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					     Using Current Career Data
to Help Students Prepare for Careers
       that will be in Demand
         when they Graduate

               Chris Droessler
          School-to-Career Coordinator
        Wake County Public School System
     www.wcpss.net/school_to_career/resources
 If we really want to prepare
our students for successful
careers, we need to know all
   we can about the rapidly
     changing job market.

                       C Droessler
 Economic Epochs
• Agricultural economy (school calendar)
• Industrial economy (bell schedule)
• Post-Industrial economy
   – Service economy
   – Information economy
   – Knowledge economy
   – Digital economy
  Susan McLester and Todd McIntire. The Workforce Readiness Crisis. Technology & Learning. Nov 15, 2006.
                D3M

Data-Driven Decision Making

 Making decisions based on real data,
                 - not -
“because we’ve always done it that way.”
Is More Education Always Better?

 • Chris Says: “Get the right education for the
   right job.”
 • It’s like the old saying of “Use the right tool for
   the right job.”
       Jobs in 2014 (USA)

college degree                                                 high school
or higher                                                      degree or less
                    12.4% 12.8%


                                  45.4%                        high school/
                                                               some college

       U.S. Department of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics
       http://stats.bls.gov/emp/optd/optd001.pdf
  2014 Projected NC Employment:
        Education Required
                work exp.           Bachelor’s degree

     long OJT                                   Bachelor + work exp.
                                                     Master’s degree
                                                      Doctorate degree
                                                        Professional
                                                    1,2 year college
mod. OJT                                             Associate degree




                                         short OJT


            NC Employment Security Commission
2005 NC High School Graduate Intentions

                                 Other
             Employment

            Military
Trade and
Business
Schools
  Private                                                       Public Senior
  Junior                                                         Institutions
  Colleges

Community and
Technical Colleges

                                                       Private Senior
                                                        Institutions
                   NC Public Schools Statistical Profile 2006
Postsecondary Intentions vs. Reality
  Graduate Intentions   Education Required



  OJT                             4 year
 12.1%
                                  19.2%
              4 year                   10%
                                   1-2 year
1-2 year       48.0%
                         OJT
  36.6%                    62.4%
http://www.nclabor.com/dol_statistics/2006%20N.C.%20Skills%20Market%20Survey.pdf
2006 NC Skills Market Survey

       “most (52.9 percent)
  entry-level jobs require only a
      high school diploma.”




             2006 NC Skills Market Survey: Reconnecting Public Education With Economic Reality
2006 NC Skills Market Survey

   “NC employers believe high
   schools are too focused on
 preparing graduates for college
   and believe that not enough
 emphasis is placed on preparing
    graduates to go to work.”
            2006 NC Skills Market Survey: Reconnecting Public Education With Economic Reality
College attendance rate of 2002–
        03 HS graduates

 Public high school 2002-2003 graduates (USA):
 •44.1% attended 4-year institution in 2003-2004
 •28.2% attended 2-year institution in 2003-2004
 •72.3% attended college in 2003-2004


    Table 188. Graduation rates of previous year's 12th-graders and college attendance rates of those who graduated,
    by selected high school characteristics: 1999–2000 and 2003–04.


                                                                   http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d06/tables/dt06_188.asp
50% of Americans said that “a college
education is necessary for a person to be
successful in today's work world.”
                                                http://www.highereducation.org/reports/squeeze_play/index.shtml


87% of Americans say that “high school
graduates (should) go on to college because in
the long run they'll have better job prospects.”
                                                  http://www.highereducation.org/reports/squeeze_play/index.shtml



 But -

   Only 29.2% of all job openings in North
   Carolina projected through 2014 will
   require one or more years of college in
   order to get hired.    http://www.nccareeroutlook.com




               http://www.wcpss.net/school_to_career/blog/053107.html
 Fastest Growing Occup. in NC
     (Total New Positions Projected from 2004 - 2014)
29,470   Retail Salespersons
26,060   Registered Nurses
17,150   Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers
16,680   Home Health Aides
16,420   Waiters and Waitresses
15,770   Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-trailer
15,440   Customer Service Representatives
15,060   Janitors/Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping
13,150   Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants
11,090   General and Operations Managers
10,580   Cashiers
10,510   Laborers & Freight, Stock & Material Movers, Hand
 9,300   Personal and Home Care Aides                 ESC-NC
Fastest Growing Occup. in USA
    (Total New Positions Projected from 2004 - 2014)
736,000   Retail salespersons
703,000   Registered nurses
608,000   Building cleaning workers
524,000   Postsecondary teachers
471,000   Customer service representatives
449,000   Driver/sales workers and truck drivers
448,000   Fast food and counter workers
440,000   Janitors/cleaners, except maids/housekeeping
415,000   Miscellaneous healthcare support occupations
376,000   Waiters and waitresses
369,000   Computer software engineers
367,000   Combined food preparation and serving workers
                                              Bureau of Labor Statistics
351,000   Elementary and middle school teachers
Fastest Growing Occup. in USA
       (% New Positions Projected from 2004 - 2014)
56.0   Home health aides
54.6   Network systems and data communications analysts
52.1   Medical assistants
49.6   Physician assistants
48.4   Computer software engineers, applications
46.1   Computer software engineers
44.2   Physical therapist assistants
43.3   Dental hygienists
43.0   Computer software engineers, systems software
42.7   Dental assistants
41.0   Personal and home care aides
                                              Bureau of Labor Statistics
40.1   Physical therapist assistants and aides
38.4   Network and computer systems administrators
 Fastest Declining Occup. in NC
      (Total New Positions Projected from 2004 - 2014)
-9,370 Farmers and Ranchers
-6,790 Textile Knitting and Weaving Machine Setters, Op.
-5,540 Textile Winding, Twisting, and Drawing Out Machine
-5,320 Sewing Machine Operators
-2,520 Textile Bleaching & Dyeing Machine Op. & Tenders
-1,850 Upholsterers
-1,720 Order Clerks
-1,490 Stock Clerks and Order Fillers
-1,400 Mail Clerks, Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal
-1,310 Computer Operators
-1,280 File Clerks
-1,280 Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers & Weighers
-1,250 Machine Feeders and Offbearers
-1,230 Furniture Finishers                             ESC-NC
 Fastest Declining Occup. in USA
       (Total New Positions Projected from 2004 - 2014)
-155,000 Farmers and ranchers
-146,000 Agricultural managers
-115,000 Stock clerks and order fillers
 -93,000 File clerks
 -93,000 Sewing machine operators
 -66,000 Textile machine setters, operators, and tenders
 -65,000 Machine tool cutting setters, operators, and tenders,
 -63,000 Order clerks
 -59,000 Mail clerks and mail machine operators, except postal
 -49,000 Computer operators
 -48,000 Secretaries, except legal, medical, and executive
 -43,000 Cutting, punching, and press machine setters, operato
 -42,000 Telemarketers                         Bureau of Labor Statistics

 -32,000 Data entry and information processing workers
   States with Most New Jobs
   (Total New Positions Projected from 2004 - 2014)
18,927,570 United States
  2,637,400   California       408,800   New Jersey
  1,749,120   Florida          407,040   Utah
    766,810   Georgia          395,790   Maryland
    732,420   Arizona          380,350   Pennsylvania
    690,240   North Carolina   370,000   Minnesota
    681,050   New York         361,460   Michigan
    664,360   Colorado         347,600   Wisconsin
    538,250   Illinois         304,060   South Carolina
    525,320   Nevada           302,600   Indiana
    476,290   Washington       299,360   Alabama
    461,450   Tennessee        265,780   Massachusetts
    425,800   Ohio               www.projectionscentral.com/
56% of bachelor’s-seeking students get
  degree in 6 years (35% in 4 years)

  National Center for Education Statistics,
U.S. Department of Education (nces.ed.gov)
       North Carolina
6-year Graduation Rate - 2005




     www.collegeresults.org
   It makes you think?
     What happens to our
  4-year program dropouts?

   25% of all students at
Wake Tech Community College
    have a 4-year degree.
    Did we send them to
     the wrong school?
         Jobs for Everyone!
What we look for in our crystal ball:
   •   Fastest growing occupations
   •   Most annual openings
   •   High demand occupations
   •   Minimum education required
   •   Jobs with potential for advancement
   •   Future-proof occupations
Career
Outlook
Handbo
  ok
NC Career Outlook Handbook
 • Fastest growing occupations in North Carolina
 • Most annual openings in North Carolina
 • Most annual openings based on minimum
   educational requirements:
        • Vocational degree
        • Associate degree
        • Bachelor degree
 • High demand listed by:
        • Education requirements
        • Starting salaries
  On the Job Training Required
     (2007 NC Starting Salaries - 2014 High Demand)
$28,480   mod. OJT   Sales Representatives, Services, all other
$25,310   long OJT   Stonemasons
$25,292   long OJT   Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters
$25,190   long OJT   HVACR Mechanics and Installers
$25,075   mod. OJT   Mechanical Door Repairers
$25,058   long OJT   Brickmasons and Blockmasons
$25,017   long OJT   Telecom. Line Installers and Repairers
$24,950   mod. OJT   Dental Assistants
$24,946   mod. OJT   Advertising Sales Agents
$24,529   mod. OJT   Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer
$24,174   long OJT   Airfield Operations Specialists
$23,691   long OJT   Audio and Video Equipment Technicians
$22,754   long OJT   Fire Fighters
$22,282   long OJT   Glaziers
Associate Degree Required
 (2007 NC Starting Salaries - 2014 High Demand)

$49,201   Nuclear Medicine Technologists
$48,240   Radiation Therapists
$46,896   Dental Hygienists
$46,479   Diagnostic Medical Sonographers
$41,468   Registered Nurses
$37,324   Respiratory Therapists
$37,018   Radiologic Technologists and Technicians
$33,907   Physical Therapist Assistants
$32,533   Cardiovascular Technologists & Technicians
$29,578   Medical Equipment Repairers
$29,438   Environmental Engineering Technicians
$27,586   Biological Technicians
$26,829   Forensic Science Technicians
     Bachelor Degree Required
     (2007 NC Starting Salaries - 2014 High Demand)
$62,451   Physician Assistants
$59,764   Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software
$56,402   Computer Software Engineers, Applications
$50,563   Materials Scientists
$49,894   Environmental Engineers
$48,366   Biomedical Engineers
$47,217   Computer Systems Analysts
$46,464   Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners, all oth
$46,163   Life Scientists, all other
$44,725   Financial Analysts
$44,076   Securities, Commodities, Financial Services Sales A
$43,476   Network Systems and Data Communications Analys
$42,382   Network and Computer Systems Administrators
$42,022   Database Administrators
http://www.wcpss.net/school_to_career/blog/052207.html
     Doctorate Degree Required
      (2007 NC Starting Salaries - 2014 High Demand)


  $49,356 Biochemists and Biophysicists
  $43,715 Occupational Therapists
  $38,427 Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists

$29,015 - $48,071 College/University Professor
  $39,365 College/University Professor (average)
Associate Degree Required
 (2007 NC Starting Salaries - 2014 High Demand)

$49,201   Nuclear Medicine Technologists
$48,240   Radiation Therapists
$46,896   Dental Hygienists
$46,479   Diagnostic Medical Sonographers
$41,468   Registered Nurses
$37,324   Respiratory Therapists
$37,018   Radiologic Technologists and Technicians
$33,907   Physical Therapist Assistants
$32,533   Cardiovascular Technologists & Technicians
$29,578   Medical Equipment Repairers
$29,438   Environmental Engineering Technicians
$27,586   Biological Technicians
$26,829   Forensic Science Technicians
  NC Career Pathway Charts
Careers organized by 11 NC Career Pathways
    • Minimum education required
    • Number of workers in NC
    • Average starting salary
    • Average salary
    • Growth outlook
    • SOC codes
      NC Career Pathways
Agricultural and Natural Resources Technologies
              Arts and Sciences
     Biological and Chemical Technologies
            Business Technologies
Commercial and Artistic Production Technologies
          Construction Technologies
           Engineering Technologies
               Health Sciences
            Industrial Technologies
          Public Service Technologies
       Transport Systems Technologies
16 Career Clusters
•Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources
•Architecture & Construction
•Arts, A/V Technology & Communications
•Business, Management & Administration
•Education & Training
•Finance
•Government & Public Administration
•Health Science
•Hospitality & Tourism
•Human Services
•Information Technology
•Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security
•Manufacturing
•Marketing, Sales & Services
•Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics
•Transportation, Distribution & Logistics
                     Why?
• Students - Learn which careers will have openings
  when they are ready to join the workforce.
• Parents - Help their children decide which career to
  pursue.
• Teachers - Know which careers are in high demand
  so they can relate their teachings to careers.
  (Relevance)
• Businesses - Give business people the data they
  need to discuss careers with our students.
  (Relationships)
www.nccareeroutlook.com
So where did all this
 data come from?
But what if I’m not
    from NC?
www.projectionscentral.com/
  Four-Year High School Plan
            Goal is high school graduation
           Reviewed by parents, counselor

                        vs
Ten-Year Education/Career Plan
        “Where do you want to be at age 25?”
      Goal is successful entry into the workplace
Reviewed by parents, counselor, and future employers
The Career Planning Process
1.   Assessments! Skill and interest inventories.
2.   Do your homework! Research all careers.
3.   Get out there! Job shadowing, internship, etc.
4.   Talk to adults!          Find out what they do.
5.   Pick a career! An entry-level position.
6.   Start a map! Schooling, certification, background
     checks or other requirements.
7.   What’s next? What does it take to get to the next
     level?


                       www.wcpss.net/school_to_career
            Our Mission
Help our students find the right career:
    • High demand occupations in growing
      industries
    • ROI - Education vs. Salary
    • Jobs with potential for advancement
    • Future-proof occupations
    • Transferable skills
    • Job satisfaction
Thanks for coming!


                             Chris Droessler
                         School-to-Career Coordinator
                       Wake County Public School System
                            Raleigh, North Carolina




  www.wcpss.net/school_to_career/resources

				
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