CDR by lanyuehua

VIEWS: 9 PAGES: 30

									                   Katalyst for Katastrophe




                    Transonic Research Inc.


                                   Project:

                                 G.H.O.S.T.
            (Geological H2O Observation Scientific Team)




                  Critical Design Review (CDR)



                     NASA Student Launch Initiative
                                  2011-2012




Submitted On: January 25, 2012
Submitted To: NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center
              C/O Edward M Jeffries & Julie D Clift
Submitted By: Katalyst for Katastrophe
              9119 Alamonte Dr., Spring Grove, IL 60081
              Sponsored by: Transonic Research Inc.
              Team Official: Robert Krause (815) 347-9449
In Response To: Request for Critical Design Review for the 2011-2012 NASA
                Student Launch Initiative
                                        Katalyst for Katastrophe
                                    2011-2012 Critical Design Review



Table of Contents
Summary of CDR ............................................................................................................ 1
   Team Summary ........................................................................................................... 1
      Team Name ............................................................................................................. 1
      Location ................................................................................................................... 1
      Team Officials .......................................................................................................... 1
   Launch Vehicle Summary ............................................................................................ 1
      Size .......................................................................................................................... 1
      Final Motor Choice ................................................................................................... 1
      Recovery System ..................................................................................................... 1
      Rail Size ................................................................................................................... 1
      Launch Vehicle Fly Sheet ........................................................................................ 1
Changes Made Since PDR ............................................................................................. 2
Vehicle Criteria ................................................................................................................ 2
   Design and Verification of Launch Vehicle .................................................................. 2
      Mission Statement.................................................................................................... 2
      Requirements and Criteria for Success.................................................................... 3
   Proposed Systems....................................................................................................... 4
      Motor Mount Design ................................................................................................. 4
      Project requirements ................................................................................................ 4
      Motor Mounting Workmanship ................................................................................. 6
      Fin Construction and Workmanship ......................................................................... 7
      Integrity of Design .................................................................................................... 8
   Subscale Flight Results ............................................................................................. 10
   Recovery Subsystem ................................................................................................. 12
      Parachutes/Harnesses/Bulkheads/U-bolts ............................................................. 12
      Electronics ............................................................................................................. 12
      Kinetic Energy ........................................................................................................ 13
      Test Results ........................................................................................................... 14



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      Safety and Failure Analysis .................................................................................... 14
   Mission Performance Criteria .................................................................................... 14
      Payload Integration ................................................................................................ 16
   Launch Concerns and Operation Procedures ............................................................ 16
   Safety and Environmental (Vehicle)........................................................................... 17
      Structural Failures .................................................................................................. 18
Payload Criteria ............................................................................................................. 19
   Testing and Design .................................................................................................... 19
      Systems ................................................................................................................. 19
      Workmanship ......................................................................................................... 20
      Testing ................................................................................................................... 21
      Manufacturing ........................................................................................................ 21
      Integration and Precision ....................................................................................... 21
      Transmitters ........................................................................................................... 22
   Payload Concept Features and Definitions................................................................ 22
   Scientific Value .......................................................................................................... 22
   Safety and Environment (Payload) ............................................................................ 23
Activity Plan ................................................................................................................... 24
   Activity Status and Schedule ..................................................................................... 24
      Budget Plan ........................................................................................................... 24
      Timeline ................................................................................................................. 24
   Educational Engagement........................................................................................... 26
Conclusion .................................................................................................................... 26




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                                   Summary of CDR
Team Summary

Team Name
Katalyst for Katastrophe

Location
Mr. Robert Krause’s residence
9119 Alamonte Drive
Spring Grove, IL, 60081

Team Officials
NAR Level 2 Mentor: John Kohler          NAR Level 1 Mentor: Robert A. Krause P.E.

Launch Vehicle Summary

Size
Rocket is projected to be approximately 91 inches long with a 5.5 inch diameter.

Final Motor Choice
The rocket will require a Cesaroni K590-DT.

Recovery System
The launch vehicle, or GeoHawk, will use the standard dual deploy system with two
altimeters, one Telemini and one StratoLogger, to provide a 100% redundant system.
Each altimeter will be provided with two pyrotechnic charges. The charges will be
staggered; the second charge will be 50% larger than the first to assure separation.

Rail Size
3/8 inch, 6 ft long launch rail.

Launch Vehicle Fly Sheet
Flysheets will be posted on website shortly after each launch of sub-scale and full-scale
rockets.


Payload Summary

The Engineering payload of a folding wing UAV, named the Eagle, equipped with a
video camera and GPS locator will be launched at approximately 400 feet Above
Ground Level (AGL) in order to survey the surrounding area of the launch site to provide



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a clear display of ground cover. This information will then be put into a TR-55 drainage
analysis of the surrounding land.

                            Changes Made Since PDR
Vehicle Criteria Changes

Minimal changes have occurred to the launch vehicle since the Preliminary Design
Review. These changes include the lengthening of the rear airframe component to 48
inches in order to prevent an extra cut to shave off three inches of fiberglass, a change
in nose cone shape to a 5:1 Von Kármán fiberglass nose cone and finally a fiberglass
motor mounting tube instead of the predicted cardboard tube.

Payload Criteria Changes

Part of the engineering payload difficulty is preventing the UAV from being entangled
with the shock cord, so the KfK (Katalyst for Katastrophe) team has designed a Sled to
help guide the Eagle safely out. This Sled has been lengthened by two inches and the
side wall will lower half an inch from the initial design.

Activity Plan Changes

Previously, our team has met whenever a meeting was needed; now, we will be
meeting every Saturday and Monday. In addition to the set meeting dates when more
than four people are present at a meeting the group will split into two groups with one
working on the next report and the other working on building the rocket and payload
alternating tasks halfway through the meeting.



                                   Vehicle Criteria
Design and Verification of Launch Vehicle

Mission Statement
The mission of the KfK team is to set up a rocketry program that has the means to
continue progress and improve on previous endeavors. This will be accomplished
through educational engagement of the local middle school in addition to the high
school. The current project of the KfK team is to design a build an engineering payload
of a folding wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle that will be launched from the rocket at
approximately 400 feet above ground level.




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Requirements and Criteria for Success
For the mission to be considered successful, the GeoHawk must:
       Reach an altitude of 5280 feet above ground level (within 300 feet)
       Land within 2500 feet of the launch pad
       Land with minimal damage and be re-flyable by the end of the day
       Deploy the engineering payload (UAV) at an altitude of 700 feet

Our payload must:
      Separate from the GeoHawk upon deployment, after approval from RSO
      Record video footage of area surrounding the launch pad



  Task                                         Start Date            End Date

  Work on full scale Rocket                    January 1, 2012       March10, 2012

  Launch small scale rocket                    January 5, 2012       January 18, 2012

  Critical Design Review Due                   January 23, 2012      January 23, 2012

  Critical Design Review Presentation          February 1, 2012      February 10, 2012

  First Outreach Date                          February 18, 2012     February 18, 2012

  Full Scale Test Launches                     March 5, 2012         March 25, 2012

  Work on Flight Readiness Review              February 2, 2012      March 20, 2012

  Second Outreach Date                         March 5, 2012         March 5, 2012

  Flight Readiness Review Due                  March 26, 2012        March 26, 2012

  Flight Readiness Presentation                April 2, 2012         April 11, 2012

  Travel to Huntsville, Alabama                April 18, 2012        April 18, 2012

  Flight Hardware & Safety Checks              April 19, 2012        April 20, 2012

  Launch Day                                   April 21, 2012        April 21, 2012

  Travel to Spring Grove, IL                   April 22, 2012        April 22, 2012

  Work on Post Launch Assessment               April 23, 2012        May 6, 2012




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  Post-Launch Assessment Due                      May 7, 2012             May 7, 2012



Proposed Systems


Motor Mount Design
The motor mounting system will consist of four 1/4" plywood centering rings, a 3mm
thick fiberglass motor tube, and an engine retainer attached to the end to ensure the
motor does not get pushed out during the ejection periods. Four centering rings will be
used to eliminate any possible motor movement within the rocket and to ensure it is
aligned correctly within the fiberglass inner tube. The motor retainer will be constructed
out of 1/8" thick steel fender washer and will be attached to the last centering ring using
bolts. The fins will be attached with the help of a fin jig to align the fins properly and aid
with the centering of the motor. A diagram of the motor mounting is below:




Project requirements
The launch vehicle will carry an engineering payload intended to record aerial
photographic information to verify/revise ground cover information for a drainage study.

The UAV (engineering payload) will be released at 400 ft AGL.

The recovery system electronics will:




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      Contain two dual deploy altimeters with separate pyrotechnic charges staggered.
       The second charge at each stage will be up sized by 50% to assure separation.
       This will provide 100% redundancy.
      Each altimeter will be armed by a dedicated arming switch and have separate
       power supplies.
      Each arming switch will be accessible from the exterior of the rocket.
      Each arming switch can be locked on in the ON position for launch.
      The recovery system will be armed after the rocket is on the pad.
      The recovery system electronics are separate from all payload electronics.
      Each altimeter will have a dedicate power supply.
      Each arming switch will be less than 6 ft above ground while rocket is on the pad.

The rocket will remain subsonic throughout the flight

The rocket and payload will be reusable and able to be launched again on the same day
without repairs or modifications.

The rocket will deploy a drogue parachute at apogee (5280 ft AGL) and a main
parachute at 700 ft AGL.

Recovery system altimeters will be shielded from on vehicle transmitting devices to
avoid inadvertent excitation of pyrotechnics.

Removable shear pins shall be used for drogue and main chute compartments to avoid
shear separation during flight.

The launch vehicle will have three tethered sections and a UAV. Each section will have
less than 75 ft lbf kinetic energy at landing. Both rocket and UAV will be recovered
within 2500 ft of launch pad assuming 15 mph wind.

The rocket and UAV will be prepared and ready to launch within 2 hours of the time the
FAA waiver opens.

The rocket and UAV are capable of sitting on the pad for over 1 hour in launch ready
configuration.

The Vehicle will be capable of being launched from a stander firing system with a 10
second count down.

The rocket does not require any external circuitry or ground support to initiate the
launch.




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The scientific method will be used in collection and analization of all data provided by
the rocket and UAV.

An electronic tracking device will send a 70 cm band radio signal from the rocket and
UAV. At least one member of the team will be Ham licensed prior to use of this
technology.

The rocket will use a CTI K590-DT certified motor.

The total impulse provided will be 2415 Ns (a K class motor).

The full scale rocket in finial flight configuration will be launched prior to submission of
FRR.

      This will verify the rocket stability, structural integrity, recovery system, and allow
       our team to practice preparing the rocket and UAV for flight.
      The recovery systems will have functioned properly prior to submittal of the FRR.
      Mass simulator may be used in the rocket for test flight however KfK hopes to fly
       the payload prior to FRR as well.
      A full scale motor will be flown in the rocket prior to submission of the FRR.
      A flight certification form will be provided by a level two NAR/TRA observer.
      After full scale flight demonstration no components of the rocket or UAV will be
       modified without concurrence of the NASA RSO.

Flash bulbs will not be used for recovery system. Forward canards will not be used for
the rocket. Forward firing motors will not be used. This rocket doesn’t use a rear
ejection parachute. Titanium sponge (sparky) motors will not be used with this project.

A safety check list will be used prior to each flight and submitted with the FRR; also this
check list will be used on flight day in Huntsville.

Student team members will do 100% of the work, design, construction, report writing,
and flight preparation, except assembling motors and handling black powder charges.

Mr. John Kohler the team level 2 mentor has successfully flown more than 15 dual
deploy flights using level 2 class motors.



Motor Mounting Workmanship
As the integrity of the whole system relies on the glue joints, great care will go into
ensuring every connection is strong and secure. To do this, anywhere epoxy bonds to
material will be sanded. This will allow for a greater bonding surface area and ultimately


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a stronger joint. All joints will be given adequate drying time to make sure no damage is
caused by handling the mounting system.


Fin Construction and Workmanship
Using OpenRocket simulation software, the desired fin dimensions were previously
designed. Four fins following these dimensions will be ordered from Wild Man
Rocketry. These fins will be constructed out of 1/8th inch G10 Fiberglass and will be
tapered down at the top and bottom to ensure better aerodynamics. Using a fin jig to
aid in precision of placement, the fins will be connected through the body tube to the
motor inner tube with the fin tabs using epoxy. An ample amount of time will be allotted
for the epoxy to dry to prevent any shifting of fins during handling. See fin diagrams
below:




Currently we have ordered our nosecone and will be cutting out our own bulkheads from
1/8 inch thick plywood and the centering rings from 1/4 inch thick plywood. All other
materials have been purchased and are waiting to be assembled beginning with the
bottom half of the rocket at the first meeting post Critical Design Review Monday,
January 30th. Build days will be every Monday and Saturday evenings at the Krause
residence beginning at six and going to eight o’clock.



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Integrity of Design
The style of fins chosen for the rocked are being used because of the clipped delta’s
efficiency in producing low drag tradeoff for stability as compared to other fin designs.
The fins are built from 1/8 inch thick G10 fiberglass to provide extra strength hopefully
preventing damage to the fins upon the rocket’s touchdown.

Bulkheads and Centering rings will be made from 1/4 inch plywood to ensure that
putting U-bolts through them will not compromise the strength of the plywood.
Proper attachment and alignment of all materials will be guaranteed by sanding the
surfaces of materials that will be connected to provide more surface area for the
adhesives. Jigs will be, if they are not already, constructed to verify the proper
alignment of all materials such as fins and rail buttons. Wood glue will be used as the
adhesive when the two materials are wood or cardboard and west systems epoxy will
be used when one of the materials are fiberglass, metallic or plastic.

Sufficient motor mounting will be guaranteed by cutting all of the centering rings at one
time so as the holes are lined up and four centering rings are going to be used instead
of the standard two centering rings; this is to provide extra glue area. The top two
centering will be glued to the engine tube and then glued into the epoxied into the rocket
once dry. Epoxy fillets will then be made between the wall of the body and the
centering rings. The third will then be glued in just above the connection point between
the engine tube and the fin tabs. Once this ring has had sufficient time to dry, a bead of
epoxy will be made going down the centering ring in order to provide another glue spot
for the fins. After the fins are glued in fillets will be made at all joints and a bead of
epoxy will be placed on the back edge of the fin and the final centering ring will be glued
in. This process will provide two extra opportunities for fillets and will provide extra
stability for the fins since their fin tabs will be secured in by two centering rings pushed
up against them.




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Component                                            Mass (lbs)

Von Karman Nose Cone                                 1.140

Upper Body Tube                                      2.690

UAV                                                  1.875

Sled                                                 0.285

Electronic Bay + Avionics                            1.370

Bulkheads                                            0.480

Main Parachute (84”)                                 1.170

Top Shock Cord                                       0.320

Rail Buttons                                         0.300



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 Lower Body Tube                                                 4.300

 Centering Rings                                                 0.400

 Fins                                                            0.710

 Inner Tube                                                      0.550

 Lower Parachute                                                 0.240

 Lower Shock Cord                                                0.340

 Paint                                                           3.500

 Miscellaneous                                                   1.500

                                                       TOTAL 21.17



The total projected weight of the rocket by open rocket’s estimates is 20.8 pounds and
an additional pound and a half has been added in since open rocket does not count the
weight of adhesives and will do a rough estimate for paint.

The launch vehicle is fairly sensitive as to how much mass it may gain before it is
unable to reach the desired altitude so the team will have to be very careful with the
assembly and try to minimize additions where we can. The vehicle will be able to still
reach its desired altitude if it gains an extra pound and a half on top of the extra weight
factored into the mass statement.


Subscale Flight Results
After the sub scale flight’s weather data was plugged into open rocket, the simulator
estimated a max altitude at 917 feet while the max altitude according to the Pnut by
Perfect Flight was 916 feet. This data helps to show that our estimated drag coefficient
in open rocket is very similar to the actual coefficient of drag. Because of this
verification, the predicted altitude for the actual rocket will be known to be closer to the
actual altitude than it was before the scale launch.




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Above is a graph of altitude (blue) versus time and velocity (red) versus time
The small scaled launch has also verified that the design for the final rocket is stable
and will perform well in winds of up to fifteen miles per hour, so long as the final launch
vehicle is built in a similar manner to that of the scaled model.




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Recovery Subsystem

Parachutes/Harnesses/Bulkheads/U-bolts
The GeoHawk is going to have an 84 inch diameter main parachute and a 24 inch
diameter drogue parachute. The drogue parachute will be deployed at apogee and the
descent rate under the drogue will be around 80 ft/s. The main parachute will be
deployed at 700 feet AGL and the descent rate will be about 21 ft/s. The separated
rocket parts will be harnessed together with one inch tubular nylon rope, quarter inch
diameter U-bolts and quarter inch diameter quick links. The rocket will have four
bulkheads and four centering rings. Two of the bulkhead will be used with the sled for
the UAV, and the other two will be used for the electronics bay. Four quarter inch U-
bolts will be provided, one at the top centering ring, one on the bottom bulkhead of the
electronics bay, one on the top bulkhead of the electronics bay (the electronics bay also
doubles as a coupler), and one at the base of the nosecone. We will be using U-bolts
instead of I hooks because they spread the force more efficiently throughout the
bulkhead/body tube, and because of the two entry points into the base materials.

Electronics
We will have the two dual deploy altimeters the Altus Metrum Telemini and the Perfect
Flight StratoLogger. The Telemini will use its first ejection charge at apogee, and the
StratoLogger will have its first charge two seconds after apogee. The second ejection
charge of the Telemini will be at 700 ft AGL, and the second ejection charge of the
StratoLogger will be at 600 ft AGL. The StratoLogger’s charges 50% more black
powder than the Telemini’s charges.




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Sketch




Above is a sketch of the recovery plan.

Kinetic Energy
The kinetic energy of the nosecone under the drogue parachute will be 99.57 ft-lbs and
the kinetic energy of the nosecone on landing will be 11.06 ft-lbs. The kinetic energy of
the mid-section of the rocket under the drogue parachute will be 389.56 ft-lbs and the
kinetic energy of the mid-section of the rocket on landing will be 43.28 ft-lbs. The back




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section of the rocket under the drogue chute will have a kinetic energy of 669.06 ft-lbs
and the back section will have a kinetic energy of 74.34 ft-lbs on landing.

Test Results
We launched our 2.33 sub-scale rocket and it flew great. The recovery system worked,
although the rocket drifted about half a mile away and then was dragged about another
half mile into some bushes due to high winds.


Safety and Failure Analysis
Failure                  Probability     Effect                  Prevention

Shock cord tears         Low             Parachute falls of      Buy heavy shock cord so
                                         the shock cord          it won’t tear

Ejection charge          Low             Rocket nose dives       Test ejection charges to
doesn’t go off                           into the ground         make sure they will blow
                                                                 out the chute

Parachute gets           Low/Moderate Rocket falls to the        Fold the parachute the
tangled up                            earth                      right way before launching


Parachute gets           Low             Parachute doesn’t       Use Nomex to protect the
holes in it from                         slow rocket down        parachute
ejection charge                          enough

Drogue chute             Low             Makes main              Test ejection charges
doesn’t deploy                           parachute zipper




Mission Performance Criteria
The mission performance criteria includes delivering the launch vehicle and payload to
an altitude no higher than one mile and then safely bring the payload back down to four
hundred feet above ground level. The launch vehicle also has to make it to this altitude
by using a K-class or lower motor.

The current altitude prediction by open rocket for the final launch vehicle is estimated at
5453 feet. Using the data from the scaled rocket’s launch, it can be inferred that this



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estimate will be close to the actual altitude of the rocket in addition to providing the
information that the rocket has room to grow, so to speak, and it will still be able to
reach its desired altitude.

The final motor selection for the launch vehicle will be Cesaroni Technology’s K590-DT.
This motor provides the rocket with enough thrust to just top the mile altitude in the
simulations, the actual altitude is expected to be lower than this estimation because the
rocket will gain mass from the initial estimate and it may also be subjected to more wind
than what the simulator is counting on.

The K590-DT’s thrust curve can be seen below:




The GeoHawk’s estimated final weight and length is 21.17 pounds and 91 inches long.
The forward section of airframe will house all of the avionics in addition to the UAV
payload and the sled deployment system for the UAV with the main parachute packed
just behind the sled and UAV.



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The stability margin for the GeoHawk is expected to be 2.07 calipers currently with the
fins being constructed last in order to help keep this stability upon completion of the
rocket. The CG is located 51.7 inches from the nose cone and the CP is located 63.1
inches from the nose cone.



Payload Integration
The way we will integrate the UAV into the rocket is by use of a sled. The UAV will sit on
the sled with the wings folded back next to the rudder. The choice of material for the
sled, which is cardboard, will soften any vibrations in the rocket as well as keeping the
sled in place during flight. The size of the sled and UAV will leave both pressed firmly
against the inside of the rocket which will also reduce the effect of vibrations. The sled
and UAV will be put into the top of the middle section of the rocket right behind the nose
cone. The two will be slid in together through the top opening of the middle section and
friction fitted.

All systems inside the UAV will be powered by a battery pack. Systems transmitting
and receiving data will be connected to the transmitter. The UAV will be controlled from
the ground via a transmitter. This will allow us control over the flight, give us video feed,
and give us a constant flow of data as to the position of the UAV. The UAV will be
constantly streaming data starting from when we pack it into the rocket until recovery.


Launch Concerns and Operation Procedures

After launching the rocket certain members will be keeping track of the rocket by eye
while other members keep track of it via GPS inside the rocket. Once the team is
cleared for recovery all members will follow the directions of the GPS, if that fails then
the members who followed the rocket visually will give the direction in which it landed.
Should the weather not permit accurate visuals and the GPS fails then wind direction
and speed will be considered and the team will form a search party and head in the
estimated direction.

The motor will be inspected before being inserted into the rocket, this includes checks
for cracks, weak casing, as well as any other damage. The motor mount will be
inspected for cracks, weak epoxy, structural faults, and any other damage.

The safety officer will be observing the insertion of the motor igniter for proper insertion.




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The rocket will be slid down the launch rail with rail buttons keeping it steady and
straight. Inspection of the launch set-up will include checks for straightness, stability,
and friction between the rail buttons and the rail.

After launch and recovery the vehicle and payload will be checked for any damage.
This includes examining the body tube, nose cone, engine mount, fins, parachute, bulk
heads, electronics, and payload.


Safety and Environmental (Vehicle)

The safety officer of Katalyst for Katastrophe is John Dowell.

Potential failures in the design of the UAV and our prevention measures are listed
below:

Payload Failures
 Failure                Probability          Effects of     Failure Prevention / Mitigation
                                             Failure

 UAV does not           Low/Moderate         UAV            Dry launch the UAV prior to
 unfold its wings       probability          crashes        launches / Stay alert on range

 GPS battery            Low probability      UAV may        Safely secure battery before
 becomes                                     be lost        launch / Be prepared to search
 disconnected                                               for UAV

 GPS battery dies       Low probability      UAV may        Change battery before every
                                             be lost        launch

 Rocket fly’s over      Low/Moderate         UAV does       Use rail system to launch the
 people                 probability          not launch.    rocket not towards people /
                                                            Harness UAV to rocket

 UAV losses signal      Low probability      Mission        Make sure UAV is in range and
 and crashes                                 failed         is visible


List of potential personal hazards:

   •   Allergy to Epoxy resin - Prolonged exposure to epoxy resin will cause an allergic



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       reaction which will lead to Allergic Contact Dermatitis. To prevent this, Nitrile
       gloves will be used whenever handling Epoxy.
   •   Paint fumes - Breathing in paint fumes will cause dizziness, nausea, headache,
       and breathing problems. To prevent this, the work area will be ventilated and
       breathing mask will be used.
   •   Sharp tools and edges - Cutting tools and sharp edges pose the danger of cuts
       or dismemberment. To prevent this, all rules of usage for every tool are read and
       followed by every member of the team, there is also a first aid kit nearby.
   •   Flying objects - While cutting, some material may fly off the stock at high speeds
       causing damage to the eyes. To prevent this, safety glasses will be worn
       whenever a tool requires them and/or there is a possibility of flying material.

The UAV and its functions will not harm the environment in any way due to our use of
electric components.

Potential failures in the design of the rocket and our prevention measures are listed
below:

Structural Failures
Failures              Probability   Effect of failures          Failure prevention

Motor retention       Low           Motor pushes through        Use epoxy, inspect engine
system brakes         probability   rocket, rocket is           retainer
                                    destroyed

Airframe breaks /     Low           Rocket becomes              Test airframe material
bends                 probability   unstable, and crashes       prior to launches

Fin tear              Low           Rocket becomes              Through the wall mounting
                      probability   unstable, and crashes       of fins is used

Rocket separates Low                Parachutes tear, body       Use shear pins, test
early/late       probability        tube zippers                ejection charges before
                                                                launches


Mitigation of the above failures will be to inspect rocket and UAV prior to each launch, to
stay alert on rocket range, and keep an eye on the sky.

The rocket is 5.5” diameter, weighs 19.2 lbs, the bottom section is 48” long and the top
is 30” and the height is 91” long.


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                                   Payload Criteria
Testing and Design

Systems
The avionics of the Payload, or UAV, consists of a Telemetrum Altimeter for Radio
telemetry and location, as well as GPS location, which will be used to help verify
location of camera during collection of video data. An ESC (Electronic Speed
Controller) and three servos will also be onboard the UAV. The ESC’s purpose is to act
as a throttle for the plane’s motor while one of the UAV’s servos will be for a rudder,
another for flaps on the horizontal stabilizers and the last will be used as the manual
release mechanism for the UAV.

The data recovery system consists of a small FPV (First Person View) camera for
recording the aerial video in addition to the Telemetrum for the position of the camera
when the video is taken.

The deployment system of the plane will consist of brake cable setup that then goes to
a sheet metal hinge just below the rudder. The steel cable inside of the protective cover
will slide in and out of this hinged portion of sheet metal by means of a servo. A quick
link will be attached to the end of the cord tethering the UAV to the rocket and then
clipped onto the cable. When the servo begins to pull, after a member from KfK
receives the signal from the Range Safety Officer to release the plane, the cable will
move out from the cover of the sheet metal and eventually enter the protective tubing,
upon which, the quick link will slip off of the end of the cable releasing the UAV as seen
below:




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                             Katalyst for Katastrophe
                         2011-2012 Critical Design Review




The Telemetrum will also be set to have a small ejection charge go off at its lowest
possible altitude to allow the plane a safe recovery even if it is spiraling out of control.
The one possible problem with this is that if the rocket is over the crowd so the plane
cannot be deployed the parachute will go off while the plane is still connected to the
rocket. This would simply slow the rocket down more than what its decent rate already
was.

As of yet no real test have been done but many hours of thought have been put into the
design of the payload. Construction of a test plane has begun to allow for a team
member to learn how to fly the plane properly prior to the full scale launch/flight test for
the payload as a whole. The practice plane is expected to be finished in two weeks’
time from the due date of the CDR. Testing of the deployment mechanism will begin
immediately after the completion of the fuselage of the UAV. This is to provide ample
time for the team to work out any unforeseen kinks in the system.

Workmanship
Since the UAV’s motor has a maximum weight that it can carry through the air,



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                              Katalyst for Katastrophe
                          2011-2012 Critical Design Review


construction of the plane will have to be done carefully so as to not add any extra weight
to the final product. This means that glue joints will not be made with excess glue and
fillets will be smaller than normal in order to cut the extra weight. The plane will also
operate with as many systems as possible that have an internal battery to prevent the
extra weight of individual batteries for each piece of electronic hardware.

Testing
The testing of the UAV will begin as soon as the preliminary model is completed since
none of the team members have ever flown before and a few crashes are expected.
This being said, the unnecessary electronics will be removed from the test model to
make the plane more maneuverable to begin with and then slowly increase the weight
of the plane.

Major testing of the ejection charge will be needed in order to prevent adding too much
black powder and causing the plane to become unstable and drop to the ground. Black
powder charge testing will begin on a different model than the flight worthy one so the
team does not accidently blow up the model along with all of the flight controls and the
motor.

Manufacturing
The entire plane has yet to be manufactured with the exception of the wings. This has
become our primary task with the small scale rocket launch out of the way. As stated
above, careful methods will be used to help prevent the plane from becoming much
heavier than it is currently expected to be. The UAV will be worked on by two KfK
members at each meeting in order to help finish the plane quicker and start tests as
early as possible.

Integration and Precision
A sled system will be used to integrate the UAV into the launch vehicle. The Sled will
be constructed from cardboard to help cushion the UAV from the vibrations of the
launch. While the plane will be built to withstand these vibrations the extra precaution
will be taken just to help protect the plane further. The Sled will be built around the
plane so that there are no problems fitting the two together.

On launch day one member will be dedicated to recording the weather conditions just
before or during the flight so that the data can then be tested against simulations and
the clarity of the video can be justified. As far as repeatability goes, the time the plane
is in the air will be recorded and so will the throttle at which the plane is flying, this will
help to keep the video quality similar to previous flights and will help the team to make
the call as to how fast the plane should be flying to take the best quality video. In



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                             Katalyst for Katastrophe
                         2011-2012 Critical Design Review


addition to speed, the altitude flown at will be recorded and varied until a good altitude is
found for video quality. With the Telemetrum placed onboard the UAV, we will be able
to receive real time data from the plane such as its altitude, GPS location and the status
of the auxiliary parachute.

Transmitters
The Telemetrum will be the only altimeter onboard the UAV although it will have
telemetry streaming back to a laptop at 434.55 MHz and 10 mill watts of transmitter
power. A Lithium Polymer battery will be dedicated to the Telemetrum. The receiver on
board the UAV will simply receive information from the pilot’s controller on the ground.
This controller has a transmitting frequency of 2.4 GHz and is an adaptive frequency
hopping spread spectrum. This means that every so often the controller and receiver
will change frequencies to help prevent interference and will immediately change
frequencies if the connection is lost for some reason.


Payload Concept Features and Definitions
The actual originality of the concept is not that distinguishable since other groups have
tried to launch a plane from a rocket. Our Creativity comes into play when we add the
camera for aerial video that will be used to perform water drainage studies and when we
add the Telemetrum for real time streaming data, thanks to its telemetry, and for the
ability to deploy a parachute for the plane to safely drift back to earth instead of burning
through multiple models because of difficulties landing. The parachute also provides
the UAV with a safety net just in case the battery runs dry or it encounters other
problems.

The challenges presented by this type of project are many, but this team is more than
willing to stick through the rough patches and see the project to the very end despite the
extra hours spent on trying to solve problems presented by this difficult of a project.


Scientific Value
Our experiment has great scientific value, because it will show how water flows of off
the property that we fly our plane over. The type of data we are collecting could be
used to stop flooding. Also the UAV design can be used for surveying the land on other
planets and deliver goods if necessary. For the mission to be a success the UAV has to
be launched out of the rocket, survey the land, and land safely on the ground. An
accurate drainage study is dependent on the type of cover on the ground. A variable
would be how the ground is used (parking lot, woods, corn field, etc.). Controls are:
what altitude the plane flies at, what camera we use, which plane we use, etc. Our



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                            Katalyst for Katastrophe
                        2011-2012 Critical Design Review


experimental process procedures follows: First, get the UAV ready for its flight. Next,
put the UAV in the rocket and launch the rocket. Then, deploy the UAV at the targeted
height. After, Fling the UAV, taking pictures of the Earth’s surface, then landing. Last,
extract the data from the UAV, and use it for a ground cover survey to be used to create
the most accurate and up to date drainage study available.


Safety and Environment (Payload)
The safety officer on the Katalyst for Katastrophe team is John. He is responsible to
inform the team if any safety rules are being broken. A list of possible failures are
below:


Payload Failures
Failure                Probability         Effects of    Failure Prevention / Mitigation
                                           Failure

UAV does not           Low/Moderate        UAV           Dry launch the UAV prior to
unfold its wings       probability         crashes       launches / Stay alert on range

GPS battery            Low probability     UAV may       Safely secure battery before
becomes                                    be lost       launch / Be prepared to search
disconnected                                             for UAV

GPS battery dies       Low probability     UAV may       Change battery before every
                                           be lost       launch

Rocket fly’s over      Low/Moderate        UAV does      Use rail system to launch the
people                 probability         not launch.   rocket not towards people /
                                                         Harness UAV to rocket

UAV losses signal      Low probability     Mission       Make sure UAV is in range and
and crashes                                failed        is visible




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                                 Katalyst for Katastrophe
                             2011-2012 Critical Design Review


                                         Activity Plan
     Activity Status and Schedule

     Budget Plan
     Currently the KfK team has to fundraise $1,432.60 more in order to cover initial budget
     estimates. This is proposed to be raised through selling of advertisement space to local
     companies, T-shirt and Sweatshirt sales, and candy sales at our high school. The
     candy sales have recently began at the team’s High School and two of the members
     have sold out on the first two days of sales. These sales appear to have the ability to
     cover more of the team’s proposed goal than what was initially expected. The most
     recent budget list can be found on the following page.



     Timeline
     Our current timeline has been pushed back from the initial time line due to a lack of
     participation a meetings. In order to fix this meeting will be held on Saturday and
     Monday nights instead of whenever a meeting would fit into everyone’s schedule. Our
     current time line can be seen below.

Task                                    Start Date                     End Date
Work on Critical Design Review          December 14, 2011              January 23, 2012
Work on full scale Rocket               January 1, 2012                March10, 2012
Launch small scale rocket               January 5, 2012                January 18, 2012
Critical Design Review Due              January 23, 2012               January 23, 2012
Critical Design Review Presentation     February 1, 2012               February 10, 2012
First Outreach Date                     Early February                 Early February
Full Scale Test Launches                March 5, 2012                  March 25, 2012
Work on Flight Readiness Review         February 2, 2012               March 20, 2012
Second Outreach Date                    March 5, 2012                  March 5, 2012
Flight Readiness Review Due             March 26, 2012                 March 26, 2012
Flight Readiness Presentation           April 2, 2012                  April 11, 2012
Travel to Huntsville, Alabama           April 18, 2012                 April 18, 2012
Flight Hardware & Safety Checks         April 19, 2012                 April 20, 2012
Launch Day                              April 21, 2012                 April 21, 2012
Travel to Spring Grove, IL              April 22, 2012                 April 22, 2012
Work on Post Launch Assessment          April 23, 2012                 May 6, 2012
Post-Launch Assessment Due              May 7, 2012                    May 7, 2012




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    Katalyst for Katastrophe
2011-2012 Critical Design Review




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                             Katalyst for Katastrophe
                         2011-2012 Critical Design Review


Educational Engagement

Our team is going to reach out to the local middle school math and science classes in
early March. The current plan is to show the class a NAR PowerPoint on rocketry and
then begin building straw rockets out of printer paper. These rockets are extremely
easy and cheap to build but will show all the characteristics of a real rocket launch.
After building we will sit the kids down and tell them about what we are doing in the
Student Launch Initiative and ask if they have any questions. We will also be
encouraging them to get involved with rocketry since it is both fun and can provide a
great window into the realistic application of math and science skills. The students will
also be provided information regarding Fox Valley Rocketeers schedule of events for
upcoming launches in 2012

In addition to this we plan on giving a presentation at NIRACON (the Northern Illinois
Rocketry Association’s yearly convention) hosted by our local Fox Valley Rocketeers.
This will help us to spread the word to other rocketry groups in our local area about the
SLI project.


                                      Conclusion


The Katalyst for Katastrophe team has had several time consuming setbacks; however,
the team has grown throughout the project. This small taste of the aerospace industry
has all of the team members interested in not only this project, but future opportunities
in aerospace fields. Even though the team is slightly behind schedule we are confident
that all requirements will continue to be fulfilled in a timely manner. Thank you again for
this opportunity.




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    Katalyst for Katastrophe
2011-2012 Critical Design Review




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