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CDR-Final

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CDR-Final Powered By Docstoc
					   Iowa State University
University Student Launch Initiative
           Critical Design Review
                Team CySLI




    Controlled Decent Video Reconnaissance Vehicle
                      (CDVRV)


                        Page 1
                                                             Table of Contents
Section 1: Summary of CDR Report ....................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.3
   1.1)       Team Summary .......................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.3
   1.2)       Launch Vehicle Summary ......................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.3
   1.3)       Payload Summary...................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.3
Section 2: Changes Made Since PDR.................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.4
   2.1)       Changes Made to Vehicle Criteria .......................................................................................... 4
   2.2)       Changes Made to Payload Criteria ......................................................................................... 4
   2.3)       Changes Made to Activity Plan ................................................................................................ 4
Section 3: Vehicle Criteria ........................................................................................................................ 5
   3.1)       Design and Verification of Launch Vehicle ............................................................................ 5
   3.2)       Recovery Subsystem .............................................................................................................. 11
   3.3)       Mission Performance Predictions .......................................................................................... 13
   3.4)       Payload Integration .................................................................................................................. 18
   3.5)       Launch Concerns and Integration Procedure ...................................................................... 18
   3.6)       Safety and Environment.......................................................................................................... 20
Section 4: Payload Criteria ..................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.23
   4.1)       Testing and Design of Payload Experiment......................... Error! Bookmark not defined.23
   4.2)       Payload Concept Features and Definition ........................... Error! Bookmark not defined.28
   4.3)       Science Value........................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.29
   4.4)       Safety and Environment.......................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.30
Section 5: Activity Plan............................................................................................................................ 32
   5.1)       Budget ....................................................................................................................................... 32
   5.2)       Timeline ..................................................................................................................................... 33
   5.3)       Gantt Chart ............................................................................................................................... 34
   5.4)       Educational Engagement........................................................................................................ 34
Section 6: Conclusion ............................................................................................................................. 36
Addendum A: NAR Regulations ............................................................................................................ 37
Addendum B: MSDS Reports ................................................................................................................ 39



                                                                            Page 2
Section 1: Summary of CDR Report

1.1) Team Summary

  1.1.1) School Name and Location
  Team CySLI is from Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

  1.1.2) Mentors
  Our administrative team official is Matt Nelson.

1.2) Launch Vehicle Summary

  1.2.1) Vehicle Size
  Our proposed vehicle design has the following dimensions:
  Outside Diameter: 7.7” Inside Diameter: 7.5” Total Length: 103”

  1.2.2) Motor Choice
  We will be using a Cesaroni L1115.

  1.2.3) Recovery System
  Our recovery system will be a dual deployment system with the use of 3/4 in. nylon shock
  cord.
       Drogue – 48” rip-stop nylon, deployed at apogee. 50
       Main – 18 ft. rip-stop nylon, deployed at 1000 ft.

  1.2.4) Rail Size
  We will be using an 8’ launch rail with diameter 0.63” buttons that fit a 1.5" rail.

1.3) Payload summary
     The payload is going to consist of two major components. The first component is a
     quadcopter. This quadcopter will have 4 arms that can be folded out from a central plate
     that allows the quadcopter to fit into the rocket. On the end of each arm that folds up
     there will be an electric motor and propeller that will provide the lift for the quadcopter.
     The second main component of the payload will be a camera system that has the ability to
     pan and tilt giving it a full range of motion in which it can film a ground location. The video
     that the camera records will be transmitted to a ground station, consisting of two
     operators, one who will control the camera and the other who will fly the quadcopter from
     the live video feed.

                                               Page 3
                      Section 2: Changes Made Since PDR


2.1) Changes Made to Vehicle Criteria
   Few changes have been made to the design of the vehicle. The only major changes are in
   the recovery configuration. The drogue parachute separates in the middle, but now the
   main parachute ejects from the top of the rocket following the payload. The main was
   upgraded to a single 18 ft. diameter parachute instead of two smaller 8 ft. diameter
   parachutes, which is now sufficiently large for a soft touchdown.
2.2) Changes Made to Payload Criteria
   The payload still has the same conceptual layout. The details have been refined, and a
   SolidWorks model has been finished. Construction techniques have been discussed, and
   the team is planning on constructing structural components of the quadcopter from
   fiberglass composites. The mechanism for deploying the quadcopter arms has been
   developed in a full scale mockup.

   The recovery of the payload has also been refined. The payload will be deployed at 1000
   ft. with the main parachute. The payload will descend to 500 ft. under its own 48 in.
   parachute, and if all systems appear to be functional the parachute will be severed by an
   electrical system developed for high-altitude balloon experiments.

2.3) Changes Made to Activity Plan
   No major changes have been made with the activity plan. Outreach activities will be
   continuing over the next couple of months.




                                             Page 4
                               Section 3: Vehicle Criteria
3.1) Design and Verification of Launch Vehicle
      3.1.1) Mission Statement
      Our mission is to deploy a reliable controlled descent vehicle with video reconnaissance
      capability from a rocket. The overall objective is to capture video surveillance of a ground
      target. The mission consists of five events:

         1.   Ignition
         2.   Motor burnout
         3.   Apogee, drogue deployment 5280 ft.
         4.   Payload and main deployment, 1000 ft.
         5.   Rocket touchdown.



      3.1.2) Requirements
      The rocket must be able to reach an altitude of one mile in a safe manner as well as carry a
      scientific payload. It must carry the payload in such a way as to keep it secure during launch
      and recovery. The rocket must also be recoverable and reusable.

      3.1.3) Mission Success Criteria
      In order to evaluate the performance of the vehicle, we have set forth the following criteria.

               Reach one mile within 5% (+/- 264ft)
               Safely carry and deploy the payload.
               Use a dual deployment recovery system to return in a safe and timely manner.
      3.1.4) Major Milestone Schedule
              The milestone schedule is integrated into our team’s Gantt Chart and Timeline, wich
              can be found in sections 5 of the report.
      3.1.5) Systems Review
        3.1.5.1) Motor System
               The motor will be composed of a solid fuel enclosed in a metal motor casing. This
               casing will be secured with forward and rear retention. The motor casing will press
               on a phenolic motor mount tube by means of a thrust ring at the base of the motor.
               The motor mount tube will be secured to the airframe with three 1/2” plywood
               centering rings. The motor will then be enclosed in the rocket from the rear by two
               bolts and a plywood ring.




                                                 Page 5
        This design was chosen because it allows a large variety of motors to be fitted into
        the rocket with no modifications. The rear retention system was chosen because it
        is inexpensive, effective and easy to manufacture.

 3.1.5.2)  Recovery System
         The recovery system will consist of two redundant altimeters to deploy the drogue
        chute at apogee and the main chute at 1000 feet. The shock chord connecting the
        upper and lower assemblies together will be composed of 3/4” tubular nylon.

        This recovery scheme was selected because it ensures a better chance of
        deployment of the parachutes. We chose to go with a dual deployment option to
        limit the rocket’s drifting as well as to allow it to reach the ground at a safe speed.
        Tubular nylon was chosen for the shock chord because of its abilities to resist high
        temperatures and carry large tension loads.




 3.1.5.3)   Stability
       The vehicle will use fiberglass fins to help stabilize the rocket. The fins will be
       trapezoidal and fitted at the bottom of the rocket to maintain stability.
 3.1.5.4)   Structural System
            The airframe is going to consist of phenolic body tube’s that will be wrapped in a
            bi-weave fiberglass cloth with epoxy resin. This takes an affordable body tube
            and increases its strength and durability making it the best choice for the rocket.
3.1.6. System Level Function Requirements
 3.1.6.1)   Motor System
               Forward retention keeps motor from exiting the front of the vehicle.
               Rear retention keeps motor from exiting the rear of the vehicle.
               All motor retention devises will be inspected before and after launch for
                functionality.
 3.1.6.2)   Recovery System
               Drogue parachute lowers the velocity of the vehicle to between 50 and 70
                ft/s, while not allowing extensive drifting due to wind.
               Main parachute lowers the velocity of the vehicle to between 10 and 15 ft/s,
                which is acceptable for a safe landing.
               Shock chord connects vehicle components during descent.
               Electronics deploy ejection charges and record altitude.

                                         Page 6
                 Ejection charges must provide separation of vehicle components while not
                  damaging recovery components.
                 Points of attachment keep vehicle components attached to shock chord
                  during deployment.
                 Electronics will be examined before and after to ensure functionality.
                 Parachutes will be examined before and after to ensure functionality.
                 Ejection charges will be tested on the ground to ensure proper ejection of
                  the drogue and main parachute.
  3.1.6.3)   Stability System
                 Fins keep the vehicle stable throughout ascent of the launch.
                 Through wall fin mounting keeps fins securely attached to the vehicle.
                 This will be examined before and after full scale launch to ensure
                  successful fin mounting has occurred.
  3.1.6.4)   Structural System
                 Phenolic body tubes will be the primary structure element.
                 The phenolic body tube will be wrapped in bi-weave fiberglass cloth with
                  epoxy resin to add the desired structural stability of the rocket during
                  launch.
                 The structure of the rocket will be examined after a full scale a launch to
                  ensure structure stability has been achieved.
3.1.7. Workmanship
The quality of vehicle will rely directly on the workmanship of those constructing it.
Therefore, to manufacture the vehicle properly, it is necessary to practice a high level of
workmanship during construction. In order to do this, the team will always have a team
member with the necessary High Power Certification present at all times of construction.
3.1.8. Component, Functional, and Static Testing
The following vehicle systems or subsystems will be tested in the following order and the
status of each test is shown.

          Component                             Status
          R-DAS Altimeter test                  previously successful
          PerfectFlite MAWD test                previously successful
          Ejection charge test                  Not yet verified
          Full vehicle test                     Not yet verified

R-DAS Altimeter test – previously successful
         The R-DAS has been verified during prior flights. The R-DAS has been flown on 4
         prior missions and has performed exceptionally.

                                          Page 7
PerfectFlite Altimeter Testing – previously successful
          The PerfectFlite altimeter has been verified during its 6 prior flights. Each time the
          altimeter has performed as needed.
Static Ejection Charge Test – Not Yet Verified
          To ensure proper separation at apogee and at 1000’, a static test of the ejection
          charges will be performed to verify the estimated amount of black powder needed.
          This will be done by using an amount smaller than our calculated amount and
          increasing until the desired ejection has occurred. This test has not yet been
          performed because of the decision to wait until the weight of the payload has been
          determined to make sure the amount of black powder is correct.
Full Scale Vehicle Test – Not Yet Verified
          Before the vehicle travels down to Huntsville and undergoes final inspection and
          launch, it will undertake a full scale test. This will make sure all of the systems are
          integrated properly and that the vehicle performs in accordance with specifications.
          The test will take place in early March.
3.1.9. Status and Plans for Remaining Manufacturing and Assembly
We will be purchasing the following rocketry components by the end of January 2012:
             Airframe
             Couplers
             Fins
             Nosecone
             Centering Rings
             Bulkheads
When these components arrive, construction can begin on the vehicle.
3.1.10. Integrity of Design
  3.1.10.1) Suitability of Fin Shape for Mission
         To stabilize the vehicle we will be using four trapezoidal fins. This design has been
         proven to be a low drag profile and is a shape that can be made out of fiberglass and
         resin.
  3.1.10.2) Proper Use of Materials
         Fins – The fins will be manufactured from a fiberglass weave and resin. The fins will
         be made in the Iowa State composites lab to the desired trapezoidal shape and then
         sanded for superior aerodynamic qualities.


                                             Page 8
     Bulkheads – The bulkheads used will be manufactured from fiberglass weave and
     resin in the Iowa State University composites lab.
     Airframe – The airframe will be composed a phenolic body tube that will be wrapped
     in a fiber glass weave and resin for structural stability and durability.
     Motor Mount Tube – The motor mount tube used to secure the motor will be
     manufactured in the Iowa State University composites lab out of fiberglass weave
     and resin.
     Nosecone – The nosecone used will be made from acrylic. This was chosen because
     of its transparency properties, durability and it is light weight material.
3.1.10.3) Proper Assembly Procedures
     Lower Assembly Loads – The forces generated from the thrust of the motor will be
     transferred to the motor mount tube. The motor mount tube will be secured to the
     airframe by three centering rings.
     Lower Assembly Construction – The construction of the lower assembly will start
     with the mounting of the centering rings to the motor mount tube. The fins will
     then be constructed. This motor mount tube will then be inserted into the rear of
     the airframe and glued in place. The fins will then be inserted and glued through fill
     holes to the motor tube. Epoxy fillets will then be placed on each fin where it comes
     through the airframe.
     Middle and Upper Assembly Loads – The forces generated from the lower assembly
     will be transferred to the middle and upper assembly through the airframe. The
     middle and upper assembly will stay attached to the lower assembly by means of a
     coupler.
     Middle Assembly Construction – The construction of the middle assembly will start
     with the coupler that will also serve as the altimeter bay. The coupler will be
     attached to the middle assembly.
     Upper Assembly Construction – The construction of the upper assembly will start
     with the installation of a bulk plate, which will serve as a divider between the
     payload and the rocket. The upper assembly will be fabricated along with the
     attachment points for the recovery system.
3.1.10.4) Motor Mounting and Retention
     To make sure the motor remains within the vehicle, forward and rear retention will
     be put in place. Forward retention will be accomplished by transferring the thrust
     produced by the motor to a thrust ring at the base of the motor casing. This thrust
     will be transferred to the motor mount tube mounted to the airframe with three

                                      Page 9
         centering rings. The motor will then be secured from the rear of the vehicle by
         means of a plywood ring that bolts onto the aft centering ring.
  3.1.10.5) Status of Verification
         Currently, our design is in the construction phase. Once the ordered components
         arrive, we can begin fabricating the vehicle and payload.
3.1.11. Safety and Failure Analysis
The following risks to the vehicle and project have been identified and are followed by an
appropriate plan that will be implemented to reduce or eliminate that risk.


                                   Risk Mitigation Table


                    Risk                                     Risk Mitigation

 Altimeter is damaged during test             Altimeter will be securely mounted in the
                                              electronics bay during test

 Vehicle is damaged during ejection charge    A low approximation of black power will be
 testing                                      tested first (lower than the calculated
                                              amount needed), then more will be added
                                              as necessary

 Vehicle is damaged during full scale         Only tested altimeters and ejection charge
 testing                                      amounts will be used on the full scale test
                                              and the launch will be conducted using safe,
                                              proven methods

 Vehicle construction falls behind schedule   Materials will be ordered as soon as the
 due to out of stock materials or delayed     design it finalized and the necessary funds
 shipping                                     are available

 Project falls behind schedule due to lack of A minimum of two team members have the
 proper personal                              level II certification required to help in
                                              construction and launch the rocket

 Project falls behind schedule due to lack of Funding will requested from the University
 funding                                      as soon as a budget is established along with
                                              solicitation from additional sources



                                         Page 10
         The following failures are those that could occur during a testing of a system or a full scale test
         of the vehicle. Each failure is matched with the proposed steps taken to reduce injury during
         such failure.




                                      Failure and Risk Reduction Table



                         Failure                                 Steps Taken to Reduce Risk

         Points of attachment dislodges or shock         Personnel are kept clear of vehicle assemblies
               chord suffers tensile failure                          during test launch

               Fin dislodged from airframe               Personnel kept clear of vehicle during launch

              Motor dislodges from airframe               Personnel are aware of the launch through
                                                               each phase of the vehicle’s flight

       Rocket fails to deploy parachute at apogee or      Personnel are aware of the launch through
                          at 1000’                             each phase of the vehicle’s flight

               Motor CATOs upon ignition                 Personnel are aware of the launch and are at
                                                         the proper distance of 300 ft during ignition
                                                                    of the “L” class motor.



3.2.     Recovery Subsystem
           3.2.5. Analysis of Recovery Subsystem
             3.2.5.1)   Main Parachute
                    With our proposed design we have an estimated recovery weight of ~32 lbs. The
                    main parachute will have an 18 foot diameter parachute that will slow the rocket to
                    an estimated 12.3 ft/s.
             3.2.5.2)   Drogue Parachute
                    To slow the rocket from apogee to deployment of the main parachute we will be
                    using a 48” drogue parachute from Public Missiles. This parachute is specifically
                    designed for drogue use. This should slow the rocket to approximately 50 ft/s.
                                                       Page 11
3.2.5.3)   Shock Chord
      To keep the vehicle components connected and attach the parachute we will be
      using a 3/4” nylon shock chord. This material is rate for 5500 lbs force and is
      resistant to the high temperatures of the ejection charges.
3.2.5.4)   Electronics
      For a safe recovery, we are using a completely redundant ejection charge system.
      One altimeter will be a Rocket Data Acquisition System (R-DAS) from AED Electronics
      and the other will be the required PerfectFlite MWAD altimeter. Each altimeter will
      be wired to two separate ejection charges, resulting in four charges total for the
      vehicle. This minimizes the room for error by using the most failsafe system possible
      with two separate altimeters. Each altimeter will have its own battery and will be
      activated by separate switches accessible from the outside of the rocket. Each
      altimeter will be test in a real-life launch to make sure the altimeter has no
      problems.
3.2.5.5)   Ejection Charges
      Each ejection charge will be composed of a plastic vessel that contains the FFFF black
      powder along with the igniter that will be wired to the altimeter. The black powder
      will be sized and then a static test will be performed to ensure proper separation is
      reached with the amount of powder used.
3.2.5.6)   Deployment Process
      The drogue parachute will be enclosed in the lower assembly and will be between
      the upper and lower assemblies when deployed. The main parachute will be
      enclosed in the upper assembly and will be between the two upper-most
      assemblies. Shear pins will be installed at the joint between the lower and upper
      assemblies to stop the rocket from ‘drag separating’ after motor burnout and at the
      joint between the two upper assemblies to keep the main parachute from deploying
      at apogee.
3.2.5.7)   Attachment Scheme
      To connect the shock chord to the recovery components, we will be using quick links
      rated to 1540 lbs force, available from Giant Leap Rocketry. These quick links will be
      attached to the upper and lower assemblies by a U-Bolt attached to a bulkhead that
      has been epoxied inside of the airframe.
      At apogee, the vehicle will deploy the drogue parachute from the lower section. The
      rocket will then descend to ~1000’ and then deploy the main parachute from the
      upper assembly. All sections will be tethered via the nylon shock cord.


                                      Page 12
                   Both the drogue parachute and the main parachute will be folded so that when
                   ejected they will unfold. Both parachutes will be protected from the ejection
                   charges by nomex cloth. This will protect the parachutes from burning of the
                   ejection charge.
          3.2.6. Safety and Failure Analysis
          The following failure modes that could occur during recovery of the vehicle have been paired
          with the necessary safety procedures to reduce the chance of injury.

                                      Recovery Safety and Failure Table

                   Possible Failure                                   Safety Procedures

          Ejection charges ignite during rocket           Keep ejection charge leads taped until rocket
                      preparation.                           is ready to be taken to the launch pad.

       Ejection charges ignite while rocket is being      Use electronics that arm the ejection charges
                  placed on launch pad.                        after launch has been detected my
                                                                          acceleration.

       Main parachute separates from rocket upon          All personal are aware of the rockets position
                     deployment.                               during all flight phases of the launch.




3.3.    Mission Performance Predictions
          3.3.5. Mission Performance Criteria
          For the mission to be a success, the vehicle must perform the following:
             - Reach an altitude of 5,280 ft within 5% (264 ft)
             - Safely carry the payload until deployment
             - Land safely
             - Be recoverable and reusable

          3.3.6. Flight Simulations and Predictions
            3.3.6.1) Flight Simulations & Altitude Predictions
              The following simulations were completed using a Cesaroni L1115 motor. The
              simulation was run during three different conditions. Simulation 0 was done under wind
              conditions between 0-2 mph. Simulation 1 was completed during conditions ranging from

                                                       Page 13
 3-7 mph. Simulation 2 was done with wind conditions between 8-14 mph.
       The following simulation was done under the conditions stated for Simulation
       0.




3.3.6.2)   Design Drawings
                         RockSim Dimensional Drawing




                                   Page 14
                             RockSim Wire Model




3.3.6.3) Components
     The proposed vehicle has the follow components with weights listed.
       Nose Cone                             13.8 OZ
       Airframe                              310.5 OZ
       Centering Rings                       2.0 OZ
       Bulkheads                             3.0 OZ
       Fin Set                               5.1 OZ
       Motor Mount Tube                      20.5 OZ
       Electronics                           4.5 OZ
       Payload Electronics                   30.4 OZ
       Shock Chord                           10 OZ
       Drogue Parachute                      .5 OZ
       Main Parachute                        80.0 OZ
       Payload Parachute                     1.0 OZ
       Ejection Charges                      1.0 OZ
       Epoxy                                 2.0 OZ
       Payload                               80.0 OZ
       Motor and Motor Casing                155.1 OZ
       Total Weight:                         719.4 OZ (~45 Lbs)




                                   Page 15
  3.3.6.4) Motor Thrust Curve




         Thrust curve for a Cesaroni Technology L1115 rocket motor.




3.3.7. Scale Test and Drag Analysis
On January 16, 2012, CySLI launched the scale model rocket of the one that will be launched
for the competition. The scale rocket launched was 1:5.6 scale of the full sized rocket. The air
frame, nose cone, and fins where all kept to this scale factor in order to maintain the proper
dimension of the scale rocket. According to Rocksim calculations, the scale rocket went to
approximately 500 ft.
Due to the fact that our full size rocket is overstable, extra attention was place on the scale
rocket launch trajectory to see if weather cocking would alter our design of our full scale
launch. The scale launch was done in somewhat windy conditions, ~10 mph, and this gave us
a clear picture on what trajectory our rocket will take and that we are happy with this. Even
though the scale launch was a success, the stability of our rocket throughout the build of the
full scale will be kept in mind.



                                          Page 16
3.3.8. Vehicle Stability
The proposed vehicle has the following stability margins
          Center of Pressure – 79”
          Center of Gravity – 52”
          Stability Margin – 3.5 Calibers (Overstable)
The proposed vehicle has the following dimensions
          Length – 103.3”
          Diameter – 7.7”
          Weight – 46 lbs
                                          Page 17
3.4.   Payload Integration
        3.4.5. Payload Integration Plan
        The payload will be integrated into the rocket in a way that fits directly with the shape of the
        rocket. In our rocket design, the payload is a controlled descent video reconnaissance vehicle
        that fits in the upper body tube and encompasses the nosecone. All of the electronics
        associated with the payload will fit within the actual payload and in the confines of the
        nosecone.
        3.4.6. Installation, Removal, and Fit of Payload
        The payload is built to fit in the rockets upper body tube. It can be removed with the
        nosecone as needed and will be secured in the rocket with the shear pins that will hold the
        nosecone on because they will be one unit when the payload deploys.
        3.4.7. Compatibility of Elements
        The payload is built to coexist with the elements of the rocket.
        3.4.8. Simplicity of Integration Procedure
        This approach for installing the payload allows for easy installation and removal in a quick and
        timely manner.

3.5.   Launch Concerns and Integration Procedure
        3.5.5. Final Assembly and Launch Procedures
        Before the rocket is launched, the launch team will prep the vehicle and the payload with the
        following list.
               1. Remove vehicle from transportation case
               2. Check vehicle and payload for damage
               3. Load batteries into vehicle and payload
               4. Measure and load ejection charges
               5. Fold parachutes and install in deployment bags
               6. Load shock chord and parachutes into vehicle
               7. Install sheer pins into vehicle
               8. Load motor casing with charge
               9. Install motor into vehicle
               10. Put rocket onto launch pad
               11. Turn on payload electronics and altimeters
               12. Check all electronic systems are working through audible tones

                                                    Page 18
           13. Install igniter and connect contacts
           14. Launch vehicle
           15. Recover vehicle
    3.5.6. Recovery Preparation
   In order for a safe recovery, the following instructions will be followed.
          1. Fold the drogue parachute, making sure lines don’t get crossed
          2. Fold nomex cloth around areas that will be exposed to deployment charge
          3. Install into vehicle
          4. Repeat steps 1-3 with the main parachute
    3.5.7. Motor Preparation
    In order to achieve a proper ignition of the motor the following list will be followed.
         1. Unpack motor hardware
         2. Obtain motor reload
         3. Load charge into casing
         4. When rocket is on the rail, load the igniter and attach leads
    3.5.8. Igniter Installation
    When the rocket is on the launch pad, the igniter will be installed into the rocket and the
    leads will then be attached to the launch system.
    3.5.9. Setup on Launcher
   The rocket will be launched using a rail system. The rocket will be installed on this rail then
   the electronics will be activated from outside the rocket.
    3.5.10. Troubleshooting
    Problems with the vehicle will be analyzed with the flowing table.

                                 Troubleshooting Vehicle Problems

              Observed Problem                                              Root Cause

       Recovery electronics fail to respond              Dead battery or system is not receiving power

Main parachute is deployed with drogue at apogee        Sheer pins not installed or not adequate to retain
                                                                         main parachute




                                              Page 19
         Rocket does not deploy recovery devices              Electronics not activated, ejection charges not
                                                                   connected, or charges not adequate

       Tracking system does not pick up transmitter           Transmitter is damaged during flight or is not
                                                                      receiving adequate power.



        3.5.11. Post-Flight Inspection
        After the vehicle is recovered the following list will be followed to ensure the rocket’s
        integrity and recover the data from the payload and vehicle.
          1. Re-pack parachutes into rocket and transport back to preparation table
          2. Retrieve payload from landing site
          3. Attach R-DAS to laptop and download data
          4. Attach MWAD to laptop and download data
          5. Inspect vehicle for any compromises in structural integrity
          6. Inspect payload for any compromises in structural integrity
          7. Detach and power down recovery transmitter

3.6.   Safety and Environment (Vehicle)
        3.6.5. Safety Officer
        The safety officer for Team CySLI of Iowa State is Matt Dickinson.
        3.6.6. Failure Mode Analysis
                 3.6.6.1)    Vehicle Failure Modes

       Vehicle Risk                               Proposed Mitigation

       Motor dislodges from rocket                Use several heavy duty 1/2” plywood centering
                                                  rings and bulkheads secure the motor in the
                                                  vehicle

       Fins dislodge from the rocket              Fins to be mounted with epoxy to the motor
                                                  mount tube via through wall mounting and fillets
                                                  from the fin to the body tube

       Airframe disintegrates upon launch         Use phenolic high power rocketry airframe

                                                   Page 20
                                            wrapped in fiberglass and resin to ensure a
                                            successful launch


          3.6.6.2)   Payload Integration



         Payload Integration Risk                            Proposed Mitigation

  Payload is damaged during separation from           Use a piston to separate payload from
               ejection charges                                  ejection charges

    Payload becomes dislodged from mount              Proper mounting to nosecone and then
                                                            shear pins to the airframe


          3.6.6.3)   Launch Operations

Launch Operation Risk                            Proposed Mitigation

Vehicle or payload is damaged in                 Place vehicle and payload in transportation
transportation                                   unit to keep from getting damaged

Ejection charge ignites while prepping           Arm ejections while the rocket is on the
vehicle                                          launch rail

Observer is hurt during launch of vehicle        A ‘heads up’ call will be given before the
                                                 vehicle is launched


3.6.7. Personnel Hazards

Personnel Hazards                              Hazards Mitigation

Injury due to table saw                        Proper instruction will be given to those using
                                               the table saw

                                               Proper instruction will be given to those using
Injury due to belt sander
                                               the belt sander

                                               Proper instruction will be given to those using
Injury due to scroll saw
                                               the scroll saw

                                            Page 21
Injury due to exposure to dangerous          Those who come into use dangerous
material                                     materials will have read MSDS sheets and
                                             have proper instruction on how to use such
                                             materials. (MSDS sheets can be seen in
                                             addendum B)*

Injury due to test of ejection charge        Ejection charges will be tested outside away
                                             from any buildings. A generous amount of
                                             distance will be put between personnel and
                                             ejection charges

Injury due to full scale test of vehicle     All NAR High Power Rocketry Safety

                                             Code rules will be observed during full scale
                                             test launch and final launch

Injury due to test of payload                All personnel will be clear of test apparatus
                                             and a call to attention will be

                                             made prior to initiation

         *For particular handling and risk mitigation –
         -Aeropoxy, Paint, APCP: PPE will be provided and required for all
         personnel handling or exposed to these materials in accordance with
         MSDS’s.
3.6.8. Environmental Concerns
We have no environmental concerns with our vehicle or payload.




                                           Page 22
                           Section 4: Payload Criteria

4.1) Testing and Design of Payload Experiment
      4.1.1) Systems Review
      The payload system can be divided into five subsystems:
      1.     Quadcopter arms deployment mechanism: The payload operation starts when it is
             deployed from the rocket by a black powder ejection charge, before which the
             quadcopter arms are folded up inside the rocket airframe. When deployed out into
             free space, the spring-loaded arms automatically fold out and lock into place.
      2.     Video: The video function is remotely controlled from the ground. The camera will
             be able to pan 360 degrees by an electric motor-driven turntable, and tilt 90
             degrees via a servo. Radio control will use 72 MHz transmitter/receiver. The camera
             feed will be transmitted down to the tracking station and recorded. The video
             downlink is important for piloting the quadcopter.
      3.     Quadcopter control: A Gaui stabilizer will be used to mix the motor ESC’s. Radio
             control will be used with Spektrum DX8 2.4 GHz transmitter.
      4.     Flight data: An Arduino Uno microcontroller will be onboard the payload and take
             acceleration, GPS, gyro and barometric measurements. These measurements will
             be saved to an onboard micro-SD card. We are still working on a method of
             transmitting/receiving data to the tracking station.
      5.     Parachute release mechanism: At 500 ft. the operators will have the option to
             release the parachute and use quadcopter control the rest of the flight. This will be
             done by passing electricity through nichrome wire attached to the parachute cord.
             This will melt the parachute attachment and release the parachute. This mechanism
             was developed for releasing high-altitude balloon experiments by undergraduate
             students at Iowa State University.




                                            Page 23
4.1.2)   System-Level Functional Requirements
    o    Deployment of payload from rocket
    o    Deployment of quadcopter arms
    o    Control of camera
    o    Communications check, quadcopter systems check
    o    Release of parachute at 500 ft.
    o    Control of quadcopter

                                     Page 24
4.1.3) Workmanship
The team will be trained for work in the composites lab. Many of our components will be
fabricated from fiberglass, and proper knowledge of how composite layups work will
prevent the likelihood of component failures.

4.1.4) Component, Functional and Static Testing

The first step to have a functioning quadcopter is going to require flawless arm
deployment. In order to achieve this, a prototype of the design has been built and
demonstrates that the arms will deploy when going from a folded up position to the
operating position. In order to confirm this will happen when deployed from the rocket,
the prototype will be used in the static testing of the rocket’s ejection charges so that it can
be observed in the actual application.

The second phase of payload testing will be to fly the quadcopter. While flying the
quadcopter at a low altitude, the pilot and observers will check for functionality of the
quadcopter, as well as ease of operation.

The parachute release mechanism will be tested with a simulated weight of the
quadcopter. The mechanism will be tested multiple times for reliability.

In order achieve the final test of the payload, the quadcopter will be placed in a cylinder
and attached to a tethered weather balloon. It will be allowed to ascend to 500 ft where
the quadcopter will be released with the parachute for the final test of controllability from
the deployed state.

4.1.5) Manufacturing and Assembly Plan
During the composite layups of our rocket’s airframe the team will fabricate the structural
components of the payload from fiberglass. The electronics will be assembled separately.
The electronics will then be integrated with the payload structure.

4.1.6) Integration Plan
The quadcopter doubles as the nose cone of the rocket from launch to apogee and stays
with the rocket during its descent until 1000 ft. The quadcopter arms fold upward inside
the body of the rocket, and are spring-loaded so that when the ejection charge pushes the
payload out of the rocket the quadcopter arms will pop into place. The arms will
mechanically lock into place. The following pictures depict our proof-of-concept mockup
model of the quadcopter arms-deployment mechanism.




                                        Page 25
Page 26
4.1.7) Precision of Instrumentation and Repeatability of Measurement
    o Barometric pressure sensors have a history of being very precise. Our pressure
       sensor from SparkFun Electronics has a precision of ± 0.03 hPa, corresponding to an
       altitude precision of roughly 1m.
    o GPS was used in the past with success, and is reliable.
    o The accelerometer from SparkFun Electronics has a ±16g operational range with
       programmable 1g increments.
    o In addition to transmitting this information to the ground tracking station, the data
       will be saved in a micro-SD card to be analyzed later.

4.1.8) Payload Electronics

   The following electronics will be used for the control of the quadcopter

   o 4 450 Helicopter D2830 electric motors.
   o 4 Exceed Rc Proton/Volcano ESC controllers
   o Radio control system (transmitter, receiver, Gaui)

                                      Page 27
         The following electronics will be used for the video and data collection

         o   Arduino Uno (acceleration, gyration, GPS, barometric pressure).
         o   Hero Cam
         o   1.5G AV transmitter and receiver for video transmission
         o   Camera radio control system (receiver, motor, servos).

      4.1.9) Safety and Failure Analysis
      Should the quadcopter arms not function properly or there is a malfunction within the
      electronic components, the parachute will be tethered to the quadcopter until landing
      preventing any damage to the quadcopter or its surroundings.

4.2) Payload Concept Features and Definition
      4.2.1) Creativity and Originality
      We believe that the quadcopter design is an innovative approach to the UAV problem.
      Quadcopters have been built and flown with cameras, but we are taking it to the next level
      and deploying one from a rocket, which involves transformation mid-flight.

      4.2.2) Uniqueness and Significance
      Teams have tried to deploy UAV’s in the past, but we believe that we are the first to deploy
      a quadcopter from a rocket. This could play a significant role in military applications. Small
      drones are commonly used in area surveillance, but our payload design could be place on
      top of current military surface to air rockets for fast deployment, getting eyes in the sky
      quicker than ever before.

      4.2.3) Level of Challenge
      The level of challenge of our project can be illustrated by the number of functions that
      must be controlled or automated to make meet payload objectives.
          o Camera pan
          o Camera tilt
          o Quadcopter throttle
          o Quadcopter pitch
          o Quadcopter yaw
          o Collection and transmission of barometric pressure, GPS, gyration, and acceleration
          o Payload parachute separation
          o Backup parachute deployment



                                             Page 28
      The amount of controls that the quadcopter requires presents a challenge that will take
      time and practice to execute correctly. This in itself is something that our team has set
      aside the time and dedication to ensure that the challenge can and will be met.



4.3) Science Value
      4.3.1) Payload Objectives
          1.    To successfully deploy a quadcopter from a rocket involving successful
                transformation into quadcopter configuration.
          2.    Receive live video transmission from the onboard camera.
          3.    To be able to control the camera remotely from the tracking station.
          4.    To successfully locate and capture video surveillance of the ground target.
          5.    Ease of quadcopter maneuverability and function as a UAV.

      4.3.2)   Payload Success Criteria
          o    Payload is successfully deployed at 1000 ft. along with the rocket’s main parachute.
          o    Camera controls are operational.
          o    Payload descends to 500 ft. under parachute.
          o    Payload controls are deemed to be functional, and parachute is severed.
          o    Helicopter rotors take control of payload flight.
          o    Video is steady and user is able to locate ground target.
          o    Streamed video is uninterrupted from liftoff to touchdown.

      4.3.3) Experimental Logic, Approach and Method of Investigation
      Since a portion of the payload’s descent will be under parachute and a portion will utilize
      the quadcopter configuration, we hope to be able to compare and contrast the
      effectiveness and stability as a platform for video streaming between the two.

      4.3.4) Measurement, Variables and Controls
      A microcontroller unit will be placed on the payload to collect such information as
      barometric pressure, acceleration, GPS coordinates, and gyration. This information will also
      be transmitted to the ground controller and recorded. With this information we hope to be
      able to determine the stability of each system.

      4.3.5) Relevance of Expected Data
      According to the U.S. Standard Atmosphere model, the air density from 0 to 1000 ft. varies
      only from 2.377 to 2.308 slugs/ft3, which is a negligible difference. Our main concern is that
      the wind varies significantly with altitude above the ground, and therefore may affect the

                                              Page 29
      stability of each platform differently. Because of this, comparing the differences between
      the two platforms is second to the evaluation of the performance of our payload’s
      engineering applications. We hope to launch on a calm day, but acknowledge that we have
      no control over this variable.

      4.3.6) Experiment Process Procedures
      The entire flight from launch to payload touchdown will be recorded on the micro-SD card.
      After launch the trajectory will be analyzed, along with the vibrations and rotation. The
      latter two will be compared between parachute descent and quadcopter flight. The ease of
      camera operation will also be qualitatively discussed between the two platforms.

4.4) Safety and Environment
      4.4.1) Safety Officer
      The safety officer for the Team is Matthew Dickenson. He will be present during build
      sessions to help oversee and encourage the proper use of power equipment and hazardous
      materials.

      4.4.2) Critical Analysis of Failure Modes and Mitigation

   Payload Risk                            Proposed Mitigation

   Payload parachute tangles with main.    Separate payload and main parachute with a
                                           piston.

   Quadcopter arms fail to deploy          Keep parachute shroud lines from interfering
   properly.                               with deployment mechanism, conduct
                                           deployment test.

   Payload goes out of radio range.        Quadcopter will descend via parachute.

   Quadcopter goes unstable.               If it is determined that the quadcopter is too
                                           close to the spectators, parachute will not be
                                           released.


             We will work to make sure these systems are tested and robust, yet we
             acknowledge the final say of the range safety officer. If the range safety officer
             deems the quadcopter system to be unsafe for recovery, we will leave the payload


                                            Page 30
          in parachute recovery as we take video and simply test the quadcopter functionality
          separate from the rocket flight.

   4.4.3) Personnel Hazards and Mitigation

Hazard                                  Proposed Mitigation

Burn from nichrome wire.                Connect to power source only when ready for
                                        flight.

Cuts from helicopter rotors.            Turn on radio control only when ready for flight.

Fiberglass construction.                Make sure that all fiberglass edges are sanded
                                        smooth. Wear face masks when working with
                                        fiberglass.


   4.4.4) Environmental Concerns
          The only environmental concern foreseen is if the payload or parts of the payload
          were unrecoverable. The payload will have a transmitter so will be easily
          recoverable. The first payload parachute will likely be separated from the payload
          and descend freely. The team will take care to locate and recover this piece, as it
          would be detrimental to the environment.




                                         Page 31
                             Section 5: Activity Plan
  5.1. Budget
                                      Vendor            Qty Price        Total
Item                                  Price             Qty Total
Rocket Hardware
6" Airframe                           $36.25            2    $72.50
Cesaroni Pro75 casing                 $189.95           1    $189.95
L1115 reload                          $246.95           3    $740.85
6" NC                                 $94.45            1    $94.45
6" TC                                 $13.20            3    $39.60
Drogue parachute (34")                $25.15            1    $25.15
Main parachute (96")                  $157.45           1    $157.45
75mm MMT                                                1
CR's                                  free              3
AeroPak motor retainer                $54.00            1    $54.00
Nylon shock cord                      $1.84/yd          20   $36.80
Nomex cloth                           free              3
A-B foam                              $23.95            1    $23.95
Misc. hardware                        $100                   $500

Payload Hardware
Arduino                               free
Breadboard                            free
Camera dome                           $54.60            1    $54.60
Camera pan and tilt system            $57.80            1    $57.80
quadcopter                            $302                   $500
Hero Cam camera                       $300              1    $300
Transmitter/reciever                  $96               1    $96
Electric motor                        $24               4    $96
esc                                   $15               4    $60
battery                               $12               4    $47


Travel
Vehicle Rental                        $662.00           1    $1,000.00
Hotel Room                            $108.00           5    $540.00

Outreach (Projected)
Model rockets                         $5                50   $250

                                                                         Total
                                                                         $4,935.90




                                      Page 32
5.2. Timeline
    August 2011:
    5    Request for proposal goes out to all teams.

    September 2011:
    26   One electronic copy of the completed proposal due to NASA MSFC.
         Send Electronic Copy to:
         edward.m.jeffries@nasa.gov
         Jacobs ESTS Group
         julie.d.clift@nasa.gov
         NASA MSFC

    October 2011:
    17   Schools notified of selection
    21   USLI Team teleconference (tentative)

    November 2011:
    4   Web presence established for each team.
    28  Preliminary Design Review (PDR) report and PDR presentation slides
        posted on the team Web site by 8:00 a.m. Central Time.

    December 2011:
    5–14 Preliminary Design Review Presentations (tentative)

    January 2012:
    23   Critical Design Review (CDR) reports and CDR presentation slides
         posted on the team Web site by 8:00 a.m. Central Time.

    February 2012:
    1-10 Critical Design Review Presentations (tentative)

    March 2012:
    26   Flight Readiness Review (FRR) reports and FRR presentation slides
         posted on the team Web site by 8:00 a.m. Central Time.

    April 2012:
    2–11 Flight Readiness Review Presentations (tentative)
    18     Travel to Huntsville
    19–20          Flight Hardware and Safety Checks (tentative)
    21     Launch Day

    May 2012:
    7    Post-Launch Assessment Review (PLAR)
                                         Page 33
           posted on the team Web site by 8:00 a.m. Central Time.
    18     Announcement of winning USLI team.


5.3. Gantt Chart




5.4. Educational Engagement
 5.4.1. Youth Outreach
     An essential aspect of the University Student Launch Initiative deals with educational
     engagement and outreach opportunities. For this aspect of the competition, members of
     CySLI dedicate time each month to visiting local grade schools and middle schools to teach
     about and generate interest in rocketry at a young age. These events often include the
     description of basic rocketry parts and explanation of how a rocket works. Amongst high
     school students, the team teaches similar concepts as previously mentioned in deeper
     context. Often times visiting high schools can be used as a tool to recruit future members.
     Other activities we commonly share with these students include how to build a film
     canister rocket, creating paper space shuttles, and playing a role in their parent-student
     Science Nights with small presentations and interactive mini projects.



 5.4.2. Community Involvement
     CySLI has actively made and will continue to make an effort to involve not only the Iowa
     State University Community, but also the surrounding Ames area. Our team here at Iowa
     State presents and recruits for the competition at the biannual Clubfest held on campus.
     This is an opportunity targeted at college students to become involved in or just learn
                                          Page 34
about the creativity and labor that goes into designing and developing a rocket with
specifications to compete. Another form of outreach targeted more toward the Ames
community used by CySLI, is the publication of information about our progress in design
and building stages and information about practice launches in local and school
newspapers. CySLI also has been invited to showcase this year’s project at local project
fairs.




                                     Page 35
                              Section 6: Conclusion



       The challenge set by team CySLI was to create a UAV that would be able to deploy
from the rocket and have a full range of control. The quadcopter was the answer to this
challenge. It provided a stable platform that would allow for video reconnaissance and
transmission while being highly maneuverable. In order to accommodate the size of this
payload a rocket of 7.7 inch diameter and 104 inches in length was chosen to give us the
best chance of getting our quadcopter and rocket to the one mile goal. For the goal of
deploying our payload in a successful manner, it will be deployed at 1000 feet giving it
enough time to unfold, slow its decent, and stabilize for a successful flight of
reconnaissance and flight. This has also become a great project to get our community
involved in. It excites children in the interest of science and what amazing things that they
will someday be able to do.




                                           Page 36
                            Addendum A: NAR Regulations
                                High Power Rocket Safety Code

1. Certification. I will only fly high power rockets or possess high power rocket motors that
are within the scope of my user certification and required licensing.

2. Materials. I will use only lightweight materials such as paper, wood, rubber, plastic,
fiberglass, or when necessary ductile metal, for the construction of my rocket.

3. Motors. I will use only certified, commercially made rocket motors, and will not tamper
with these motors or use them for any purposes except those recommended by the
manufacturer. I will not allow smoking, open flames, nor heat sources within 25 feet of
these motors.

4. Ignition System. I will launch my rockets with an electrical launch system, and with
electrical motor igniters that are installed in the motor only after my rocket is at the launch
pad or in a designated prepping area. My launch system will have a safety interlock that is
in series with the launch switch that is not installed until my rocket is ready for launch, and
will use a launch switch that returns to the "off" position when released. If my rocket has
onboard ignition systems for motors or recovery devices, these will have safety interlocks
that interrupt the current path until the rocket is at the launch pad.

5. Misfires. If my rocket does not launch when I press the button of my electrical launch
system, I will remove the launcher's safety interlock or disconnect its battery, and will wait
60 seconds after the last launch attempt before allowing anyone to approach the rocket.

6. Launch Safety. I will use a 5-second countdown before launch. I will ensure that no
person is closer to the launch pad than allowed by the accompanying Minimum Distance
Table, and that a means is available to warn participants and spectators in the event of a
problem. I will check the stability of my rocket before flight and will not fly it if it cannot be
determined to be stable.

7. Launcher. I will launch my rocket from a stable device that provides rigid guidance until
the rocket has attained a speed that ensures a stable flight, and that is pointed to within 20
degrees of vertical. If the wind speed exceeds 5 miles per hour I will use a launcher length
that permits the rocket to attain a safe velocity before separation from the launcher. I will
use a blast deflector to prevent the motor's exhaust from hitting the ground. I will ensure
that dry grass is cleared around each launch pad in accordance with the accompanying
Minimum Distance table, and will increase this distance by a factor of 1.5 if the rocket
motor being launched uses titanium sponge in the propellant.

8. Size. My rocket will not contain any combination of motors that total more than 40,960
N-sec (9208 pound-seconds) of total impulse. My rocket will not weigh more at liftoff than
one-third of the certified average thrust of the high power rocket motor(s) intended to be

                                              Page 37
ignited at launch.

9. Flight Safety. I will not launch my rocket at targets, into clouds, near airplanes, nor on
trajectories that take it directly over the heads of spectators or beyond the boundaries of
the launch site, and will not put any flammable or explosive payload in my rocket. I will not
launch my rockets if wind speeds exceed 20 miles per hour. I will comply with Federal
Aviation Administration airspace regulations when flying, and will ensure that my rocket will
not exceed any applicable altitude limit in effect at that launch site.

10. Launch Site. I will launch my rocket outdoors, in an open area where trees, power
lines, buildings, and persons not involved in the launch do not present a hazard, and that is
at least as large on its smallest dimension as one-half of the maximum altitude to which
rockets are allowed to be flown at that site or 1500 feet, whichever is greater.

11. Launcher Location. My launcher will be 1500 feet from any inhabited building or from
any public highway on which traffic flow exceeds 10 vehicles per hour, not including traffic
flow related to the launch. It will also be no closer than the appropriate Minimum Personnel
Distance from the accompanying table from any boundary of the launch site.

12. Recovery System. I will use a recovery system such as a parachute in my rocket so
that all parts of my rocket return safely and undamaged and can be flown again, and I will
use only flame-resistant or fireproof recovery system wadding in my rocket.

13. Recovery Safety. I will not attempt to recover my rocket from power lines, tall trees, or
other dangerous places, fly it under conditions where it is likely to recover in spectator
areas or outside the launch site, nor attempt to catch it as it approaches the ground.




                                           Page 38
                                 Addendum B: MSDS Reports

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET &
EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION
Revised: October 23, 2002
Manufacturer: Animal Motor Works, Inc.
Address: 5951 Riverside Drive
Port Orange, FL 32127
Emergency Response
Telephone Number: (800) 451-8346

SECTION I – PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
Product Name: Rocket Motor Reload Kits
Synonyms: Black Bear Propellant™, Blue Baboon Propellant™, Green
Gorilla Propellant™, Greyhound Propellant™, Purple Parrot
Propellant™, Red Rhino Propellant™, Skidmark Propellant™,
Super Tiger Propellant™, White Wolf Propellant™
Proper Shipping Name: Articles, explosives, n. o. s.
1.4C, UN0351, PG II (DOT-E 10996)

SECTION II – HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
These articles contain propellant and delay charge modules which consist primarily of ammonium
perchlorate (NH4ClO4) dispersed in synthetic rubber.

SECTION III – PHYSICAL DATA
Boiling Point Range: Decomposes
Specific Gravity: Propellant ranges from 1.35 to 2.25
Appearance: Silver static shielding bags containing cylindrical segments and
o-rings
Odor: None
Physical State: Solid

SECTION IV – FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA
Autoignition Temperature: 280°C
Flammability: Flammable
Extinguishing Media: Water only
Special Fire Procedures: Extinguish with water only
Protect against toxic fumes
Unusual Fire Hazard: Burning propellant gives off hydrogen chloride gas.
Unusual Explosion Hazard: None anticipated

SECTION V – HEALTH HAZARD DATA
Effects of Overexposure:
Acute: None known
Chronic: None Known
Overexposure:
Eyes: Ammonium perchlorate is a mild irritant to the skin, eyes,
mucous membranes and the digestive tract.
                                                   Page 39
Skin: Ammonium perchlorate is a mild irritant to the skin, eyes,
mucous membranes and the digestive tract.
Inhalation: No information available
Ingestion: Ammonium perchlorate is a mild irritant to the skin, eyes,
mucous membranes and the digestive tract.

SECTION VI – EMERGENCY FIRST AID PROCEDURES
Ingestion: If swallowed, induce vomiting, Call a physician.
Inhalation: Avoid breathing exhaust fumes.
Skin Contact: For mild burns, use a first aid burn ointment.
For severe burns, see a physician immediately.
If loose ammonium perchlorate contacts skin, flush with plenty of
water.
Eye Contact: Immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15
minutes. Call a physician.
Note to physician: Chemical of exposure is ammonium perchlorate, a mild gastric
irritant.

SECTION VII – REACTIVITY DATA
Conditions to Avoid: Heat (propellant auto-ignites at 280°C)
Incompatibility: Acids
Hazardous Products
Of Decomposition: Oxides of carbon, hydrogen chloride gas

SECTION VIII – SPILL OR LEAK PROCEDURES
Spills: Replace articles in packaging and boxes and seal securely.
Waste Disposal Method: Pack reload kit firmly in hole in ground. Ignite reload kit
electrically from a safe distance and wait 5 minutes before
approaching. Dispose of spent reload components in inert trash.

SECTION IX – SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
Ventilation Requirements: None. Do not use reload kits indoors.
Special Personal Protective Equipment
Respiratory: None. Avoid breathing exhaust fumes.
Other Handling and
Storage Requirements: Store reload kits away from sources of heat and highly
flammable materials.
When handling components inside the protective packaging,
wear skin protection, such as latex or nitrile gloves




                                                   Page 40
                                                             Aeropoxy Part A

                                             MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
                                           SECTION I — PRODUCT INFORMATION
AEROPOXY ES6209A
PTM & W INDUSTRIES, INC. PHONE NUMBER: (562)946-4511
10640 S. PAINTER AVE. CHEMICAL TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY:
SANTA FE SPRINGS, CA. 90670-4092 CHEMTREC (800) 424-9300
DATE OF PREPARATION: 2/9/2007 SUPERSEDES: 6/7/2006
PROPER SHIPPING NAME....: Plastic Material liquid, N.O.I.
CONTAINS ..... : NOT REGULATED
HAZARD CLASS......................:N.A.
UN NUMBER...........................: N.A.
PACKAGING GROUP..............:N.A.
HAZARD LABEL(S).................: N.A.
HMIS CODES: RATINGS:
HEALTH.....................= 2 0 = MINIMAL 3 = SERIOUS
FLAMMABILITY.........= 1 1 = SLIGHT 4 = SEVERE
REACTIVITY..............= 0 2 = MODERATE

⇒ PERSONAL PROTECTION RATING TO BE SUPPLIED BY USER DEPENDING ON USE CONDITIONS.

                                          SECTION II — PRODUCT/COMPOSITION
THE PRECISE COMPOSITION OF THIS PRODUCT IS PRIVILEGED INFORMATION. A MORE COMPLETE DISCLOSURE CAN BE
PROVIDED TO A HEALTH, SAFETY, OR REGULATORY PROFESSIONAL IF REQUIRED.
NO. COMPONENT CAS. NO. PERCENT
P N.A. N.A. < 100%
NOTE: CONTAINS MATERIAL(S) REGULATED AS DUST HAZARDS, DISPERSED IN A NON-HAZARDOUS FORM.
IF DUST IS RECREATED, APPROPIATE RESPIRATORY AND/OR EXPLOSION PRECAUTIONS MUST STILL BE USED .
                                                SECTION III — HAZARD STATUS
NO. CANCER REPRO-TOX TARGET ORGANS ACGIH/TLV OSHA/PEL
P NO NO UNKNOWN N.A.mg/M3 N.A.mg/M3
                          SECTION IV — REGULATORY STATUS
A. CAL SAFE DRINKING WATER & TOXIC ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1986
NO. CHEMICAL NAME CAS. NO. CANCER/REPRO.TOX QUANTITY
THIS PRODUCT MAY CONTAIN TRACES OF, OR OTHER PROP. 65 LISTED CHEMICALS
AS IMPURITIES. HOWEVER, NONE ARE USED AS INGREDIENTS.
B. CERCLA — 40 CFR 302
RELEASES EXCEEDING THE REPORTABLE QUANTITY (RQ) MUST BE REPORTED TO THE NATIONAL RESPONSE CENTER.
(800)424-8802
RQ NOT ESTABLISHED OR REQUIRED FOR THIS PRODUCT.
C. OSHA — 29 CFR 1910
ACCORDING TO OSHA CRITERIA THE FOLLOWING COMPONENT(S) ARE HAZARDOUS:
P N.A. N.A. < NIL%
D. RCRA — 40 CFR 261
NOT A HAZARDOUS WASTE BY RCRA CRITERIA (40CFR261.20-24).
E. SARA TITLE III — 52 CFR 13378, 52 CFR 21152
NO. RQ(lbs.) TPQ(lbs.) SEC.313 313 CAT. 311/312
(•1) (•2) (•3) (•4) (•5)
P NONE NOT LISTED NOT LISTED NONE H1
OTHER SARA SUBSTANCE(S) IF PRESENT ARE ALL BELOW THE DE MINIMUS
CONCENTRATION(S).
•1 = REPORTABLE QUANTITY OF EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, SEC. 302
•2 = THRESHOLD PLANNING QUANTITY, EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, SEC. 302
•3 = TOXIC CHEMICAL, SEC. 313 (INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL LISTED)
•4 = TOXIC RELEASE INVENTORY FORM CATEGORY SEC. 313 (40 CFR 372.65 C)
•5 = HAZARD CATEGORY FOR SARA SEC. 311/312 REPORTING
H1 = IMMED. (ACUTE) HEALTH HAZARD H2 = DELAYED (CHRONIC) HEALTH HAZARD
P3 = FIRE HAZARD P4 = SUDDEN PRESSURE RELEASE HAZARD P5 = REACTIVE HAZ.
                                          AEROPOXY ES6209A MSDS # 447 1 2




                                                                  Page 41
                                                   Aeropoxy Part B

                                        MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
                                      SECTION I — PRODUCT INFORMATION
AEROPOXY ES6209B
PTM & W INDUSTRIES, INC. PHONE NUMBER: (562)946-4511
10640 S. PAINTER AVE. CHEMICAL TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY:
SANTA FE SPRINGS, CA. 90670-4092 CHEMTREC (800) 424-9300
DATE OF PREPARATION: 2/9/2007 SUPERSEDES: 11/7/2006
PROPER SHIPPING NAME....: Plastic Material liquid, N.O.I.
CONTAINS..............................: NOT REGULATED
HAZARD CLASS......................: N.A.
UN NUMBER...........................: N.A.
PACKAGING GROUP..............: N.A.
HAZARD LABEL(S).................: N.A.
HMIS CODES: RATINGS:
HEALTH.....................= 1 0 = MINIMAL 3 = SERIOUS
FLAMMABILITY.........= 1 1 = SLIGHT 4 = SEVERE
REACTIVITY..............= 0 2 = MODERATE

⇒ PERSONAL PROTECTION RATING TO BE SUPPLIED BY USER DEPENDING ON USE CONDITIONS.

                                      SECTION II — PRODUCT/COMPOSITION
THE PRECISE COMPOSITION OF THIS PRODUCT IS PROPRIETARY INFORMATION. A MORE COMPLETE DISCLOSURE CAN BE
PROVIDED TO A HEALTH, SAFETY, OR REGULATORY PROFESSIONAL IF REQUIRED.
NO. COMPONENT CAS. NO. PERCENT
P MODIFIED AMINE MIXTURE N.A. < 100%
                                           SECTION III — HAZARD STATUS
NO. CANCER REPRO-TOX TARGET ORGANS ACGIH/TLV OSHA/PEL
P NO NO UNKNOWN N.A.mg/M3 N.A.mg/M3
                          SECTION IV — REGULATORY STATUS
A. CAL SAFE DRINKING WATER & TOXIC ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1986
NO. CHEMICAL NAME CAS. NO. CANCER/REPRO.TOX QUANTITY
THIS PRODUCT MAY CONTAIN TRACES OF PROP. 65 LISTED CHEMICALS AS
IMPURITIES. HOWEVER, NONE ARE USED AS INGREDIENTS.
B. CERCLA — 40 CFR 302.4
RELEASES EXCEEDING THE REPORTABLE QUANTITY (RQ) MUST BE REPORTED TO THE NATIONAL RESPONSE CENTER.
(800)424-8802
RQ = 1000 lbs. (UNLISTED HAZARDOUS WASTE — CHARACTERISTIC OF CORROSIVITY)
C. OSHA — 29 CFR 302.4
ACCORDING TO OSHA CRITERIA THE FOLLOWING COMPONENTS ARE HAZARDOUS:
P MODIFIED AMINE MIXTURE N.A. < 100%
D. RCRA — 40 CFR 261.33
RQ = 1000 lbs. (UNLISTED CORROSIVE CONTENT <10%)
E. SARA TITLE III — 52 CFR 13378, 52 CFR 21152
NO. RQ(lbs.) TPQ(lbs.) SEC.313 313 CAT. 311/312
(•1) (•2) (•3) (•4) (•5)
P NONE NOT LISTED NOT LISTED NONE H1,H2
•1 = REPORTABLE QUANTITY OF EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, SEC. 302
•2 = THRESHOLD PLANNING QUANTITY, EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, SEC. 302
•3 = TOXIC CHEMICAL, SEC. 313 (INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL LISTED)
•4 = TOXIC RELEASE INVENTORY FORM CATEGORY SEC. 313 (40 CFR 372.65 C)
•5 = HAZARD CATEGORY FOR SARA SEC. 311/312 REPORTING
H1 = IMMED. (ACUTE) HEALTH HAZARD H2 = DELAYED (CHRONIC) HEALTH HAZARD
P3 = FIRE HAZARD P4 = SUDDEN PRESSURE RELEASE HAZARD P5 = REACTIVE HAZ.
                                           AEROPOXY ES6209B MSDS #448 1 2




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