      7          2        8         1          4.8
 Calumet County    101 100 105 128              77     71    100         37       68        57         84.4
Source: Calumet County Planning Department.

A plat is a map of a specific land area such as a town, section, or subdivision showing the
location and boundaries of individual parcels of land subdivided into lots, with streets,
easements, etc., usually drawn to scale. The map is representative of a survey performed by a
registered land surveyor. Plats become effective upon being recorded and filed.

                                  Table 8-11
           Plat Reviews, Calumet County Towns, 1994-20032001-2010
                                                                            10-Year
    Municipality          2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Average
 T. Brillion          0     10    48      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            6
 T. Brothertown       0      0    15      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            2
 T. Charlestown       0      0     0      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            0
 T. Chilton           0      0     0      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            0
 T. Harrison       367 205 128           66    165    100      0          0       10         0          104
 T. New Holstein      0      0     0      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            0
 T. Rantoul           0      0     0      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            0
 T. Stockbridge       0      0     0     28      0      0      0          0        0         0            3
 T. Woodville         0      0     0      0      0      0      0          0        0         0            0
 Calumet County    367 215 191           94    165    100      0          0       10         0           84
Source: Calumet County Planning Department.

As anticipated, the Town of Harrison has experienced the greatest number of CSM/lots as well as
plat reviews for the years shown.

Sanitary Permits

Sanitary permits provide another source of information describing development trends in the
county. Table 8-12 details sanitary permits that have been issued for towns in Calumet County
Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-19
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
   from 19932001 to 20032010. Note that data provided is for new systems only, not replacement
   systems. The majority of these new systems are for residential structures, however some may be
   for commercial or industrial structures.

                                  Table 8-12
        Sanitary Permits for New Systems, Calumet County Towns, 1993-
                                20032001-2010
                                                                                             10-Year 10-Year
 Municipality          2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010                       Total Average
T. Brillion          2      4      4      1     2       2      3       3      0      1              22           2.2
T. Brothertown      12      7     10    11      4       2      5       2      1      1              55           5.5
T. Charlestown       2      0      3      4     3       3      2       0      1      2              20           2.0
T. Chilton           5     12      9      7     6     10       3       6      2      3              63           6.3
T. Harrison          8      7     10      7     9       8      5       3      4      1              62           6.2
T. New Holstein      7      9     14    10     11       8      6       0      0      3              68           6.8
T. Rantoul           6      1      5      5     3       0      4       1      0      0              25           2.5
T. Stockbridge      13     12     17    18     15     11       5       5      3      2             101          10.1
T. Woodville         3      6      1      1     2       2      3       2      1      1              22           2.2
Calumet County      58     58     73    64     55     46      36      22     12     14             438          43.8
    Source: Calumet County Planning Department. Data is for new sanitary systems only.

   Towns experiencing the greatest demand for sanitary permits for new systems include the Town
   of New Holstein and the Town of Stockbridge averaging 7 and 10 permits respectively, both
   averaging over 10 permits per year. For Calumet County towns as a whole, in 2003 the greatest
   number of permits were issued with 73.

   Building Permit Activity for New Home Construction

   Possibly one of the best indicators for land demand and development in the county is building
   permits. Calumet County no longer keeps track of this data. Therefore, this data was not
   updated as part of the 2012 amendment process. Table 8-13 details building permit activity for
   new home construction in the county from 1993 to 2003.




   Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-20                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                        Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                  Table 8-13
     Building Permit Activity for New Home Construction (New Homes
                   Added), Calumet County, 1993-2003
                                                                                                        11-Year
        Municipality         1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003                     Average
      T. Brillion               8   10    9    8    4   22   12   11   17   13   14                        11.6
      T. Brothertown            8    9    9    6    7    9    3    4    9    5   14                         7.5
      T. Charlestown            2    7    1    4    0    1    2    1    2    0    3                         2.1
      T. Chilton**             NA NA             NA NA      NA NA NA      2       7      13      10          2.9
      T. Harrison               68 105            77 109     98 164 204 219     283     351     235        173.9
      T. New Holstein            3   9             8   9      8   8  22   9       8      12      15         10.1
      T. Rantoul                 1   1             0   3      7   5   2   3       7       2       4          3.2
      T. Stockbridge             7       9       NA    13    8   13   11    9     19      11      14         10.4
      T. Woodville               4       6         1    7    4    5    6    3      5       7       1          4.5
      V. Hilbert                 2       3         4    4    3    1    0    0      5       4       6          2.9
      V. Potter                  0       0         1    3    3    1    2    1      0       1       2          1.3
      V. Sherwood               11      18        20   31   46   38   53   51     74      90      70         45.6
      V. Stockbridge            10           3   NA     0    9    7    5    6      5      12        6          5.7
      C. Appleton***            93      74       32    59   23   28   38   49     37      34      23         44.5
      C. Brillion                7       9        8     9    0   13   15   10      7      10      13          9.2
      C. Chilton                14      18       13    13   16   10   16    7      6      11      13         12.5
      C. Kiel***                  0          0   NA    NA    0    0    0    0      2       0        0          0.2
     C. Menasha***         33 NA NA 22             12   34   24  39 NA                    62    102          29.8
     C. New Holstein        9    13   15     13     6     1    4 10      7                 9      5           8.4
     **Includes shoreland and data obtained from town clerk.
     ***Data is for portion of community in Calumet County only.
     Source: Calumet County Planning Department. NA, data not available.

While data is missing for some communities, it is evident that the Town of Harrison has
consistently experienced the greatest demand for new home building permits, averaging over 170
permits per year. The Village of Sherwood as well as the portion of the City of Appleton in
Calumet County had the second highest demand for permits, both averaging over 40 permits per
year for the 11 year period shown.

8.4       Projected Land Use Demand

Projected Land Use Demand Based on Population

The following tables estimate the total acreage that will be demanded for residential,
commercial/industrial, and institutional land uses for five year increments through the year 2030
in Calumet County. These future demand estimates are entirely based on population and do not
take into account market factors such as interest rates, land prices, or availability of land and do
not take into account land use regulations and policies that are used to control development.


Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                  Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-21
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
These estimates should only be used for planning purposes in combination with other indicators
of land use demand. This data was not updated as part of the 2012 amendment process.

Year 2005 acreage figures that are provided were obtained from existing land use calculations as
indicated on Table 8-1 earlier in this chapter. Year 2010 to 2030 acreage calculations were
projected by utilizing East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (ECWRPC)
population projections. ECWRPC population projections estimated the greatest amount of
population growth for the county when compared to other population projections.

Projected demand for residential, commercial/industrial, and institutional land use assume that
the ratio of the county’s 2000 population to land area in each use will remain the same in the
future. In other words, each person will require the same amount of land for each particular land
use as they do today.

                               Table 8-14
    Projected Land Use Demand (acres) Based on ECWRPC Population
                 Projection, Calumet County, 2005-2030

                           Year                 Residential Commercial/Industrial          Institutional
                  2005                  7,372.7                   1,827.2              588.2
                  2010                  8,917.8                   2,210.1              711.4
                  2015                  9,479.1                   2,349.2              756.2
                  2020                 10,060.8                   2,493.4              802.6
                  2025                 10,599.6                   2,626.9              845.6
                  2030                 11,094.4                   2,749.5              885.1
                 Source: Year 2005 acreages are existing land use acreages as provided by the Calumet
                 County Planning Department. Years 2010 through 2030 prepared by Foth utilizing
                 ECWRPC population projections.

While Table 8-14 utilized ECWRPC population projections, Table 8-15 utilizes a linear
population projection. The linear population projection that was created for the county was the
lowest of the three population projections created. Therefore, land use demand for residential,
commercial/industrial, and institutional land in the county should fall somewhere between Table
8-14 and Table 8-15, assuming demand is only based on population.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-22                                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                                Table 8-15
      Projected Land Use Demand (acres) Based on Linear Population
                  Projection, Calumet County, 2005-2030

                          Year               Residential   Commercial/Industrial             Institutional
                 2005                   7,372.7                  1,827.2               588.2
                 2010                   7,979.5                  1,977.6               636.6
                 2015                   8,365.1                  2,073.1               667.3
                 2020                   8,750.7                  2,168.7               698.1
                 2025                   9,136.3                  2,264.3               728.8
                 2030                   9,522.1                  2,359.9               759.6
                Source: Year 2005 acreages are existing land use acreages as provided by the Calumet
                County Planning Department. Years 2010 through 2030 prepared by Foth utilizing linear
                population projections.

As indicated by Tables 8-14 and 8-15, the amount of residential land required in Calumet County
by 2030 to meet population demand could range from 9,500 acres to approximately 12,000 acres.
Commercial land required by 2030 could range from a low of 2,400 acres to a high of 2,750
acres and institutional demand could range from a low of 760 acres to a high of 890 acres. These
figures were used as an initial guide for the development of future land use maps during the
planning process.

Projected Land Use Demand Based on Building Permits

In addition to projecting land use demand based on population, a methodology was developed to
project residential land use demand based on historic building permit information. Utilizing
building permit information for communities in Calumet County between 1994 and 2003for the
last 11 years, the county averages approximately 386 new residential structures per year.
Wisconsin Realtors Association (WRA) data provided for Calumet County shows that
approximately 80% of vacant land sold in the county is served by sewer while the remaining
20% are not served. Using these two sources of data, building permits and WRA data, a
projection of residential land use demand was created which assumed that sewered lots are 0.5
acres in size and unsewered lots are 1.5 acres in size. These lot size assumptions were used
based on the uncertainty of lot locations in the county and what regulations will be in place.
They are provided only to allow creation of land use projection estimates. Table 8-16 represents
the residential land use that will be required in the county based on historic building permit
activity and the assumptions noted above. This data was not updated as part of the 2012
amendment process.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-23
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                               Table 8-16
    Projected Residential Land Use Demand (acres) Based on Historic
            Building Permit Data, Calumet County, 2005-2030

                                                Year     Residential Acreage
                                       2004                               7,373
                                       2005                               7,643
                                       2010                               8,994
                                       2015                             10,345
                                       2020                             11,696
                                       2025                             13,047
                                       2030                             14,398
                                Source: Prepared by Foth utilizing building permit and
                                land use data provided by the Calumet County Planning
                                Department. Wisconsin Realtors Association.

The residential acreage projected for Calumet County utilizing the methodology described above
is significantly higher than the acreages projected utilizing population, as shown in previous
tables. As noted throughout this report, Calumet County is projected to be one of the fastest
growing areas of the state with regard to population and residential building permits have also
reflected this growth. Overall, Calumet County will continue to deal with significant demand for
residential and other land uses over the next 25 years.

All of the land use demand projections provided should be used as a tool to discuss future land
use, existing management, regulations, and future policies. All projections utilize some
assumptions and should be used only for planning purposes.

8.5       Land Use Programs

To alleviate information redundancy in this report, the land use programs, agencies, and
activities that are currently in use or available for use in Calumet County are either addressed in
another element or are discussed in the Implementation Chapter.

8.6       Land Use Trends and Outlook

Changes in land use are not isolated. They are related to changes in population, housing,
transportation, community services, agriculture, natural resources, and economic development.
The following land use trends are anticipated within Calumet County over the next 20 to 25
years.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-24                                  Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                                Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Housing, Population, and Land Use

         Over the last 30 years, Calumet County’s population grew over twice as fast as that of the
          State of Wisconsin. Calumet County is forecasted to continue that growth trend over the
          next 30 years.

         The number of persons per household will continue to decrease requiring more housing
          units and more land to accommodate the county’s growing population.

         The number of housing units in Calumet County will continue to grow at rates over
          double that of the State Wisconsin as a whole.

         The Wisconsin Department of Administration forecasts over 7,00010,000 new
          households will be added in Calumet County between 2000 and 20252030.

         The East-Central Regional Planning Commission forecasts between 7,796 and 9,879 new
          households will be added in Calumet County between 2000 and 2030.

         Assuming the level of new residential home construction continues at levels experienced
          over the last 10 years, Calumet County could see an additional 11,717 new homes
          between 2000 and 2030.

         The county’s shoreland areas, woodlands, and highland areas will be desired as
          residential and seasonal use building sites and subdivisions.

         The county’s land use policies will play a significant role in the location and density of
          new development.

Transportation and Land Use

         Major highway intersections will continue to be targeted for commercial and industrial
          development.

         US 10 access management will significantly impact land use development.

         The regional highway system will offer efficient access to regional employment and
          recreation opportunities which will support growth and development trends.

         The use of STH 32/57 (north - south) and US 10 (east - west) for local traffic and as
          major statewide connectors will continue to lead to higher traffic volumes.

         Lower density development in rural areas will lead to increased costs of maintaining and
          developing transportation facilities.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                            Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-25
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Community Services and Land Use

         County and local government administration of land use regulations will increase in
          response to a growing population and the need to provide this service at a lower cost and
          higher level of efficiency.

Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Land Use

         The sale of forested, open, and agricultural lands for conversion to more intensive uses
          will continue.

         Agriculture will maintain a strong presence in Calumet County. There will likely be a
          decreasing number of total farms, but increasing numbers of large farms.

         Productive land uses like forestry and forage cropping will increase in order to take
          advantage of property tax breaks.

         Cash cropping and specialty farming will increase.

         Nonmetallic mine sites will continue to be developed to meet demands for sand, gravel,
          and other resources.

         Water quality management and development coordination will become more prevalent,
          potentially impacting location and density of development.

Economic Development and Land Use

         The types of businesses and industry attracted to the county will continue to be a mix of
          manufacturing, professional, and agriculturally based uses.

         Residential and highway corridor development will continue in order to accommodate
          those who commute to employment centers in Outagamie, Winnebago, and Brown, and
          Manitowoc Counties.

         The New Holstein Airport and its ability to provide aviation services to meet growing
          demand will be critical for Calumet County’s future economic development strategy.

         Calumet County railroads will continue to be integral to some businesses and industries
          in the county.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  8-26                         Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                       Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
9.        Implementation
The comprehensive planning process can be generally defined in four phases. The planning
process starts with the decision to plan. Deciding to address how we as a community are going
manage change can not be overstated in importance. Much time and discussion focused on this
issue as discussed in the Issues and Opportunities chapter. The second phase of the planning
process is defined by our existing conditions. The existing conditions are built on current market
and regulatory forces that impact our communities, as well as from historical introspection, the
combination of which allows clarity in evaluating the results of past development and growth.
Planning leverages the power of history through extensive evaluation of data and analysis of the
conditions that have shaped our communities, most of which are accumulated in this report.

The inventory process also exposes certain trends      Planning and Implementation
that will impact future growth. The assessment of
trends and the knowledge gained from our own           Just as the comprehensive plan does not
experiences, or from others, allows an evaluation      work independently of other community
to how we position our future decisions. This is       documents, the implementation element
accomplished through goal setting, visioning, and      does not work independently of the
through extensive public participation. The            other elements in the plan. In fact, the
community members voice their concerns and             implementation element is one of the
articulate their hopes. Through identification and     best ways to demonstrate the integration
subsequent prioritization of these concerns, the       of all the elements. Through
third phase of planning builds the community           implementation, the connectivity among
strategies that ultimately address how growth          community issues and opportunities,
should be managed. Building viable growth              housing, transportation, utilities and
management strategies and how they will be             community facilities, agricultural,
applied depends on a solid foundation of               natural, and cultural resources,
understanding provided by the existing conditions      economic development,
and trends and by leveraging the public opinion.       intergovernmental cooperation, and land
Implementation, the fourth and final phase of the      use is realized. Decisions should be
planning process, provides the bridge between          made based on the knowledge that one
what we want (the plan) and how we are going to        decision can affect all the elements
achieve it.                                            involved and there are direct and
                                                       indirect effects of all actions.
This implementation element includes a
compilation of existing county and local
ordinances and codes which regulate land use. The following regulations determine how
Calumet County communities currently manage growth.

9.1       Existing County Ordinances, Codes, and Plans

Calumet County Zoning Ordinance

The Calumet County Zoning Ordinance was originally adopted by the Calumet County Board of
Supervisors in 1976, and was last revised in 2001 and comprehensively revised in 2009.
Amendments have also been made since 20012009.

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The County Zoning Ordinance regulations apply to those unincorporated communities having
adopted county zoning (Brillion, Charlestown, New Holstein, Woodville) and within the
shoreland areas of the others (Brothertown, Chilton, Harrison, Rantoul, Stockbridge) most of the
unincorporated areas of the county in respect to the minimum standards applied in each zoning
district. The minimum standards affect land use by generally regulating or establishing standards
and procedures for development by specific land use.

The county zoning ordinance contains the
following districts:                                    Zoning Regulations Apply to:

                                                           The type of use allowed by
         Exclusive Agricultural (A-1)Wetland (W)
         Transitional Agricultural (A-2)Exclusive          permitted, conditional and
          Agricultural Wetland (EAW)                        nonconforming uses per district
                                                           The location of specific uses such as
         General Agricultural (A-3)Natural Area
          (NA)                                              commercial areas or residential areas
         Residential District (R-1)Exclusive               by designation of areas on the
          Agricultural (EA)                                 zoning map
                                                           The requirements for minimum lot
         Residential District (R-2)General
          Agricultural (GA)                                 sizes, widths, setbacks
                                                           The standards for building height,
         Multiple Family Residential District (R-
          3)Heartland (HL)                                  development density, site plans,
         Residential Planned Development District          impervious surface and
          (R-4)Small Estate Residential (SE)                administrative procedures
         Recreational (REC)Single Family
          Residential-20,000 (SF20)
         Local & Neighborhood Commercial (C-1)Single Family Residential-10,000 (SF10)
         Community and Area Wide Commercial (C-2)High Density Residential (HD)
         Commercial/Light Industrial (C-3)Mixed Use Commercial (MC)
         Industrial District (I)Recreational Commercial (RC)
         Conservancy District (CON)Commercial Center (CC)
         Town of Harrison Overlay District
          (HOD)Light Industrial (LI)                     Shoreland Area Zoning
         Industrial (I)
                                                         Regulations Apply Within:
All unincorporated areas are regulated by the
Calumet County Shoreland Ordinance as                      One thousand (1,000) feet of the
discussed later in this section. However, not all           ordinary high-water mark of
towns are under County Zoning for lands outside             navigable lakes, ponds or flowages.
of the shoreland zone.                                     Three hundred (300) feet of the
                                                            ordinary high-water mark of
To allow an understanding of the relationship that          navigable rivers or streams, or to the
land use has with zoning regulations, the                   landward side of the floodplain,
following details are provided from each Calumet            whichever distance is greater.
County zoning district. The information provided
only covers the purpose and intent of the zoning
district and some of the other most applicable information such as lot size standards to allow the

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reader to understand the intent of the zoning district and the implication of having lands
designated as such. Therefore, the information provided in the following section(s) is not a
complete representation of all regulations. In addition, where existing ordinance language
references other sections of the zoning code, those references were maintained to allow further
review as necessary. Please refer to the Calumet County Zoning Ordinance for a complete
listing.




The box below indicates the definitions of the various footnotes (*) that accompany some of the
permitted and conditional uses mentioned in this chapter.



  *Footnotes:

        1.    Such use shall not entail on-site retail sales.
        2.    Establishments with drive-through facilities shall be permitted only as provided in Sec. 82-114, Site Plan
              Review.
        3.    Restricted to businesses solely associated with farm products or to provide a farm service.
        4.    Such use shall be incorporated into a larger development and the floor area dedicated to the retail use
              shall not exceed 30% of the total floor area of the buildings which serve the development’s clientele.
        5.    Restricted to fruit processing plants only. Vegetable and cheese processing shall not be allowed.
        6.    Establishments where the total floor area of all buildings which serve a retail use on the lot exceeds
              20,000 square feet shall only be permitted as conditional uses.
        7.    Multiple Occupancy Developments, or expansions thereof, where the total number of occupancy units
              exceeds 22 units shall only be permitted as conditional uses.
        8.    Such use shall be restricted to buildings or structures lawfully in existence at the effective date of this
              chapter only and shall not be permitted in any building erected after the effective date of this chapter.
        9.    Must comply with s. 91.01(1)(d), Wis. Stats.
        10.   Must comply with s. 91.46(4), Wis. Stats.
        11.   Must comply with s. 91.46(5), Wis. Stats.
        12.   Must comply with s. 91.46(6), Wis. Stats.
        13.   Must comply with s. 91.46(2), Wis. Stats.
        14.   Must comply with s. 91.46(3), Wis. Stats.




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Exclusive Agricultural (A-1)

   Intent: The purposes of the Exclusive Agricultural District are to: (1) preserve agricultural
   land for food and fiber production; (2) protect existing farms from encroachment by
   conflicting, non-agricultural land uses; (3) maintain a viable agricultural base to support
   agricultural processing and service industries; (4) prevent conflicts between incompatible
   uses; (5) reduce costs of providing services to scattered non-farm uses; (6) properly time
   and shape non-farm growth; (7) implement the objectives of the County Farmland
   Preservation Plan, as adopted by the Calumet County Board of Supervisors; and (8) comply

This district is generally intended to include:

              The entire acreage of all existing parcels of 35 or more acres in size which are (1)
               comprised of over 50% of total acreage in Soil Conservation Service Soil Capability
               Classes I-III (inclusive), and (2) which are currently being used predominantly for
               one or more of the uses "permitted" under Section 7.012; or "conditional" under
               Section 7.013.

              Except that, any portions of such parcels which are: (1) currently being used for any
               purposes other than those listed as "Permitted" or "Conditional" under Sec. 7.012 or
               (2) which are located either entirely or partially within any of the "Growth Service
               Areas" delineated in the Growth Management Policy of the Calumet County Land
               Subdivision Regulations, shall not be included within the Exclusive Agricultural
               District:

     
                    Providing that no such resulting Exclusive Agricultural Districts shall be less than
                     one hundred (100) contiguous acres in size; and that individual, fractional parcels
                     of less than 35 acres shall not be included, unless they are part of a larger farm in
                     the county which meets all the requirements and 75% of the parcel is cropped and
                     pastured and on prime agricultural soils.
               




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Map 9-1 Zoning and Land Use Regulations




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     Permitted Uses in A-1: Permitted Uses within the A-1 district include Primary
     Agricultural Uses (as defined under S. 91.01(1) Wisconsin Statutes) and under the general
     farming definition of the zoning code:


1.  Beekeeping                                     14.   Raising of fruits, nuts and berries
2.  Animal feeding operation (commercial           15.   Sod farming
    feed lot) of less than 250 animal units        16.   Vegetable farming
3.  Dairying                                       17.   One primary farm residence
4.  Egg production                                 18.   Up to two (2) additional, single-family
5.  Floriculture                                         residences occupied by the farm owner or
6.  Fish hatcheries                                      operator or the parents or children of the
7.  Forest and game management                           owner or operator; and, of which at least
8.  Grazing                                              one of the two must be sited on a
9.  Livestock raising                                    recorded lot. Farm dwellings and other
10. Orchards                                             related structures existing prior to the
11. Plant greenhouses and nurseries. Plant               effective date of this amendment, which
    greenhouses involving no sales except for            is remaining after a farm consolidation
    those products grown on the premises.                may be separated from the farm lot.
    Nurseries involving just the growing of        19.   Public recreational trails, except
    products with no sales on premises.                  motorcycle trails.
12. Poultry raising
13. Raising of grain, grass, mint and seed
    crops
Wetland (W)

 Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to prevent the destruction and depletion of
 Calumet County’s wetlands; protect watercourses and navigable waters and the public
 rights therein; to maintain the purity of water and lakes and streams and to prevent pollution
 thereof; and to protect spawning grounds, fish, and habitat for wild flora and fauna.
 Furthermore, this district is intended to prevent the changing of the natural character of
 wetlands.The purposes of the Exclusive Agricultural District are to: (1) preserve agricultural
 land for food and fiber production; (2) protect existing farms from encroachment by
 conflicting, non-agricultural land uses; (3) maintain a viable agricultural base to support
 agricultural processing and service industries; (4) prevent conflicts between incompatible
 uses; (5) reduce costs of providing services to scattered non-farm uses; (6) properly time
 and shape non-farm growth; (7) implement the objectives of the County Farmland
 Preservation Plan, as adopted by the Calumet County Board of Supervisors; and (8) comply
 with Wisconsin's Farmland Preservation Law, to permit eligible landowners to qualify for
 tax credits under S.71.09(11).


Exclusive Agricultural Wetland (EAW)



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  Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to prevent the destruction and depletion of
  Calumet County’s wetlands; protect watercourses and navigable waters and the public
  rights therein; to maintain the purity of water and lakes and streams and to prevent pollution
  thereof; and to protect spawning grounds, fish, and habitat for wild flora and fauna.
  Furthermore, this district is intended to prevent the changing of the natural character of
  wetlands. This district is also intended to identify those wetlands shown on the Department
  of Natural Resources (DNR) Wisconsin Wetland Inventory Maps which are in excess of
  two acres in size and where the DNR Wetland Inventory Map boundaries overlay lands
  within the Exclusive Agricultural (EA) zoning district, resulting in those wetland lands
  being eligible for tax credits through Wisconsin’s Farmland Preservation Program. Uses
  shall be restricted only to those uses allowed in the Wetland (W) district.The purposes of
  the A-2 District are to: (1) provide for the orderly transition of agricultural land to other
  uses in areas planned for eventual non-agricultural expansion; and (2) defer non-agricultural
  development until the appropriate local governmental bodies determine that adequate public
  services and facilities can be provided at a reasonable cost; (3) ensure that non-agricultural
  development is compatible with local land use plans and policies; (4) provide periodic
  review to determine whether all or part of the lands should be transferred to another zoning
  district. Such review shall occur: (a) a minimum of every five years; (b) upon revision of a
  county agricultural preservation plan or municipal land use plan which affects lands in the
  district; or (c) upon extension of public services such as sewer and water, necessary to serve
  non-agricultural development.


Permitted Accessory Uses

1.     Accessory uses, customarily incidental to the single-family residences permitted above,
       such as those listed in the Residential District.
2.     One (1) roadside stand per farm, used solely for sale of products produced on the premises.
3.     Accessory uses clearly related but incidental to the primary farm operation such as, but not
       limited to, seed sales, grain drying, fertilizer sales, and minor repair of farm equipment.
       Any accessory use in this category must be clearly interpreted by the County Code
       Administrator as being "subordinate to and customarily incidental to" a pre-existing,
       permitted principal use on the same premises.




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Transitional Agricultural (A-2)

Theis W and EAW districts is generally intended to include:

         Uses which do not require the issuance of a zoning permit, which must be carried out
          without any filling, draining, flooding, dredging, ditching, tiling or excavating:
           Hiking, fishing, trapping, hunting, swimming and boating. In the EAW district such
             uses are only allowed as a private, non-commercial use.
           The harvesting of wild crops such as marsh hay, ferns, moss, wild rice, berries, tree
             fruits, and tree seeds in the manner that is not injurious to the natural reproduction of
             such crops.
           The pasturing of livestock.
           The cultivation of the agricultural crops.
           The practice of silviculture, including the planting, thinning and harvesting of timber,
             subject to the requirements of Sec. 82-80, Woodlands.
           The construction or maintenance of duck blinds and deer stands.


         Uses which do not require the issuance of a zoning permit and which may include limited
          filling, flooding, draining, dredging, ditching, tiling, or excavating, but only to the extent
          specifically provided below:
           Temporary water and stabilization measures necessary to alleviate abnormally wet or
               dry conditions that would have an adverse impact on silvicultural activities if not
               corrected.
           The cultivation of cranberries including flooding, dike and dam construction, or
               ditching necessary for the growing and harvesting of cranberries.
           The maintenance and repair of existing agricultural drainage systems where
               permissible by s. 30.20, Wis. Stats., including ditching, tiling, dredging, excavating,
               and filling necessary to maintain the level of drainage required to continue the
               existing agricultural use. This includes the minimum filling necessary for disposal of
               dredge spoil adjacent to the drainage system, provided that the filling is permissible
               by Ch. 30, Wis. Stats., and that the dredge spoil is placed on existing spoil banks
               where possible.
           The construction or maintenance of fences for pasturing livestock, including limited
               excavating and filling necessary for such construction or maintenance.
           The construction or maintenance of piers, docks or walkways built on pilings,
               including limited excavating and filling necessary for such construction and
               maintenance.
           The maintenance, repair, replacement, or reconstruction of existing town and County
               highways and bridges, including limited excavating and filling necessary for such
               maintenance, repair, replacement, or reconstruction.

         Uses which require the issuance of a regular zoning permit and which may include
          limited filling, flooding, draining, dredging, ditching, tiling, or excavating, but only to the
          extent specifically provided below:
           Roads. The construction and maintenance of roads, which are necessary to conduct
              silvicultural activities or agricultural cultivation, subject to the following conditions:

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                 The road cannot, as a practical manner, be located outside the wetland.
                The road is designed and constructed to minimize adverse impact upon the natural
                  functions of the wetland.
                The road is designed and constructed with the minimum cross section to serve the
                  intended use.
                Road construction activities are carried out in the immediate areas of the roadbed
                  only.
               Roads in the EAW district must meet the requirements of s. 91.46(4), Wis. Stats.

              Buildings. The construction and maintenance of non-residential buildings, subject to
               the following conditions:
                The building is essential for and is used solely in conjunction with the raising of
                   waterfowl, minnows, or other wetland or aquatic animals or some use permitted in
                   the Wetland district.
                The building cannot, as a practical matter, be located outside the wetland.
                Such building is not designed for human habitation and does not exceed 500
                   square feet in floor area.
                Only limited filling or excavating necessary to provide structural support for the
                   building shall be allowed.
                Buildings in the EAW district are permitted uses if they meet the requirements of
                   s. 91.44, Wis. Stats., or, permitted as conditional uses if they meet the
                   requirements of s. 91.46, Wis. Stats.

              Recreational and Misc. Uses. The establishment of public and private parks and
               recreation areas, natural and outdoor education areas, historic and scientific areas,
               wildlife refuges, game preserves and private wildlife habitat areas, and public boat
               launching ramps and attendant access routes, subject to the following:
                Any private wildlife habitat areas shall be used exclusively for that purpose.
                Filling or excavating necessary for the construction and maintenance of public
                   boat launching ramps or attendant access roads is allowed only where such
                   construction or maintenance meets the criteria in, Roads.
                Ditching, excavating, dredging, or dike and dam construction in public and
                   private parks and recreation areas, natural and outdoor education areas, historic
                   and scientific areas, wildlife refuges, and game preserves and private wildlife
                   habitat and to otherwise enhance wetland values.
                In the EAW, such uses are only allowed provided they also meet the requirements
                   of s. 91.46(5), Wis. Stats.

              Utilities. The construction or maintenance of electric, gas, telephone, water and
               sewer transmission distribution facilities by public utilities and cooperative
               associations organized for the purpose of producing or furnishing such services to
               their members and the construction or maintenance of railroad lines subject to the
               following standards:
                The transmission and distribution facilities of railroad lines cannot, as a practical
                   matter, be located outside the wetland.
                Such construction or maintenance is done in a manner designed to minimize
                   adverse impacts upon the natural function of the wetland.

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               In the EAW district, such uses are only allowed provided they meet the
                requirements of s. 91.46, Wis. Stats.
     The entire acreage of all existing parcels of 35 or more acres in size, which are:
        1.    Comprised of over 50% of total acreage in Soil Conservation Service Soil
              Capability Classes I-III (inclusive),
        2.    Currently being used predominantly for one or more of the uses listed in Section
              7.012, or conditional uses listed in Sec. 7.013.
        3.    At least partially located within any of the "Growth Service Areas" delineated in the
              Growth Management Policy of the Calumet County Land Subdivision Regulations;
              or shown as "Transitional Areas" in the Calumet County Farmland Preservation
              Plan.

     Providing   that no such resulting Transitional Agricultural Districts shall be less than thirty-
          five (35) contiguous acres in size and that individual, fractional parcels of less than 35
          acres shall not be included, unless they are part of a larger farm in the county which does
          meet all of the requirements and 75% of the parcel is cropped and pastured and on prime
          agricultural soils.


Agricultural (A)Natural Area

  Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to conserve the existing, mostly
  undeveloped natural areas of Calumet County. This district may be used in upland areas
  adjacent to, or surrounded by wetland areas, or in other areas where natural features are
  considered significant. To conserve these areas, commercial and industrial uses are
  disallowed, but general agricultural, passive recreational, and some institutional uses are
  permitted. This district may also include wetland areas. All wetland areas in this district
  which lie in a shoreland area are subject to the use restriction identified in, Uses
  Pertaining to the Wetland District. This agricultural district provides for the continuation
  of general agriculture and related uses in those areas suited to farming. The intent is to
  conserve areas with adequate soil types, drainage and topography for farming and to
  regulate residential, commercial and industrial development in such areas.


  Minimum Lot Size: 1 acre




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     Special AccessoryPermitted Uses in NA: These uses are permitted by right, provided all
     requirements of the zoning chapter are met:Any of the following uses are permitted as
     accessory uses, if in full compliance with the following special provisions:
     Any of the following uses are permitted as accessory uses, if in full compliance with the
     following special provisions:


      1. General agriculture.Small engine repair and welding activities in conjunction with the
         pre-existing agricultural use.
      2. Private stables and paddocks.Farm implement repair activities in conjunction with the
         pre-existing agricultural use.
      3. Tree/shrub nurseries*1.Contractor's storage activities.
      4. Cemeteries.Such proposed Special Accessory Use must be clearly interpreted, by an
         authorized county employee, as being "subordinate to and customarily incidental to" a
         pre-existing, permitted, principal use on the same premises, and
      5. Churches.Compliance with all other general provisions of Section 6.02 of this ordinance,
         except no such structures shall exceed twenty (20) feet in height.
      6. Camping.
      7. Parks and recreational trails.
      8. Private riding stables.
      9. Utility facilities – Type A.

     Conditional Uses in NA: These uses are not permitted by right; rather, their allowance is
     subject to the discretionary judgment of the Planning, Zoning and Farmland Preservation
     Committee.

a      Trailer camps, campgrounds and               m. Veterinary Clinics
       manufactured home parks                      n. Commercial animal kennels and/or
b.     Fur farms and the processing of                 breeding activities structure.
       agricultural products such as but not        c. One structure permitted
       limited to by specific enumeration,          d. No commercial activity allowed to be
       canning, dairy processing, livestock            conducted.
       butcheries, livestock sales facilities or    e. Size and height of structure must be
       grain milling.                                  reviewed to determine compatibility.
c.     Junk or salvage yards                        f. Existing structure(s) that are not accessory
d.     Solid waste disposal sites including         g. Must comply with b, d, and e as listed
       concrete, stone and other demolition            above.
       materials from building or construction      h. Contractor's storage structures, provided:
       projects.                                    i. Use limited to one permanent building not
e.     Quarrying and mineral extraction or             to exceed 2,400 square feet.
       placement and deposition of such             j. Usage of building be limited to storage
       materials.                                      purposes only - sales or other commercial
f.     Saw mills                                       activity not permitted.
g.     Golf courses - Type A                        k. All equipment and supplies to be housed
h.     Golf Driving Ranges                             within enclosed building.
i.     Recreational Complex                         l. Such proposed building is permitted only
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j.    Private aircraft landing fields and facilities      as an accessory building (meaning that the
k.    Sales and servicing facilities for                  principle structure must precede said
      agricultural related machinery or                   accessory building).
      equipment.                                       m. No such structure shall exceed eighteen
l.    Wastewater and/or sewage treatment                  (18) feet in total height.
      facilities (except for individual, on-site       n. Facilities for centralized collection and
      sewage disposal facilities such as septic           bulk storage of agricultural products.
      tank-filter field, holding tanks, or alternate   o. The storage and sale of feed, fertilizer and
      sewage disposal systems.)                           other products essential to agricultural
                                                          production, if not considered an accessory
p.    Ammunition manufacturing and wholesale              use under 7.012 (b)(3) of this ordinance.
      distribution                                     v. Day Care Center
q.    Sportsmen's clubs and related activities to      w Bed and Breakfast
      include, but not limited to; rifle ranges,       x. Telecommunication Facilities
      field shooting and the authorized raising
      of small game.
r.    The temporary storage and mixing of
      cement, asphalt, or road oils
s.    Mini-warehousing and nonagricultural
      related storage facilities.
t.    New construction
u.    Use must be interpreted by Planning
      Department staff as being accessory to the
      pre-existing permitted, principle use on
      the same premises.
v.    All material, equipment must be housed
      within an enclosed area.
     1. Greenhouses*1.
     2. Commercial stables and paddocks.
     3. Bed and breakfast establishments*8.
     4. Commercial fishing facilities.
     5. Personal transport vendors.
     6. Wineries/micro breweries.
     7. Sawmills/planing mills.
     8. Private schools.
     9. Travelers’ information centers.
     10. Campgrounds/trailer camps.
     11. Commercial riding stables.
     12. Gun clubs/shooting ranges.
     13. Institutional recreation camps.
     14. Retreat centers.
     15. Ski resorts.
     16. Farm related residences.
     17. Single-family residences/lots separate from farm parcels.




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Residential District (R-1)Exclusive Agricultural (EA)

  Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to protect the agricultural industry from
  scattered non-agricultural development that may displace agricultural uses and is,
  therefore, not intended to accommodate future non-agricultural growth. Although some
  residential development is allowed, it is limited in density and location so as to not be
  incompatible with the agricultural operations and uses of the EA district. This district is
  intended to help implement recommendations of the Calumet County Farmland
  Preservation Plan, as specified in Ch. 91, Wis. Stats., and thereby establishing eligibility
  for tax credits for farm owners as provided in Ch. 71, Wis. Stats. It is further intended
  this district apply to lands identified as farmland preservation areas in the Calumet
  County Farmland Preservation Plan, and, include productive farm operations; those
  operations which have historically exhibited crop yields, or capable of such yields; have
  demonstrated productivity for dairying, livestock raising, and grazing; have been used
  for production of specialty crops such as tree and plant materials, fruits and vegetables;
  or have been integral parts of such farm operations. Uses in this district shall only be
  established if in full compliance with Ch. 91, Wis. Stats.
   To provide for high quality year-round residential development in and around the
  existing villages and communities in order to make it more reasonable to provide these
  developments with the necessary municipal services, such as sewer and water facilities
  and fire protection. The criteria of this district is designed to provide reliable single-
  family home sites in those developing areas which offer a "suburban" arrangement of
  amenities, services, facilities, etc.

  Minimum Lot Size: Residential Development = 1 acre
                    All Other Development = 35 acres12,500 square feet if served by
             sewer, 20,000 square feet if not served by sewer

Permitted uses in the EAR-1 district include:

     1.   General agriculture.
     2.   Greenhouses*9.
     3.   Exclusive agriculture.
     4.   Roadside stands.
     5.   Private stables and paddocks.
     6.   Tree/shrub nurseries.
     7.   Family day care homes*9.
     8.   Home occupations*8,9.
     9.   Community living arrangements as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.

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     10. Private riding stables.
     11. Farm related residences.
     12. Single family residences/lots separate from farm parcels*13.

     1.
     2. One family dwellings
     Public park and recreation areas, churches, schools, historic sites
     Horticulture and gardening but not including commercial greenhouses.
     Telephone, telegraph and power transmission poles and lines, including transformers,
        equipment housings and other necessary appurtenant equipment and structures provided
        there is no service garage or storage yard.
     Home occupations
     Crop farming
     Public swimming pools


       Conditional Uses in EA: These uses are not permitted by right; rather, their allowance is
       subject to the discretionary judgment of the Planning, Zoning and Farmland Preservation
       Committee.


     1. Farm markets*9.
     2. Commercial stables and paddocks*9.
     3. Bed and breakfast establishments*8,9.
     4. Boardinghouses*9.
     5. Commercial trucking establishments*3,9.
     6. Farm implement sales/service.
     7. Fertilizer distribution plants.
     8. Home businesses*3,8,9.
     9. Trade or contractor establishments*3,9.
     10. Veterinarian clinics*3,9.
     11. Bulk storage of fuel products*3,9.
     12. Fruit/vegetable/cheese processing plants*3,9.
     13. Manufacturing, assembly, processing*3,9.
     14. Nonmetallic mining*12.
     15. Sawmills/planning mills*3.
     16. Slaughterhouses*3.
     17. Temporary asphalt/concrete plants*11.
     18. Churches*11.
     19. Community living arrangements as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     20. Private schools*8,9.
     21. Public schools*8,11.
     22. Public highway garages*11.
     23. Town halls/community centers*11.
     24. Commercial riding stables*9.
     25. Parks and recreational trails*11.
     26. Single family residences/lots separate from farm parcels*14.
     27. Airports and landing fields, governmental*11.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-16                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     28. Utility facilities – Type A*10.
     29. Utility facilities – Type B*10.
     30. Commercial communication towers, antennas, transmitters>75’ but <200’*10.
     31. Communication towers, antennas, transmitters>200’*10.
     32. Temporary MET towers*10.
     33. Permanent MET towers*10.
     34. Commercial wind energy facilities/other commercial renewable energy facilities*10.

General Agricultural (GA)

  Purpose and Intent. This district is intended to maintain agricultural lands, which have
  historically demonstrated high agricultural productivity. It is also intended to accommodate
  certain non-agricultural uses, which require spacious areas to operate where natural resource
  exploitation occurs. Lands eligible for designation in this district shall generally include
  those designated as farmland preservation areas in the Calumet County Farmland
  Preservation Plan. This district is also intended to provide farmland owners with additional
  management options by allowing limited residential development, or with residential density
  limits and other requirements set so as to maintain the rural characteristics of this district.

  Minimum Lot Size: Residential Development = 1 acre
                    All Other Development = 20 acres



Permitted uses in the GA district include:

     1. Farm markets (subject to site plan review procedures).
     2. General agriculture.
     3. Greenhouses.
     4. Exclusive agriculture.
     5. Roadside stands.
     6. Private stables and paddocks.
     7. Commercial stables and paddocks (subject to site plan review procedures).
     8. Tree/shrub nurseries.
     9. Bed and breakfast establishments*8.
     10. Boardinghouses.
     11. Commercial fishing facilities.
     12. Family day care homes.
     13. Farm implement sales/service (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Home occupations.
     15. Kennels (subject to site plan review procedures).
     16. Lumber/building supply (subject to site plan review procedures).
     17. Veterinarian clinics (subject to site plan review procedures).
     18. Wineries/micro breweries (subject to site plan review procedures).
     19. Temporary asphalt/concrete plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
     20. Cemeteries.
     21. Churches.

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                            Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-17
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     22. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     23. Fire/police stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     24. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     25. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     26. Public highway garages (subject to site plan review procedures).
     27. Town halls/community centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     28. Camping.
     29. Commercial riding stables (subject to site plan review procedures).
     30. Golf courses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     31. Parks and recreational trails
     32. Private riding stables.
     33. Public boat launching facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     34. Farm related residences.
     35. Single family residences.
     36. Single family residences/lots separate from farm parcels.
     37. Temporary manufactured homes.
     38. Airstrips and landing fields, governmental (subject to site plan review procedures).
     39. Airstrips and landing fields, private.
     40. Utility facilities – Type A.
     41. Commercial communication towers, antennas, transmitters>75’ but <200’ (subject to site
         plan review procedures).
     42. Noncommercial communication towers, antennas, transmitter<200’.
     43. Communication towers, antennas, transmitters>200’ (subject to site plan review
         procedures).
     44. Temporary MET towers.
     45. Permanent MET towers.

       Conditional Uses in GA: These uses are not permitted by right; rather, their allowance is
       subject to the discretionary judgment of the Planning, Zoning and Farmland Preservation
       Committee.


     1. Art galleries.
     2. Commercial trucking establishments*3.
     3. Commercial storage facilities*3.
     4. Fertilizer distribution plants.
     5. Home businesses*8
     6. Animal shelters/pounds.
     7. Taxi and limousine service.
     8. Trade or contractor establishments.
     9. Ammunition manufacturing and wholesale distribution..
     10. Asphalt/concrete plants.
     11. Bulk storage of fuel products*3.
     12. Fruit/vegetable/cheese processing plants*3.
     13. Manufacturing, assembly, processing*3.
     14. Nonmetallic mining.
     15. Resource recovery facilities.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-18                      Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                    Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     16. Salvage yards.
     17. Sawmills/planning mills*3.
     18. Sewage disposal/treatment plants.
     19. Slaughterhouses*3.
     20. Solid waste facilities.
     21. Wholesale establishments/distributors*3.
     22. Campgrounds/trailer camps.
     23. Gun clubs/shooting ranges.
     24. Institutional recreation camps.
     25. Retreat centers.
     26. Airports.
     27. Airports and landing fields, commercial.
     28. Utility facilities – Type B.
     29. Commercial wind energy facilities/other commercial renewable energy facilities.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                       Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-19
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     Residential District (R-2)Heartland (HL)

   Purpose and Intent: This district is primarily intended for mostly rural areas of
   Calumet County where agricultural activity has been declining or is threatened, but
   where a mixture of rural residential and agricultural activity is desirable or existing. The
   district primarily provides for residential development at modest densities consistent with
   the generally rural environment and also provides for certain non-residential uses that
   require relatively large land areas and/or which are compatible with surrounding
   residential uses. This district secondarily provides for continued agricultural uses of land.
   Lands eligible for designation in this district shall generally include those designated as
   farmland preservation areas in the Calumet County Farmland Preservation Plan. To
   provide a lot size and associated standards for a home site which will accommodate the
   use of a duplex housing type. Since the two-family dwelling produces a divergent
   occupancy pattern from that of the traditional single-family dwelling, duplex zoning
   when desired should be applied on a district basis. This zoning should be applied
   adjacent to but not within the character of the single-family neighborhood in which it is
   to be located.

   Minimum Lot Size: Manufactured Home Park = 5 acres
                     Planned Residential Development = varies
                     Residential Development = 1 acre
                     All Other Development = 10 acres
                     15,000 square feet if served by sewer, 30,000 square feet if not
              served by sewer

Permitted uses in the R-2HL district include:

     1.        General agriculture.Two-family Dwelling
     2. Greenhouses.
     3. Roadside stands.
     4. Private stables and paddocks.New farm buildings on any existing farm, provided that
        buildings in which farm animals are kept shall be at least 100 feet from the nearest
        existing residence on a nonfarm lot. New farm buildings housing animals, barnyards or
        feed lots shall be at least 100 feet from any lakes, ponds, or continuous streams as defined
        by United States Geological Survey (USGS) Quadrangle maps.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-20                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     5.         Tree/shrub nurseries.All permitted uses of the R-1 District
     6. Bed and breakfast establishments*8.
     7. Boardinghouses.
     8. Family day care homes.
     9. Farm implement sales/service (subject to site plan review procedures).
     10. Home occupations.
     11. Kennels (subject to site plan review procedures).
     12. Lumber/building supply yards (subject to site plan review procedures).
     13. Veterinarian clinics (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Wineries/micro breweries (subject to site plan review procedures).
     15. Temporary asphalt/concrete plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
     16. Cemeteries.
     17. Churches.
     18. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     19. Fire/police station (subject to site plan review procedures).
     20. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     21. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     22. Public highway garages (subject to site plan review procedures). .
     23. Town halls/community centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     24. Camping.
     25. Commercial riding stables (subject to site plan review procedures).
     26. Golf courses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     27. Parks and recreational trails.
     28. Private riding stables.
     29. Public boat launching facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     30. Duplexes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     31. Farm related residences.
     32. Manufactured homes.
     33. Single-family residences.
     34. Single-family residences/lots separate from farm parcels.
     35. Temporary manufactured homes.
     36. Airstrips and landing fields, governmental (subject to site plan review procedures).
     37. Airstrips and landing fields, private (subject to site plan review procedures).
     38. Utility facilities – Type A.
     39. Noncommercial communication towers, antennas, transmitter<200’ (subject to site plan
         review procedures).
     40. Temporary MET towers.
     41. Permanent MET towers (subject to site plan review procedures).

Multiple Family Residential District (R-3)Small Estate Residential (SE)




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                      Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-21
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
   Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to provide for single-family residential
   and planned residential development on smaller lots at a slightly higher density than the
   Heartland district. The district is intended for residential areas where high density is
   inappropriate or undesirable and for transitional areas that are beginning to convert from
   undeveloped land to residential uses. To provide residential development which provides
   rental housing to be built within the economics of scale while retaining a relatively low
   density pattern. The use of this district shall be applied to those locations in which it will
   be compatible with surrounding uses. Also where the increased density would not create
   a service problem and where the use will accommodate both the existing or anticipated
   character of the surrounding area.

   Minimum Lot Size: Planned Residential Development = varies
                      Residential Development = 2 acres
                      All Other Development = 5 acres
                      20,000 square feet
                      Lots should provide a minimum of the following square feet per
              dwelling unit; up to 4 units-5,000 square feet; up to 6 units-4,500 square
              feet.; over 6 units-4,000 square feet.

Permitted uses in the R-3SE district include:

     1. General agriculture.
     1. Multiple family dwellings - only on lots provided with public sewer unless application
         applies to existing structures. Site Plan approval required of Planning and Zoning
         Committee.
     2.         Roadside stands.All permitted uses of Section 7.041 (B) of the ordinance.
     3. Bed and breakfast establishments*8.
     4. Family day care homes.
     5. Home occupations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     6. Model homes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     7. Cemeteries.
     8. Churches (subject to site plan review procedures).
     9. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     10. Fire/police stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     11. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     12. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     13. Town halls/community centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Camping.
     15. Commercial riding stables (subject to site plan review procedures).
     16. Golf courses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     17. Parks and recreational trails.
     18. Private riding stables.
     19. Public boat launching facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     20. Duplexes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     21. Planned residential developments (subject to site plan review procedures).

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-22                         Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                       Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     22. Single family residences.
     23. Single family residences/lots separate from farm parcels.
     24. Airstrips and landing fields, governmental (subject to site plan review procedures).
     25. Airstrips and landing fields, private (subject to site plan review procedures).
     26. Utility facilities – Type A.
     27. Noncommercial communication towers, antennas, transmitter<200’ (subject to site plan
         review procedures).
     28. Temporary MET towers (subject to site plan review procedures).




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                      Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-23
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Residential Planned Development District (R-4)Single Family Residential-20,000 (SF20)

   Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to provide for exclusive single-family
   residential and planned residential development at fairly high densities. Generally, these
   districts will be located along the waterfront and in or near existing communities where
   smaller lots dominate the development pattern. The permitted uses are restricted in order
   to maintain strictly residential character of these areas.
   The purpose of the R-4 Residential Planned Development District is to provide the
   means whereby land may be planned and developed as a unit for residential uses under
   standards and conditions which afford flexibility; encourage good design; open spaces;
   the preservation of natural features, and to minimize the present and future burdens upon
   the community as a whole, which result from poor planning.

   Minimum Lot Size: Planned Residential Development = varies
                      All Other Development = 20,000 square feet
                      10,000 square feet for single family dwellings, 5,000 square feet
              for each row house or apartment, and 12,000 square feet for duplexes

   In Cluster Subdivisions the grouping or residences will permit individual lot sizes to be
   reduced, provided that the overall density within the development is maintained. The
   remaining undeveloped area shall be required to remain a common open space,
   preferably on the shoreline if the subdivision is located in a shore area, in perpetuity.
   Such grouping of residences facilitates common water supply and sewage disposal
   systems. Such developments shall be site designed as a total unit development and may
   be developed by subunits in accordance to the approved overall site plan. Developments
   of this type shall not be built on unsewered lots.

   Minimum Lot Size: 3 acres under one ownership

Permitted uses in the R-4SF20 district include:

     1.         Family day care homes.Clustered single family lot developments. Site Plan
         approval required of Planning and Zoning Committee.
     2. Home occupations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     3. Model homes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     4.         Cemeteries.Two Family dwellings. Site Plan approval required of Planning and
         Zoning Committee.
     5. Churches (subject to site plan review procedures).
     6. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     7. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     8. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     9. Parks and recreational trails.
     10. Public boat launching facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     11. Planned residential developments (subject to site plan review procedures).
     12. Single family residences.
     13. Utility facilities – Type A.

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-24                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     3.Multi-family dwellings. Site Plan approval required of Planning and Zoning Committee.
     4.Any permitted use in the R-1 and R-2 Residence District.
     5.Accessory uses, structures, and amenities in the approved development plan.

Recreational (REC)Single Family Residential-10,000 (SF10)

   Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to provide for single-family residential
   and planned residential development at slightly higher densities than the Single Family
   Residential-20,000 district. Generally, this district will be located in or near existing
   communities where public sewer and water are available. Due to state limitations on the
   size of lots in a shoreland area, lands in the shoreland area shall not be zoned SF10. The
   permitted uses are generally the same as those in Single Family Residential-20,000
   district.Provides for the continuation of some agricultural uses and the development of
   those recreational uses that are consistent with the maximum recreational use of the
   water and its shoreland. The development of some residential uses is permitted
   providing that adequate sewage disposal facilities can be provided.

   Minimum Lot Size: Planned Residential Development = varies
                         All Other Development: Sewered and Non-Sewered = 10,000
                         Sewered in Harrison = 7,500 square feet
   Single family - 10,000 square feet, duplexes – 15,000 square feet if served by sewer.
   Single family – 20,000 square feet, duplexes – 30,000 if not served by sewer

Permitted uses in the SF10 district include:

     1. Family day care homes.
     2. Model homes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     3. Cemeteries.
     4. Churches (subject to site plan review procedures).
     5. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     6. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     7. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     8. Parks and recreational trails.
     9. Public boat launching facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     10. Planned residential developments (subject to site plan review procedures).
     11. Single family residences.
     12. Utility facilities – Type A.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                         Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-25
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Local and Neighborhood Commercial (C-1)High Density (HD)

   Intent: This district is intended to provide areas for a variety of residential uses,
   including multiple occupancy development, manufactured home parks, and single family
   residential development at fairly high densities. This district is intended to be located in
   areas with an existing mixture of residential types, certain regions that are served by
   public sewer, and other locations where high density residential developments are
   appropriate. This district is not intended to develop into centers with commercial activity
   and, thus, most commercial uses are not permitted. These lots are typically located where
   sewer and water are available.This commercial district is intended to provide for the
   orderly and attractive grouping of convenient locations of local retail stores, shops,
   offices and establishments serving the daily needs of the neighborhood.

   Minimum Lot Size: Multiple Occupancy Development (Non-shore) = 2 acres
                     Manufactured Home Park (Non-shore) = 20,000 square feet
                     Planned Residential Development (Non-shore) = varies
                     All Other Development: Sewered and Non-Sewered (Non-shore)
                                             = 16,200 square feet
                     All Development in a Shoreland Area = 20,000 square feet

Permitted uses in the HD district include:

     1.         Banks*2.Retail stores and shops offering convenience goods and services
     2.         Bed and breakfast establishments*8.Business and professional offices and studios
     3.         Boardinghouses.Banks and savings and loan offices
     4.         Day care centers (subject to site plan review procedures).Post offices
     5.         Family day care homes.Restaurants
     6.         Home occupations.Dental and medical clinics
     7.         Model homes.Public and semi-public buildings and institutions
     8.         Private lodges and clubs.Telephone buildings, telephone, telegraph and power
         transmission towers, poles and lines, including transformers, substations, relay and
         repeater stations, equipment housings and other necessary appurtenant equipment and
         structures; radio and television stations and transmission towers and microwave relay
         towers
     9.         Restaurants or taverns*4 (subject to site plan review procedures). Museums
     10.        Taxi and limousine service.Veterinary Clinics (not to include any type of
         commercial animal kennels and/or breeding activities)
     11.        Veterinarian clinics.Cemeteries, mausoleums, crematories and funeral homes
     12. Cemeteries.
     13. Churches (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     15. Post offices (subject to site plan review procedures).
     16. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     17. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     18. Town halls/community centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     19. Golf courses (subject to site plan review procedures).

Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-26                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     20. Parks and recreational trails.
     21. Public boat launching facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     22. Duplexes.
     23. Zero lot lines duplexes.
     24. Manufactured homes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     25. Manufactured home parks (subject to site plan review procedures).
     26. Multiple occupancy developments*7 (subject to site plan review procedures).
     27. Planned residential developments (subject to site plan review procedures).
     28. Single family residences.
     29. Utility facilities – Type A.

Community and Area Wide Commercial (C-2)Mixed Use Commercial

   Intent: This district permits both residential and commercial uses and is designed to
   accommodate those areas of Calumet County with an existing desirable mixture of uses,
   or such a mixture of uses is desired. Typically, this district will be located within or near
   existing communities but it is also intended for outlying or smaller nodes of
   development. In addition, this district can be used as a transition between business
   centers and strictly residential areas.This district is intended to provide for grouping at
   convenient locations, larger community orientated retail stores, shops, offices and
   establishments serving the needs of the area, rather than just the local neighborhood.
   Higher levels of traffic and activity would be expected in this district.

Permitted uses in the MC district include:

     1.        Farm markets.All uses listed in C-1 district
     2.        Greenhouses (subject to site plan review procedures).Rest homes and homes for
        aged
     3.        Art galleries.Drive-in establishments serving food or beverages to customers other
        than at a booth or table
     4.        Auto sales & service (subject to site plan review procedures). New and used car
        sales
     5.        Banks*2.Farm implement sales
     6.        Bed and breakfast establishments*8.Golf driving ranges
     7.        Boardinghouses.Laundromats
     8.        Day care centers (subject to site plan review procedures). Auto service stations
        and maintenance facilities
     9.        Family day care homes.Wastewater and/or sewage treatment facilities (except for
        individual, on-site sewage disposal facilities such as septic tank filter fields, holding
        tanks, or alternate sewage disposal systems)
     10.       Home businesses (subject to site plan review procedures).Day Care Center
     11.       Home occupations.Municipal and private water towers
     12.       Laundromats and laundry service.Commercial entertainment facilities
     13.       Medical/dental clinics.Small repair shops
     14.       Model homes.Rooming and boarding houses, hotels and motels
     15.       Passenger bus terminals (subject to site plan review procedures).Commercial
        greenhouses

Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                           Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-27
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
    16.         Personal service establishments.Recreational complex, commercial
    17. Private lodges and clubs.
    18. Professional offices/studios.
    19. Radio/TV stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
    20. Recreational/fishing equipment sales (subject to site plan review procedures).
    21. Recreational vehicle sales/service (subject to site plan review procedures).
    22. Restaurants or taverns*2.
    23. Retail stores*6.
    24. Taxi and limousines service.
    25. Veterinarian.
    26. Cemeteries.
    27. Churches.
    28. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
    29. Fire/police stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
    30. Institutional residential (subject to site plan review procedures).
    31. Libraries/museums.
    32. Post offices.
    33. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
    34. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
    35. Public highway garages (subject to site plan review procedures).
    36. Town halls/community centers.
    37. Travelers’ information centers.
    38. Marinas/excursion/boating/charter fishing.
    39. Parks and recreational trails.
    40. Public boat launching facilities.
    41. Retreat centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
    42. Ski resorts (subject to site plan review procedures).
    43. Accessory residences.
    44. Duplexes.
    45. Zero lot line duplex.
    46. Multiple occupancy developments*7 (subject to site plan review procedures).
    47. Planned residential developments (subject to site plan review procedures).
    48. Single family residences.
    49. Municipal/commercial parking lots (subject to site plan review procedures).
    50. Utility facilities – Type A.

Commercial/Light Industrial (C-3)Recreational Commercial (RC)


   Purpose and Intent: This district is intended for Calumet County’s resort areas,
   particularly areas where high concentration of recreational uses are desired or located or
   are appropriate. These areas are not intended to develop into business districts, and, thus,
   many retail, office, and service uses are restricted or prohibited in favor of recreational
   uses such as golf courses, resorts, multiple occupancy developments, marinas and
   restaurants.
   The intent of this district is to provide for the development of areas where activity and
   usage are more intense than in the C-1 or C-2 district. These uses are generally
   considered quasi commercial/industrial or light industrial. These districts, due to actual
   physical and operational  9-28
Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC characteristics, need to be carefully established to ensure and Trends Report
                                                                                 Calumet County Inventory
   compatibility with surrounding areas.                                          Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Permitted uses in the RC district include:

     1.         Art galleries.All uses listed in C-1 and C-2 including the following:
     2.         Bed and breakfast establishments*8.Wholesaling establishment
     3.         Family day care homes.Lumber and building supply yards
     4.         Laundromats and laundry services (subject to site plan review procedures).Auto
         Body Shop
     5.         Model homes.Gas Station/Convenience Store
     6.         Private lodges and clubs.Contractors
     7. Recreational/fishing equipment sales (subject to site plan review procedures).
     8. Restaurants or taverns (subject to site plan review procedures).
     9. Cemeteries.
     10. Churches.
     11. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     12. Libraries/museums
     13. Post offices (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     15. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     16. Town halls/community centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     17. Travelers’ information centers.
     18. Commercial riding stables (subject to site plan review procedures).
     19. Golf courses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     20. Marinas/excursion/boating/charter fishing.
     21. Outdoor theatre (subject to site plan review procedures).
     22. Parks and recreational trails.
     23. Private riding stables.
     24. Public boat launching facilities.
     25. Accessory residences.
     26. Duplexes.
     27. Zero lot line duplex.
     28. Multiple occupancy developments*7 (subject to site plan review procedures).
     29. Single family residences.
     30. Municipal/commercial parking lots (subject to site plan review procedures).
     31. Utility facilities – Type A.

With the exclusion of;
   7.Rooming and Boarding Houses
   8.Rest homes and Homes for Aged
   9.Day Care Center




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                       Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-29
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Industrial District (I)Commercial Center (CC)


 Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to provide centers for commercial and
 mixed-use development and redevelopment. The district permits a wide variety of retail,
 service, and office uses and is intended to maintain the vitality of Calumet County’s
 commercial centers. It should be established for the main business districts of existing
 communities.
 The industrial district is intended to provide for any manufacturing or industrial
 operation which, on the basis of actual physical and operational characteristics, would
 not be detrimental to the surrounding area or the county as a whole by reason of noise,
 dust, smoke, odor, traffic, physical appearance or other similar factors and subject to
 such regulatory controls as will reasonably ensure compatibility in this respect.
Permitted uses in the CC district include:

     1.         Farm markets.Manufacture, assembly fabrication, and processing plants and
         similar type industrial operations
     2.         Greenhouses (subject to site plan review procedures).General warehousing
     3.         Art galleries.Lumber and building supply yards
     4.         Auto sales & service lot.Saw mills
     5.         Banks*2.Contractors
     6.         Bed and breakfast establishments*8.Transportation Terminal
     7.         Boardinghouses.Wholesaling Establishment
     8. Commercial fishing facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     9. Conference facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     10. Day care centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     11. Farm implement sales/service (subject to site plan review procedures).
     12. Gas stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     13. Home businesses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Home occupations.
     15. Laundromats and laundry service.
     16. Lumber/building supply yards (subject to site plan review procedures).
     17. Medical/dental clinics.
     18. Model homes.
     19. Passenger bus terminals (subject to site plan review procedures).
     20. Personal service establishments.
     21. Private lodges and clubs.
     22. Professional offices and studios.
     23. Radio/TV stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     24. Recreational/fishing equipment sales.
     25. Recreational vehicle sales/service (subject to site plan review procedures).
     26. Restaurants or taverns*2.
     27. Retail stores*6.
     28. Taxi and limousine service.
     29. Veterinarian clinics.
     30. Wineries/micro breweries (subject to site plan review procedures).

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     31. Cemeteries.
     32. Churches.
     33. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     34. Fire/police stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     35. Hospitals (subject to site plan review procedures).
     36. Institutional residential (subject to site plan review procedures).
     37. Libraries/museums
     38. Post offices.
     39. Private schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     40. Public schools (subject to site plan review procedures).
     41. Public highway garages (subject to site plan review procedures).
     42. Town halls/community centers.
     43. Travelers’ information centers.
     44. Marinas/excursion/boating/charter fishing (subject to site plan review procedures).
     45. Outdoor theatre (subject to site plan review procedures).
     46. Parks and recreational trails.
     47. Public boat launching facilities.
     48. Retreat centers (subject to site plan review procedures).
     49. Ski resorts (subject to site plan review procedures).
     50. Accessory residences.
     51. Duplexes.
     52. Zero lot line duplex.
     53. Multiple occupancy developments*7 (subject to site plan review procedures).
     54. Municipal/commercial parking lots (subject to site plan review procedures).
     55. Utility facilities – Type A.
     56. Noncommercial communication towers, antennas, transmitters>200’ (subject to site plan
         review procedures).

Conservancy District (CON)Light Industrial (LI)

  Purpose and Intent: This district is intended to provide for small scale manufacturing,
  mini or low volume warehousing, and other light industrial operations. It is also intended
  that this district be used for the location of trade or contractor establishments,
  commercial storage facilities, and similar businesses. Such uses shall not be detrimental
  to the surrounding area or to the County as a whole by reason of noise, dust, smoke,
  odor, traffic or physical appearance, degradation of groundwater, or other nuisance
  factors. Such uses may be subject to requirements, which will reasonably ensure
  compatibility. This district can also be used for industrial or business parks.
  The conservancy district is intended to be used to prevent destruction of natural or man-
  made resources and to protect watercourses including the shorelands of navigable waters,
  and areas which are not adequately drained, or which are subject to periodic flooding;
  where development would result in hazards to health or safety; would deplete or destroy
  resources or be otherwise incompatible with the public welfare. This district includes all
  wetland areas designated as swamps or marshes on the United States Geological Survey
  map sheets.
Permitted uses in the LI district include:

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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     1. Greenhouses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     2. Auto repair.
     3. Auto sales & service lot (subject to site plan review procedures).
     4. Commercial fishing facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
     5. Commercial trucking establishments (subject to site plan review procedures).
     6. Commercial storage facilities.
     7. Farm implement sales/service.
     8. Gas stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     9. Grain mills (subject to site plan review procedures).
     10. Home businesses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     11. Animal shelters/pounds.
     12. Laundromats and laundry services (subject to site plan review procedures).
     13. Model homes (subject to site plan review procedures).
     14. Private lodges and clubs.
     15. Professional offices/studios.
     16. Radio/TV stations.
     17. Recreational/fishing equipment sales.
     18. Retail stores (subject to site plan review procedures).
     19. Taxi and limousine service.
     20. Trade or contractor establishments.
     21. Veterinarian clinics.
     22. Bulk storage of fuel products (subject to site plan review procedures).
     23. Freight terminals (subject to site plan review procedures).
     24. Fruit/vegetable/cheese processing plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
     25. Manufacturing, assembly, processing (subject to site plan review procedures).
     26. Sawmills/planning mills.
     27. Temporary asphalt/concrete plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
     28. Wholesale establishments/distributorships (subject to site plan review procedures).
     29. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
     30. Fire/police stations.
     31. Public highway garages.
     32. Airstrips and landing fields, governmental (subject to site plan review procedures).
     33. Municipal/commercial parking lots (subject to site plan review procedures).
     34. Utility facilities – Type A.
     35. Commercial communication towers, antennas, transmitters>75’ but <200’ (subject to site
         plan review procedures).
     36. Noncommercial communication towers, antennas, transmitter<200’.
     37. Communication towers, antennas, transmitters>200’ (subject to site plan review
         procedures).
     38. Temporary MET towers.
     39. Permanent MET towers (subject to site plan review procedures).




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                                                                  Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Wetlands are any lands wet enough to support a growth of moisture loving plants or aquatics and
having an accumulation of organic matter, such as peat or muck. Wetlands are seldom suitable
for building for the following reasons:

     septic tank systems will not function because of high groundwater
     water supplies are often polluted by septic tank wastes that have not been adequately
         absorbed by the soil
     foundations and roads crack due to poor support capabilities and frost action
     flooding is often common in Spring and other times of high water


Town of Harrison Overlay District (HOD)Industrial (I)

   Purpose and Intent: The intent of this overlay district is to address the needs for the
   growth and expansion of areas in close proximity to other developing areas of the Fox
   Valley. This district provides for more concentrated development that is more consistent
   with the character of adjoining urban and semi-urban areas. This overlay allows for
   changes to the zoning standards that reflect a pattern of more compact and dense
   development. These patterns provide for more efficient and cost effective routes and
   modes of transportation, sewer and water extension and other public utilities.
   Additionally, these standards are intended to reduce sprawl and encourage more compact
   development in areas where sewer and public utilities are provided.The intent of this
   overlay district is to address the needs for the growth and expansion of areas in close
   proximity to other developing areas of the Fox Valley. This district provides for more
   concentrated development that is more consistent with the character of adjoining urban
   and semi-urban areas. This overlay allows for changes to the zoning standards that
   reflect a pattern of more compact and dense development. These patterns provide for
   more efficient and cost effective routes and modes of transportation, sewer and water
   extension and other public utilities. Additionally, these standards are intended to reduce
   sprawl and encourage more compact development in areas where sewer and public
   utilities are provided.


Permitted uses in the I district include:

     1. Greenhouses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     2. Adult entertainment establishments (subject to site plan review procedures).
     3. Auto repair.
     4. Auto sales & service lot (subject to site plan review procedures).
     5. Commercial trucking establishments.
     6. Commercial storage facilities.
     7. Farm implement sales/service.
     8. Fertilizer distribution plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
     9. Gas stations (subject to site plan review procedures).
     10. Grain mills.
     11. Home businesses (subject to site plan review procedures).
     12. Animal shelters/pounds (subject to site plan review procedures).
     13. Lumber/building supply yards.
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    14. Radio/TV stations.
    15. Recreational vehicle sales/service.
    16. Taxi and limousine service.
    17. Trade or contractor establishments.
    18. Asphalt/concrete plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
    19. Bulk storage of fuel products (subject to site plan review procedures).
    20. Freight terminals.
    21. Fruit/vegetable/cheese processing plants.
    22. Manufacturing, assembly, processing.
    23. Resource recovery facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
    24. Salvage yards (subject to site plan review procedures).
    25. Sawmills/planning mills.
    26. Sewage disposal/treatment plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
    27. Slaughterhouses (subject to site plan review procedures).
    28. Solid waste facilities (subject to site plan review procedures).
    29. Temporary asphalt/concrete plants (subject to site plan review procedures).
    30. Wholesale establishments/distributorships (subject to site plan review procedures).
    31. Community living arrangement as regulated in s. 59.69(15), Wis. Stats.
    32. Fire/police stations.
    33. Airstrips and landing fields, governmental (subject to site plan review procedures).
    34. Municipal/commercial parking lots (subject to site plan review procedures).
    35. Utility facilities – Type A.
    36. Utility facilities – Type B.
    37. Commercial communication towers, antennas, transmitters>75’ but <200’.
    38. Noncommercial communication towers, antennas, transmitter<200’.
    39. Communication towers, antennas, transmitters>200’.
    40. Temporary MET towers.
    41. Permanent MET towers.
Lands included within this district include the boundaries of this district shall include all areas
served by municipal sewer within the Town of Harrison that are also part of the following
described districts or areas: (1) Darboy Sanitary District; (2) Waverly Sanitary District; (3)
Appleton Boundary Agreement Area; (4) Menasha Boundary Agreement Area.

Calumet County Shoreland Zoning Ordinance

Adopted in 1996 and revised in 2001, Calumet County’s Shoreland Zoning Ordinance is
designed to uphold the requirements outlined by Wisconsin State Statute. This ordinance has
also been amended since 2001. The ordinance specifies regulations regarding land development
and land use along waterways within the county.

Areas to be regulated under the ordinance include:

     Within    one thousand (1,000) feet of the ordinary high-water mark of navigable lakes, ponds
          or flowages.

     Within   three hundred (300) feet of the ordinary high-water mark of navigable rivers or
          streams, or to the landward side of the floodplain, whichever distance is greater.

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                                                                       Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
The shorelands of Calumet County are divided into the following shoreland districts:

     Shoreland-Wetland    District (W-Sh)
     Recreational-Residential  District (R-Sh)
     Commercial District (C-Sh)
     Agricultural District (A-Sh)


The following minimum requirements relating to yards, lot width, floor area and lot area shall be
in effect for the various zoning districts. Additional requirements are in place for duplexes.

                                                       R-SH and C-SH Districts
                                                   Standard Lot Sub-Standard Lot               A-SH District
Lot Area (Sq. Ft.) Single family
     Lots not served by public sewer                      20,000                  15,000                  43,560
     Lots served by public sewer                          12,500                   7,500                  43,560
Lot Width (feet)
     Lots not served by public sewer                         100                        75                    150
     Lots served by public sewer                              85                        55                    150
Side Yard, Principal Bldg. (feet)
     Minimum on any one side                                  10                        10                     25
     Aggregate of Both sides, unsewered                       25                        25                     50
     If served by public sewer                                20                        20                     50
Side Yard Accessory Bldg. (feet)                              10                         6                     25
If placed entirely in rear yard                                6                         6                      6
Rear Yard Principal Bldg. (feet)                              25                        25                     50
Rear Yard Accessory Bldg. (feet)                               6                         6                      6
Floor Area of Residence (sq. ft.)                            720                       720                    720
Height Principal Bldg. (Maximum Ft.)                          35                        35                     35

The total square footage, in ground floor area, of all structures (proposed and existing) on any
one lot shall not exceed 15% of net lot area for unsewered lots, or 20% for sewered lots.
Additional details for each district are provided in the ordinance includes permitted and
conditional uses.

The Shoreland-Wetland District (W-Sh) includes all shorelands within the jurisdiction of this
ordinance which are wetlands of five acres or more. Some of the permitted uses within this
district include:

     Hiking,     fishing, trapping, hunting, swimming and boating.

     The   harvesting of wild crops, such as marsh hay, ferns, moss, wild rice, berries, tree fruits
          and tree seeds, in a manner that is not injurious to the natural reproduction of such crops.

     The    pasturing of livestock including fence construction.



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     The    cultivation of agricultural crops.

     The    practice of silviculture including the planting, thinning and harvesting of timber.

     The    construction and maintenance of duck blinds.

For further specific details regarding the Calumet County Shoreland Zoning Ordinance refer to
the ordinance.

Calumet County Floodplain Zoning Ordinance

Adopted in 2006 and amended in 2008, the purpose of the ordinance is to regulate development
in flood hazard areas to protect life, health, and property and minimize negative consequences of
flood events. The ordinance establishes the following three districts:

         The Floodway District (FW) consists of the channel of a river or stream and those
          portions of the floodplain adjoining the channel required to carry the regional flood
          waters.
         The Floodfringe District (FF) consists of that portion of the floodplain between the
          regional flood limits and the floodway.

         The General Floodplain District (GFP) consists of all areas which have been or may be
          hereafter covered by flood water during the regional flood. It includes both the floodway
          and floodfringe districts.

Permitted uses for each district are as follows.

Floodway District (FW)
Open space uses are allowed in the floodway district, and the floodway portion of the general
floodplain district, providing they are not prohibited by any other ordinance. Permitted uses
include:

         Agricultural uses, such as: general farming, pasturing, outdoor plant nurseries,
          horticulture, viticulture, truck farming, forestry, sod farming and wild crop harvesting.

         Nonstructural industrial and commercial uses, such as: loading areas, parking areas and
          airport landing strips.

         Private and public recreational uses, such as: golf courses, tennis courts, driving ranges,
          archery ranges, picnic grounds, boat launching ramps, swimming areas, parks, wildlife
          and nature preserves, game farms, fish hatcheries, shooting, trap and skeet
          activitiesshooting preserves, target ranges, trap and skeet ranges, hunting and fishing
          areas, and hiking and horseback riding trails.

         Uses or structures accessory to open space uses, or classified as historic structures that
          comply with ss. 51-33 and 51-34essential for historical areas, that are not in conflict with


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          the provisions in ss. 3.3. and 3.4.

         Extraction of sand, gravel or other material according to s. 51-33(d)3.3(4).

         Functionally water-dependent uses such as: docks, piers or wharves, including those used
          as part of a marina, and other water related uses, such as dams, flowage areas, culverts,
          navigational aids and driver crossings of transmission lines, and pipelines, according to
          chapters 30, 31, Wisconsin Statutes.

         Public utilities, streets and bridges, according to s. 51-33(c)3.3(3).

Floodfringe District (FF)
Any structures, land use, or development, including accessory structures and uses, are allowed
within the floodfringe district and floodfringe portions of the general floodplain district, provided
that the standards contained in s. 51-474.3 are met, that the use is not prohibited by this or any
other ordinance or any other local, state or Federal regulation and that all permits or certificates
specified in s. 7.151-81 have been issued.

General Floodplain District (GFP)
The general floodplain district encompasses both floodway and flood fringe areas. Therefore, a
determination shall be made pursuant to s. 51-61(d)5.4, to determine whether the proposed use is
located within a floodway or floodfringe area. Those uses permitted in floodways (s.51.323.2)
and floodfringe areas (s.51-464.2) are allowed within the general floodplain district, according to
the standards of s. 51-61(c)5.3. and provided that all permits or certificates required under s. 51-
817.1 have been issued.

For further specific details regarding the Calumet County Floodplain Zoning Ordinance
including standards for development, prohibited uses, and administration refer to the ordinance.

Calumet County Land DivisionSubdivision Ordinance

The Calumet County Land DivisionSubdivision Ordinance is designed to guide the division and
preparation of land for future development. The impact of decisions to subdivide land into
smaller parcels is permanent and will determine development patterns of other parcels within and
around the area, as well as the services established for the new development.

Design requirements for block and lot design standards include, but are not limited to, the
following:

         Blocks shall be not greater than 1,500 feet in length nor less than 600 feet in length,
          except where necessary in case of 1) Cul-de-sacs and permanent dead-end streets, 2) The
          connection of a new roadstreet with an existing roadstreet or other unusual
          circumstances, when approved by the Committee.

         Lot DimensionsDesign - in those townships and shoreland areas under the jurisdiction of
          the Calumet County Zoning Ordinance and/or the Calumet County Shoreland Floodplain


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          Supplementary Overlay Zoning Ordinance, the minimum lot area and width requirements
          specified therein shall be applicable.

         In all towns having not adopted the Calumet County Zoning Ordinance, unzoned
          townships, or in townships exercising town-zoning jurisdiction where any such lot
          area/width requirements are less restrictive than below, the following lot area and width
          standards shall be applicable for unsewered lots:

          Net Lot Area (minimum): 1.0 acre
          Lot Width (minimum): 150 feet

Once State approved sanitary sewerage facilities have been provided for the proposed lot(s), the
minimum net lot area shall be reduced to 7,50010,000 square feet, and the minimum lot width
shall be reduced to 6075 feet for lands not located within shoreland areas. For lots located within
shoreland areas, the minimum net lot shall be reduced to 20,000 square feet, and the minimum
lot width reduced to 100 feet.

Base Development Yield, Density Management, and Growth Management AreasGrowth
Management Policy
Base development yield, density management, and growth management areas are methods
implemented through Calumet County’s Land Division Ordinance to effectively manage the rate
of residential growth, to promote more efficient growth patterns and to minimize the public costs
of non-agricultural growth in unincorporated areas, by restricting the number and location of new
buildable lots created by all forms of land subdivision.

Base development yield (otherwise known as “density”), establishes the maximum number of
lots, which may be created in a given residential subdivision. Each parcel in Calumet County
has an assigned density. For towns that have adopted the Calumet County Zoning Ordinance,
the density is determined by dividing the acreage of the original tract by the maximum
residential density permitted in the zoning district where the original tract is located. For towns,
which have not adopted the Calumet County Zoning Ordinance, the density is determined by
dividing the acreage of the original tract by the maximum residential density identified on the
Calumet County Density Map.

After the density of the parcel is determined, the subdivider must divide the land according to the
density management standards of the land division ordinance. Density management regulates
the numbers of lots that can be created at a single time depending on the availability of public
sewer and the location of the subdivision to density management boundaries. The density
management standards are as follows:

     (a) Minor or major subdivisions where state approved public sanitary sewerage facilities are
     provided for all lots of the subdivision shall be permitted subject to the following conditions:

          (1) The applicant must secure approvals of the subdivision from the applicable town,
          incorporated community having extraterritorial plat approval jurisdiction, and the
          servicing sewer district.


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                                                                       Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
     (b) Major subdivisions where state approved public sanitary sewerage facilities are not
     provided for all lots of the proposed new subdivision may be permitted within, but not
     beyond, any Density Management Boundary, as shown on the Density Map subject to the
     following conditions:

          (1) No more than nine (9) lots have been created from the parent parcel.

          (2) The applicant must secure approvals of the subdivision from the applicable town,
          incorporated community having extraterritorial plat approval jurisdiction, and any
          applicable servicing sewer district.

     (c) Major subdivisions may be permitted beyond any Density Management Boundary, as
     shown on the Density Map, where state approved public sanitary sewerage facilities are not
     provided for all lots of the subdivision subject to all of the following:

          (1) The permitted base development yield of Sec. 62-23(a), Base Development Yield,
          was four (4) or less lots;

          (2) The subdivision plat has been designed in accordance with Sec. 62-35, Cluster
          Subdivisions;

          (3) The base development yield is increased to five (5) or more lots because of bonus
          lots claimed in Sec. 62-23(c), Cluster Subdivision Density Bonuses; and

          (4) The applicant secured approvals of the subdivision from the applicable town and the
          incorporated community having extraterritorial plat approval jurisdiction.

     (d) Minor subdivisions where state approved public sanitary sewerage facilities are not
     provided for all lots of the proposed new subdivision may be permitted subject to either of
     the following conditions:

          (1) The subdivision is developed in accordance with Sec. 62-35, Cluster Subdivisions.

               A. The applicant must secure approvals of the subdivision from the applicable town,
               incorporated community having extraterritorial plat approval jurisdiction, and any
               applicable servicing sewer district.

          (2) The subdivision creates no more than three (3) lots from the parent parcel in a five
          (5) year period provided the subdivision is in compliance with the base development
          yield.

     (e) Where agreeable by the subdivider, approving agencies, and objecting authorities, a
     shadow plat may be created for minor and major subdivisions located within a Density
     Management Boundary, as shown on the Density Map, where state approved public sanitary
     sewerage facilities are not provided for all lots of the subdivision. A shadow plat shall
     include the following:


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          (1) Lot design and size consistent with the comprehensive plan of the area.

          (2) The layout of future roads. Local roads shall be planned to provide road connections
          to adjoining parcels, neighborhoods, or future development open spaces as a means of
          discouraging the reliance on county and state roads for local trips.

          (3) Easement locations for utilities and stormwater drainage.

          (4) Locations of buildings or structures on the lots to accommodate future subdivision.

          (5) Information demonstrating how public utilities may be extended to the subdivision to
              accommodate future urban development.

In an effort to preserve farmland and ensure the proper planning in the unincorporated areas of
Calumet County, land divisions are encourage to occur in areas identified as ‘Short Term Growth
Areas’ on the Growth Management Map prior to areas identified as ‘Long Term Sewer Service
Areas,’ unless the proposed land division is the ‘Long Term Sewer Service Area’ is served by a
public sanitary sewer facility. The Growth Management Map for Calumet County is shown as
Map 9-2.
The purpose of this policy is to effectively manage the rate of nonagricultural growth, to promote
more efficient growth patterns and to minimize the public costs of non-agricultural growth in
unincorporated areas, by restricting the number and location of new buildable lots created by all
forms of land subdivision.

For the above stated purpose, the following is considered the Growth Management Policy of
Calumet County, and be fully enforceable under this ordinance:

     No   "Major Subdivision" of ten (10) or more lots in size shall be permitted beyond the
          corporate limits of any incorporated city or village.

     "Major   Subdivisions" of less than ten (10) lots in size may be permitted beyond municipal
          corporate limits, but not beyond the boundaries of any "Growth Service Area" shown on
          the Growth Management Policy map. Only "Minor Subdivisions" shall be allowed
          beyond any "Growth Service Area" boundary.

     Under   no circumstances shall any "Major Subdivision" be permitted, unless all the lots of
          such subdivision will either be served by State-Approved sanitary sewerage system, or
          contain sufficient area of soils, which are fully suitable for placement of on-site sewage
          disposal systems.

     Any    subdivision plat located beyond a Growth Service Area boundary as shown on the
          Growth Management Policy map, approved and recorded prior to the effective date of
          these regulations, may be further subdivided (one time only) subject to the following
          conditions:
          1. That at least 75% of the lots comprising the pre-existing plat have been developed
               with permanent, residential primary structures, or


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          2.    That such further land subdivision shall contain no more than nine (9) additional
                (new) lots.

     Major   subdivisions of ten (10) or more lots may be permitted beyond the corporate limits,
          but within Growth Service Areas, subject to the following conditions:
          1. That such proposed new subdivision is contiguous to at least one other pre-existing
              subdivision of ten (10) or more lots in size; or
          2. That State approved sanitary sewerage facilities are first provided for all lots of the
              proposed new subdivision.

For further specific details regarding the Calumet County Land DivisionSubdivision Ordinance
or the Growth Management Policy refer to the ordinance.




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Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Map 9-2 Growth Management and Sewer Service Areas




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Calumet County Manure Storage and Runoff ManagementAnimal Waste Storage
Ordinance

This county ordinance became effective in 20111989. The purpose of this ordinance is to
provide for proper and safe storage, handling, and land application of manure, and to reduce the
delivery of manure, other waste materials, and fertilizers to surface waters and groundwater
through the use of conservation practices and implementation of state performance standards and
prohibitions for agriculture. The ordinance adopts the State Agricultural Performance Standards
and Prohibitions into County Ordinance. The ordinance regulates all livestock facilities that are
less than 1000 animal units. The ordinance also regulates land application of most nutrients,
including manure and commerical fertilzers. It is designed to prevent water pollution by
requiring allAll new or modified manure storage facilities require a construction and use permit
from the Calumet County Land and Water Conservation Department. new manure storage
facilities or modifications to existing storage fFacilities shall be designed and built according to
NRCS technical standards. The ordinance dictates the requirement for a permit from the County
Land Conservation Department prior to construction of a facility as well as several other
requirements with regard to animal waste storage. Several types of plans must be submitted with
each application. These plans include: engineering plans, operation and maintenance plans,
safety and design plans, clean water diversion plans, nutrient management plans, erosion control
and stormwater management plans.An animal waste storage facility plan is also required by the
ordinance. For further specific details regarding the ordinance refer to the ordinance.

Calumet County Sanitary SystemsPrivate Sewage Disposal Ordinance

Comprehensively revised in 2010, Tthe scope andgeneral intent of this ordinance is to regulate
wastewater generation and the location, construction, installation, alteration, design and use of all
private onsite wastewater treatmentsewerage disposal systems so as to protect the health of
residents and transients; to protect drinking water from harmful nitrates and bacteria; to secure
safety from disease and pestilence; to further the appropriate use and conservation of land and
water resources; and to preserve and promote the beauty of Calumet County and its
communities. It is further intended to provide for the administration and enforcement of this
ordinance and to provide penalties for violation of this ordinance.

The ordinance details requirements for a sanitary permit, maintenance requirements, applicable
fees, and prohibited systems. For further specific details regarding this ordinance refer to the
ordinance.

Calumet County Private Water Systems Ordinance

Adopted 1994, the purpose of the ordinance is to protect the drinking water and groundwater
resources of the county by governing access to groundwater through regulating well
abandonment and drill hole abandonment. The ordinance details county administration and
duties and enforcement actions. For further specific details regarding this ordinance refer to the
ordinance.




Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-44                        Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                      Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Calumet County Non-Metallic Mining Reclamation Ordinance

Adopted in 20072001, the ordinance establishes a program to ensure effective reclamation of
nonmetallic mining sites in Calumet County. The ordinance was adopted in compliance with
Chapter NR 135, Wisconsin Administrative Code.

Calumet County Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste Siting Ordinance

This ordinance from 1998 is for the purpose of regulating the transportation, disposal, storage,
and treatment of solid waste and hazardous waste by persons within the boundaries of Calumet
County. These activities shall be permitted only under the terms and conditions as set forth by
the ordinance due to the possible danger to the health, safety, and welfare of the public and the
impact on the natural resources of the county.

This ordinance is intended to regulate the siting of solid waste disposal sites (landfill) as that
term is defined in Chapter 289, Solid Waste Facilities, and Hazardous Waste Facilities as defined
in Chapter 291, Wisconsin Statutes. It is also the intent of this ordinance to:

         Establish procedures pertaining to the landfill siting process within the County.

         Appropriate and levy sufficient fees to cover the County's involvement in the siting
          process.

         Ensure that any sited landfill is considered in, and works as a supporting part of, the
          County solid waste management plan. This includes financial support for and/or physical
          accommodation of programs to reduce, reuse, recycle, screen, or otherwise divert
          materials from landfill disposal.

         Preserve landfill capacity of solid waste facilities in the County for future use and to
          ensure that County municipalities, residents, and businesses shall have assurances as to
          the duration of landfill operations and the availability of disposal at landfills located
          within the County.

         Require orderly land use development pertaining to the siting of solid waste and
          hazardous waste facilities.

         Ensure that final negotiated agreements under Chapters 289 and 291, Wisconsin Statutes,
          shall contain sufficient provisions to afford local residents protection against adverse
          impacts from the siting of solid waste and hazardous waste facilities in the County.

         Ensure that the costs of disposal are borne by the generators of solid waste and hazardous
          waste to the greatest degree practical.

For further specific details regarding this ordinance refer to the ordinance.




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                           Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-45
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
Calumet County Outdoor Recreation Plan, 20112005

With assistance from the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, Calumet
County completed an updated outdoor recreation plan in 20112005. The plan provides goals and
objectives, an inventory of recreational resources, identifies recreational needs, provides goals
and objectives, and provides recommendations for the future and an action plan for
implementation. Earlier plans were created in 1976, 1987, and 1995 and 2005.

Calumet County FarmlandAgricultural Preservation Plan, 20101980

FarmlandAgricultural preservation plans are developed by counties in order to participate in the
State’s Farmland Preservation Program. Calumet County formally adopted its original farmland
preservation plan in 1980 and (updated it in 1988). To meet state certification requirements, the
plan needed to be redrafted. The 2010 Calumet County Farmland Preservation Plan was
formally adopted in 2009. The plan is certified for 10 years and it will expire in 2020.

Calumet County Land and Water Resource Management Plan, 2007-20111999

Calumet County developed its first Land and Water Resource Management (LWRM) Plan in
1999 and implemented it through 2006. In 2006, Calumet County adopted the 2007-2011 Land
& Water Resource Management Plan. A LWRM plan serves as a strategic plan for county
governments, giving directions to their land and water conservation efforts. It summarizes
county land and water resource conditions, identifies resource concerns and outlines strategies
for addressing those concerns. The LWRM plan identified four goals for Calumet County: 1.
Improve and protect groundwater quality; 2. Improve and protect surface water quality; 3.
Improve and protect soil quality, and; 4. Improve and protect habitat quality.The staff of the
Calumet County Land Conservation Department prepared and adopted the Soil Erosion Control
Plan in 1986. That plan was updated and renamed the Land and Water Resource Management
Plan in March of 1999. The overall goal of the plan is to “restore, improve and protect
ecological diversity and quality and to promote the beneficial uses of its land, water and related
resources”.

Water Quality in the Lake Winnebago Pool

Water Quality in the Lake Winnebago Pool is a report prepared by the WDNR in cooperation
with the University of Wisconsin Extension and the Poygan Sportsmen’s Club. The report
provides information regarding the status and possible trends in water quality on Lakes
Winnebago, Butte des Morts, Winneconne, and Poygan. The Winnebago Pool covers nearly
160,000 acres and is one of Wisconsin’s most renowned natural features.

Additional county plans include the following:

         Groundwater, An Inventory of Wells and Contamination Potential within the Silurian
          Aquifer of Calumet County, 1983

         Solid Waste Management Plan, 1980



Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-46                       Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report
                                                                     Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
         Calumet County Comprehensive Planning Program, Comprehensive Sewer and Water
          Facilities Plan, 1975

         Calumet County All-Hazards Mitigation Plan, 2006




Calumet County Inventory and Trends Report                   Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC  9-47
Adopted May 2007, Amended January 2012
                         Utilities and Community Facilities Appendix


Churches and Cemeteries
Town of Brillion
    Zion Lutheran Methodist Church and
      Cemetery, N8893 Church St., Forest Junction
    Brillion Bluffs Cemetery, at the southwest
      intersection of County Highways K and PP
    Holy Family Saint Mary’s Catholic Church
      and Cemetery, north of State Highway 10,
      east of County Highway PP
    Brillion Township Cemetery, Brillion Village
      Cemetery, and the old Trinity Lutheran
      Cemetery, all south of the City of Brillion,
                                                     Local Calumet County church and cemetery
      west of County Highway PP
   Brillion Community Cemetery and the new Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, both south of the
      City of Brillion, east of County Highway PP
    Forest Homes Cemetery


Town of Brothertown
    Holy Trinity Catholic Church and Cemetery, at the intersection of County Highways C
      and H, Jericho
    St. Charles Church and Cemetery, Charlesburg
    Dick Family Cemetery, on the west side of Lake Shore Road, south of Ecker Lakeland
      Road
    Brothertown Union Cemetery, on the east side of Lake Shore Road Road, south of
      Driftwood Beach Road
    Morrill Family Cemetery, north side of County Highway H, west of County Highway C


Town of Charlestown
    Saint Martin’s Catholic Church and Cemetery, County Highway T
    Gravesville Union Cemetery, Irish Road
    Hayton Hillside Cemetery, Weeks Road


Town of Chilton
    Portland Church and Cemetery, located on County Highway E, approximately one mile
      west of County Highway BB
    St. Luke’s Lutheran Church and Cemetery, located on Killsnake Road, approximately
      one half mile east of County Highway BB
    St. Augustine’s Catholic Cemetery, located on Court Road, almost one mile east of
      County Highway BB
   Chilton Hillside Cemetery and St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery, both located on the east side
      of State Highway 57, just north of the City of Chilton


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Town of Harrison
    Mansfield Family Cemetery
    Sacred Heart Catholic Church Cemetery
    Mount Calvary Lutheran Church
    Christ the Rock


Town of New Holstein
    New Holstein Community Cemetery, a non-denominational cemetery, is located east of
      County Highway A, on the south side of Fur Farm Road
    St. Anna Catholic Church and Cemetery, School Street, St. Anna
    Gloria-Dei Lutheran Church, located along State Highway 57


Town of Rantoul
    Peace and EvangelicalFaith United Methodist Church Cemetery, Riverview Road
    German Free Cemetery, at the intersection of County Highways JJ and PP
    Trinity Lutheran Church and Cemetery, Trinity Road


Town of Stockbridge
    St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery, on the north side of Moore Road, north of the Village of
      Stockbridge
    German Evangelical Church and Cemetery, south side of Schluchter Road, east of North
      Tower Road
    St. Elizabeth Catholic Church and Cemetery, in Kloten on the east side of County
      Highway C
    Quinney Cemetery, on the east side of Lake Shore Drive, north of Ecker Lakeland Road
    Stockbridge Indian Cemetery, on the south side of Moore Road, just north of the Village
      of Stockbridge
    Dorn Family Cemetery, southwest intersection of Faro Springs Road and Lake Shore
      Drive
    Lakeside Cemetery, on the west side of Lake Shore Drive, south of the Village of
      Stockbridge
    Abandoned Family Cemetery (known as the “Sweet” Cemetery), west side of State
      Highway 55 where it intersects County Highway F
    Scandinavian Cemetery, on the east side of State Highway 55, just south of the
      intersection with County Highway EE. However, no evidence of a cemetery remains

Town of Woodville
    St. John Lutheran Cemetery, intersection of Manitowoc and Military Roads
    St. John the Baptist Catholic Church and Cemetery, St. John, County Highway BB
    St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery, west side of State Highway 57, south of Hilbert
    St. Peter’s Lutheran Cemetery, east side of McHugh Road, approximately one half mile
      south of US Highway 114

Village of Hilbert
     St. Mary’s Catholic of Hilbert
     St. Peter Lutheran Church
    Trinity Lutheran Church
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Village of Potter
     Peace United Church of Christand Evangelical Church


Village of Sherwood
     Christ the King Lutheran Church
     Sacred Heart Catholic Church
    St. John Sacred Heart Parish
     High Cliff Cemetery
     St. John Cemetery
     Forest Run Pet Cemetery


Village of Stockbridge
     St. Mary’s Catholic Church
     Fox Valley Christian Church


City of Appleton                                                                                    Sacred Heart Catholic
                                                                                                    Church, Village of
     Eternal Love Lutheran
                                                                                                    Sherwood
     Hope Lutheran Brethren


City of Brillion
     Brillion Community Cemetery
    Lutheran Cemetery
     Trinity Lutheran Cemetery
     Brillion Community Church
    Brillion United Methodist Church
     Faith United Methodist Church of Brillion
     Holy Family Parish
     Peace United Church of Christ
     St. Bartholemew Lutheran Church
     Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church
    United Methodist Faith Parsonage


City of Chilton
     Good Shepard Catholic Church
     St. Martin Lutheran
     Ebenezer United Church of Christ
     Faith Alliance Church
     St. Augustine’s Catholic Cemetery
     Chilton Hillside Cemetery
     St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery


City of Kiel
    Bethlehem United Church
     First Baptist Church of Kiel
    First Presbyterian Church
    Holy Trinity Parish
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     Jehovah’s   Witnesses Kiel
     Kiel Alliance Church
     Kiel Jehovah’s Witnesses
     St. Peter and Paul
     St. Peter and Paul Catholic Cemetery
     St. Peter’s United Church
     Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church
     Kiel Municipal Cemetery


City of Menasha – None in Calumet County
    Active Living Ministries
    Appleton Korean Presbyterian
    Bethel Evangelical Lutheran
    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    Evangelical Worship Center
    Living Word Lutheran Church
    Our Redeemer Lutheran Church
    Pentecostals of the Fox Cities
    St. John’s Menasha
    St. Mary’s Menasha
    St. Patrick’s Catholic Church
    St. Patrick’s Menasha
    St. Thomas Episcopal Church
    St. Timothy Lutheran Church
     Trinity Lutheran Church


City of New Holstein
    Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
     Holy Rosary Catholic
     Holy Rosary Cemetery
     Jubilee Assembly of God
     St. John’s United Church of Christ
     Zion Evangelical Lutheran
     New Holstein City Cemetery




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East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission
    NAICS Based Regional Land Use Coding Scheme

                          Version 4
                      August 15, 2001




                        132 Main Street
                 Menasha, Wisconsin 54952
                    (920) 751-4770
                     Fax (920) 751-4771
                 Website: www.eastcentralrpc.org
                  Email: gis@eastcentralrpc.org
                     TABLE OF CONTENTS


Land Use Field Work Rules & Guidelines   Page 1-2

Land Use Codes by Land Use Type          Pages 3-5

Field Work Note Sheets                   Pages 6-7




                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS
           LAND USE INTERPRETATION & FIELD WORK RULES AND GUIDELINES
                        A REGIONAL LAND USE PERSPECTIVE
                                                         August 15, 2001

Base Data:
   - The most recent County or other source data will be used, if not available, base data layers will be created by
      East Central.


Basic Methodology:
    - 2000 aerial photography, with base data, will be printed for urbanized areas where field work is required.
    - "Heads Up" photo interpretation will be done in Arcview for rural areas.
    - Field Checking is required in the urban / planning areas where "heads up" interpretation is not feasible.
    - Occasional Field Spot checking will be necessary for questionable parcels in rural areas. This will be done with
       the use of the laptop computer after the initial vectoring and coverage "clean up" has been done. The code will
       be entered digitially in the field.
    - The condensed Regional Land Use Coding Scheme will be utilized and all data created will conform to ECWRPC
       Digital Map Data Standards.


If unsure about a particular land use out in the field:
     - Write a letter on the photo and provide notes (observations, descriptions, names, ph. #, etc.) on the notesheets in back.
     - The planner-in-charge will follow-up on unidentified / unknown land uses or determine if a new code is needed.
     - In no case should the field worker / interpreter develop their own codes!


Parcel Based maps: (Where available, parcels will be used as a guide in land use interpretation.)

   - If the land use line coincides with the parcel line, use the parcel line.
   - The intent of the photo interpretation is based more on the "land use ", not so much the parcel lines.
     Follow the edges of the mowed area or parking lot when determining the land use polygon.

Multiple Use Buildings
    - If it has separate entrances (i.e., strip mall) dominate use suffices - Retail trade code (44) in most cases.
    - If it has interior entrances, utilize code for the primary use (i.e., gas stations w/fast food - use gas station, 50 Services)

Ownership / Activities
  - Ownership (public vs. private) or "activities" (game farm, etc.) will NOT be accounted for in the coding,
    note on photo if a game farm is obvious - code under other open land, 95.

Parking Lots
  - Only those lots that are designated as ride and share will be coded, (488).
  - Other lots will be included with the type of "land use" it is associated with.

Open Land Areas
  - Coders are NOT required to access the developability of land.
  - One code will be used to represent open land, including pasture and fenced in lots: (95)
   Open Land Areas are defined as: wet, rocky, pasture land or outcrop; open lots in what looks like a subdivision or rural
   parcel; areas outside the mowed area of a residential parcel that are not developed. Note: Areas that are wooded
   outside these mowed areas should be coded appropriately using the woodland code.




                                                            Guidelines                                                Page 2
Agricultural Land
   - If the field appears to be cropped, the polygon should be coded 1116 (non irrigated cropland).
   - General barns, sheds and outbuildings in an agricultural use should be coded 11182, includes abandoned barns.
   - Use 1115 for all irrigated cropland, Center pivot may be the only interpretation that can be made.
   - The 1117 code has been eliminated, as it was impossible to determine pastureland from "heads up interpretation."
   - Other Ag Open Land should be coded 95 and is defined as pastureland, or dairy fenced in land.
      Game Farm land is included and corners of center pivot irrigation fields. (formally the 1117 code)
   - Orchards and vinyards should be coded with the planted woodlots code: 1135.

Trucking and Warehousing
   - A trucking terminal or transport company, with warehousing which appears to support the trucking operation should
      be coded 484.
   - An establishment which is primarily warehousing but has a bunch of trucks hanging around should be coded 493.
   - An establishment which has equal parts trucking and warehousing and is attached to a manufacturing facility,
     should be coded manufacturing, 31.

Other Miscellaneous Uses / Coding Discrepencies:
   - Armories or military installations should be coded 92, Public Administration, Other Government Facilities.
   - Movie theatres should be coded 50, Commercial Services.
   - Public post offices should be coded 92.
   - Non public post offices (mailboxes etc.) should be coded 50.
   - Copy stores (Kinkos) should be coded 50.
   - Packaging operations should be coded 50.
   - Pet stores should be coded 44.
   - Vacated or abandoned buildings should utilize the 2-digit code for the most obvious type of use
   - Museums are recreational, code 712.
   - Soccer fields, tennis, basketball, baseball diamonds not located in stadiums or arenas code 931, General
      Parks; these may be located within a school-type setting.
   - Game Farms are to be coded 95, other ag open land. Buildings should go under Commercial Services, 50.
   - Casinos, Go-carts, Bowling Alleys, Mini-golf and amusement parks code 713.
   - Junkyards will have their own code, 42111 under Commercial.
   - Funeral Homes are located under Commercial Services, 50.
   - Animal Shelters such as the Humane Society is located under Commercial Services, 50.
   - Airport strips and buildings associated with it, are under Transportation and have their own code 481.
   - Center Pivot Irrigated Ag corners should be coded other open land, 95 or if wooded coded either 1136 or 1135.
   - Hedgerows will only be picked out where a thick row exists, these will be coded general woodlands, 1136.
   - Retirement and Nursing Homes, and Resident Halls will reside under residential and be coded as 942.
   - Landfills, active and abondanded facilities will be coded, 56221 and 56222, respectively.
   - Daycare centers, Family Services, Dating and Wedding Services will be coded under 50, Commercial Services.




                                                       Guidelines                                           Page 2
                                      Reduced Coding Scheme
                                A Regional Land Use Methodology v.4
                                                               August 15, 2001


                                                                                                                 AGRICULTURE
Irrigated Cropland
Non-irrigated Cropland
Barns / Sheds / Outbuildings / Manure Storage Buildings - includes abandoned / destroyed barns, sheds, and land between buildings


                                                                                                      OTHER OPEN LAND
Open areas that are wet, rocky, or outcrop; open lots in a subdivision or rural parcel; side or back lots on a residential parcel that are not
developed, double, "big" lots (> 5 acres) - should be divided and coding accordingly. Note: Areas that are wooded within the parcel
should be coded as woodland or if cropped coded agricultural. Pastureland and gamefarm land or included in this category.


                                                                                                        WATER FEATURES
WATER AREAS - ponds (man-made & natural), lakes, streams, rivers, etc.


                                                                                                                   WOODLANDS
Planted Wood Lots - includes forestry and timber tract operations, silviculture, orchards, & vineyards
General Woodlands - includes hedgerows where distinguishable


                                                                                                                   RESIDENTIAL
Residential, vacated, other or unknown
Single Family Structures / Duplexes - includes the mowed land surrounding house and Bed & Breakfast Houses
Farm Residences, includes mowed yard
Mobile Homes Not in Parks, includes mowed yard
Accessory Residential Uses / Buildings (ECWRPC CODE) i.e. garages / sheds, includes mowed land surrounding the unit. If the garage
is attached to a single family dwelling and is coded 9411 with the house.
Resident Halls, Group Quarters, Retirement Homes, Nursing Care Facilities, Religious Quarters, includes parking
MOBILE HOME PARKS
Apartments, Three or More Households: includes condos, Rooming and Boarding Houses - includes parking and yard


                                                                                                                  COMMERCIAL
Commercial, vacated, other, or unknown

WHOLESALE TRADE

WHOLESALE TRADE, DURABLE GOODS - LUMBER, AUTOMOBILE, ELECTRICAL, HARDWARE WHOLESALERS / SUPPLIERS

WHOLESALE TRADE, NONDURABLE GOODS - GROCERY, BEER, WINE, FRUIT, GRAIN, BEAN WHOLESALERS / SUPPLIERS


RETAIL TRADE
CAR AND BOAT DEALERS, USED OR NEW, INCLUDES PARTS SALES
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES
ELECTRONICS AND APPLIANCE STORES
BUILDING MATERIAL AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES DEALERS, HARDWARE STORES
GROCERY AND LIQUOR STORES
HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE STORES
GASOLINE STATIONS
CLOTHING AND CLOTHING ACCESSORIES STORES, SHOE, LUGGAGE, JEWELRY STORES
SPORTING GOODS, HOBBY, BOOK AND MUSIC STORES
GENERAL MERCHANDISE STORES - DEPARTMENT STORES - Multi-Retail, Malls & Strip Malls
MISCELLANEOUS STORE RETAILERS - FLORISTS, USED MERCHANDISE STORES, PET STORES, MOBILE HOME MANUF.
NONSTORE RETAILERS - CAR WASHES, VIDEO RENTAL STORES
COURIERS AND MESSENGERS - LOCAL DELIVERY
Greenhouse, Nursery and Floriculture Production (buildings / facilities only)
Golf Course Pro shops, Driving Range / Country Clubs (buildings / facilities only)
                                                                                                           COMMERCIAL
SERVICES
SUPPORT ACTIVITIES FOR CROP & ANIMAL, AND FORESTRY PRODUCTION -Coops, Grain and Feed Storage/Supply
PUBLISHING INDUSTRIES - newspaper, software, book, publishers
MOTION PICTURE AND SOUND RECORDING INDUSTRIES - Movie Theaters
CELLULAR TELECOMMUNICATIONS - U.S. Cellular, Cellulink, Einstein
INFORMATION SERVICES AND DATA PROCESSING SERVICES
BANKS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
REAL ESTATE OFFICES - Century 21, Coldwell Banker
INSURANCE AGENCIES AND CARRIERS
WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REMEDIATION SERVICES - offices
Taxidermists, Veterinary Services/Animal Hospitals
ACCOMM