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Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan

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					        Port Botany and Sydney
Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Submission to Infrastructure Australia




                    November 2011
Contents
1.   Introduction                                                                    1

     1.1     Purpose of this Document                                                1
     1.2     Background and Description                                              2
     1.3     Structure of the Submission                                             5

2.   Strategic Context                                                               6

     2.1     NSW Transport Planning Framework                                        6
     2.2     The economic significance of the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct 7
     2.3     Problem Definition                                                      8
     2.4     Preferred Strategy                                                     18

3.   Methodology and Outcomes                                                       33

     3.1     Plan Definition                                                        33

4.   Funding Requirements                                                           39

5.   Delivery Arrangements                                                          41

     5.1     Plan governance                                                        41
     5.2     Timetable and key milestones                                           42
     5.3     Stakeholder engagement                                                 43

Appendix A      Reform and Investment Framework Templates                           47
Executive Summary
Introduction
This document has been prepared by the NSW Government in support of its submission to Infrastructure
Australia (IA). The NSW Government proposal is for the development of a Port Botany and Sydney Airport
Transport Improvement Plan (“The Plan”) to comprehensively address the future land side transport
challenges affecting these important international gateways. The Plan will enable integrated Port Botany
and Airport rail and road plans to be developed that are consistent with Port and Airport masterplan in
order to meet the needs of these gateways over the next 25-30 years.

The efficient and effective movement of people and freight within the Port Botany and Sydney Airport
precinct is critical to the State’s economy, productivity growth and on-going investment. Following previous
NSW Government Submissions related to this precinct1, IA has recognised that ensuring efficient landside
connections to Port Botany and Sydney Airport is a nationally significant problem2.

Noting this, the NSW Government has already begun the task of addressing the transport challenges in
the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct by commissioning Infrastructure NSW (INSW) to develop a
Sectoral Strategy Statement that will have a particular focus on coordinating short term improvements for
the precinct. INSW is working closely with Transport for NSW (TfNSW) to ensure all the work being
undertaken for this precinct is rigorously assessed as part of the development of the Plan.

The proposed planning work will also consolidate and build upon previous studies that have focused on
addressing land transport issues in and around this precinct. It will examine in detail the relationships
between the two key gateways, the freight task, the passenger task, rail, road and intermodal planning
and the capacity of the transport system to support a wide range of transport needs in an environment
where there are already high levels of congestion and significant projected future growth. The Plan will
detail the transport strategy for the precinct, in particular the future role of rail, road and bus, recommend a
set of short, medium and long term multimodal solutions, a proposed delivery strategy and possible
funding sources. The transport strategy will also drive the development of mode specific road and rail
improvement plans.

As these international gateways are critical to productivity growth and investment in NSW and Australia,
and recognising the need to integrate land side transport plans with the Australian Government’s policy
responsibilities in respect of airport development and freight, a joint response to addressing the land
transport challenges from both the NSW and Australian Governments is needed. This submission
therefore seeks to commence a joint process of scoping a package of options that will consider the port
and airport, local traffic, links with key connections such as existing and potential intermodal terminals and
links with the greater metropolitan area of Sydney.

The first three phases of work (planning, delivery strategy and funding) will culminate in delivery of the
Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan which is expected to take 18 months
(to Mid-2013). Phase 4, which will advance preferred infrastructure options through the EIS/approvals
process, will take another 18 months (to End-2014).




1
    NSW Government 2010 IA Submissions:Container Freight Improvement Strategy and M5 East Expansion
2
 Infrastructure Australia, Letter from Michael Deegan to Les Wielinga, 3 March 2011 “Infrastructure Priority List Submissions”, and
“Communicating the Imperative for Action: A report to the Council of Australian Governments” June 2011




                Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program |Submission to Infrastructure Australia | iii
INSW’s Strategy Statement will be delivered in April 2012 and it is expected that some key initiatives will
emerge early from the planning process in Phase 1 that will potentially advance into detailed project
scoping, concept design and the approvals process prior to completion of the final Plan. The intent will be
to advance these initiatives towards implementation, subject to normal government approvals, with a view
to accelerating the delivery of key components of the final set of improvement plans.

Funding of $28 million from the Australian Government, supplemented by $7 million of State funding, is
required to support the planning, economic assessment, engineering and environmental analysis needed
to establish and develop an appropriate response to the transport challenges in the precinct and to then
develop detailed mode specific road and rail improvement plans. The NSW Government is seeking from
the Australian Government $28 million of the funds it has already allocated to planning for the M4
extension so that a more comprehensive plan can be developed that considers both the road and rail task
for this area.


The significance of the Port Botany and Sydney Airport
precinct
The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct, covering an approximate radius of 6 kilometres,
encompass two of Australia’s most significant international gateways:

     Sydney Airport is Australia’s largest international airport, accounting for:
      – 46% of international air passenger journeys3;

      – 23% of domestic air passenger journeys4; and

      – 50% of international air freight5.
     Port Botany is Australia’s second largest container port:
      – Handled 2 million twenty foot equivalent (TEU) containers in 2010-116 or around one-third of annual
        containerised freight into and out of Australia7.
The precinct also has a key role in connecting regions to the north, south and west of Sydney. The key
east-west corridors supporting these gateways, the M4 and M5 corridors, together contain almost one-third
of Sydney’s population and almost half of Sydney’s jobs. The east-west corridors are also critically
important for the State’s major intermodal freight supply chains, particularly for international freight, with an
increasing concentration of industrial, warehousing and freight distribution networks in Sydney’s west.
Various plans are underway to expand network and terminal capacity for rail freight services connecting to
the precinct.

The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct is of high economic significance to the New South Wales and
national economies and will remain so in the decades ahead. Within the Port Botany and Sydney Airport
precinct and the connecting east-west corridors, significant growth is expected in:
     Population and employment
      – An additional 480,000 people (28% of Sydney’s population growth) are expected to live in the area
        by 20368; and

3
    Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.50
4
    Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.50
5
    Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.73
6
    Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Upublished Data
7
  Total container trade in 2009/10 for ports of Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Fremantle, Adelaide was 5,768,095 TEU's. Source: Bureau
of Transport and Regional Economics (2011), Australian Infrastructure Statistics Yearbook 2011, Canberra ACT, Table 7.8 p.102




iv | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
       – An additional 377,000 jobs (50% of new jobs in Sydney) in the area are expected over the
         same period9.
      Freight volumes
       – Port Botany containerised freight volumes are expected to increase over 3.5 times or by
         5.5 million TEU from 2010-11 to 2030-31, subject to an approved increase from the current
         planning approval limit of 3.2 million TEU per annum10;

       – Air freight volumes are expected to increase by 85%, or an additional 480,000 tonnes, from 2009
         to 202911; and

       – Heavy vehicles trips forecast to increase by 2.2% per annum between 2006 and 2036 and Light
         Commercial vehicle trips by 1.1% per annum12.
      Air Passenger volumes
       – Sydney Airport passenger volumes are expected to more than double by 2029, creating an
         additional 38 million passenger trips13.


Land transport challenges
There is currently a heavy reliance on road-based transport to service the needs of the precinct. The M4
and M5 are the major arterial corridors supporting the precinct and access to the major population,
employment and freight distribution centres in Sydney’s west. They are already heavily congested with
road access constraints affecting the city’s overall productivity, liveability and sustainability. The ability of
the Port to tranship containers is currently higher than the ability of the land transport system to clear the
cargo from the terminals and adjacent container depots. Similarly, the management of empty containers
through the land side transport system is a critical issue affecting supply chain efficiency. A recent study by
Booz & Company for the Tourism and Transport Forum suggested there is a major risk that land transport
constraints may inhibit continued growth in aviation activity at Sydney airport which ultimately will have a
negative flow on effect to the NSW and Australian Economies14.

The rail proportion of container movements to/from Port Botany has declined over recent years (22% in
2001-02 to 14% in 2010-11), however, the volume of containers moved has increased (225,000 in 2001-02
to 250,000 in 2010-11). Rail volumes peaked at 317,000 TEU in 2009-10 dropping the following year due
to the closure of the Pacific National intermodal facility at Camellia. The challenges facing the growth in rail
mode share include operational, infrastructure and governance issues such as: port trade increasing at a
faster rate than rail volumes; a poorly co-ordinated rail supply chain; inefficient port/rail interface; lack of
performance standards; unsuitable rail windows; IT and communication systems not integrated; lack of
intermodal terminal capacity; and conflicts between passenger and freight rail on shared lines with priority
given to passenger rail services.

The road freight task is also evolving with a shift towards high-top containers, 40’ containers and heavier
loads, with more trucks needing to operate on authorised routes at high mass limits.


8
  NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Data: Population and Employment in M4 and M5 Corridors. Based on 5km width (2.5m
radius) spanning from Penrith through to Parramatta the CBD, Sydney Airport, Port Botany, Bexley, Liverpool and Campbelltown
9
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Data: Population and Employment in M4 and M5 Corridors
10
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
11
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009 , p.73
12
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2010), Freight Movements in Sydney, p.1
13
     Sydney Airport Corporation Master Plan (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.2
14
     Booz & Company (2011), Accessing our Airports, A Report prepared for Tourism & Transport Forum




                 Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | v
Key aspects of the land transport challenges are:

    Strong demand for travel in extended peak periods and lack of supply of road space (capacity and
     links) between Port Botany, Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west;
    Lack of a high quality road connection east of Strathfield in the M4 corridor;
    Constrained rail network capacity for freight services and a curfew applying to the movement of freight
     trains on the Cityrail network during peak passenger periods;
    Lack of high capacity rail terminal space and rail-based logistics capability;
    Absence of an effective pricing mechanism to constrain discretionary demand for transport capacity
     and rationalise space in favour of high value users; and
    Absence of a public revenue stream to fund additional capacity in line with growing travel demands for
     people, business and goods.
Notwithstanding the potential for improved demand management and the targeted modal shift to rail for
port traffic, it is expected that significant road investment will be required to support future growth in freight
and general travel in the precinct. Roads are expected to manage approximately 72% of the container
freight task in 2020 and 80% of people movements in and out of the precinct in 202915.


Complementary investments
More than $2.2 billion of private and public funds are being invested to upgrade Sydney Airport and Port
Botany between 2008 and 2013. This comprises $1 billion on the Port Botany Expansion and $1.2 billion
at Sydney Airport, including $400 million already spent on terminal and runway safety and security
improvement16. Further funding is being invested by the private sector in industries locating in the
Port/Airport Precinct, along the Sydney Motorway Network and across Western Sydney.

To ensure the benefits of these investments and economic growth and productivity are maximised, they
must be complemented with significant investments in landside transport infrastructure over the next 25 to
30 years.
The NSW Government has also commenced a process of refinancing its Port Botany assets through a
long term lease in order to help fund priority infrastructure projects. The transaction is expected to be
completed in the first half of 2013 and significant progress on the development of solutions to the landside
transport challenges in the precinct is needed to ensure that investors have a degree of certainty and the
Government maximises potential value from the transaction.




15
  Analysis based on NSW Government planning target and Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009,
p.89
16
   See: Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), PBLIS Guide Regulation and Mandatory Standards Overview and URS Australia Pty Ltd for
SACL (2008),The Economic Impact of Growth at Sydney Airport




vi | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
The Proposed Plan
The size, complexity and economic significance of the transport task between Port Botany, Sydney Airport
and Sydney’s regions will require a joint multimodal response by the Australian and NSW Governments.
The proposed transport improvement plan will integrate a number of existing rail freight, road and public
transport initiatives at various stages of development.

The Plan will develop a discrete number of demand and supply side options for testing with customers,
stakeholders and the community, with the most economically robust options taken forward to
implementation. It will also bring together and build on the range of studies conducted so far addressing
land transport issues in and around the Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct, including various M4 and
M5 motorway studies, the Container Freight Strategy and proposals in respect of Moorebank intermodal
precinct, and will consider other planning activities currently underway.

The objectives of the Plan are to prepare an evidence base and then to develop and test a series of
transport improvement options covering the next 25-30 years that:

1.      Determine the most efficient and appropriate land side transport system to support Port Botany and
        Sydney Airport, including defining of the role of road and rail;
2.      Ensure that the Port Botany and Sydney Airport land transport system is compatible with, supports
        and provides synergy with the broader transport system;
3.      Identify and sequence key infrastructure and policy initiatives to implement the preferred direction
        for land side transport serving the precinct; and
4.      Consider possible funding sources.

Meeting these objectives and implementing the Plan is expected to:

    Ensure that Port Botany and Sydney Airport remain as competitive international gateways and have
     the capacity to accommodate forecast growth with efficient landside connections;
    Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
     passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
     for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
    Cater for a broad set of freight, commercial and passenger travel demands in and across the precinct,
     including:
     – Time sensitive, high value, and/or short haul freight to/from Port Botany and Sydney Airport

     – High value business travel and/or travel with heavy luggage to/from Sydney Airport

     – Employee travel to the Port/Airport Precinct (e.g. shift workers)

     – General freight task

     – Commercial travel which involves travel with tools of trade and/or travel to multiple addresses

     – Commuter travel task to jobs located outside of centres

     – Personal travel which involves multiple purposes and/or destinations;
    Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
     transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
    Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
     motorway systems;
    Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
     value proposition for rail freight;




            Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | vii
      Improve road based public transport services where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced;
      Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to influence
       travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel; and
      Consider the use of tolling as a mechanism to partially fund future initiatives.
The scoping of options requires high quality planning, economic, engineering and environmental analysis
in order to establish a well-developed set of recommendations to take forward to community consultation
and ultimately to implementation. The Plan will also address previous criticisms of NSW Government IA
submissions in relation to the M4 and M5 proposals and provide a comprehensive and rigorous
assessment of transport needs and alternative options before determining the preferred direction for
landside transport in the precinct. The preferred direction will take account of other related planning
activities, including a new freight strategy currently being developed for NSW.


Alignment to State objectives
The NSW Government has developed clear goals in NSW 202117:

1.         Improve the performance of the NSW economy;
2.         Rebuild State finances;
3.         Drive economic growth in regional NSW;
4.         Increase the competitiveness of doing business in NSW;
5.         Place downward pressure on the cost of living;
6.         Strengthen the NSW skill base;
7.         Reduce travel times;
8.         Grow patronage on public transport by making it a more attractive choice;
9.         Improve customer experience with transport services; and
10.        Improve road safety.

Given the importance of efficient international gateways to the State and national economies, ensuring
efficient land side access is critically important to improving and maintaining the performance of the NSW
economy and driving economic growth in the State.

The significance of this precinct to the State is evidenced by the Government asking INSW to develop a
Strategy Statement for the Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct as an early priority for the new
infrastructure agency.

The Transport Masterplan will be the foundation document for integrated strategic planning in NSW based
on sound economic principles and supporting by a range of subsidiary plans such as priority corridor plans
and modal plans and integrated with wider metropolitan and regional plans. The Transport Masterplan is
due for completion next year and will complement the INSW Strategy Statement for this precinct.


Alignment to national priorities
The proposed Plan is aligned with Infrastructure Australia’s themes of “competitive international
                                                                                18
gateways”, “transforming our cities” and developing “a national freight network” .

It is acknowledged that in order to more efficiently cope with imports and exports, Australia needs to
develop more effective ports and associated land transport systems, particularly at its major gateways.
The efficiency of freight supply chains are often constrained by their weakest component and so

17
     NSW Government (2011),NSW 2021 - A Plan to Make NSW Number One, p.39
18
     Infrastructure Australia website, Retrieved from http://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/themes_challenges/




viii | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
investment will be required in both port throughput and in associated land transport infrastructure to ensure
end to end efficiency across the supply chain. Allowing investment in land transport efficiency to lag behind
will undermine overall supply chain efficiency and discourage private and public sector investment in other
complementary components of the supply chain. The Plan will consider the Port Botany and Sydney
Airport masterplans and the IA ports and freight strategies to ensure that land side transport initiatives are
fully aligned with other developments across the supply chain.

Similarly, an efficient national freight network requires connected networks with efficient intermodal
transfers. Investment in major intermodal terminals and logistics capacity requires confidence that
connections to major international gateways and other freight hubs will be efficient. The Plan, and its focus
on improving road and rail transport connections between the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct and
the emerging freight distribution networks in Sydney’s west, is therefore fully aligned with this theme.

Transforming our cities is about increasing public transport capacity in our cities and making better use of
existing transport infrastructure. Enhancement of road infrastructure capacity in the M4/M5 corridors will
clearly enhance the capacity to improve road-based public transport services on parallel routes. Similarly,
improving rail capacity and connections in the long term rail strategy will enhance rail-based public
transport options. The proposed Plan will also consider other opportunities and mechanisms to make
better use of available infrastructure, including intelligent transport systems, high value vehicle priority and
network upgrades for higher productivity vehicles where appropriate and enhanced rail freight capacity and
efficiency.


Content of the submission
This submission seeks the Australian Government’s funding support for the development of a land side
transport improvement plan that considers all modes of transport and both future passenger and freight
needs for this vitally important precinct. Funding of $28M from the Australian Government is sought,
supplemented by $7M from the NSW Government, to develop a strong evidence base of traffic and freight
movements, develop a strategic transport model that links to the broader transport model, model different
scenarios for land use and freight and passenger movements and develop and fully assess appropriate
options to establish a preferred direction.

The preferred approach to meeting the future land side transport task for this precinct will need to consider
policy directions as well as short, medium and long term initiatives, focus on an appropriate delivery
strategy and undertake the appropriate technical, engineering and planning investigations to consider any
associated risks.

The submission also provides detail on previous analyses and studies and the evidence base that
supports the need for road and rail based enhancements in this precinct.

The IA “Reform and Investment Framework” templates are detailed in Appendix A.




           Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | ix
1.           Introduction
1.1          Purpose of this Document
The purpose of the NSW Government’s submission to Infrastructure Australia (IA) is to seek funding of
$28M to conduct a Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan (“The Plan”). The Plan
will build upon previous studies focused on addressing land transport issues in and around the Port Botany
and Sydney Airport precinct. This area covers New South Wales’ two most important international
gateways and the efficient and effective movement of people and freight within this precinct is critical to the
State’s and the nation’s economies, productivity growth and attraction for on-going investment.

The major transport infrastructure networks supporting these gateways, the M4 and M5 corridors, the
metropolitan rail freight network and the Cityrail network, all have a part to play in delivering an efficient
and appropriate landside transport system to support Port Botany and Sydney Airport. Road, rail and bus
will need to play significant roles in supporting freight and passenger movements from Port Botany and
Sydney Airport and the transport system supporting these developments will also need to connect
effectively with the broader transport system.

The key M4 and M5 corridors together contain almost one-third of Sydney’s population and almost half of
Sydney’s jobs. They are the major road arterial corridors supporting the precinct, providing accessibility to
major population, employment and freight distribution centres in Sydney’s west, and are already heavily
congested with road access constraints affecting the city’s overall productivity, liveability and sustainability.
These problems will be further exacerbated with the forecast increase in demand for access to the
precinct.

The east-west corridors are critically important for the State’s major intermodal freight supply chains,
particularly for international freight, given an increasing concentration of industrial, warehousing and freight
distribution networks in Sydney’s west. Integrated rail distribution networks that offer a competitive
alternative to existing road based supply chains will need to be developed, requiring significant investment
in suitable rail-based terminal, warehousing and logistics capability and an expansion of metropolitan rail
network capacity to improve transit times, access and reliability.

It is expected that significant road investment will be required to support future growth in freight and
general travel to the precinct. Roads are expected to manage approximately 72% of the container freight
task in 2020 and 80% of people movements in and out of the precinct in 202919.

As these international gateways are critical to productivity growth and investment in NSW and Australia
and recognising the need to integrate land side transport plans with the Australian Government’s policy
responsibilities in respect of airport development and freight, a joint response to addressing the land
transport challenges from both the Australian and NSW Governments is needed. This submission
therefore seeks to commence a joint process of scoping a package of options that will ultimately be taken
forward to implementation.




19
   Analysis based on NSW Government planning target and Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009,
p.89




              Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program |Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 1
1.2        Background and Description
1.2.1      Overview

The NSW Government recognises the need to develop appropriate land transport solutions to address the
significant growth in demand for access to the already congested Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct.

The precinct encompasses two of Australia’s most significant international gateways that require high
quality access to the rapidly evolving industrial, warehousing and freight logistics areas in the south and
west of Sydney. Access to these economic areas is critical to national economic competitiveness and
productivity.

It is necessary to develop an integrated multi-modal Transport Plan to address the land transport issues in
the precinct. The Plan will detail the transport strategy for the precinct, in particular the future role of rail,
road and bus, recommend a set of short, medium and long term multimodal solutions, a proposed delivery
strategy and possible funding sources. The transport strategy will also drive the development of mode
specific road and rail improvement plans.

The focus area for the Plan is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Study Area – Strategic Context and Focus Area




2 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
While the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct is the focus of the Plan, problems associated with
serving the Port/Airport precinct extend well beyond its immediate vicinity to the Sydney Metropolitan
Region, including the central and south western part of Sydney (spanning from Port Botany/Sydney
Airport to the west of the M7 Motorway). The scope of work will take into account the greater
metropolitan region covering existing and proposed strategic transport infrastructure and land use
initiatives. Examples include:

TRANSPORT:
   M4 Motorway: Sydney’s central east-west motorway spine which currently terminates at Strathfield
    around 14km from the Port/Airport precinct;
   F5/M5/M5 East: Sydney’s southern east-west motorway corridor providing a high quality connection
    between Port Botany/Sydney Airport, the Sydney Orbital and National Network;
   Port Botany Goods Line and Southern Sydney Freight Line (Opening 2013): Sydney’s dedicated
    freight network with the Port Botany Goods Line serving Port Botany and the Southern Sydney
    Freight Line primarily domestic trade and the Chullora Intermodal Terminal as well as exports from
    Southern NSW:
   Main Western Rail Line, Bankstown Line and Airport and East Hills Line: Sydney’s east-west
    passenger rail network with shared passenger and freight access;
   Chullora, Leightonfield/Villawood, Yennora and Minto Intermodal Terminals: Chullora being
    Sydney’s major domestic container terminal (connecting to Western Australia, Victoria and
    Queensland) with the remaining terminals serving Port Botany container trade (and Yennora also
    serving domestic freight);
   Enfield Intermodal Terminal (Opening 2013): Enfield will form part of a network of existing and
    planned intermodal terminal facilities in Sydney and will provide around double the current
    import/export intermodal terminal capacity in Sydney;
   Proposed Moorebank and Eastern Creek Intermodal Terminals: Planned intermodal terminals and
    associated freight precinct to address Sydney’s medium to long term port import/export terminal (and
    potentially domestic freight) needs; and
   The F6 Corridor: The F6 corridor between St Peters and Loftus has been protected for future use in
    the transport network. A motorway in this corridor would provide an alternative to the Princes Highway
    between Loftus and St Peters and arterial routes such as Taren Point Road, Rocky Point Road, The
    Grand Parade and General Holmes Drive.

LAND USE:
   Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct: Apart from the Port and Airport themselves the
    surrounding precinct contains capital intense industries related to international trade, business and
    tourism. This includes repositioning empty containers for export, unpacking containers, catering of
    flights, and maintenance of aircraft;
   Green Square/Redfern-Waterloo/Mascot: Major urban renewal precinct located in the corridor
    between Sydney CBD and Sydney Airport which will include residential, commercial and retail
    development;
   Employment lands along the M4, M5 and M7 Corridor: Industry, warehousing and distribution
    centres have strategically located around the Sydney Motorway Network to take advantage of the
    access and mobility it provides;
   Western Sydney Employment Area: Located at the junction of the M7 and M4 Motorways the
    Western Sydney Employment Area is one of the most central and easily accessible sites in the Sydney
    Region from all directions;




           Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 3
      Industrial clusters around Blacktown to Seven Hills, Wetherill Park, Villawood, Chullora/Enfield to
       Silverwater, Moorebank to Prestons/Minto and Bankstown: Many of Sydney’s primary industrial
       clusters are located along the Sydney Motorway Network. Other industrial clusters are serviced by the
       Metropolitan Freight Rail Network;
      South West Growth Centre: One of two of Sydney’s major greenfield development areas to be
       developed over the next 25-30 years, and planned to house around 110,000 dwellings housing around
       300,000 people20; and
      Other relevant planning instruments: metropolitan planning, subregional strategies and relevant
       State Environmental Planning Policies and Regional and Local Environmental Plans that support the
       retention of land zoned for industrial uses in the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct.
Previous work undertaken over the last decade has identified road and rail network and infrastructure
constraints and as the key impediments to the competitiveness of Sydney’s international gateways.

1.2.2          Objectives

The objectives of the Plan are to prepare an evidence base and then to develop and test a series of
transport improvement options covering the next 25-30 years that:

1.         Determine the most efficient and appropriate land side transport system to support Port Botany and
           Sydney Airport, including defining of the role of road and rail;
2.         Ensure that the Port Botany and Sydney Airport land transport system is compatible with, supports
           and provides synergy with the broader transport system;
3.         Identify and sequence key infrastructure and policy initiatives to implement the preferred direction
           for land side transport serving the precinct; and
4.         Consider possible funding sources.

Meeting these objectives and implementing the Plan is expected to:

      Ensure that Port Botany and Sydney Airport remain as competitive international gateways and have
       the capacity to accommodate forecast growth with efficient landside connections;
      Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
       passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
       for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
      Cater for a broad set of freight, commercial and passenger travel demands in and across the precinct,
       including:
       – Time sensitive, high value, and/or short haul freight to/from Port Botany and Sydney Airport

       – High value business travel and/or travel with heavy luggage to/from Sydney Airport

       – Employee travel to the Port/Airport (e.g. shift workers)

       – General freight task

       – Commercial travel which involves travel with tools of trade and/or travel to multiple addresses

       – Commuter travel task to jobs located outside of centres

       – Personal travel which involves multiple purposes and/or destinations;




20
     NSW Department of Planning and Infrastructure (2011), Sydney’s Growth Centres website




4 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
   Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
    transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
   Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
    motorway systems;
   Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
    value proposition for rail freight;
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced;
   Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to influence
    travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel; and
   Consider the use of tolling as a mechanism to partially fund future initiatives.


1.3        Structure of the Submission
The remainder of this document is structured as follows:

   Chapter 2 sets out the strategic context and problem definition for this submission. It defines the
    problem created by the growth in the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct and explains the
    alignment of the Plan with national and State priorities;
   Chapter 3 explains the proposed methodology and details Plan phasing and key outcomes;
   Chapter 4 provides initial information about the proposed funding for the Plan; and
   Chapter 5 describes the delivery arrangements for the Plan including governance arrangements, the
    proposed timetable, key milestones and engagement with key stakeholders that will be implemented
    throughout the delivery stage of the Plan.
Appendix A includes the completed Infrastructure Australia (IA) “Reform and Investment Framework”
templates.




           Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 5
2.               Strategic Context
2.1               NSW Transport Planning Framework
The NSW Government is changing the way infrastructure is planned, developed, financed and delivered in
NSW. Key to this change will be discipline and rigour in the way projects are evaluated and selected,
establishing clear links to an overarching infrastructure strategy.

Coordinated and consistent planning at state, regional and local level for population growth and
infrastructure is a priority for the NSW Government. The Government’s focus on improved governance and
process will lead to more certainty and predictability in the way Sydney’s strategic planning system
operates, resulting in better infrastructure solutions to better meet the community needs and promote
effective transport solutions and economic growth.

Central to the Government’s strategic planning framework for transport is the Transport Masterplan which
will have detailed community consultation at its core. The Transport Masterplan will be developed by
Transport for NSW and will reflect the consolidation of its urban and regional strategies and its freight
strategy. Underpinning the overarching strategies will be a strong focus on land use planning, corridor
strategies, access plans, modal plans and other supporting plans as illustrated in Figure 2 below.

It is acknowledged that an integrated approach is essential and that the State’s transport strategies and
plans need to be driven off a future view of where people will be living and working in full alignment with:

     The over-arching State Plans, including the 20 year infrastructure Strategy;
     Land use and other local and regional planning strategies; and
     National strategies and plans.

Figure 2: The NSW Transport Planning Framework
                                                                    Updated State Plan “NSW 2021”

                                                                    20 Year Inf rastructure Strategy

                                                                       5 Year Inf rastructure Plan


     COAG Better Value
     Inf rastructure Plan
                                                                                                                                Integration with land use and




                                                                          Link to State Plans                                                                    Metropolitan and
                                                                                                                                  other planning strategies




    COAG National Urban
                            Strategies and Plans




                                                                                                                                                                Regional Land Use
         Policy
                              Links to National




                                                                                                                                                                      Plans

       COAG National
                                                                                                                                                                Precinct Strategies
       Road Ref orms                                                 NSW Transport Masterplan

    IA National Ports and                                                                                                                                          Local Centre
      Freight Strategies                                                                                                                                            Strategies

                                                                    State Infrastructure Priorities
     IA Priority Themes



                                                                         Port botany/Sydney
                                                      North
                                                                           Airport Transport         Pacif ic Highway Upgrade
                                                   West Rail Link
                                                                          Improvement Plan




6 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Although many of the documents in the new transport strategic planning framework have yet to be
completed, the improved governance and process that will be applied to the planning framework ensures
that the State’s three infrastructure priorities (the NWRL, Port Botany/Sydney Airport Transport
Improvement Plan and Pacific Highway Upgrade) will be taken forward in an integrated and co-ordinated
manner. These three infrastructure projects are the subject of the 2011 IA submissions.


2.2            The economic significance of the Port Botany and Sydney
               Airport precinct
The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct, covering an approximate radius of 6 kilometres,
encompass two of Australia’s most significant international gateways:

      Sydney Airport is Australia’s largest international airport, accounting for:
       – 46% of international air passenger journeys21;

       – 23% of domestic air passenger journeys22; and

       – 50% of international air freight23.
      Port Botany is Australia’s second largest container port:
       – Handled 2 million twenty foot equivalent (TEU) containers in 2010-1124 or around one-third of
         annual containerised freight into and out of Australia25.
The precinct also has a key role in connecting regions to the north, south and west of Sydney. The key
east-west corridors supporting these gateways, the M4 and M5 corridors, together contain almost one-third
of Sydney’s population and almost half of Sydney’s jobs. The east-west corridors are also critically
important for the State’s major intermodal freight supply chains, particularly for international freight, with an
increasing concentration of industrial, warehousing and freight distribution networks in Sydney’s west.
Various plans are underway to expand network and terminal capacity for rail freight services connecting to
the precinct.

The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct is of high economic significance to the New South Wales and
national economies and will remain so in the decades ahead. Within the Port Botany/Sydney Airport
precinct and the M4 and M5 corridors, significant growth is expected in:
      Population and employment
       – An additional 480,000 people (28% of Sydney’s population growth) are expected to live in the area
         by 203626; and

       – An additional 377,000 jobs (50% of new jobs in Sydney) in the area are expected over the same
         period27.




21
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.50
22
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.50
23
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.73
24
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Upublished Data
25
 Total container trade in 2009/10 for ports of Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Fremantle, Adelaide was 5,768,095 TEU's.
Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics (2011), Australian Infrastructure Statistics Yearbook 2011, Canberra ACT, Table 7.8 p.102
26
  NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Data: Population and Employment in M4 and M5 Corridors. Based on 5km width (2.5m
radius) spanning from Penrith through to Parramatta the CBD, Sydney Airport, Port Botany, Bexley, Liverpool and Campbelltown
27
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Population and Employment in M4 and M5 Corridors




                Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 7
      Freight volumes
       – Port Botany containerised freight volumes are expected to increase over 3.5 times or by 5.5 million
         TEU from 2010-11 to 2030-31, subject to an approved increase from the current planning approval
         limit of the 3.2 million TEU per annum 28;

       – Air freight volumes are expected to increase by 85%, or an additional 480,000 tonnes, from 2009 to
         202929; and

       – Heavy vehicles trips forecast to increase by 2.2% per annum between 2006 and 2036 and Light
         Commercial vehicle trips by 1.1% per annum30.
      Air Passenger volumes
       – Sydney Airport passenger volumes are expected to more than double by 2029, creating an
         additional 38 million passenger trips31.


2.3             Problem Definition
2.3.1          Overview

The problem this Plan seeks to address is the land side access constraints that exist in servicing the
current and expected future transport needs of two of Australia’s most significant international gateways.
The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct has an important role in ensuring efficient and effective
connections between these international gateways and key business, freight and population centres to the
north, south and west of Sydney. Based on previous NSW Government submissions related to the
precinct32, IA has recognised that ensuring efficient landside connections to Port Botany and Sydney
Airport is a nationally significant problem33.

There is currently a heavy reliance on road-based transport to service the needs of the precinct. The M4
and M5 are the major arterial corridors supporting the precinct and access to the major population,
employment and freight distribution centres in Sydney’s west. There are extended periods of road
congestion and access constraints between Port Botany, Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west that affect
Sydney’s productivity, sustainability and liveability. The nature of congestion and its causes are inherently
complex and multi-faceted and may be summarised as demand for road space outstripping supply.

The ability of the Port to tranship containers is currently higher than the ability of the land transport system
to clear the cargo from the terminals and adjacent container depots. Similarly, the management of empty
containers through the land side transport system is a critical issue affecting supply chain efficiency.
Sydney Ports Corporation is delivering the Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy (PBLIS) and
through the development of PBLIS a number of operational issues and capacity issues have been
identified. These issues include: lack of capacity at intermodal terminals, capacity constraints in stevedore
windows and rail operator processes, as well as a lack of capacity for train paths on the rail network34.




28
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
29
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009 , p.73
30
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2010), Freight Movements in Sydney, p.1
31
     Sydney Airport Corporation Master Plan (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.2
32
     NSW Government 2010 IA Submissions,Container Freight Improvement Strategy and M5 East Expansion
33
  Infrastructure Australia, Letter from Michael Deegan to Les Wielinga, 3 March 2011 “Infrastructure Priority List Submissions”, and
“Communicating the Imperative for Action: A report to the Council of Australian Governments” June 2011
34
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011): Port Botany Supply Chain Efficiency, presentation, September 2011.




8 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
A recent study by Booz & Company for the Tourism and Transport Forum suggested there is a major risk
that land transport constraints may inhibit continued growth in aviation activity at Sydney airport which
ultimately will have a negative flow on effect to the NSW and Australian Economies35. The interaction with
Port traffic also exacerbates the situation as an increasing number of port container truck movements to
and from Port Botany will further reduce the serviceability of the current road network especially around
the domestic terminal36. Additionally, Sydney Airport operates under a curfew which restricts flights
between 11pm and 6am and therefore limits opportunities to spread landside access to Sydney Airport
beyond extended peak and business hours.

The Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics (BTRE) estimated the cost of avoidable congestion in
Sydney at $3.6 billion in 2006 ($1.7 billion business, $1.8 billion private vehicles), and at $5.2 billion in
2011 ($2.7 billion business, $2.5 billion private vehicles)37. Apart from additional travel time, the cost of
congestion includes higher vehicle operating costs and extra air pollution. These factors impact both
freight and passenger costs of travel and negatively influence the competitiveness of Sydney as an
international centre.

An integrated multi-modal Plan is required that builds from an established and credible evidence base and
clearly lays out the future role for rail, road and bus in addressing the transport needs of these important
gateways. The Plan should include a properly defined and sequenced set of improvement initiatives
together with appropriate delivery strategies and funding options.

2.3.2          Expected growth in demand

The increase in travel demand in the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct stems largely from
entrenched land use (population and employment growth) and the growth in the Port Botany and Sydney
Airport precinct as an international gateway for freight and travel.

Population and Employment Growth
Sydney is a vibrant growing city. By 2036, Sydney’s population is forecast to grow by an additional 1.7
million people to reach a total of 6 million residents38. The number of jobs is forecast to grow by an
additional 760,000 jobs, to total 2.8 million39. This will inevitably grow demand for travel and place pressure
on the already heavily congested road network.

In the next decade alone an additional 1.3 million vehicle driver trips, 360,000 vehicle passenger trips,
126,000 bus trips and 15,000 taxi trips are forecast on the Sydney road network as shown in Table 1. The
combined additional 1.8 million trips on the Sydney road network (77%) compares to an additional 9% of
the growth in trips that are forecast by rail and 11% by walking or cycling40.




35
     Booz & Company (2011), Accessing our Airports (2011), A Report prepared for Tourism & Transport Forum, p.40
36
     Booz & Company (2011), Accessing our Airports (2011), A Report prepared for Tourism & Transport Forum, p.40
37
  Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics (BTRE) (2007), Estimating Urban Traffic and Congestion Cost Trends for Australian
Cities: Working Paper 71, p.13
38
     NSW Department of Planning (2010), Metropolitan Plan for Sydney 2036, p.5
39
     NSW Department of Planning (2010), Metropolitan Plan for Sydney 2036, p.5
40
     NSW Government (2010), Metropolitan Transport Plan: Connecting the City of Cities, p.15




                Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 9
Table 1: Trip forecasts by mode 2010-2020 Greater Metropolitan Region Average Weekday (000)

             Mode                        2010                      2020               Additional trips   %total

     Vehicle driver                     10,471                    11,814                   1,343          56
     Vehicle passenger                   4,563                     4,921                    358           15
     Bus                                 1,139                     1,265                    126              5
     Taxi                                    139                    154                     15            <1
     Train                                   989                   1,211                    222              9
     Ferry                                   40                     38                      (2)              -
     Walk only                           3,529                     3,790                    261           11
     Cycle                                   159                    171                     12            <1
     Other                                   164                    227                     63               3
     TOTAL                              21,193                    23,591                   2,398          100
Source: Metropolitan Transport Plan 2010, p.15


In the combined M4 Corridor (5 kilometres wide spanning from Penrith to the CBD/Port/Airport) and M5
Corridor (5 kilometres wide spanning from Campbelltown to Sydney Airport/Port Botany) population is
forecast to grow by around 480,000 people (28% of population growth) and jobs by 377,000 (50% of new
jobs) by 2036 (from a 2006 base)41. Given the strategic role these two corridors play in the Sydney road
network, they will draw demand well beyond their 5 kilometre corridor catchments. For instance, Western
Sydney, which is served by both the M5 and M4 corridors, is forecast to accommodate half of Sydney’s
population and half of its jobs by 203642.

International Gateway Growth – Freight and Travel

Reliance on road transport
Around 85% of trips to and from Sydney Airport are by private vehicle, taxi or mini bus with the remaining
                    43
15% by train or bus . There are a number of factors that influence mode choice to access Sydney Airport
which differ across the markets accessing the Airport. These factors include:

      Difficulties in travelling with luggage;
      The cost of rail fares due to the station access fee, particularly where multiple passengers travel
       together;
      Business travellers with expense accounts not sensitive to costs to access the airport; and
      Security and convenience of travel for night time/shift workers.
                                                                  44
In 2010-11, around 86% of container throughput at Port Botany and 100% of freight at Sydney Airport
travels by road given the reliability and timeliness of a road based solution and lack of a rail freight
connection to Sydney Airport.




41
     Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011)
42
     NSW Department of Planning (2010), Metropolitan Plan for Sydney 2036, p.14
43
     Sydney Airport Corporation Ltd (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.89
44
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data




10 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
An estimated 89% of metropolitan imports are moved by road through the port. Of these, 98.5% of
containers are destined for locations within Sydney making them short haul trips45. Freight rail is currently
more competitive in the long haul market and has a greater market share in the movement of regional
freight to port.

Almost all of Sydney Airport’s domestic and international freight is transported to and from the airport by
road. There is no rail freight link to Sydney Airport. Exports are dominated by perishables and
manufactured goods and imports are typically high value urgent manufactured products such as computer
and vehicle parts. Mail is also an important segment of the airfreight business. The high value, time
sensitive and/or perishable nature of the goods lends itself to transport by road rather than rail.

There are several reasons for the historical preference to access Sydney Airport and Port Botany
by road46:

      Time and reliability costs currently associated with double handling of containers over relatively short
       distances;
      Last minute/just in time delivery models for some container markets;
      High value, time sensitive and/or perishable nature of air freight; and
      Specialised nature of Airport travel, including travelling with luggage, travel with multiple passengers
       and travel for business where time and convenience are imperatives over travel cost.
In line with population and employment growth, freight and commercial trips are also forecast to grow
between Sydney Airport, Port Botany and Sydney’s regions. This comprises a wide range of sectors all of
which are road based – food and beverages, household goods, fuel, building materials, trade deliveries,
health supplies, waste and recycling, parcels and mail, etc.

The NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics forecast the following broad trends across Sydney in relation to
Heavy Vehicles (HV) and Light Commercial Vehicles (LCV)47:

      HV movements in Sydney are forecast to increase by 2.2% per annum between 2006 and 2036,
       faster than Light Commercial Vehicle (LCV) trips which are predicted to grow by 1.1% per year;
      The growth in LCV movements is on par with the expected increase in population (1.1%) and
       employment (1.0%) per year;
      The number of trips made by rigid trucks on an average weekday is expected to grow from 227,000
       to 430,000 between 2006 and 2036 or 2.2% per annum, the same rate as articulated truck movements
       which will grow from 61,000 in 2006 to 117,000 in 2036; and
      LCV trips are expected to rise at half the growth rate of heavy vehicle trips from 1,190,000 in 2006 to
       1,651,000 trips in 2036.
In relation to the geographic distribution of these trips, the Bureau of Transport Statistics (BTS) identifies
that:

      Sydney Airport/Port Botany, the broader Ports Precinct (Mascot/Botany) and industrial parks across
       Sydney are among those that generate the highest volumes of heavy truck movements;
      Between 2006 and 2036, Blacktown South-West, Fairfield-West, Penrith-East, Liverpool-East and
       Blacktown South-East are the areas which will experience the highest growth in heavy vehicle trips;




45
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
46
     NSW Department of Transport analysis
47
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2010), Freight Movements in Sydney, p.1




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 11
      LCV movements tend to occur around commercial centres and are more spread than heavy vehicle
       trips. There are high concentrations of LCV trips in Sydney-Inner, Warringah, Ryde, Parramatta-Inner
       and Blacktown South-East; and
      Sydney-Inner, Camden, Blacktown-North, Liverpool-East and Sydney-South are expected to attract the
       largest increases in LCV movements between 2006 and 2036.
Servicing these areas, which will have an increased role in servicing Sydney’s freight and commercial
needs, are dependent on an efficient motorway and arterial network, most notably in the bounds of the
Study Area.

Growth at Port Botany
Australia’s total freight task is expected to treble by 205048. Government will need to support substantial
new investment and policy reform and provide incentives for private sector investment to meet this task.

Sydney is a key international gateway for freight and Australia’s largest city. Transport has a key role in
linking manufacturers to their markets and individuals to their employment, goods, services and social
opportunities. Ensuring suitable space in employment areas linked to good freight transport connections
will be vital to Sydney’s economic growth.

Port Botany accounts for almost all containerised freight in NSW. Analysis of import data has indicated that
85% of containers are destined for area within 40 kilometres of Port Botany in metropolitan Sydney, and
the vast majority for consumption by Sydney residents. An efficient freight network is required to
accommodate containerised transport in Sydney and will assist in increasing regional and interstate rail
freight movements.

The port Import/Export (IMEX) container trade largely involves the transport of IMEX containers between
Port Botany and suburban distribution centres and customer locations by road direct or between Port
Botany and a number of intermodal terminals by rail. There is typically a short haul road movement
between the rail intermodal terminal and the origin/destination of the freight. A breakdown of Port Botany
throughput is shown in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Port Botany Container Throughput 2008-09

                                           TEU Equivalent (000)                           % split

     Import                                          772                                    43
     Export                                          335                                    19
     Empty                                           435                                    24
     Transhipment                                    242                                    15
     TOTAL                                          1,784                                   100
Source: SAHA (2010) based on SPC Trade Report 2008-09




48
     IBISWorld (2008), Transport Infrasructure 2050, prepared for Infrastructure Partnerships Australia




12 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
The significant growth observed in Port Botany throughput in recent years is expected to continue in the
future as the population and economy of Sydney continue to grow. The historical growth rate of Port
throughput has averaged 7.0 percent per annum over the last 15 years. At current growth rates, the
current planning approval maximum throughput of 3.2M TEU is likely to be reached by around 2017-1849.
The recent $1 billion investment in the third terminal at Port Botany has created seaside infrastructure that
can handle significantly higher volumes of throughput. Under Sydney Ports Corporation’s “Likely Growth”
scenario, 7.5M TEU would be reached by 2030-3150.

In recognition of the strategic challenge that the growth at Port Botany places on the transport network, the
NSW Government has set a mode share target of doubling the proportion of containers moved by rail
through NSW Ports by 2020. In practical terms this means increasing rail’s mode share of containers
through Port Botany to 28% by 202051. Even with this target being achieved, the road task will double by
2020-21 and more than treble by 2030-31, as indicated in Table 3. Demand for travel between Port Botany
and Western Sydney will continue to grow as industrial, warehousing and distribution centres intensify in
Sydney’s outskirts.

Table 3: 2010-11 Trade and Mode Split and "Likely Growth" Trade Scenarios and Mode Split Target for
2020-21 and 2030-31

     Financial Year        Total Trade       Total Trade excluding         Rail            Rail        Road          Road
                           (000 TEU)             Transhipment              mode         (000 TEU)      mode        (000 TEU)
                                                   (000 TEU)               split                       split

     2010-11                  2,006                   1,802                 14%            252         86%           1,550
     2020-21                  3,879                   3,625                 28%           1,015        72%           2,610
     2030-31                  7,465                   7,165                 28%           2,006        72%           5,159
Source: Sydney Ports Corporation (2011b) Container Movement Information. Unpublished Data.


Achieving the targeted 28% mode share on rail by 2020 will require changes and improvements to
stimulate demand for transport by rail as well as increasing the supply of intermodal and line-haul rail
capacity in Western Sydney. The operation of the Enfield Intermodal Terminal and the markets it ultimately
serves when it opens in 2013 will be a first step to achieving that target. The successful roll out of Enfield
will provide an increase in the rail mode share and re-establish rail’s viability in the urban import market.
This will in turn support future investments in Moorebank and potentially Eastern Creek intermodal
precincts.

The rail freight logistics chain is inherently complex and requires coordination of many parties including
shipping lines, stevedores, rail transport providers, rail infrastructure providers, intermodal terminal
operators and empty container park operators. Developing a Plan that delivers an improved competitive
value proposition for rail transport will be the key to achieving the mode shift target and relieving pressures
on Sydney’s roads.




49
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
50
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
51
  Based on 2010/11 14% rail mode share for containers through Port Botany. Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement
and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 13
Growth at Sydney Airport
The quantum of growth at Sydney Airport is significant. The current Sydney Airport Master Plan
forecasts52:

      Moving an additional 46 million air passengers in 2029, increasing from 33 million in 2009 to 79 million
       in 2029. This represents an additional average of 126,000 passengers per day, plus additional
       employees and “meeters and greeters”;
      Moving an additional 480,000 tonnes of air freight in 2029, increasing from 595,000 tonnes in 2009 to
       1,100,000 tonnes in 2029;
      Generating an estimated 100,000 additional jobs over the next ten years associated with increased
       passenger, freight, retail and commercial business. This is a significant addition to Sydney Airport’s
       current provision or generation of more than 75,000 jobs and about 131,000 jobs indirectly, making a
       total of around 206,000 full-time equivalent jobs; and
      Accommodating up to a total of 240,000 square meters of commercial space, including 25,000 square
       metres of general retail space, at both the International and Domestic airport precincts.
Landside access is a key issue given the co-location of Sydney Airport with other intense developments in
the Port Botany/Sydney Airport to CBD Corridor. These include significant urban renewal developments at
Green Square, Redfern-Waterloo and Mascot. The existing industrial activities located in the broader Port
Botany and Sydney Airport precinct are also intense trip generators and directly service both the Airport
and Port. In the case of Sydney Airport, this includes catering of flights, maintenance of aircraft and
servicing expanding retail and commercial operations.

In 2005, rail had 11% mode share of trips to and from the Airport, bus had 4%, mini bus had 10% and taxi
25%, as shown in Figure 3. Sydney Airport has sought to increase the public transport mode share by a
further 5% by 2029, up from 15% (11% rail and 4% bus) in 2005 to 20%53. With the quantum of growth at
the Airport the relatively modest targeted increase in mode share will still result in a significant increase in
demand on the Airport Rail Line and Airport bus services. Conversely, the quantum of airport growth will
have a far greater impact on the already heavily congested surrounding road network system given the
size of the expected task.




52
     Sydney Airport Corporation Ltd (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.2,73,97-98
53
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.89




14 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Figure 3: Mode share access for Sydney Airport, 2005




                                                                                             Rental
                                                                                             Car Drop Off
                                                                                             Park Car
                                                                                             Other
                                                                                             Bus
                                                                                             Minibus
                                                                                             Train
                                                                                             Taxi




Source: Sydney Airport Corporation Limited, (2009) Sydney Airport Master Plan 2009, p.89


2.3.3           Existing road constraints

Roads and Maritime Services has identified relatively poor travel conditions compared to Sydney averages
for the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct, the M4 motorway and the M5 east corridor. On the M5
East, M5 and M4 Motorways, average speeds have reduced to around 40-55 kilometres per hour in the
AM peak (eastbound) and 60-75 kilometres per hour in the PM peak (westbound) compared to posted
speeds of 90 kilometres per hour to 110 kilometres per hour54. Also increasing congestion periods are
spreading well beyond traditional 2-hour peak periods (7-9am and 4-6pm) on the Sydney Motorway
Network. In the case of the M5 East, peak traffic flows extend from 5.30am to 10am and from 2pm to
6.30pm, with heavy flows of traffic in both directions55.

In 2009, 70.7% of passengers in the AM Peak using the Airport and East Hills Line (which runs parallel to
the F5/M5/M5 East) were destined for the CBD, North Shore, Redfern and Airport56. In contrast, of all
surveyed M5 users in the AM Peak only 18.6% were destined for Inner Sydney and Lower Northern
Sydney57, suggesting the destinations of M5 users were far more dispersed than that of the parallel rail line
(which has a primary role in servicing Sydney’s employment in the immediate vicinity of stations58) which
limits the potential for major mode shift to rail.




54
   Baulderstone Hornibrook Bilfinger Berger Joint Venture (2004 and 2010), M5 East Traffic Loop Collection Data Reported to the Roads
and Traffic Authority in 2004 and 2010 and NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (2011), Traffic Information System: Travel Speed March
2010 Survey
55
   Baulderstone Hornibrook Bilfinger Berger Joint Venture (2004 and 2010), M5 East Traffic Loop Collection Data Reported to the Roads
and Traffic Authority in 2004 and 2010 and NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (2011), Traffic Information System: Travel Speed March
2010 Survey
56
     CityRail (2010) A Compendium of City Rail Travel Statistics 2010, p.51 and City Rail Unpublished Data. Provided May 2011
57
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Household Travel Survey – 5 years 05/06 to 09/10, unpublished data
58
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Household Travel Survey – 5 years 05/06 to 09/10 unpublished data




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 15
A key missing link in the Sydney Motorway Network is in its east-west spine with the M4 Motorway
terminating at North Strathfield, 14 kilometres from Sydney Airport/Port Botany. East of North Strathfield,
Parramatta Road, City West Link Road, Sydenham Road, Livingstone Road, Stanmore Road, Edgeware
Road, Canal Road and Gardeners Road currently serve as arterial links between Sydney’s west, east and
south. This is a key issue for the distribution of Port Botany containers as the significant majority are
destined for locations in the M4 Corridor as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4: Destination of Port Botany Import Containers within Sydney 2009-10




Source: BS 2011, Information Paper–Experimental Statistics on International Shipping Container Movements 2009-10.


These roads are typically four and six lane aging arterial roads, in some cases undivided without adequate
turning lanes. Some sections have poor alignments, narrow lanes and uncontrolled access. This makes
them particularly challenging for heavy vehicles and they are prone to disruption due to traffic incidents.

In the absence of alternate high quality arterial routes, over time these roads have come to perform a mix
of local and higher order traffic functions. To avoid these lower quality routes, some road users, particularly
freight and commercial operators, use longer alternative routes to travel between Sydney’s west, Sydney
Airport and Port Botany.

Other network access constraints between Port Botany, Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west constrain the
operation of higher productivity vehicles in terms of height, length and/or mass. Addressing these
constraints would enable a greater number/volume/mass of goods to be moved in fewer trips with overall
lower labour, vehicle operating and congestion costs. In terms of payload alone, higher mass limits (HML)
result in significant productivity gains, with a 10% increase in pay load for semi-trailers (19 metres) and a
13% increase for B-Doubles (25/26 metres)59.




59
     NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (2011), “Higher Mass Limits (HML)” webpage




16 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Some notable network access constraints include the HML B-Double restriction on the bridge on the
M4 Motorway over Silverwater Road, the HML Semi-Trailer and B-Double restriction on the bridge on
Marsh Street over the Cooks River, the 4.3 metre clearance limit in the M5 East’s Airport and Cooks River
Tunnel and the circuitous 4.6 metre over height vehicle surface route between the M5 East Main Tunnel
and Port Botany.

2.3.4           Existing rail constraints

There are a number of operational issues and capacity issues on the Sydney metropolitan rail network for
port services. These issues include: lack of capacity at intermodal terminals, capacity constraints in
stevedore windows as well as a lack of capacity for train paths on the rail network.

The Container Freight Strategy60 identified a number of opportunities to remove constraints on the existing
rail network:

     Removal of the rail crossing       General Holmes drive is an important local link for traffic between South Sydney, the
     at General Holmes Drive            Eastern Suburbs and the Airport. All freight movements to/from Port Botany travel
                                        across this level crossing which impacts on the efficiency and capacity of the rail
                                        freight system and causes delays on the road network.
     Duplication of the Botany to       The Enfield intermodal terminal due for completion in 2013 will be connected to Port
     Mascot rail freight line           Botany by a dedicated freight line. The Botany to Enfield/Chullora freight line, a
                                        distance of approximately 20 kilometres, is linked to operational sidings in Port Botany
                                        with both stevedores and the P&O Trans Australia container park.
                                        The Port Botany Rail Line Upgrade Program, funded by the Australian Government’s
                                        Nation Building program, involves a series of track and signalling projects to enhance
                                        capacity. The program is due for completion in 2013.
                                        After the completion of the Port Botany Rail Upgrade Program, only the 3 kilometre
                                        link between Mascot and Port Botany on the Enfield to Port Botany freight line will
                                        remain single track. Single track limits the line’s operational capacity and extending
                                        the duplication between Mascot and Port Botany so the entire route becomes dual
                                        track will create operational efficiency and capacity benefits.
     Construction of a Western          Additional intermodal capacity is required to service growth in the freight task,
     Sydney Freight Line                especially in Sydney’s west. A Western Sydney Freight Line is the missing link in a
                                        dedicated freight network connecting Port Botany to the main west line to service this
                                        additional intermodal capacity.
More general constraints for freight rail in the metropolitan area include a curfew on freight movements
during the passenger peaks and difficulty in obtaining suitable train paths in windows that suit the market.
The rail passenger task is continuing to grow, particularly from growth areas in the South West, and the
Cityrail network will continue to come under pressure from increasing passenger demands.

2.3.5           Lack of effective demand management

IA’s Communicating the Imperative for Action identifies that it will seek to engage in a more mature and
challenging debate at the national level and with community about infrastructure needs and how it is paid
for in future61.

At present there is no pricing mechanism aimed at managing demand for travel between Port
Botany/Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west with the exception of the toll on the M5 Motorway for non-
privately registered vehicles. The toll was established as a funding mechanism but it is recognised that it
also operates as a rather simple pricing mechanism for non-private users.


60
     NSW Govenrment IA Submission (2010)
61
     Infrastructure Australia (2011),Communicating the Imperative for Action




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 17
For high value travel in the commercial and freight markets there is likely to be a much greater acceptance
of road pricing/tolling as a means to manage demand, alleviate congestion and to fund the provision of
new and upgraded road infrastructure.

Given constraints on public revenue sources for funding major upgrades, coupled with ongoing
demand for road usage, it is likely that future governments will need to consider reforms in both road
funding and pricing. The introduction of electronic tolling across the Sydney motorway network is a step
in this direction.

Appropriate pricing signals on the Sydney Motorway Network could mitigate some of the costs of urban
congestion, although it is most likely that these would need to be delivered in combination with additional
plans for road, public transport and freight rail.

The introduction of a carbon tax in Australia is not expected to have a significant impact on travel demand.
In 2009, the transport sector represented 14% of Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions62, however,
the Australian Government has suggested on-road light transport, including private motor vehicles, taxis,
and light commercial vehicles, will not experience any increase in the cost of fuel as a result of the carbon
tax, given the planned exemption for fuel.

Further, there are some key issues in the existing pricing environment which influence decisions to travel
by road, including:

      Absence of a toll on the M5 East Tunnel;
      M5 Cashback Scheme for privately registered vehicles;
      Rail access fee (Adult Single $11.80, Return $18.60 additional to City Rail fare) at the Domestic
       and International Airport Stations; and
      Absence of a pricing mechanism to incentivise travel of Port Botany containers by freight rail instead
       of road.
Implementing any changes to the above will involve changes in Government policy and alternative pricing
scenarios would need to be modelled and tested with the general community, customers and industry
stakeholders to determine the extent that pricing reform in these areas could be a useful component of the
final package of road and rail improvements.


2.4             Preferred Strategy
2.4.1           The Proposed Transport Improvement Plan

The size, complexity and economic significance of the transport task between Port Botany, Sydney Airport
and Sydney’s west will require a joint multimodal response by the Australian and NSW Governments over
the next 25-30 years. The proposed transport improvement plan will integrate a number of existing rail
freight, road and public transport initiatives at various stages of development.

The Plan will develop a discrete number of demand and supply side options for testing with customers,
other stakeholders and the community, with the most economically robust options taken forward to
implementation. It will also bring together and build on the range of studies conducted so far addressing
land transport issues in and around the Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct, including various M4 and
M5 motorway studies, the Container Freight Strategy and proposals in respect of Moorebank intermodal
precinct, and will consider other planning activities currently underway, including having regard to the Port



62
     Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (2010), Australia’s Emissions Projections 2010




18 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Botany and Sydney Airport masterplans, the NSW freight strategy, the INSW Strategy Statement and the
NSW Transport Masterplan.

The Plan will take account of a broad set of objectives and considerations, as outlined in Section 1.2.2, to
determine a preferred option, including the future role of road and rail in meeting the transport needs of the
precinct. The analysis of options will include:

        Demand analysis and assessment of future needs;
        Broad identification of infrastructure needed;
        Broad identification of supporting policy;
        Strategic cost estimation and engineering risk assessment;
        Sustainability assessment; and
        Economic assessment and multi-criteria analysis.
Proper consideration of the options therefore requires appropriate planning, economic, engineering and
environmental analysis in order to establish a well-developed set of recommendations. The Plan will also
address previous criticisms of NSW Government IA submissions in relation to the M4 and M5 proposals
and provide a comprehensive and rigorous assessment of transport needs and alternative options before
determining the preferred direction for landside transport in the precinct.

2.4.2           Integration with other existing transport improvement initiatives

The proposed Plan will integrate a number of existing rail freight, road and public transport initiatives.
Some of these are already underway, some are the subject of detailed investigation and others are still
conceptual and require detailed scoping and analysis.

Table 4 describes a number of short, medium and long term initiatives that may need to be integrated with
the proposed Plan. Combined, these will form the basis of a comprehensive multimodal response to
addressing the Port Botany and Sydney Airport transport task.

Table 4: Short, medium and long term initiatives

                                Description                                        Link to the Plan

    1.     Short Term Initiatives
    Planning approval to        The present planning approval at Port Botany       The Plan will need to consider the
    increase throughput at      has approved a total throughput of 3.2M TEUs       landside transport implications of the
    Port Botany                 per annum. To accommodate long term growth         increase in planning approval to allow
    (Under consideration)       an increase in the planning approval is to be      expansion of Port Botany throughput to
                                progressed which is subject to finalisation of a   its practical capacity, which has been
                                revised NSW Government ports policy and the        estimated to be around 7M TEUs per
                                normal processes around new planning               annum.
                                approvals (such as an EIS, community
                                consultation).




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 19
                          Description                                           Link to the Plan

 Southern Sydney          The Southern Sydney Freight Line (SSFL) will          The SSFL, at least in the short term,
 Freight Line             physically expand the dedicated freight network       offers benefits to the Port Botany
 (Under Construction)     in Sydney spanning from Sefton Junction to            freight task through servicing the
                          Macarthur. The SSFL provides 24/7 dedicated           existing relatively small Villawood
                          freight rail capacity and segregates the freight      intermodal terminal, and providing
                          and passenger network. The need for the SSFL          improved accessibility to Port Botany
                          is centred on improving the availability, transit     for port freight from Southern NSW
                          time and reliability of domestic freight (rather      through a dedicated freight line from
                          than Port Botany freight) between Melbourne           Macarthur to Port Botany, bypassing
                          and Sydney to shift freight from road to rail and     the RailCorp network.
                          will, in the main, benefit the Hume Highway.          Over the medium term, the SSFL offers
                          The SSFL interfaces with the Chullora                 the potential to enable new rail
                          intermodal terminal, which handles domestic           terminals at Moorebank which would
                          freight (around 300,000 TEU per annum) and            have a significant benefit in achieving
                          the existing intermodal terminal at Villawood,        the NSW Government’s target of
                          which handles Port Botany freight (around             doubling the proportion of freight
                          40,000 TEU per annum). The existing                   moved by rail through NSW Ports by
                          intermodal terminal at Minto which services Port      2020.
                          Botany will not have access to the SSFL. The
                          SSFL will provide access to potential new
                          intermodal terminals in south west Sydney. This
                          includes a future connection to proposed
                          intermodal terminals at Moorebank and possibly
                          Minto.
 Enfield Intermodal       The Enfield Intermodal Terminal (IMT) is due to       The Enfield Intermodal Terminal will
 Terminal                 be operational by mid-2013. It will have capacity     provide the potential to move more
 (Under Construction)     to handle 300,000 TEU of containers, although         than double the current railed
                          it is likely to take some time for the operation to   throughput between Port Botany and
                          reach capacity. In 2009-10 around 210,000             metropolitan intermodal terminals. It
                          TEUs were moved by rail through Sydney                will play a significant short term role in
                          intermodal terminals (65% of the total 320,000        moving toward the NSW Government’s
                          moved by rail in NSW, with the remaining 35%          target of doubling the proportion of
                          moved through regional terminals).                    freight moved by rail through NSW
                          The opening of Enfield IMT will almost double         Ports by 2020.
                          the current supply of intermodal capacity in
                          Sydney in the short term. It will increase current
                          metropolitan intermodal capacity in Sydney from
                          the current estimated 370,000 TEU to 670,000
                          TEU.




20 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
                        Description                                           Link to the Plan

Port Botany Landside    The Port Botany Landside Improvement                  PBLIS has both rail and road
Improvement Strategy    Strategy (PBLIS) aims to improve the                  improvement components. The rail
(Ongoing)               competitive access and service arrangements of        components assist in moving toward
                        container movements between stevedores and            the target to double the proportion of
                        transport carriers at Port Botany. Governing the      container freight movements by rail
                        PBLIS reform is The Ports and Maritime                through NSW Ports. The road
                        Administration Amendment (Port Botany                 component, which has already resulted
                        Landside Improvement Strategy) Regulation             in more efficient processing of truck
                        2010.                                                 turnaround times at the Port, could
                        The objective of this Regulation is to provide for:   increase the competitive advantage of
                                                                              road to rail. The implications of the
                         The setting of and compliance with access           PBLIS Reform will be considered as
                           and performance standards relating to              part of the Plan.
                           access by road carriers to the Port Botany
                           Container Terminals, the performance of
                           road carriers at those terminals and the
                           performance of stevedores in providing
                           services to road carriers at those terminals;
                           and
                         The regulation by the Portfolio Minister of the
                           charges imposed by stevedores and service
                           providers for or in connection with the
                           operation or provision of facilities or services
                           of the port-related supply chain at Port
                           Botany, including truck servicing and rail
                           servicing charges.
                        The objective of the PBLIS plan is to maximise
                        the amount of trade passing through Port
                        Botany by making the landside supply chain
                        more efficient, transparent, consistent and
                        transitioning to 24/7 operations.
M5 West Widening        The proposed widening of the M5 South West            The proposed M5 West Widening
(Under negotiation      Motorway provides for three lanes in each             would add capacity to the central part
with Interlink)         direction between King Georges Road, Beverly          of the F5/M5/M5 East Corridor. This
                        Hills and Camden Valley Way, Prestons. At             will benefit freight, commercial and
                        King Georges Road, where the M5 West                  passenger markets. The M5 West
                        widening interfaces with the M5 East Freeway,         Widening is compatible with a future
                        the eastbound third lane will function as a "trap"    possible M5 East Duplication, including
                        lane which essentially acts as the eastbound          the interface at King Georges Road.
                        on-load ramp to King Georges Road.                    Work by the Australian Government on
                        This will primarily remove one lane of eastbound      the proposed Moorebank IMT has
                        traffic from the corridor, with two lanes             highlighted the need to consider
                        progressing beneath King Georges Road onto            capacity over the Georges River
                        the M5 East Freeway. In the westbound                 crossing and traffic weaving issues
                        direction the third lane will operate in a similar    between Moorebank Avenue and the
                        manner, but as the westbound on-load ramp             Hume Highway. These issues will form
                        from King Georges Road.                               part of considerations for the Plan.
                        With proposed expansion of the M5 East
                        Freeway, three lanes will be provided in each
                        direction beneath King Georges Road. On
                        completion of the expansion the King Georges
                        Road on-load and off-load ramps will revert to a
                        conventional merge/diverge lane with from/to
                        the third lane. Accordingly, the design of the M5
                        West Widening is compatible with a future
                        possible M5 East Duplication.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 21
                          Description                                             Link to the Plan

 National Managed         To improve traffic flows, journey times and             The managed motorway proposal for
 Motorways                relieve congestion, the NSW Government, in              the Sydney Orbital and M4 has the
 (IA “Ready to Proceed    collaboration with Queensland, Victoria, South          potential to offer significant benefits,
 Status”)                 Australia and Western Australia, is working             relative to cost, for traffic flows in peak
                          towards developing a Managed Motorway                   conditions. The Plan is likely to include
                          system that uses technology based                       the Managed Motorway as an option
                          enhancements to improve efficiency and safety           element to address identified problems
                          for the Australian motorway network.                    and causes in the Study Area.
                          The Managed Motorway system involves the                Implementation of Managed Motorway
                          optimisation of existing traffic management             systems is considered a key element in
                          technologies such as automatic vehicle and              making better use of the existing road
                          incident detection systems, electronic variable         infrastructure which is a key objective
                          speed limits, closed circuit television cameras         of the Plan.
                          and systems to manage the operation of
                          Motorway on-load ramps, to enhance the
                          operational efficiency and safety of motorways
                          and to get more out of the motorway network.
                          In NSW, the system is intended to encompass
                          the entire motorway network including the
                          Sydney Orbital, the M4 Motorway, the F3
                          Freeway to Newcastle, the F5 Freeway to
                          Campbelltown and the F6 Freeway to
                          Wollongong.
 Integrated Ticketing     The new electronic ticketing system will make           The Plan will consider demand side
 (Under development)      travelling on public transport easier and simpler       options to manage road demand and to
                          for people living and working in or visiting the        shift discretionary road users onto
                          greater Sydney area. For customers it means             public transport. The implementation of
                          only one smartcard to travel on ferries, trains,        Integrating Ticketing for public
                          buses and light rail. The new Opal card will            transport will support this aspect of the
                          begin to be rolled out in late 2012.                    Plan.
                          The Opal smart card will be available on Sydney
                          Ferries, CityRail, private and public bus
                          networks and light rail. It will be available for all
                          types of fares – adult, child, concession, PET
                          and school students. Customers will enjoy
                          capped fares and discounts to reward frequent
                          and multimodal travellers.




22 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
                         Description                                          Link to the Plan

South West Rail Link     The South West Rail Link (SWRL) will operate         The Plan will consider options to
(Under construction)     as an extension of the Airport and East Hills        manage road demand and shift
                         Line. It will extend from Glenfield with new         discretionary road users onto public
                         stations at Edmondson Park and Leppington            transport. This may include options
                         and is due for completion in 2016. The SWRL is       which could incentivise use of the
                         intended to support population growth by             SWRL for some trips. Use of the SWRL
                         providing additional services to the East Hills      is likely to include, in the main, trips to
                         Line from Leppington to the City and additional      major centres including Parramatta,
                         stabling for Sector 2 of the Sydney metropolitan     CBD-Redfern-North Shore Corridor
                         rail network (the AEHL, Main South Line via          and Sydney Airport. The
                         Granville, Bankstown Line and the Inner West         implementation of the SWRL will
                         Line).                                               support this aspect of the Plan by
                         The train stabling facilities proposed as part of    expanding accessibility to the Cityrail
                         the SWRL west of Leppington will support rail        network to further incentivise shifting of
                         patronage growth associated with the South           discretionary road users.
                         West Growth Centre and additional passengers
                         on Cityrail’s south-western services as a whole.
                         The stabling is required to store trains when
                         they are not in operational use. The junction of
                         the South and East Hills Line, Glenfield
                         Junction, will be grade separated as part of the
                         proposal. Currently, Glenfield Junction presents
                         a significant timetabling and capacity constraint
                         on the existing network.
Kingsgrove to            The Kingsgrove to Revesby Quadruplification          The Plan will consider options to
Revesby                  Project builds on the Revesby Turnback Project       manage road demand and shift
Quadruplification        which opened in 2008. It forms part of the           discretionary road users onto public
Project (Airport and     Railway Clearways Programme and relates to           transport. This may include options
East Hills Rail Line)    Clearway 3 – Campbelltown Express and                which could incentivise use of the
(Under construction)     Clearway 4 – Airport and South.                      Airport and East Hills Rail Line (AEHL)
                         Reliability would be improved as delays to local     for some trips. Use of the AEHL is
                         services are not likely to affect express services   likely to continue to be dominated by
                         and vice versa after completion of the               travel to major centres including, the
                         quadruplification. The project would also enable     CBD-Redfern-North Shore Corridor
                         scope to increase service frequency over the         and Sydney Airport. The
                         medium to long term if necessary to meet future      implementation of the AEHL project will
                         demand. The project is currently under               support this aspect of the Plan by
                         construction and due for completion in 2013.         improving rail reliability and service to
                                                                              further incentivise shifting of
                                                                              discretionary road users.
Commuter Car Park        Construction is underway on the following            The Plan will consider options to
and Interchange          commuter car park and interchange projects           manage road demand and shift
Program                  which are all located within the strategic context   discretionary road users onto public
(Under construction      area of the Plan (see Figure 1):                     transport. This may include options for
                                                                              road pricing which could incentivise
and in the                Blacktown Commuter Car Park;
planning/design                                                               use of the Cityrail network for some
component)
                          Macarthur Commuter Car Park – Stage 2;             trips.
                          Mount Druitt Commuter Car Park; and                The implementation of the Commuter
                          Kingswood – Upgrade of Transport                   Car Park and Interchange plan will
                            Interchange Facilities and Commuter Car           support this aspect of the Plan by
                            Park.                                             improving park and ride facilities to
                                                                              further incentivise shifting of
                         A number of other projects are in the planning       discretionary road users.
                         and design Component, including:
                          Cabramatta Commuter Car Park;
                          Fairfield Transport Interchange Upgrade;
                            and
                          Granville - Transport Interchange Upgrade.




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 23
                          Description                                            Link to the Plan

 2.   Medium/Long Term Initiatives
 Moorebank Intermodal     The Australian Government is currently                 The proposed Moorebank IMT has the
 Terminal                 undertaking a Feasibility Program which is due         potential to offer very significant
 (Feasibility stage)      to be completed in early 2012. The Moorebank           benefits in moving toward the target to
                          Intermodal Terminal (IMT) site offers some key         double the proportion of container
                          strategic advantages:                                  freight movements by rail through NSW
                                                                                 Ports.
                           Large consolidated site of approximately 220
                             hectares;
                           Located adjacent to the Southern Sydney
                             Freight Line and the main inter-state line;
                           Located in close proximity to the M5 and M7
                             Motorways;
                           Located in close proximity to the growing
                             industrial centres to Sydney’s south west
                             and west; and
                           Potential to serve both the Port Botany
                             container freight market and the interstate
                             freight market.
                          These advantages provide an opportunity to
                          facilitate increased movements by freight rail in
                          the Sydney basin. It is a key infrastructure
                          supply side proposal to achieve the Australian
                          and NSW Government’s joint strategic priority of
                          increasing the movement of freight by rail in
                          Sydney.
                          Delivery of a Moorebank IMT is dependent on a
                          rail line extension to/from the South Sydney
                          Freight Line and road enhancements to address
                          issues on the M5 Motorway between
                          Moorebank Avenue and the Hume Highway.
                          Capacity over the Georges River crossing and
                          traffic weaving issues between Moorebank
                          Avenue and the Hume Highway are issues
                          under consideration. The costs of these rail and
                          road network upgrades are being considered
                          jointly by the Australian and NSW Governments
                          in the feasibility of the proposal.
                          Further, to support the Moorebank IMT proposal
                          consideration of demand side stimulus for
                          freight rail is likely to be required to encourage a
                          sustainable shift away from road to rail.
                          Delivering a fully operational demand and
                          supply side package at Moorebank is likely to
                          take some years to resolve, making it a medium
                          term proposition.




24 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
                        Description                                         Link to the Plan

SIMTA Moorebank         The Sydney Intermodal Terminal Alliance             SIMTA’s proposal for a Moorebank IMT
Intermodal Terminal     (SIMTA), a private sector consortium comprising     focuses on servicing the Port Botany
(Proposal at the        QR, Qube and Stocklands, has submitted a            container task. It has the potential to
Preliminary             Concept Plan Application and a Preliminary          offer very significant benefits in moving
Environmental           Environmental Assessment to the Department          toward the target to double the
Assessment Stage)       of Planning and Infrastructure for an intermodal    proportion of container freight
                        terminal at Moorebank. The site is adjacent to      movements by rail through NSW Ports.
                        the site proposed by the Australian
                        Government.
                        The concept plan includes four components (1)
                        Rail link connecting the site to the Southern
                        Sydney Freight Line; (2) Intermodal terminal
                        with a capacity to handle up to 1M TEUs per
                        annum of primarily port related freight operating
                        24/7; (3) Warehousing and distribution facilities
                        and (4) Freight village of support services.
                        Like the Australian Government’s proposed
                        Moorebank Intermodal Terminal, it too is
                        dependent on a rail line extension to/from the
                        South Sydney Freight Line and road
                        enhancements to address issues on the M5
                        Motorway between Moorebank Avenue and the
                        Hume Highway.
North Sydney Freight    The NSW and Australian Governments are              The North Sydney Freight Access
Access                  currently negotiating an agreement to expand        project will benefit interstate rail freight
(Under development)     rail freight access to the north of Sydney. The     services and allow for additional train
                        precise scope is still subject to agreement but     movements between Port Botany and
                        may include a rail grade separation in the          freight distribution activities in the north
                        vicinity of north Strathfield to allow improved     of Sydney.
                        access to the metropolitan freight network,
                        completion of a full quadruplication between
                        North Strathfield and West Ryde and dedicated
                        freight access between Sydney and Newcastle.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 25
                          Description                                            Link to the Plan

 Road pricing reform at   A number of recent national initiatives have           The Plan will consider options for
 the national level       raised the need for both national and state            demand management, including:
 (Early consideration)    governments in Australia to further consider           1.   Reviewing specific transport
                          road pricing reforms with the broader                       pricing policies to influence travel
                          community.                                                  decisions around time of travel,
                          The final report of the Australia’s Future Tax              mode choice and alternatives to
                          System Review (the Henry Tax Review) made                   travel in Port Botany/Sydney
                          eight recommendations in relation to road                   Airport Precinct.
                          transport pricing in 2010. It recommends that          2.   Providing appropriate priority and
                          the revenue raised from fuel taxes for general              facilities for high value freight and
                          purposes be replaced with road user charges                 commercial travel on Sydney’s
                          linked to the cost of congestion and the cost of            transport system, which may be
                          efficient financing the road network. It raised the         linked to a direct road user
                          introduction of variable congestion pricing and             charge.
                          possibly wider road pricing in Australian cities if
                          cost effective.
                          The COAG Road Reform Plan (CRRP), initiated
                          in 2007, was created by the Council of
                          Australian Governments (COAG) in response to
                          the Productivity Commission Report Road and
                          Rail Freight Infrastructure Pricing. It has found
                          that it is feasible to develop a platform of direct
                          road user charging for heavy vehicles. Further,
                          the work on heavy vehicle charging reform has
                          found that there will be significant benefits from
                          such reform if it is tied to funding reforms for the
                          delivery of heavy vehicle related infrastructure
                          and associated access arrangements.
                          More recently, in 2011, the Australian
                          Government released a discussion paper to
                          inform public debate on priorities and directions
                          for continuing tax reform in the lead-up to the
                          Tax Forum in October 2011. Tax Reform: Next
                          Steps for Australia, outlines a range of issues
                          and proposals that were raised in the Henry Tax
                          Review.




26 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
                        Description                                          Link to the Plan

Container Freight       The Container Freight Improvement Strategy,          The options considered in the Plan will
Improvement Strategy    submitted to IA in 2010, identified four rail        include the removal of the General
(Proposed)              freight proposals for Sydney:                        Holmes Drive Rail Level Crossing
                                                                             recognising the constraint it places on
                         Removal of General Holmes Drive Rail Level
                                                                             the transport network in the Port/Airport
                           Crossing;
                                                                             Precinct.
                         Duplication of Port Botany to Mascot Rail          Planning for a Western Freight Line is
                           Freight Line (last 3km to be duplicated);
                                                                             a long term contribution to sustaining a
                         Protection of Western Freight Line Corridor;       significant shift of container freight
                           and                                               movements to rail through Port Botany.
                         Construction of Western Freight Line.              The Plan will focus on addressing
                        The need for these proposals is premised on          issues related to the SSFL and the
                        additional capacity being required to                Moorebank IMTs as more immediate
                        accommodate increased rail volumes to/from           priorities, but may involve some pre-
                                                                             feasibility assessment of the potential
                        Port Botany to support progress toward the
                        NSW Government’s rail mode share target and          to construct the Western Sydney
                        to get the most out of the seaside infrastructure    Freight Line and develop the Eastern
                                                                             Creek intermodal Terminal.
                        by considering a significant increase in the
                        planning cap of 3.2M TEU per annum at Port
                        Botany. These are considered medium and long
                        term rail freight proposals, with the exception of
                        the General Holmes Drive Level Crossing and
                        potentially the duplication of the remaining
                        single track (which is a complementary project
                        to the level crossing closure).
                        The Port Botany to Mascot Rail Freight Line
                        Upgrade – Stage 2 will significantly increase
                        capacity of the line prior to the opening of the
                        Enfield Intermodal Terminal. It involves signal
                        control separation and the Enfield staging
                        facility. The project is funded through the Nation
                        Building Plan. It is due to be completed in 2012
                        in anticipation of the Enfield Intermodal
                        Terminal serviced by the line becoming
                        operational in 2013.
Joint Program on        The Australian and NSW Governments are               The Plan will assume that Sydney
Aviation Capacity for   currently working together on a Joint Program        Airport will continue to operate as
the Sydney Region       on aviation capacity for the Sydney region.          Sydney’s international and domestic
(Under development)     The Joint Program will consider the short and        airport as guided by the Sydney Airport
                        long term aviation infrastructure and supporting     Master Plan 2009 – 2029 until 2029.
                        surface transport requirements of the Sydney         While the findings of the Joint Program
                        region, and identify strategies and locations to     on Aviation Capacity for the Sydney
                        meet future needs. It will also consider options     Region are not yet known, this
                        for the use of Commonwealth land at Badgerys         assumption is based on the likely lead
                        Creek, which the Australian Government               time it would take to deliver and
                        indicated is no longer an option for an airport.     commence operations of a second
                        The Joint Program will facilitate the                major airport in Sydney.
                        development of an Aviation Strategic Plan
                        which will inform future infrastructure planning
                        and investment by government and industry,
                        and enable the proper integration of future
                        airport operations with surrounding state land
                        use planning and surface transport networks. It
                        is anticipated that the Aviation Strategic Plan
                        will be completed in the latter part of 2011.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 27
2.4.3         Alignment with State plans

NSW 2021 is the NSW Government’s 10-year plan to guide policy and budget decision-making to deliver
on community priorities. The plan will rebuild the economy, return quality services, renovate infrastructure,
strengthen local environment and communities and restore accountability to Government. The goals of
NSW 2021 are supportive of national strategic priorities defined in the IA themes (see next Section).

The Government has developed clear goals for NSW63. These are:

1.        Improve the performance of the NSW economy;
2.        Rebuild State finances;
3.        Drive economic growth in regional NSW;
4.        Increase the competitiveness of doing business in NSW;
5.        Place downward pressure on the cost of living; and
6.        Strengthen the NSW skill base.

Specifically for the transport sector, the goals are related to improving the quality of services:

1.        Reduce travel times;
2.        Grow patronage on public transport by making it a more attractive choice;
3.        Improve customer experience with transport services; and
4.        Improve road safety.

An additional goal that is relevant is Goal 19 – to invest in critical infrastructure.

In addition to supporting the goal of improving the performance of the NSW economy, the proposed Plan is
aligned with all of the transport sector goals and the goal to invest in critical infrastructure. The Plan will
seek to develop an integrated set of transport options within, and connecting to, the precinct and link in
with broader transport and land use plans. It will set out a set of multimodal initiatives to address what is a
very complex and sizeable transport task.

Six of the 32 NSW 2021 goals have been identified as most relevant to the plan. Each of these goals align
in the following way to the outcomes targeted in the Plan (see Section 1.2.2).

NSW 2021 Goal 1: Improve the performance of the NSW economy
The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

      Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
       passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
       for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
      Cater for a broad set of freight, commercial and passenger travel demands in and across the precinct;
      Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
       transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
      Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
       motorway systems;
      Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
       value proposition for rail freight; and
      Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.




63
     NSW Government (2011), NSW 2021 - A Plan to Make NSW Number 1, p.3




28 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
NSW 2021 Goal 7: Reduce Travel Times
The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
    for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport; and
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.

NSW 2021 Goal 8: Grow patronage on public transport by making it a more attractive choice
The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.

NSW 2021 Goal 9: Improve customer experience with transport services
The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
    for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport; and
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.

NSW 2021 Goal 10: Improve Road Safety
The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
    for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
   Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
    value proposition for rail freight;
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced; and
   Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to influence
    travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel.

NSW 2021 Goal 19: Invest in critical infrastructure
The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and safety
    for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
   Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
    transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
   Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
    motorway systems;
   Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
    value proposition for rail freight;
   Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to influence
    travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel; and
   Consider the use of tolling as a mechanism to partially fund future initiatives.




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 29
The Plan supports the actions listed under the target of doubling the proportion of freight moved by rail
through NSW Ports by 2020, which include delivering the third terminal at Port Botany, continuing the
implementation of PBLIS and conducting a detailed assessment of the capacity of the landside
infrastructure.

The NSW Government has also commenced a process of refinancing its Port Botany assets through a
long term lease in order to help fund priority infrastructure projects. The transaction is expected to be
completed in the first half of 2013 and significant progress on the development of solutions to the landside
transport challenges in the precinct is needed in order to ensure that investors have a degree of certainty
and the Government maximises potential value from the transaction.

2.4.4          Alignment with national themes and strategic priorities

The proposed plan of work aligns with three of IA’s seven national infrastructure themes. These themes
provide a framework for action to meet the gaps, deficiencies and bottlenecks in Australia’s infrastructure.

THEME: Competitive international gateways – Developing more effective ports and associated land
transport systems to more efficiently cope with imports and exports; and

THEME: A national freight network – Development of a National Freight Network so that more
freight can be moved by rail and road.
The proposed Plan seeks to develop a more capable and effective transport system to cope with the land
transport task in and around the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct. It will determine a set of demand
side and supply side responses to the transport challenges of the precinct, including recommendations to:

      Address the NSW Government strategic target to double the proportion of container freight movement
       by rail through NSW ports by 2020;
      Improve road conditions in the broader Sydney Airport/Port Botany Precinct;
      Improve east-west connections between Sydney’s international gateways and Western Sydney;
      Respond to the Sydney Airport strategic target to increase public transport mode share by a further 5%
       by 2024 from the current 15% to 20%, with the remaining 80% by road;
      Support the NSW Government’s freight and port strategies and improve rail freight capacity and
       connections and integrate effectively with terminal, warehousing and logistics capabilities in Western
       Sydney;
      Address land transport requirements to support the increase of the current planning approval of a 3.2M
       TEU per annum throughput at Port Botany in view of current trend growth forecasts for Port Botany of
       7.5M 64 TEU by 2030-31; and
      Fully align with the IA ports and freight strategies and other national directions in freight transport.




64
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data




30 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
THEME: Transforming our cities – Increasing public transport capacity in our cities and making
better use of existing transport infrastructure.
The proposed Plan seeks to make better use of existing road infrastructure through both built and non-built
elements. It will identify opportunities around the Port Botany/Sydney Airport Precinct and on the existing
Sydney Motorway Network and metropolitan rail network to:

   Identify opportunities to improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity
    is enhanced;
   Utilise pricing mechanisms to influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and
    alternatives to travel; and
   Utilising tolling as a means of partially funding the initiatives.
Furthermore, the proposed plan’s goals and objectives align with a number of IA’s national strategic
priorities (SP).

SP1 – Expand Australia’s productive capacity
The Plan seeks to provide the necessary transport infrastructure and policy framework to expand the
volume and value of goods and services produced in Australia. In particular, the Plan seeks to support
investment and growth:

   In the Port Botany/Sydney Airport precinct, which focuses on the international trade, business and
    tourism industries; and
   Around the greater Sydney metropolitan region, where employment, industrial, transport and logistics
    activities are able to take advantage of the high level of accessibility and mobility provided by effective
    rail and road connections to the Port/Airport Precinct.

SP2 – Increase Australia’s productivity
The Plan seeks to increase Australia’s productivity by improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the
land side transport system supporting two of Australia’s most important international gateways.

SP5 – Develop our cities and/or regions
The Plan seeks to support the Australian Government’s National Urban Policy for a productive, sustainable
and liveable future by:

   Addressing major congestion on key arterial road routes servicing the precinct;
   Integrating rail freight services with major terminal, warehousing and logistics capabilities in the Sydney
    region;
   Improving access to the wide variety of employment opportunities in and around the Port
    Botany/Sydney Airport precinct; and
   Managing demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to
    influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel.

SP 6 – Reduce green-house emissions
The Plan will seek to address both demand side and supply side options to deal with congestion and as a
result will work to reduce green-house emissions.

The goals and objectives of the proposed Plan align with those set out in key national and state planning
port, land freight and city strategies, including:




           Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 31
National Ports Strategy Objectives and Priorities
   Improving the efficiency of port related freight movements across infrastructure networks; and
   Improving landside efficiency, reliability, security and safety of container ports.

National Land Freight Strategy Discussion Paper Goals
   Improved economic, social and safety outcomes; and
   High productivity vehicle capability and access.

Our Cities, Our Future Objectives
   Improve labour and capital productivity;
   Integrate land use and infrastructure; and
   Improve the efficiency of urban infrastructure.




32 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
3.              Methodology and Outcomes
3.1             Plan Definition
This submission focuses on establishing the transport needs of the precinct and then to develop an initial
plan identifying a package of demand and supply side improvement options, noting:

     The economic significance of the precinct;
     The challenges faced in accommodating growth in freight and general travel around the port and
      airport and the role of the precinct in connecting regions to the north and south of west of Sydney; and
     The wider planning underway in this precinct, including proposals for development of intermodal
      terminals at Moorebank.
The plan methodology developed to deliver this outcome is based on the National Guidelines for Transport
System Management in Australia (ATC 2006). The methodology developed recognises that system
planning for this precinct is an iterative and continuous in nature and that significant investment in existing
infrastructure and systems has already been made or currently in the pipeline (as noted elsewhere in this
submission).

Recognising the specific challenges that will face the Port/Airport precinct, the methodology for the Plan
has been consolidated into the following four phases:

    Phase 1 –                Determine a Preferred Direction for land side transport supporting Port Botany and Sydney
                             Airport over the next 25-30 years, including establishing an integrated evidence base that
                             brings together data on all transport modes in this precinct, undertakes detailed modelling to
                             develop a strategic plan that will enable a range of options to be developed and tested and
                             concept analysis to be undertaken.
    Phase 2 –                Develop a delivery strategy including sequencing of infrastructure and policy initiatives to
                             support delivery of the Preferred Direction. Identify short, medium and long term options.
    Phase 3 –                Identify possible funding sources and the role of the NSW and Australian Governments in
                             implementing the delivery strategy.
    Phase 4 -                Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and concept design.



Phases 1, 2 and 3 will culminate in delivery of the Port Botany/Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan
which is expected to take 18 months (to Mid-2013). Phase 4, which will advance preferred infrastructure
options through the EIS/approvals process, will take another 18 months (to End-2014).

The INSW Strategy Statement will be delivered in April 2012 and It is expected that some key initiatives
will emerge early from the planning process in Phase 1 that will potentially advance into detailed project
scoping, concept design and the approvals process prior to completion of the final Plan. The intent will be
to advance these initiatives towards implementation, subject to normal Government approvals, with a view
to accelerating the delivery of key components of the final set of improvement plans.

The final set of improvement plans across all modes will be approved by the NSW Government having
regard to the State Infrastructure Strategy, Transport Masterplan and other relevant plans.

Each phase is described in turn below.




                Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 33
3.1.1      Phase 1 – Determine a Preferred Direction

The first phase is a planning phase that seeks to establish a Preferred Direction for land side transport
supporting Port Botany and Sydney Airport over the next 25 years. This first phase will involve
identification and evaluation of a series of multi-modal infrastructure and policy initiatives designed to
address the future transport needs of the precinct and surrounding regions.

The proposed process for Phase 1 will include the following steps:

   Create a full data set and evidence base of traffic and freight movements to, from and within the Port
    Botany and Sydney Airport precinct;
   Create a Strategic Transport Model for transport movements in the precinct and link to the broader
    Sydney Transport Model;
   Model different scenarios for freight and other transport movements for Port Botany and Sydney
    Airport. Variables to be included:
    – Various land use scenarios for adjacent precincts;

    – Various land side transport systems supporting the forecast traffic movements (road and rail);

    – Different port development scenarios; and

    – Different Sydney Airport development scenarios.
   Determine the alternative infrastructure and policy options to address future transport needs and to
    support the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct over the next 25 years;
   Undertake a full assessment of the options, including the future role of road and rail in supporting the
    transport needs of the precinct. The assessment of options is to include:
    – Demand analysis and assessment of future needs;

    – Broad identification of infrastructure needed;

    – Broad identification of supporting policy;

    – Strategic cost estimation and engineering risk assessment;

    – Sustainability assessment; and

    – Economic assessment and multi-criteria analysis.
   Determine Preferred Direction including setting of key policy directions in consultation with the
    community; and
   For the Preferred Direction, identify short, medium and long term initiatives.
It is expected that the outputs of the study will provide input to the State Freight Plan and other relevant
plans. Examples include:




34 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Demand side initiatives
   Transport pricing – Road, rail and port pricing to influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode
    choice and alternatives to travel;
   Regulatory reform – Changes to port, airport and rail regulations, particularly flight and freight
    movement restrictions; and
   Supply chain – Decisions made on value of goods and location and utilisation of other supply chain
    infrastructure (truck and train cycle times, warehouse opening hours and capacity, value and time
    sensitivity of goods).

Supply side initiatives
   Increased capacity at Port Botany through the completion and opening of the third stevedoring
    terminal. The total capacity of the two existing terminals and the new third terminal is 13 berths, 3791
    metres of quay line and 149 hectares of terminal area.
   Metropolitan Freight Network Improvements – Including General Holmes Drive Level Crossing,
    Duplication of the last 3 kilometres of the Port Botany Good Line (Port to Mascot), shared
    passenger/freight line works;
   Moorebank Intermodal Precinct – Container freight processing facilities with associated warehousing
    and distribution precinct;
   Eastern Creek Intermodal Terminal – Dependent on construction of the Western Sydney Freight Line
    for servicing;
   Road Based Public Transport – Complementary bus transport network improvements that result from
    opportunities presented by major infrastructure improvements;
   Managed Motorways – Provide infrastructure and intelligent transport systems on the Motorway
    network which will provide priority to vehicles on the Motorways, improving movement of all vehicles,
    including freight and commercial vehicles and access to all key centres around the Motorway network;
   Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct Roads Improvement – Network improvements in the
    Port/Airport Precinct that would both complement and enable major infrastructure elements;
   Road Freight Network Improvements – Freight network improvements beyond the Port/Airport Precinct
    that support access to Western Sydney and complement major infrastructure improvements;
   High Value Vehicle Infrastructure – Dedicated infrastructure including high value vehicle lanes and
    intersection priority where appropriate;
   M5 East enhancement options – Duplication of the M5 East between King Georges Road and Marsh
    Street; and
   M4 Extension options – Extension and improvement of the M4 with connections to Sydney CBD,
    Sydney Airport and Port Botany.

Key Outcomes
The primary outcome of Phase 1 will be:

   The Preferred Direction for the land side transport system servicing the Port Botany/Sydney Airport
    precinct, including :
    – A clear articulation of the future role of road and rail in addressing the transport needs of the
      precinct;

    – Identification of the infrastructure needed; and
    – The setting of key complementary policy and regulatory directions.




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 35
3.1.2      Phase 2 – Develop a delivery strategy

The objective of Phase 2 is to develop an appropriate delivery strategy, including sequencing of
infrastructure and policy initiatives to support delivery of the Preferred Direction. The outcome will be a set
of short, medium and long term initiatives.

The process proposed for Phase 2 will be to:

   Undertake further community and stakeholder consultation regarding the refinement of the initiatives
    and confirming the outcomes of Phase 1;
   Analyse the optimum timing for the individual infrastructure and policy initiatives, taking into
    consideration potential project benefits, stakeholder and community feedback, project
    interdependencies and the broad funding envelope; and
   Assess options to advance medium and longer term projects towards implementation, with a view to
    accelerating the delivery of components of the final set of improvement initiatives when funding
    becomes available.

Key Outcomes
The primary outcome of Phase 2 will be a delivery strategy for the Preferred Direction, including:

   A timeline which sets out short, medium and long term initiatives; and
   A planning program to advance the development of medium and longer term improvement initiatives.

3.1.3      Phase 3 – Identify funding sources

The objective of Phase 3 is to identify possible funding sources and to establish the role of the NSW and
Australian Governments in implementing the delivery strategy.

The analysis will include an assessment of the potential for private financing of specific improvement
initiatives and options for user contributions to the cost of meeting future transport needs. The potential
role of Government financing to de-risk major projects and potential for risk sharing with the private sector
will be addressed.

The funding commitments of both the NSW and Australian Governments to specific initiatives will also be
established in this phase.

Key Outcomes
The primary outcome of Phase 3 will be a funding plan for the Preferred Direction, including the role of the
NSW and Australian governments in funding the various improvement initiatives.

3.1.4      Phase 4 - Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment
           and concept design

The objective of Phase 4 is to undertake a detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and
concept design for the initial road and rail infrastructure initiatives. The work includes preparation of an
Environmental Impact Statement(s) for the preferred improvement initiatives, including all approvals.




36 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
The process proposed for Phase 4 will cover:

   Preparation and submission of a project application to NSW Department of Planning and Infrastructure
    (D&PI);
   Finalise concept design for the preferred initiatives to a stage where an environmental assessment can
    be undertaken including the following tasks:
    – Engineering concept design refinement;

    – Detailed traffic modelling;

    – Tunnel design and ventilation;

    – Geotechnical investigations; and

    – Construction methodology.
   Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) including necessary investigations and community
    engagement. The extent of these investigations will be determined by the NSW Minister for Planning.
    Nevertheless, it is anticipated that the EIS will consider key social and environmental issues arising
    from the project and the identification of measures to mitigate and manage these impacts such:
    – Traffic flows in and around the precinct;

    – Air quality;

    – Noise and vibration;

    – Energy use;

    – Greenhouse gas generation;

    – Contaminated soil and spoil removal; and

    – Visual amenity and urban design.
   The community engagement process would need to be confirmed at the appropriate time but based on
    recent experience is anticipated to cover the following:
    – Distribution of postcards and information brochures to residents and local businesses across
      Sydney;

    – Meetings between the project team and local councils, various industry stakeholders, and
      community groups, to brief them on the proposal, answer queries and provide feedback;

    – A dedicated website and free call information line;

    – Advertisements in Sydney metropolitan papers, local papers, community language papers and
      industry publications, as well as on radio and on websites;

    – Posters in local council offices, community centres and libraries within the local government areas;

    – Community information days throughout the subject area to raise awareness of the project and
      provide the community with an opportunity to speak with project managers about any concerns or
      issues; and

    – Customer engagement with freight forwarders, transport companies and the owners of the import
      and export goods.




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 37
   Submit EIS for determination by the NSW Minister for Planning and Infrastructure; and
   Receive planning approval noting any conditions of consent to take forward during the project delivery
    phase (not considered as part of this submission).

Key Outcomes
The primary outcome of Phase 4 is to progress the set of infrastructure initiatives as far as possible
towards a position where detailed design and construction could commence. This may be achieved
and documented through the following main deliverables:

   Completed Environmental Impact Statement (including for an increased planning approval for
    Port Botany);
   Planning Approval;
   Final Concept Design for the preferred proposals, including necessary features for connection to the
    existing road/rail network and possible future stages; and
   Final cost estimate and completed procurement strategy.




38 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
4.         Funding Requirements
The funding required to support delivery of this submission has been estimated by the NSW Government
at $35 million and it is proposed that the Australian and NSW Governments share the cost of the plan in a
ratio of 80:20 in line with previous IA funding proposals (i.e. a total of $28 million is being sought from the
Australian Government). A breakdown of the preliminary funding requirements for the Project is provided
in Table 6.

Joint funding is being sought from the Australian Government to establish a strong partnership approach to
addressing land transport needs of Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct, from early planning through
to delivery. It is envisaged that the partnership and the methodology proposed will lead to more effective
and accelerated outcomes for the precinct.

Table 5: Project Funding Estimates (Preliminary)

 Phase 1 – Determine a Preferred Direction

  Establish the evidence base, including data collection and surveys                                    1.5M

  Strategic Transport Model development                                                                 1.0M

  Scenario Analysis                                                                                     1.0M

  Option Identification                                                                                 1.0M

  Community/Customer/Stakeholder consultation                                                           1.0M

  Option Analysis and Assessment                                                                        4.0M

  Determine Preferred Direction                                                                         0.5M

 TOTAL                                                                                                $10.0M

 Phase 2 – Develop delivery strategy

  Analyse optimal timing and interdependencies                                                          1.0M

  Further community and stakeholder consultation                                                        0.5M

  Develop a preferred delivery strategy                                                                 0.5M

  Develop planning program to advance medium/long term options towards                                  0.5M
    implementation
 TOTAL                                                                                                  $2.5M

 Phase 3 – Identify funding sources

 TOTAL                                                                                                  $1.0M

 Phase 4 – Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and concept design

  Additional technical investigations and project scoping                                               5.0M

  Concept design for road/rail improvement options                                                      5.0M

  Environmental Impact Statement(s) and approvals                                                      10.0M

  Community/Customer/Stakeholder engagement                                                             1.0M

  Determine procurement strategy                                                                        0.5M

 TOTAL                                                                                                $21.5M
 TOTAL PLAN                                                                                           $35.0M




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 39
The Australian Government has previously provided $5 million and the NSW Government $10 million to
fund the M5 Transport Corridor Feasibility Study. The Australian Government also provided $300 million
for the M4 Extension, which has been reduced to $30 million for use until end of 2013-14. It is proposed
that the Australian Government redirect $28 million of these already allocated funds to fund the plan and
extend the timeframe for use of these funds.

The preliminary cash flow for funding for the plan is shown in Table 7. It is proposed that should IA support
the plan, the Australian and NSW Governments work together on resolving provision of respective
contributions over the period 2011-12 to 2014-15.

From a NSW Government perspective, ensuring significant progress has been made on the landside
transport issues to support the Port Botany refinancing process is an important timing consideration. In
that respect, the intent will be to advance the planning and implementation of certain agreed initiatives in
consultation with the Australian Government over the next 12 months to ensure potential value from the
transaction is maximised.

Table 6: Plan Cash flow funding requirements (Preliminary)

                            2011-12                 2012-13              2013-14         2014-15             TOTAL

 Phase 1                     $5.0M                   $5.0M                                                   $10.0M
 Phase 2                                             $2.5M                                                   $2.5M
 Phase 3                                              0.5M                                                   $0.5M
 Phase 4                                             $2.0M               $10.0M           $10.0M             $22.0M
 TOTAL                       $5.0M                   $10.0M              $10.0M           $10.0M             $35.0M




40 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
5.           Delivery Arrangements
This Section outlines the arrangements proposed to ensure an efficient, robust and effective delivery of the
Plan, covering:

    Plan governance;
    Timetable and key milestones; and
    Stakeholder engagement.


5.1          Plan governance
The high level governance structure for the Plan is set out in Figure 5. The proposed structure is intended
to ensure the project team remains focussed on achieving the Plan objectives whilst providing a
mechanism to ensure direction and regular contact is provided by the Senior Co-ordination Group.
Overarching direction and resolution will be provided by the Steering Committee comprising heads of the
Australian and NSW Government agencies whose role it will be to facilitate constructive inter-agency
cooperation.

Figure 5: Plan Governance Structure

                    Australian and NSW Government Steering Committee

    Role:                                        Participants:
    Manage and report on the Australian and      The Steering Committee will comprise
    NSW Government requirements f or the         the heads of Australian and NSW
    plan. This includes f acilitating            Government agencies and bodies
    constructive inter-agency cooperation        including the Department of Inf rastructure
    and resolution of f undamental policy        and Transport, Inf rastructure Australia,
    decisions.                                   Department of Premier and Cabinet,
    Meeting regularity: Quarterly                Transport f or NSW, Roads and Maritime
                                                 Services and Inf rastructure NSW.




                                  Senior Co-ordination Group

    Role:                                        Participants:
    Determine, direct and co-ordinate work to    The plan co-ordination group will
    deliver the plan, including the technical,   comprise executives and representation
    communication, environmental, and            f rom Department of Inf rastructure and
    stakeholder relationships.                   Transport, Inf rastructure Australia,
    Meeting regularity: Monthly                  Department of Premier and Cabinet,
                                                 Transport f or NSW, Roads and Maritime
                                                 Services and Inf rastructure NSW and the
                                                 Study Project Team.




                                          Plan Team

    Port Botany and Sydney Airport Roads Improvement Plan Team
    Policy and technical expertise including, modal expertise, planners, modelling and
    statistical analysis




            Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Programs | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 41
5.1.1         Steering Committee

The Australian and NSW Governments will both provide representation on the Steering Committee.
It is also intended that both Infrastructure Australia and Infrastructure NSW provide representation
on the Steering Committee. This will ensure that the Plan progresses in a way that aligns with
Infrastructure Australia’s themes and strategic priorities and Infrastructure NSW’s future directions |
as they are developed.

This Committee will meet and be updated on progress quarterly unless specific milestones require
otherwise.

A quarterly progress report will be provided to the Steering Committee at least one week in advance of the
quarterly meetings, and members of the coordination group and key project team members will be
available to provide input to the meetings as required.

The Government Steering Committee participants will be expected to communicate plan progress as
necessary to other relevant government agencies in their jurisdiction.


5.2           Timetable and key milestones
The Plan is being developed in line with standard industry practice, which includes a planning stage
followed by further development and delivery stages. This submission aims to advance the improvement
program for the Port Botany/Sydney Airport precinct from the strategic planning phase through to project
scoping and early definition as illustrated in Figure 6.

Figure 6: Program stages and phases

         Planning stage                      Development stage                             Delivery stage


                                                                                                            Handover
  Strategic         Pre-                                                   Construction
                               Feasibility     Scoping        Definition                  Construction        and
  Planning       Feasibility                                                Readiness
                                 Phase         Phase           Phase                        Phase           Closeout
   Phase           Phase                                                      Phase
                                                                                                             Phase



The key milestones of relevant to the plan are as follows.

 Phase 1 – Determine a Preferred Direction (Planning Stage)                               Complete by:

  Establish the evidence base, including data collection and surveys                     Early/Mid 2012

  Strategic Transport Model development                                                  Mid 2012

  Scenario Analysis                                                                      Mid/Late 2012

  Option Identification                                                                  Mid/Late 2012

  Community/Customer/Stakeholder consultation                                            Early 2013

  Option Analysis and Assessment                                                         Early 2013

  Determine Preferred Direction                                                          Mid 2013




42 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
 Phase 2 – Develop delivery strategy (Planning/Development Stage)                     Complete by:

  Analyse optimal timing and interdependencies                                       Early/Mid 2013

  Further community and stakeholder consultation                                     Early/Mid 2013

  Develop a preferred delivery strategy                                              Mid 2013

  Develop planning program to advance medium/long term options towards               Mid 2013
    implementation

 Phase 3 – Identify funding sources

  Delivery of Draft Port Botany Transport Improvement Plan                           Mid 2013

 Phase 4 – Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and concept design (Development Stage)

  Additional technical investigations and project scoping                            End 2013

  Concept design for road/rail improvement options                                   End 2013

  Environmental Impact Statement(s) and approvals                                    Mid 2014

  Community/Customer/Stakeholder engagement                                          End 2014

  Determine procurement strategy                                                     End 2014


5.3        Stakeholder engagement
This Plan’s success will depend on effective engagement with key stakeholders across government bodies
and agencies, industry and the community. Key stakeholders and the proposed lines of communication are
shown in Figure 7 below.

It is proposed that the planning team coordinate and undertake the primary stakeholder engagement
activities. Input and facilitation from the Australian and NSW Government Steering Committee will be
required with respect to high level policy implementation issues.




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 43
Figure 7: Stakeholder Engagement

        Inf rastructure Australia         Australian Government               NSW Government            Inf rastructure NSW




                                                             Steering Committee




                                                         Senior Co-ordination Group




                                    Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program Team




    NSW Government                      Inf rastructure/Transport             Other Community,
    Agencies:                           Authorities:                        Customer and Industry       Regional Councils
    • Transport f or NSW                • Sydney Ports Authority                   Groups
    • NSW Treasury                      • Sydney Airport
    • State Transit Authority             Corporation Ltd
    • Roads and Maritime                • Australian Rail Track
      Services                            Authority
    • Department of Planning            • NRMA
      and Inf rastructure               • Organisation of Peak
    • Of f ice of Environment             Transport Groups
      and Heritage
    • Department of Trade
      and Investment
      Regional Inf rastructure
      and Service


5.3.1             Key Government and Non-Government Agencies, Bodies & Peak Groups

Given the national and state significant of Port Botany and Sydney Airport, and the complexity of transport
needs in the Study Area, engagement with a wide range of key government and non-government
agencies, bodies and peak groups will be required. An indicative list of such stakeholders includes:

       Sydney Ports Corporation
       Sydney Airport Corporation Limited
       Australian Rail Track Corporation
       Department of Planning and Infrastructure
       Department of Environment and Heritage
       Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Development and Services
       State Transit Authority
       NSW Treasury
       Peak Transport Groups
       Road Freight Operators
       Rail Freight Operators
       Intermodal Terminal Operators




44 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Empty Container Park Operators
     Freight forwarders and owners of freight
     Transport companies
     NSW Roads and Motoring Association
     Community Groups
     Regional Organisations of Councils
These stakeholders will be engaged on an as-needs basis. Early engagement will be established through
a series of briefings to inform stakeholders of the scope, intent and timeframes of this planning work and
opportunities for input. Stakeholder participation will be sought for key workshops most notably around
problem definition, needs identification and options development.

5.3.2         The Community

The NSW Government recognises that the proper planning and analytical work that underpins major
infrastructure investments and new policy directions benefit from regular stakeholder and community
engagement. The work components will involve community engagement particularly against key
milestones:

    Late 2012 - Early 2013            Consultation regarding infrastructure and policy options to meet the transport
                                      needs of the precinct

    Mid 2013 - Late 2013              Consultation on the draft Transport Improvement Plan
    Early 2014 - Mid 2014             Display of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement



In addition to the above there will be regular community updates, a dedicated project website for the Port
Botany/Sydney Airport Precinct Transport Improvement Plan and a dedicated information line during
preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement.




             Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 45
Appendix A   Reform and investment
             framework templates
Contents
Proposal Summary                  51

Stage 1: Goal Definition          55

Stage 2: Problem Identification   60

Stage 3: Problem Assessment       68

Stage 4: Problem Analysis         79

Stage 5: Option Generation        87

Stage 6: Options Assessment       93
Proposal Summary
Study Name:                                Port Botany /Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan
Location (State/Region(or City)/           NSW, Sydney
Locality):
Name of Proponent Entity:                  Transport for NSW
Contact (Name, Position, phone/e-mail):    Carolyn McNally
                                           Deputy Director General
                                           Planning and Programs
                                           Transport for NSW
                                           T 02 82022013
                                           M 0417686522
                                           E. Carolyn.McNally@transport.nsw.gov.au
Description of the Plan:
The size, complexity and economic significance of the landside transport challenges in the Port Botany
and Sydney precinct (see focus area in Figure 1 below) requires a joint response by the NSW and
Australian Governments. Addressing these challenges to ensure efficient and effective movement of
people and freight within the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct and between the precinct and
other regions is critical to the State’s and the nation’s economies, productivity growth and on-going
investment.

The NSW Government proposal is for the development of a Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport
Improvement Plan (“The Plan”) to comprehensively address the future land side transport challenges
affecting these important international gateways. The proposed planning work will consolidate and build
upon previous studies that have focused on addressing land transport issues in and around this
precinct. It will examine in detail the relationships between the two key gateways, the freight task, the
passenger task, rail, road and intermodal planning and the capacity of the transport system to support a
wide range of transport needs in an environment where there are already high levels of congestion and
significant projected future growth. The Plan will detail the transport strategy for the precinct over the
next 25-30 years, in particular the future role of rail, road and bus, recommend a set of short, medium
and long term multimodal solutions, a proposed delivery strategy and possible funding sources. The
transport strategy will also drive the development of mode specific road and rail improvement plans.

The scoping of options requires high quality planning, economic, engineering and environmental
analysis in order to establish a well-developed set of recommendations to take forward to community
consultation and ultimately to implementation.




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 51
    Theme alignment
    The proposed plan of work aligns with three of IA’s seven national infrastructure themes.
    These themes provide a framework for action to meet the gaps, deficiencies and bottlenecks in
    Australia’s infrastructure.

    THEME: Competitive international gateways – Developing more effective ports and associated
    land transport systems to more efficiently cope with imports and exports; and

    THEME: A national freight network – Development of a National Freight Network so that more
    freight can be moved by rail and road.

    The proposed Plan seeks to develop a more capable and effective transport system to cope with the
    land transport task in and around the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct. It will determine a set of
    demand side and supply side responses to the transport challenges of the precinct, including
    recommendations to:

       Address the NSW Government strategic target to double the proportion of container freight
        movement by rail through NSW ports by 2020;
       Improve road conditions in the broader Sydney Airport/Port Botany Precinct;
       Improve east-west connections between Sydney’s international gateways and Western Sydney;
       Respond to the Sydney Airport strategic target to increase public transport mode share by a further
        5% by 2024 from the current 15% to 20%, with the remaining 80% by road;
       Support the NSW Government’s freight and port strategies and improve rail freight capacity and
        connections and integrate effectively with terminal, warehousing and logistics capabilities in Western
        Sydney; and
       Address land transport requirements to support the increase of the current planning approval of a
        3.2M TEU per annum throughput at Port Botany in view of current trend growth forecasts for Port
        Botany of 7.5M1 TEU by 2030-31.
    THEME: Transforming our cities – Increasing public transport capacity in our cities and making
    better use of existing transport infrastructure.

    The proposed Plan seeks to make better use of existing road infrastructure through both built and non-
    built elements. It will identify opportunities around the Port Botany/Sydney Airport Precinct and on the
    existing Sydney Motorway Network and metropolitan rail network to:

       Identify opportunities to improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity
        is enhanced;
       Utilise pricing mechanisms to influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and
        alternatives to travel; and
       Utilising tolling as a means of partially funding the initiatives.




1
    Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data




52 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Pipeline category nominated by            To be determined with Infrastructure Australia. Note: M5 East
proponent (please indicate one            was previously identified as having “Real Potential” and the M4
category only):                           Extension at an “Early Stage”.

Capital Cost of Plan by Proponent         Unknown as preferred transport improvement initiatives are yet
($M, nominal, undiscounted):              to be identified.

Commonwealth contribution sought          $28 million of development funding over the period 2012/13-
by Proponent, and cash flow in            2014/15.
financial years – including any
                                          The Australian Government previously provided $300 million for
requests for project development
                                          the M4 Extension, which has been reduced to $30 million for use
funding ($M, nominal,
                                          until end of 2013/14. It is proposed that this funding be re-
undiscounted):
                                          allocated to support the development of the Plan.

                                          Precise cash flow to be determined in consultation with IA
                                          having regard to the NSW Government contribution.

Other funding (source/amount/cash         The NSW Government will contribute $7 million to support the
flow) ($M, nominal, undiscounted):        development of the Plan.

BCR by Proponent excluding Wider          To be determined upon resolution of project scoping.
Economic Benefits

High level development and
implementation program

Recognising the specific challenges that will face the Port/Airport precinct, the methodology for
development of the Plan has been consolidated into four phases:

Phase 1 –      Determine a Preferred Direction for land side transport supporting Port Botany and
               Sydney Airport over the next 25-30 years, including establishing an integrated evidence
               base that brings together data on all transport modes in this precinct, undertakes detailed
               modelling to develop a strategic plan that will enable a range of options to be developed
               and tested and concept analysis to be undertaken.

Phase 2 –      Develop a delivery strategy including sequencing of infrastructure and policy initiatives to
               support delivery of the Preferred Direction. Identify short, medium and long term options.

Phase 3 –      Identify possible funding sources and the role of the NSW and Australian Governments in
               implementing the delivery strategy.

Phase 4 –      Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and concept design for
               initial road and rail infrastructure initiatives.

The first three phases of work (planning, delivery strategy and funding) will culminate in delivery of the
Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan which is expected to take 18 months (to
Mid-2013). Phase 4, which will advance preferred infrastructure options through the EIS/approvals
process, will take another 18 months (to End-2014).




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 53
 The significance of this precinct to the State is evidenced by the Government asking INSW to develop a
 Strategy Statement for the Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct as an early priority for the new
 infrastructure agency.

 INSW’s Strategy Statement will be delivered in April 2012 and it is expected that some key initiatives will
 emerge early from the planning process in Phase 1 that will potentially advance into detailed project
 scoping, concept design and the approvals process prior to completion of the final Plan. The intent will
 be to advance these initiatives towards implementation, subject to normal government approvals, with a
 view to accelerating the delivery of key components of the final set of improvement plans.

 Confidentiality
 Suitable for public release.


 Figure 1: Port Botany /Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan – Focus Area




54 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
    Stage 1: Goal Definition

    Goal Statements
    NSW 2021 is the NSW Government’s 10-year plan to guide policy and budget decision-making to
    deliver on community priorities. The plan will rebuild the economy, return quality services, renovate
    infrastructure, strengthen local environment and communities and restore accountability to Government.
    The goals of NSW 2021 are supportive of national strategic priorities defined in the IA themes
    (see next Section).
    The Government has developed clear goals for NSW2. These are to:

    1.       Improve the performance of the NSW economy;
    2.       Rebuild State finances;
    3.       Drive economic growth in regional NSW;
    4.       Increase the competitiveness of doing business in NSW;
    5.       Place downward pressure on the cost of living; and
    6.       Strengthen the NSW skill base.

    Specifically for the transport sector, the goals are related to improving the quality of services:

    7.       Reduce travel times;
    8.       Grow patronage on public transport by making it a more attractive choice;
    9.       Improve customer experience with transport services; and
    10.      Improve road safety.

    An additional goal that is relevant is Goal 19 – to invest in critical infrastructure.

    In addition to supporting the goal of improving the performance of the NSW economy, the proposed
    Plan is aligned with all of the transport sector goals and the goal to invest in critical infrastructure. The
    Plan will seek to develop an integrated set of transport options within, and connecting to, the precinct
    and link in with broader transport and land use plans. It will set out a set of multimodal initiatives to
    address what is a very complex and sizeable transport task.

    Objective Statements
    The objectives of The NSW Government’s Port Botany/Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan
    are to prepare an evidence base and to then develop and test a series of transport improvement options
    covering the next 25-30 years that:

         Determine the most efficient and appropriate land side transport system to support Port Botany and
          Sydney Airport, including defining of the role of road and rail;
         Ensure that the Port Botany and Sydney Airport land transport system is compatible with, supports
          and provides synergy with the broader transport system;
         Identify and sequence key infrastructure and policy initiatives to implement the preferred direction for
          land side transport serving the precinct; and
         Consider possible funding sources.
    Meeting these objectives and implementing the Plan is expected to:

         Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
          passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and
          safety for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;


2
    NSW Government (2011), NSW2021 – A Plan to Make NSW Number One, p.3




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 55
 Stage 1: Goal Definition

    Cater for a broad set of freight, commercial and passenger travel demands in and across the
     precinct, including:
     - Time sensitive, high value, and/or short haul freight to/from Port Botany and Sydney Airport

     - High value business travel and/or travel with heavy luggage to/from Sydney Airport

     - Employee travel to the Port/Airport (e.g. shift workers)

     - General freight task

     - Commercial travel which involves travel with tools of trade and/or travel to multiple addresses

     - Commuter travel task to jobs located outside of centres

     - Personal travel which involves multiple purposes and/or destinations;
    Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
     transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
    Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
     motorway systems;
    Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
     value proposition for rail freight;
    Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced;
    Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to
     influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel; and
    Consider the use of tolling as a mechanism to partially fund future initiatives.
 These objectives align with the targets set in the NSW Government’s NSW 2021 – A Plan to Make NSW
 Number One – September 2011.

 Goal and Objective Alignment
 Six of the 32 NSW 2021 goals have been identified as most relevant to the plan. Each of these goals
 align in the following way to the outcomes targeted in the Plan.
 NSW 2021 Goal 1: Improve the performance of the NSW economy

 The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

    Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
     passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and
     safety for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
    Cater for a broad set of freight, commercial and passenger travel demands in and across the
     precinct;
    Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
     transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
    Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
     motorway systems;
    Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
     value proposition for rail freight; and
    Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.




56 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 1: Goal Definition
NSW 2021 Goal 7: Reduce Travel Times

The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and
    safety for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport; and
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.
NSW 2021 Goal 8: Grow patronage on public transport by making it a more attractive choice

The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcome:

   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.
NSW 2021 Goal 9: Improve customer experience with transport services

The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and
    safety for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport; and
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced.
NSW 2021 Goal 10: Improve Road Safety

The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and
    safety for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
   Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
    value proposition for rail freight;
   Improve road based public transport where road infrastructure capacity is enhanced; and
   Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to
    influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel.
NSW 2021 Goal 19: Invest in critical infrastructure

The Plan aligns to this goal by targeting the following transport outcomes:

   Improve the performance of the motorway network, road-based public transport, metropolitan
    passenger rail and freight rail services by enhancing capacity, access, efficiency, reliability and
    safety for freight, commercial and passenger travel to Port Botany and Sydney Airport;
   Provide appropriate priority and facilities for high value freight and commercial travel on Sydney’s
    transport system, including higher mass limits and over height vehicles in specific circumstances;
   Make better use of the existing road network and improve its operations by utilising managed
    motorway systems;
   Integrate rail-based distribution networks serving the precinct and facilitate an improved competitive
    value proposition for rail freight;
   Manage demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to
    influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel; and
   Consider the use of tolling as a mechanism to partially fund future initiatives.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 57
 Stage 1: Goal Definition
 The Plan supports the actions listed under the target of doubling the proportion of freight moved by rail
 through NSW Ports by 2020, which include delivering the third terminal at Port Botany, continuing the
 implementation of PBLIS and conducting a detailed assessment of the capacity of the landside
 infrastructure.

 The proposed Plan’s goals and objectives align with a number of IA’s national strategic priorities (SP).
 SP1 – Expand Australia’s productive capacity

 The Plan seeks to provide the necessary transport infrastructure and policy framework to expand the
 volume and value of goods and services produced in Australia. In particular, the Plan seeks to support
 investment and growth:

    In the Port Botany/Sydney Airport precinct, which focuses on the international trade, business and
     tourism industries; and
    Around the greater Sydney metropolitan region, where employment, industrial, transport and
     logistics activities are able to take advantage of the high level of accessibility and mobility provided
     by effective rail and road connections to the Port/Airport precinct.
 SP2 – Increase Australia’s productivity

 The Plan seeks to increase Australia’s productivity by improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the
 land side transport system supporting two of Australia’s most important international gateways.

 SP5 – Develop our cities and/or regions

 The Plan seeks to support the Australian Governments National Urban Policy for a productive,
 sustainable and liveable future by:

    Addressing major congestion on key arterial road routes servicing the precinct;
    Integrating rail freight services with major terminal, warehousing and logistics capabilities in the
     Sydney region;
    Improving access to the wide variety of employment opportunities in and around the Port
     Botany/Sydney Airport precinct; and
    Managing demand for travel on the transport network by reviewing transport pricing policies to
     influence travel decisions around time of travel, mode choice and alternatives to travel.
 SP 6 – Reduce green-house emissions

 The Plan will seek to address both demand side and supply side options to deal with congestion and as
 a result will work to reduce green-house emissions.

 The goals and objectives of the proposed Plan align with those set out in key national and state
 planning port, land freight and city strategies, including:




58 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 1: Goal Definition
National Ports Strategy Objectives and Priorities

   Improving the efficiency of port related freight movements across infrastructure networks; and
   Improving landside efficiency, reliability, security and safety of container ports.
National Land Freight Strategy Discussion Paper Goals
   Improved economic, social and safety outcomes; and
   High productivity vehicle capability and access.
Our Cities, Our Future Objectives

   Improve labour and capital productivity;
   Integrate land use and infrastructure; and
   Improve the efficiency of urban infrastructure.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 59
    Stage 2: Problem Identification

    Problem Identification: Current issues
    The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct, covering an approximate radius of 6 km, encompass two of
    Australia’s most significant international gateways:

       Sydney Airport is Australia’s largest international airport, accounting for:
        - 46% of international air passenger journeys3;

        - 23% of domestic air passenger journeys4; and

        - 50% of international air freight5.
       Port Botany is Australia’s second largest container port:
        - Handled 2 million twenty foot equivalent (TEU) containers in 2010-116 or around one-third of
          annual containerised freight into and out of Australia7.
    The precinct also has a key role in connecting regions to the north and south west of Sydney.
    The key east-west corridors supporting these gateways, the M4 and M5 corridors, together contain
    almost one-third of Sydney’s population and almost half of Sydney’s jobs. The east-west corridors are
    also critically important for the State’s major intermodal freight supply chains, particularly for international
    freight, with an increasing concentration of industrial, warehousing and freight distribution networks in
    Sydney’s west.

    There is currently a heavy reliance on road-based transport to service the needs of the precinct.
    Congestion is causing the current land transport access issues for the Port Botany and Sydney Airport
    precinct and the regional connections linking these two international gateways to population centres and
    to critically important intermodal freight supply chains. This is affecting productivity, sustainability and
    liveability of Sydney and potentially compromising future investment and economic growth.

    The ability of the Port to tranship containers is currently higher than the ability of the land transport
    system to clear the cargo from the terminals and adjacent container depots. Similarly, the management
    of empty containers through the land side transport system is a critical issue affecting supply chain
    efficiency. Sydney Ports Corporation is delivering the Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy
    (PBLIS) and through the development of PBLIS a number of operational issues and capacity issues
    have been identified. These issues include: lack of capacity at intermodal terminals, capacity constraints
    in stevedore windows and rail operator processes, as well as a lack of capacity for train paths on the rail
    network8.




3
    Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.50
4
    Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.50
5
    Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.73
6
    Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Upublished Data
7
 Total container trade in 2009/10 for ports of Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Fremantle, Adelaide was 5,768,095 TEU's. Source: Bureau
of Transport and Regional Economics (2011), Australian Infrastructure Statistics Yearbook 2011, Canberra ACT, Table 7.8 p.102
8
    Sydney Ports Corporation: Port Botany Supply Chain Efficiency, presentation, September 2011.




60 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 2: Problem Identification
     A recent study by Booz & Company for TTF suggested there is a major risk that land transport
     constraints may inhibit continued growth in aviation activity at Sydney airport which ultimately will have a
     negative flow on effect to the NSW and Australian Economies9. The interaction with Port traffic also
     exacerbates the situation as an increasing number of port container truck movements to and from Port
     Botany will further reduce the serviceability of the current road network especially around the domestic
     terminal10. Additionally, Sydney Airport operates under a curfew which restricts flights between 11pm and
     6am and therefore limits opportunities to spread landside access to Sydney Airport beyond extended
     peak and business hours.

     The Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics (BTRE) estimated the cost of avoidable congestion in
     Sydney at $3.6 billion in 2006 ($1.7 billion business, $1.8 billion private vehicles), and at $5.2 billion in
     2011 ($2.7 billion business, $2.5 billion private vehicles)11. Apart from additional travel time, the cost of
     congestion includes higher vehicle operating costs and extra air pollution. These factors impact both
     freight and passenger costs of travel and negatively influence the competitiveness of Sydney as an
     international centre.

     Problem identification: Future scenarios
     The landside access problems will be exacerbated by the expected growth in freight and travel demand
     in the region.

     1.      Growth in Population and Employment

     Sydney is a vibrant growing city. By 2036, Sydney’s population is forecast to grow by an additional 1.7
     million people to reach a total of 6 million residents12. The number of jobs is forecast to grow by an
     additional 760,000 jobs, to total 2.8 million13. This will inevitably grow demand for travel and place
     pressure on the already heavily congested road network.

     In the next decade alone an additional 1.3 million vehicle driver trips, 360,000 vehicle passenger trips,
     126,000 bus trips and 15,000 taxi trips are forecast on the Sydney road network as shown in Table 1.
     The combined additional 1.8 million trips on the Sydney road network (77%) compares to an additional
     9% of the growth in trips that are forecast by rail and 11% by walking or cycling14.




9
    Booz & Company, Accessing our Airports (2011), a Report prepared for Tourism & Transport Forum, p40
10
     Booz & Company (2011), op-cit, p40
11
  Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics (BTRE) (2007), Estimating Urban Traffic and Congestion Cost Trends for Australian
Cities: Working Paper 71, p.13
12
     NSW Department of Planning (2010), Metropolitan Plan for Sydney 2036, p.5
13
     NSW Department of Planning (2010), Metropolitan Plan for Sydney 2036, p.5
14
     NSW Government (2010), Metropolitan Transport Plan: Connecting the City of Cities, p.15




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 61
     Stage 2: Problem Identification


     Table 1: Historic and forecast growth of the North West Subregion

           Mode                   2010                      2020                  Additional trips   % total

          Vehicle               10,471                     11,814                     1,343            56
           driver
          Vehicle                4,563                     4,921                       358             15
         passenger
           Bus                   1,139                     1,265                       126             5




           Taxi                   139                       154                         15             <1
           Train                  989                      1,211                       222             9
           Ferry                   40                        38                         (2)             -
         Walk only               3,529                     3,790                       261             11
           Cycle                  159                       171                         12            <1
           Other                  164                       227                         63             3
          TOTAL                 21,193                     23,591                     2,398           100
     Source: Metropolitan Transport Plan 2010, p.15


     In the combined M4 Corridor (5 kilometres wide spanning from Penrith to the CBD/Port/Airport) and M5
     Corridor (5 kilometres wide spanning from Campbelltown to Sydney Airport/Port Botany) population is
     forecast to grow by around 480,000 people (28% of population growth) and jobs by 377,000 (50% of new
     jobs) by 2036 (from a 2006 base)15. Given the strategic role these two corridors play in the Sydney road
     network, they will draw demand well beyond their 5 kilometre corridor catchments. For instance, Western
     Sydney, which is served by both the M5 and M4 corridors is forecast to accommodate half of Sydney’s
     population and half of its jobs by 203616.

     Some of the key growth area precincts that influence travel demands in the area between Port Botany,
     Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west include:

         Green Square – around 1,700 dwellings have been built over the last 5 years and another 11,000 are
          planned over the next 20 years. There are currently around 8,000 jobs and this is forecast to grow to
          around 14,000 in the same timeframe. Given the relatively high density of population and jobs around
          Green Square, it is and will continue to be both an origin and destination for rail.
         Redfern Waterloo – Construction of around 2,000 new dwellings is planned and there is potential for
          around 18,000 jobs up from the current 4,000 jobs. This would see Redfern develop as a major
          destination for rail passengers accessing jobs adding to the dominant university student market at
          Redfern Station.




15
     Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011)
16
     NSW Department of Planning (2010), Metropolitan Plan for Sydney 2036, p.14




62 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 2: Problem Identification

         Mascot Station Precinct – the 5 kilometres around Mascot Station has been identified as a future
          Town Centre by the Department of Planning with potential to intensify employment and housing. It is
          estimated that the precinct should generate about 1,750 additional jobs in the
          commercial/warehousing precinct and 3,000 new dwellings. Mascot has recently benefited from the
          removal of the rail station access fee. Destination trips are likely to remain fairly constant given the
          availability of parking in Mascot.
         Western Sydney Employment Area – Located at the junction of the M7 and M4 Motorway, the
          Western Sydney Employment Hub currently contains 1,500 hectares of zoned industrial land and has
          the potential to generate more than 1,000 hectares of additional employment land. In particular,
          distribution centres for major companies that import goods from overseas are attracted to the location
          because of its high accessibility at the junction of the two motorways. The area has low employment
          densities, but will host up to 40,000 jobs.
         Intensification of employment lands along the M5 Corridor – Land along the M5 Corridor is being
          protected to enable the enhancement of employment lands in close proximity to the motorway.
          Protection of employment lands is required to preserve the M5 Corridor for potential important
          industrial areas and avoid rezonings for conversion to residential uses. The major strategic areas of
          Milperra, Bankstown Airport, Moorebank, Ingleburn, Minto and Campbelltown along with the Port and
          Airport provide potential for agglomeration of transport and distribution activities along the M5
          corridor.
         South West Growth Centre (SWGC) – around 110,000 dwellings housing around 300,000 people
          are planned over the next 25-30 years. They will be serviced by new stations at Edmondson Park
          and Leppington. A relatively small proportion of residents in the SWGC is expected to access jobs
          areas best served by rail notably the Redfern-CBD-North Shore corridor given the travel distance.
          Further, a significant proportion of the likely labour market will typically work in industries outside of
          centres and so the jobs will be poorly accessible by train and bus based forms of travel.
     2.      Growth in Freight and Commercial Travel

     In line with population and employment growth, freight and commercial trips are also forecast to grow
     between Sydney Airport, Port Botany and Sydney’s west. This comprises a wide range of sectors all of
     which are road based – food and beverages, household goods, fuel, building materials, trade deliveries,
     health supplies, waste and recycling, parcels and mail, etc.

     The NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics forecast the following broad trends across Sydney in relation to
     Heavy Vehicles (HV) and Light Commercial Vehicles (LCV)17:
         HV movements in Sydney are forecast to increase by 2.2% per annum between 2006 and 2036,
          faster than Light Commercial Vehicle (LCV) trips which are predicted to grow by 1.1% per year;
         The growth in LCV movements is on par with the expected increase in population (1.1%) and
          employment (1.0%) per year;
         The number of trips made by rigid trucks on an average weekday is expected to grow from 227,000
          to 430,000 between 2006 and 2036 or 2.2% per annum, the same rate as articulated truck
          movements which will grow from 61,000 in 2006 to 117,000 in 2036; and
         LCV trips are expected to rise at half the growth rate of heavy vehicle trips from 1,190,000 in 2006
          to 1,651,000 trips in 2036.



17
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2010), Freight Movements in Sydney, p.1




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 63
     Stage 2: Problem Identification
     In relation to the geographic distribution of these trips, the Bureau of Transport Statistics (BTS)
     identifies that:

         Sydney Airport/Port Botany, the broader Ports Precinct (Mascot/Botany) and industrial parks across
          Sydney are among those that generate the highest volumes of heavy truck movements;
         Between 2006 and 2036, Blacktown South-West, Fairfield-West, Penrith-East, Liverpool-East and
          Blacktown South-East are the areas which will experience the highest growth in heavy vehicle trips;
         LCV movements tend to occur around commercial centres and are more spread than heavy vehicle
          trips. There are high concentrations of LCV trips in Sydney-Inner, Warringah, Ryde, Parramatta-Inner
          and Blacktown South-East; and
         Sydney-Inner, Camden, Blacktown-North, Liverpool-East and Sydney-South are expected to attract
          the largest increases in LCV movements between 2006 and 2036.
     Servicing these areas, which will have an increased role in servicing Sydney’s freight and commercial
     needs, are dependent on an efficient motorway and arterial network, most notably in the bounds of the
     Study Area.

     3.      Growth in Port Botany demand

     Australia’s total freight task is expected to treble by 205018. Government will need to support substantial
     new investment and policy reform and provide incentives for private sector investment to meet this task.

     Sydney is a key international gateway for freight and Australia’s largest city. Transport has a key role in
     linking manufacturers to their markets and individuals to their employment, goods, services and social
     opportunities. Ensuring suitable space in employment areas linked to good freight transport connections
     will be vital to Sydney’s economic growth.

     Port Botany accounts for almost all containerised freight in NSW. Analysis of import data has indicated
     that 85% of containers are destined for area within 40 kilometres of Port Botany in metropolitan Sydney,
     and the vast majority for consumption by Sydney residents. An efficient freight network is required to
     accommodate containerised transport in Sydney and will assist in increasing regional and interstate rail
     freight movements.

     The port Import/Export (IMEX) container trade largely involves the transport of IMEX containers between
     Port Botany and suburban distribution centres and customer locations by road direct or between Port
     Botany and a number of intermodal terminals by rail. There is typically a short haul road movement
     between the rail intermodal terminal and the origin/destination of the freight. A breakdown of Port Botany
     throughput is shown in Table 2 below.




18
     IBISWorld (2008), “Transport Infrasructure 2050”, prepared for Infrastructure Partnerships Australia




64 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 2: Problem Identification


     Table 2: Port Botany Container Throughput 2008-09

                                         TEU Equivalent                      % split
                                             (000)

      Import                                   772                              43
      Export                                   335                              19
      Empty                                    435                              24
      Transhipment                             242                              15
      TOTAL                                   1,784                            100
     Source: Sydney Ports Corporation (2011b) Container Movement Information. Unpublished Data.

     The significant growth observed in Port Botany throughput in recent years is expected to continue in the
     future as the population and economy of Sydney continue to grow. The historical growth rate of Port
     Botany throughput has averaged 7.0% per annum over the last 15 years. At current growth rates, the
     3.2M TEU cap (which is the maximum throughput for which Port Botany has planning approval) is likely
     to be reached by around 2017-1819. The recent $1 billion investment in the third terminal at Port Botany
     has created seaside infrastructure that can handle significantly higher volumes of throughput. Under
     Sydney Ports Corporation’s “Likely Growth” scenario, 7.5M TEU would be reached by 2030-3120.

     In recognition of the strategic challenge and the growth at Port Botany places on the transport network,
     the NSW Government has set a mode share target of doubling the proportion of containers moved by rail
     through NSW Ports by 2020. In practical terms this means increasing rail’s mode share of containers
     through Port Botany to 28% by 202021. Even with this target being achieved, the road task will double by
     2020-21 and more than treble by 2030-31. Demand for travel between Port Botany and Western Sydney
     will continue to grow as industrial, warehousing and distribution centres intensify in Sydney’s outskirts.

     Table 3: 2010-11 Trade and Mode Split and "Likely Growth" Trade Scenarios and Mode Split Target for
     2020-21 and 2030-31

         Financial        Total Trade        Total Trade        Rail mode            Rail         Road mode          Rail
           Year           (000 TEU)           excluding           split           (000 TEU)          split        (000 TEU)
                                            Transhipment
                                             (000 TEU)

      2010-11                 2,006             1,802              14%                 252             86%           1,550


      2020-21                 3,879             3,625              28%               1,015             72%           2,610


      2030-31                 7,465             7,165              28%               2,006             72%           5,159
     Source: Sydney Ports Corporation (2011b) Container Movement Information. Unpublished Data.




19
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
20
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data
21
  Based on 2010/11 14% rail mode share for containers through Port Botany. Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement
and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 65
     Stage 2: Problem Identification
     Achieving the targeted 28% mode share on rail by 2020 will require changes and improvements to
     stimulate demand for transport by rail as well as increasing the supply of intermodal and line-haul rail
     capacity in Western Sydney. The operation of the Enfield Intermodal Terminal and the markets it
     ultimately serves when it opens in 2013 will be a first step to achieving that target. The successful roll out
     of Enfield will provide an increase in the rail mode share and re-establish rail’s viability in the urban import
     market. This will in turn support future investments in Moorebank and potentially Eastern Creek
     intermodal precincts.

     The rail freight logistics chain is inherently complex and requires coordination of many parties including
     shipping lines, stevedores, rail transport providers, rail infrastructure providers, intermodal terminal
     operators and empty container park operators. Developing a Plan that delivers an improved competitive
     value proposition for rail transport will be the key to achieving the mode shift target and relieving
     pressures on Sydney’s roads.

     4.      Growth in Sydney Airport demand

     The quantum of growth at Sydney Airport is significant. The current Sydney Airport Master Plan
     forecasts22:

         Moving an additional 46 million air passengers in 2029, increasing from 33 million in 2009 to 79
          million in 2029. This represents an additional average of 126,000 passengers per day, plus additional
          employees and “meeters and greeters”;
         Moving an additional 480,000 tonnes of air freight in 2029, increasing from 595,000 tonnes in 2009 to
          1,100,000 tonnes in 2029;
         Generating an estimated 100,000 additional jobs over the next ten years associated with increased
          passenger, freight, retail and commercial business. This is a significant addition to Sydney Airport’s
          current provision or generation of more than 75,000 jobs and about 131,000 jobs indirectly, making a
          total of around 206,000 full-time equivalent jobs; and
         Accommodating up to a total of 240,000 square meters of commercial space, including 25,000 square
          metres of general retail space, at both the International and Domestic airport precincts.
     Landside access is a key issue given the co-location of Sydney Airport with other intense developments
     in the Port Botany/Sydney Airport to CBD Corridor. These include significant urban renewal
     developments at Green Square, Redfern-Waterloo and Mascot. The existing industrial activities located
     in the broader Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct are also intense trip generators and directly
     service both the Airport and Port. In the case of Sydney Airport, this includes catering of flights,
     maintenance of aircraft and servicing expanding retail and commercial operations.

     In 2005, rail had 11% mode share of trips to and from the Airport, bus had 4%, mini bus had 10% and taxi
     25%, as shown in Figure 2. Sydney Airport has sought to increase the public transport mode share by a
     further 5% by 2029, up from 15% (11% rail and 4% bus) in 2005 to 20%23. With the quantum of growth at
     the Airport the relatively modest targeted increase in mode share will still result in a significant increase in
     demand on the Airport Rail Line and Airport bus services. Conversely, the quantum of airport growth will
     have a far greater impact on the already heavily congested surrounding road network system given the
     size of the existing task.




22
     Sydney Airport Corporation Ltd (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.2,73,97-98
23
     Sydney Airport Corporation Limited (2009), Sydney Airport Masterplan 2009, p.89




66 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 2: Problem Identification


Figure 2: Mode share access for Sydney Airport, 2005




                                                                                Rental
                                                                                Car Drop Off
                                                                                Park Car
                                                                                Other
                                                                                Bus
                                                                                Minibus
                                                                                Train
                                                                                Taxi




Source: Airport Ground Travel Plan Scooping Study, July 2005




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 67
 Stage 3: Problem Assessment

 Problem assessment
 The problem confronting land side transport in the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct reflects four
 key issues:

 1.                     Concentration of peak demand;
 2.                     Existing road constraints;
 3.                     Existing rail constraints; and
 4.                     Lack of effective demand management.

 Each issue is described further below.

 Current problems
 1. Concentration of peak demand

 Increasingly congestion costs are spreading well beyond traditional 2-hour peak periods (7-9AM and
 4-6PM) on the Sydney Motorway Network. Peak traffic flows extend from 5.30AM to 10AM and from
 2PM to 6.30PM in the case of the M5 East, with heavy flows of traffic in both directions.

 To avoid congestion some market segments are able to shift their time of travel to take advantage of
 underutilised capacity on the Sydney road network. For example, in 2004 around 30% of truck arrivals
 to Port Botany occurred between 6pm and 6am. This figure increased to around 40% in 2011, as shown
 in Figure 3.

 Figure 3: Port Botany Truck Trip Arrivals by Hour of Day 2011

                                                            Port Botany Truck Trip Arrivals By Hour Of Day
                                                                    (28 February -28 August 2011)
                   7%




                   6%




                   5%




                   4%
      Percentage




                   3%




                   2%




                   1%




                   0%
                         0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00
                                                                                    Time


 Source: Sydney Ports Corporation, Unpublished Data, September 2011.




68 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment
     This is a very significant shift compared to less than 10% in 1999, especially considering that landside
     throughput at the Port was just over half that in 2011 (1M TEU in 1999 compared to 1.8M TEU in 2011).
     This shift to night-time access to Port Botany reflects the ability of some port-related industries to offset
     higher labour costs due to shift work with lower vehicle operating costs and greater utilisation of asset
     (vehicles/warehousing/IT systems).

     However, the same shifts to night time operations have not occurred for all heavy vehicles suggesting the
     bulk of the freight industry is typically constrained for a multitude of reasons to operating during extended
     daylight hours. On the M5 East in 2004, 17% of heavy vehicles travelled between 6pm and 6am and this
     figure has declined slightly to 16% in 2010.

     While Port Botany offers 24/7 operations, Sydney Airport operates under a curfew which restricts flights
     between 11pm and 6am. The curfew restricts opportunities to spread landside access to Sydney Airport
     beyond extended peak and business hours.

     2. Existing road constraints

     Roads and Maritime Services has identified relatively poor travel conditions compared to Sydney
     averages for the Port Botany/Sydney Airport precinct, the M4 motorway and the M5 east corridor. On the
     M5 East, M5 and M4 Motorways, average speeds have reduced to around 40-55 kilometres per hour in
     the AM peak (eastbound) and 60-75 kilometres per hour in the PM peak (westbound) compared to
     posted speeds of 90 kilometres per hour to 110 kilometres per hour24. Also increasing congestion periods
     are spreading well beyond traditional 2-hour peak periods (7-9am and 4-6pm) on the Sydney Motorway
     Network. In the case of the M5 East, peak traffic flows extend from 5.30am to 10am and from 2pm to
     6.30pm, with heavy flows of traffic in both directions25.

     In 2009, 70.7% of passengers in the AM Peak using the Airport and East Hills Line (which runs parallel to
     the F5/M5/M5 East) were destined for the CBD, North Shore, Redfern and Airport26. In contrast, of all
     surveyed M5 users in the AM Peak only 18.6% were destined for Inner Sydney and Lower Northern
     Sydney27, suggesting the destinations of M5 users were far more dispersed than that of the parallel rail
     line (which has a primary role in servicing Sydney’s employment in the immediate vicinity of stations28)
     which limits the potential for major mode shift to rail.

     A key missing link in the Sydney Motorway Network is in its east-west spine with the M4 Motorway
     terminating at North Strathfield, 14km from Sydney Airport/Port Botany. East of North Strathfield,
     Parramatta Road, City West Link Road, Sydenham Road, Livingstone Road, Stanmore Road, Edgeware
     Road, Canal Road and Gardeners Road currently serve as arterial links between Sydney’s west, east
     and south. This is a key issue for the distribution of Port Botany containers as the significant majority are
     destined for locations in the M4 Corridor as shown in Figure 3.




24
   Baulderstone Hornibrook Bilfinger Berger Joint Venture (2004 and 2010), M5 East Traffic Loop Collection Data Reported to the Roads
and Traffic Authority in 2004 and 2010 and NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (2011), Traffic Information System: Travel Speed March
2010 Survey
25
   Baulderstone Hornibrook Bilfinger Berger Joint Venture (2004 and 2010), M5 East Traffic Loop Collection Data Reported to the Roads
and Traffic Authority in 2004 and 2010 and NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (2011). Traffic Information System: Travel Speed March
2010 Survey
26
     CityRail (2010) A Compendium of City Rail Travel Statistics 2010, p.51 and City Rail Unpublished Data. Provided May 2011
27
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Household Travel Survey – 5 years 05/06 to 09/10, unpublished data
28
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011), Household Travel Survey – 5 years 05/06 to 09/10 unpublished data




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 69
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment


     Figure 4: Destination of Port Botany Import Containers within Sydney 2009-10




     Source: ABS (2011), Information Paper–Experimental Statistics on International Shipping Container Movements 2009-10.


     These roads are typically four and six lane aging arterial roads, in some cases undivided without
     adequate turning lanes. Some sections have poor alignments, narrow lanes and uncontrolled access.
     This makes them particularly challenging for heavy vehicles and they are prone to disruption due to traffic
     incidents.

     In the absence of alternate high quality arterial routes, over time these roads have come to perform a mix
     of local and higher order traffic functions. To avoid these lower quality routes, some road users,
     particularly freight and commercial operators, use longer alternative routes to travel between Sydney’s
     west, Sydney Airport and Port Botany. Typically, these include the M4 Motorway/Centenary Drive/King
     Georges Road/M5 East route and the M7 Motorway/M5 Motorway/M5 East route adding to existing
     congestion on these routes. A more direct easterly extension of the M4 Motorway would provide
     approximately a 15 kilometres (or 25%) shorter high quality alternative to the M7/M5/M5 East route from
     the junction of the M4/M7 Motorways to the Botany-Mascot area.

     Other network access constraints between Port Botany, Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west constrain the
     operation of higher productivity vehicles in terms of height, length and/or mass. Addressing these
     constraints would enable a greater number/volume/mass of goods to be moved in fewer trips with overall
     lower labour, vehicle operating and congestion costs. In terms of payload alone, higher mass limits (HML)
     result in significant productivity gains, with a 10% increase in pay load for semi-trailers (19 metres) and a
     13% increase for B-Doubles (25/26 metres)29.


29
     NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (2011), “Higher Mass Limits (HML)” webpage




70 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment
     Some notable network access constraints include the HML B-Double restriction on the bridge on the M4
     Motorway over Silverwater Road, the HML Semi-Trailer and B-Double restriction on the bridge on Marsh
     Street over the Cooks River, the 4.3 metre clearance limit in the M5 East’s Airport and Cooks River
     Tunnel and the circuitous 4.6 metre over height vehicle surface route between the M5 East Main Tunnel
     and Port Botany.

     3. Existing rail constraints

     There are a number of operational issues and capacity issues on the Sydney metropolitan rail network for
     port services. These issues include: lack of capacity at intermodal terminals, capacity constraints in
     stevedore windows as well as a lack of capacity for train paths on the rail network.

     The Container Freight Strategy30 identified a number of opportunities to remove constraints on the
     existing rail network:

      Removal of the rail             General Holmes drive is an important local link for traffic between South
      crossing at General             Sydney, the Eastern Suburbs and the Airport. All freight movements
      Holmes Drive                    to/from Port Botany travel across this level crossing which impacts on the
                                      efficiency and capacity of the rail freight system and causes delays on the
                                      road network.

      Duplication of the Botany       The Enfield intermodal terminal due for completion in 2013 will be
      to Mascot rail freight line     connected to Port Botany by a dedicated freight line. The Botany to
                                      Enfield/Chullora freight line, a distance of approximately 20 km, is linked
                                      to operational sidings in Port Botany with both stevedores and the P&O
                                      Trans Australia container park.

                                      The Port Botany Rail Line Upgrade Program, funded by the Australian
                                      Government’s Nation Building program, involves a series of track and
                                      signalling projects to enhance capacity. The program is due for
                                      completion in 2013.

                                      After the completion of the Port Botany Rail Upgrade Program, only the
                                      link between Mascot and Port Botany on the Enfield to Port Botany freight
                                      line will remain single track. Single track limits the line’s operational
                                      capacity and extending the duplication between Mascot and Port Botany
                                      so the entire route becomes dual track will create operational efficiency
                                      and capacity benefits.

      Construction of a               Additional intermodal capacity is required to service growth in the freight
      Western Sydney                  task, especially in Sydney’s west. A Western Sydney Freight Line is the
      Freight Line                    missing link in a dedicated freight network connecting Port Botany to the
                                      main west line to service this additional intermodal capacity.




30
     NSW Govenrment IA Submission (2010)




              Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 71
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment
     More general constraints for freight rail in the metropolitan area include a curfew on freight movements
     during the passenger peaks and difficulty in obtaining suitable train paths in windows that suit the market.
     The rail passenger task is continuing to grow, particularly from growth areas in the South West, and the
     Cityrail network will continue to come under pressure from increasing passenger demands.

     The challenges facing the growth in rail mode share include operational, infrastructure and governance
     issues such as: port trade increasing at a faster rate than rail volumes; a poorly co-ordinated rail supply
     chain; inefficient port/rail interface; lack of performance standards; unsuitable rail windows; IT and
     communication systems not integrated; lack of intermodal terminal capacity; and conflicts between
     passenger and freight rail on shared lines with priority given to passenger rail services.

     4. Lack of effective demand management

     IA’s Communicating the Imperative for Action identifies that it will seek to engage in a more mature and
     challenging debate at the national level and with community about infrastructure needs and how it is paid
     for in future31.

     At present there is no pricing mechanism aimed at managing demand for travel between Port
     Botany/Sydney Airport and Sydney’s west with the exception of the toll on the M5 Motorway for non-
     privately registered vehicles. The toll was established as a funding mechanism but it is recognised that it
     also operates as a rather simple pricing mechanism for non-private users.

     For high value travel in the commercial and freight markets there is likely to be a much greater
     acceptance of road pricing/tolling as a means to manage demand, alleviate congestion and to fund the
     provision of new and upgraded road infrastructure.

     Given constraints on public revenue sources for funding major upgrades, coupled with ongoing demand
     for road usage, it is likely that future governments will need to consider reforms in both road funding and
     pricing. The introduction of electronic tolling across the Sydney motorway network and time of day tolling,
     as on the Sydney Harbour Crossings, are steps in this direction.

     Appropriate pricing signals on the Sydney Motorway Network could mitigate some of the costs of urban
     congestion, although it is most likely that these would need to be delivered in combination with additional
     plans for road, public transport and freight rail.

     The introduction of a carbon tax in Australia is not expected to have a significant impact on travel
     demand. In 2009, the transport sector represented 14% of Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions32,
     however, on-road light transport, including private motor vehicles, taxis, and light commercial vehicles,
     will not experience any increase in the cost of fuel as a result of the carbon tax in line with the exemption
     announced by the Australian Government.




31
     Infrastructure Australia (2011), Communicating the Imperative for Action
32
     Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (2010), Australia’s Emissions Projections 2010




72 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 3: Problem Assessment
Further, there are some key issues in the existing pricing environment which influence decisions to travel
by road, including:

    Absence of a toll on the M5 East Tunnel;
    M5 Cashback Scheme for privately registered vehicles;
    Rail access fee (Adult Single $11.80, Return $18.60 additional to City Rail fare) at the Domestic and
     International Airport Stations; and
    Absence of a pricing mechanism to incentivise travel of Port Botany containers by freight rail instead
     of road.
Implementing any changes to the above will involve changes in Government policy and alternative pricing
scenarios would need to be modelled and tested with the general community, customers and industry
stakeholders to determine the extent that pricing reform in these areas could be a useful component of
the final package of road and rail improvements.

Future problems
The growth in expected demand on top of an already constrained landside transport system will create
significant challenges for the efficiency and effectiveness of access to two of the nation’s most significant
international gateways. In addition to the growth in expected demand outlined previously, there are four
issues are relevant to the future transport challenge:

1.   On-going changes in the urban supply chain toward more consolidated and just in-time deliveries,
     greater use of higher productivity vehicles and more efficient processing truck loads at Port Botany;

2.   Growing demand for personal mobility in line with the increasing relative affordability of vehicle
     ownership and operation and the prevalence of more fuel efficient cars;

3.   A gradual shift to ‘user pays’ principles in the road transport sector coupled with the introduction of a
     carbon tax in Australia; and

4.   Ongoing reform and investment in freight rail and public transport to incrementally grow volumes and
     potentially mode share, although this moving from a low base given the existing reliance on road
     transport.

1.   On-going changes in the urban supply chain toward more consolidated and just in-time
     deliveries, greater use of higher productivity vehicles and more efficient processing truck
     loads at Port Botany
A number of factors that have emerged over the last decade in relation to urban freight are forecast to
continue over the next 20-30 years. Two critical urban supply chain trends that will continue to influence
vehicle composition:

    Supply Push to Customer Pull: Integrated logistics processes and collaboration within and across
     firms support a pull supply chain model, where customers demand goods which are built to order,
     manufactured and quickly dispatched. This model contrasts with the traditional push supply chain:
     forecast demand, and then produce the product for stock and warehouse close to the customer. Pull
     systems result in the movement of smaller quantities more frequently and ‘just in time’, hence lower
     inventory holdings and high importance on fast reliable delivery; and




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 73
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment

         Just in Time: Just in time methods have been found in the manufacturing industry to increase
          deliveries by a factor of two and decrease the size of deliveries by about half. Reduction in stocks and
          warehousing costs are a key objective of just in time operations. A main driver in costs of
          warehousing is the price and value of land in urban areas. Consequences of this shift in supply chain
          philosophy include the move from larger vehicles operating less frequent delivery schedules, to
          smaller vehicles and thus more intense trip generation.
     These trends highlight a likely future of smaller loads across a greater number of trips. At the other end of
     the spectrum it anticipates a greater number of high productivity vehicles (HPVs) will be used to service
     Port Botany, and these need to be supported by network improvements.

     In 2010, on average 1.9 TEU per vehicle were moved, compared to 1.8 in 2011. Similarly, back loading is
     another means of reducing truck movements at the port by increasing the number of trucks making
     loaded two way movements, rather than one way loaded movements. In 2010, 11% of truck movements
     at the port were back loaded, compared to 8% in 200133. The Port Botany Freight Logistics Plan (2008)
     set productivity improvement targets of 2.3 TEU per vehicle and 20% back loading by 2016. Work
     through the Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy is focused on working toward achieving these
     targets.

     Productivity improvements are forecast at Port Botany through mechanisms to support better truck
     scheduling and utilisation. The introduction of the “Go Live” truck turn around system has resulted in
     significant average truck turnaround times per truck at the Port Botany. In April 2009, during the trial of
     the system truck turn times were averaging 53 minutes at both the Patrick and DP World terminals.
     Since, February 2011 the average truck turn around at both terminals has been 30-35 minutes
     consistently.

     It is anticipated that through the Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy work will continue to
     enhance productivity of road access at Port Botany through use of truck tracking GPS systems,
     enhancing IT vehicle booking systems, greater use of electronic bulletin boards and SMS technology
     to disseminate up-to-date information on port activities and operational delays, and facilitating greater
     use of electronic commerce to eliminate paper documentation.

     2.   Growing demand for personal mobility in line with the increasing relative affordability of
          vehicle ownership and operation and the prevalence of more fuel efficient cars

     While the gains in mode shift towards public transport over the last decade are positive, the overall
     preference of private mobility in the form of motor vehicle ownership is clear with the growth in the
     number of motor vehicles registered in NSW. Between 1995 and 2009, private vehicle registrations have
     grown by 48.1 per cent whereas the population of 17 year olds and over has grown by less than half the
     rate at 19.1 per cent.

     There has been a combination of factors influencing the growth in motor vehicle ownership. The cost of
     private motoring as a proportion of wages has fallen by over 25 per cent between the end of 1994 and
     the end of 2009, as shown in Figure 5. Components of private motoring that have recorded falls include
     ownership, repair, servicing and other charges.




33
  Sydney Ports Corporation (2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data (Provided September 2011) and
Sydney Ports Corporation (2008) Port Freight Logistics Plan: A framework to improve road and rail performance at Port Botany, p.26.




74 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 3: Problem Assessment

Figure 5: Total motoring costs compared to wages index 1994 to 2009

                          1.0

                                                                                          Index <1 = Decreasing cost
                                                                                          Index >1 = Increasing cost
                                                                                          Indexed to 1994 values
 MCI Indexed Aug-94=1.0




                          0.9




                          0.8




                          0.7




                                                                              Year

Quarterly Data Sources: RTA registration numbers, ABS CPI 6401.0 Table 13. ABS Average Weekly Earnings 6302.0 Table 13A


Despite the volatility of oil prices, the cost of automotive fuels as a proportion of wages at the end of 2009
was roughly the same compared to the end of 1994, Figure 6. Motorists over this period have also
benefited from the improved fuel efficiency of motor vehicles.
Figure 6: Cost of automotive fuel index compared to wages index 1994 to 2009

                          1.4

                                         Index <1 = Decreasing cost
                          1.3            Index >1 = Increasing cost
                                         Indexed to 1994 values
 MCI Indexed Aug-94=1.0




                          1.2


                          1.1


                          1.0


                          0.9


                          0.8




                                                                              Year

Quarterly Data Sources: ABS CPI 6401.0 Table 13, ABS Average Weekly Earnings 6302.0 Table 13A




                                Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 75
 Stage 3: Problem Assessment
 To an extent the prevalence of more fuel efficient cars and alternate fuel sources will in future mitigate
 some of the environmental impacts of increased road travel demands and preferences for personal
 mobility in future. The fuel efficiency of the Australian vehicle fleet has been improving in recent years as
 consumers purchase smaller and more fuel efficient cars again mitigating environmental impacts of road
 usage.
 The Australian Government intends driving further fuel efficiency by introducing fuel consumption
 standards for cars. The introduction of similar standards overseas has encouraged manufacturers to
 produce more fuel efficient vehicles and this trend will continue. Manufacturers are not only improving the
 fuel efficiency of current technology internal combustion engines but are investing heavily in the
 development of alternative technologies, such as electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles.

 3.    A gradual shift to ‘user pays’ principles in the road transport sector coupled with the
       introduction of a carbon tax in Australia

 Given constraints on public revenue sources for funding major upgrades coupled with ongoing demand
 for road usage it is likely that in future governments will need to consider reforms in both road funding
 and pricing. The introduction of electronic tolling across the Sydney motorway network and time of day
 tolling, as on the Sydney Harbour Crossings, could be steps in this direction.

 Appropriate pricing signals delivered as part of new motorway proposals/upgrades could foster
 behavioural changes in some users and play a part in addressing the problem of urban congestion over
 the next 10 years. Some motorists making discretionary trips may choose not to make these trips, others
 may shift the time of travel outside of peak hours, others may opt to ride share or shift to public transport
 or freight rail assuming capacity, service and reliability and others again may make different decisions
 about where they live and work.

 Appropriate pricing signals on the Sydney Motorway Network could mitigate some of the costs of urban
 congestion, although it is most likely that these would be needed to be delivered in combination with
 additional plans for road, public transport and freight rail.

 With regard to the introduction of carbon tax in Australia, effective July 2012, it is not forecast to have a
 significant impact on road travel demand. Transport is responsible for around 17% of Australia’s carbon
 emissions34, however, the liquid fuels used for on road transport (light and heavy vehicles) will be
 excluded from the carbon tax. On-road light transport, including private motor vehicles, taxis, and light
 commercial vehicles, will not experience any increase in the cost of fuel as a result of the carbon tax in
 line with the exemption announced by the Australian.

 Heavy vehicles (buses and trucks over 4.5 tonnes) will not experience any increase in the price of
 fuel as a result of the carbon tax at the commencement of the scheme. However, the Australian intends
 to introduce a carbon price on this sector from 1 July 2014. This aspect of the package is still being
 negotiated.




34
   Australian Government, Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency, (2010), Transport Emissions Projections: 2010, quotes
that "Transport emissions accounted for 14 per cent of Australia's total domestic emissions in 2009". This estimate does not account for
electric rail which is included in the stationary energy sector. Note: These emissions estimates are of transport vehicle use only.




76 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment
     For heavy vehicles (predominantly road freight), fuel constitutes around 22 to 30 per cent of operating
     costs35. Six cents per litre carbon tax would add around 2 per cent to operating costs. For bus operators,
     fuel constitutes around 7 to 11 per cent of operating costs36. A six cents per litre carbon tax would add
     less than 1 per cent to operating costs. These changes in operating costs are considered less than the
     average fuel price variation due to market volatility. (NSW DoT 2011)

     A carbon tax is not expected to have any measurable effect in people’s choices regarding public transport
     or private car use. Trends in the use of public transport have grown in line with population and
     employment. Increases in prices of fuel have had a negligible impact on public transport patronage in
     Sydney. Other factors, such as reliability of travel time, public transport routes, parking availability and
     road congestion, are more significant.

     4.   Ongoing reform and investment in freight rail and public transport to incrementally grow
          volumes and potentially mode share, although moving from a low base given the existing
          reliance on road transport.

     As outlined in NSW 2021 – A Plan to Make NSW Number 1 (NSW Government 2011) the NSW
     Government is committed to enhancing rail freight movement (Goal 19) and growing patronage on public
     transport by making it a more attractive choice (Goal 8).

     These are both strategically very important goals that support higher order national goals focused on the
     productivity, sustainability and liveability of Australia cities. Further, Sydney is a particularly fortunate city
     in that it has a well-established passenger and freight rail network to continue to build upon and amplify
     usage.

     Public transport trend data for Sydney shows some positive mode shifting for the journey to work towards
     public transport over the last decade or so. This reflects a number of positive factors including –
     limitations on parking, changes to the parking space levy, improvements to public transport services and
     customer experience, more infill rather than greenfields development, more employment in centres and
     increasing congestion on the road network.

     Data from the Bureau of Transport Statistics shows that public transport mode share for commute trips
     to/from the CBD in peak hours has increased from 73% in 2001/02 to 75% in 2009/1037. Similarly, public
     transport mode share for commute trips across Sydney all day has increased in 2001/02 from 21% to
     24% in 2009/1038.

     NSW 2021 targets further increases in the (1) share of commuter trips made by public transport to and
     from Sydney CBD during peak hours to 80% by 2016 and (2) proportion of total journeys to work by
     public transport in the Sydney Metropolitan Region to 28% by 201639. Ongoing population and
     consequent passenger trip growth in future does mean that there will be a significant absolute growth in
     road use, even with continued positive shifts to public transport.




35
     National Transport Commission (2007), 2007 Heavy Vehicle Charges Determination p59
36
  These estimates were developed by NSW Department of Transport, through calculations based on STA financial statements and
advice from STA.
37
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011) Data: Journey to Work by Mode Historical Data. Unpublished.
38
     NSW Bureau of Transport Statistics (2011) Data: Journey to Work by Mode Historical Data. Unpublished.
39
     NSW Government (2011) NSW 2021 - A Plan to Make NSW Number 1, p.18




               Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 77
     Stage 3: Problem Assessment
     Enhancing freight rail movements while strategically desirable is challenging for the NSW Government.
     Not least because of the complexity of the port freight rail supply chain. This includes the number of
     decision makers in the chain (shipping lines, stevedores, rail transport providers, rail infrastructure
     providers, intermodal terminal operators, empty container park operators, importers, exporters, customs
     etc) and the fragmentation of accountability over the elements required to make port freight rail work
     (port-rail interface, rail track, rolling stock, intermodal terminals, empty container parks etc).

     At present the Port Botany Goods Line has spare capacity with the Australian Rail Track Corporation
     estimating that the line has capacity for more than 1 million TEU per annum40. This compares to current
     utilisation of around 300,000 TEU per annum41.

     Similarly, the existing intermodal terminals at Yennora, Minto and Villawood are estimated to have
     capacity to handle around 370,000 TEU per annum42. This compares to around 210,000 TEUs moved by
     rail in the Sydney basin (the remaining 90,000 are regionally based)43. The Enfield Intermodal Terminal
     which is due to open in 2013 will provide potential for a further 300,000 TEUs to be railed in Sydney
     adding significantly to the supply of port freight rail capacity.

     Given the challenge of generating demand in the short haul port freight rail market it will take significant
     reforms and investment over period of time to grow Sydney’s metropolitan freight rail market.

     In view of faster than expected growth at Port Botany and uncertainty about rail’s ability to maintain
     and/or increase its mode share in the short to medium term, the need for amplifying dedicated freight
     road capacity to serve the Port becomes a priority. Given the lead time to design, develop and deliver any
     major motorway proposal progressing a roads plan is considered a high priority.

     As in the case with public transport, with ongoing population and consequent freight trip growth in future
     does mean that there will be a significant absolute growth in road use, even if positive gains can be made
     in port freight rail.




40
  Australian Rail Track Corporation ARTC (2007) Submission to IPART – Review of the Interface between the Land Transport Industries
and the Stevedores at Port Botany, p.7. Capacity estimate subsequently revised upward in ARTC 2010 Project Proposal Report, Port
Botany Rail Line (PBRL) Upgrade Stage 2.
41
     Sydney Ports Corporation (2010) Annual Report 2009/10 p.5.
42
     NSW Department of Transport (2010) Container Freight Improvement Strategy – IA Submission for Stage 7, p.16.
43
  Department of Transport and Regional Services AUSLINK, Sydney Urban Corridor Strategy, p.6-7 and Sydney Ports Corporation
(2011), Container Movement and Port Task Information. Unpublished Data




78 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
     Stage 4: Problem Analysis

     Problem analysis
     The problem this Plan seeks to address is the land side access constraints that exist in servicing the
     current and expected future transport needs of two of Australia’s most significant international gateways.
     The Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct has an important role in ensuring efficient and effective
     connections between these international gateways and key business, freight and population centres to
     the north, south and west of Sydney. Based on previous NSW Government submissions related to the
     precinct44, IA has recognised that ensuring efficient landside connections to Port Botany and Sydney
     Airport is a nationally significant problem45.

     The underlying causes or genesis of the problem, which is inherently complex and multi-faceted, may
     be summarised as being a combination of:

     1.   Population and employment growth and growth in movements through Sydney’s international
          gateways in line with Sydney’s evolving service based economy placing increasing demands on the
          transport system;

     2.   Co-location of Sydney Airport and Port Botany (and their surrounding Precincts) only 8 kilometres
          south of the CBD and in close proximity to Sydney’s urban renewal areas which generates intense
          local travel demands;

     3.   Established land use patterns in Sydney with relatively dispersed employment patterns not well
          served by public transport;

     4.   Emergence of intensive employment uses that have strategically located around the Sydney
          Motorway Network to take advantage of the high order access and mobility it provides in linking to
          Port Botany and Sydney Airport;

     5.   Historical reliance of road transport in serving these two important international gateways and in the
          precinct generally;
     6.   Existing road network constraints with the most significant being the missing link in the east-west
          spine with the M4 Motorway terminating 14 kilometres short of Sydney Airport/Port Botany;

     7.   Access constraints for higher productivity vehicles;

     8.   Highly fragmented port freight rail sector which under existing operating conditions and pricing
          structures has been unable to offer a competitive alternative to port road freight; and

     9.   Absence of an effective pricing mechanism to deter that portion of discretionary travel on the
          transport network that could either be avoided or switch to less congested times of day.




44
     NSW Government 2010 IA Submissions:Container Freight Improvement Strategy and M5 East Expansion
45
  Infrastructure Australia, Letter from Michael Deegan to Les Wielinga, 3 March 2011 “Infrastructure Priority List Submissions”, and
“Communicating the Imperative for Action: A report to the Council of Australian Governments” June 2011




              Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 79
 Stage 4: Problem Analysis

 Identify fundamental cause, not symptoms, of the problem
 The fundamental or root cause of the problem may then be summarised as:

 1.      Strong and growing demand for travel in extended peak periods between Port Botany, Sydney
         Airport and Sydney’s regions;
 2.      Lack of supply of efficient transport capacity (both road and rail);
 3.      Absence of an effective pricing mechanism to constrain discretionary demand for transport
         capacity and to better ration capacity to high value users; and
 4.      Absence of a public revenue stream to supply additional transport capacity in line with growing
         road travel demands for people, business and goods.

 Although much work has been done in recent years in relation to the landside transport issues in the
 precinct, a coherent multi-modal transport strategy does not yet exist. The proposed Plan will develop a
 rigorous evidence base from which a sensible and pragmatic transport strategy can be developed to
 guide the development of the most appropriate options to address the future transport needs of the
 precinct.

 The proposed Plan will integrate a number of existing rail freight, road and public transport initiatives.
 Some of these are already underway, some are the subject of detailed investigation and others are still
 conceptual and require detailed scoping and analysis. Table 4 describes a number of short, medium and
 long term initiatives that may need to be integrated with the proposed Plan. Combined, these will form the
 basis of a comprehensive multimodal response to addressing the Port Botany and Sydney Airport
 transport task.

 Table 4: Short, medium and long term initiatives

                                                      Description                                   Link to the Plan

   1.   Short Term Initiatives
   Planning approval to     The present planning approval at Port Botany has approved          The Plan will need to
   increase throughput      a total throughput of 3.2M TEUs per annum. To                      consider the landside
   at Port Botany           accommodate long term growth an increase in the planning           transport implications of
   (Under                   approval is to be progressed which is subject to finalisation      the increase in planning
   consideration)           of a revised NSW Government ports policy and the normal            approval to allow
                            processes around new planning approvals (such as an EIS,           expansion of Port Botany
                            community consultation).                                           throughput to its practical
                                                                                               capacity, which has been
                                                                                               estimated to be around
                                                                                               7M TEUs per annum.
   Southern Sydney          The Southern Sydney Freight Line (SSFL) will physically            The SSFL, at least in the
   Freight Line             expand the dedicated freight network in Sydney spanning            short term, offers benefits
   (Under Construction)     from Sefton Junction to Macarthur. The SSFL provides 24/7          to the Port Botany freight
                            dedicated freight rail capacity and segregates the freight and     task through servicing the
                            passenger network. The need for the SSFL is centred on             existing relatively small
                            improving the availability, transit time and reliability of        Villawood intermodal
                            domestic freight (rather than Port Botany freight) between         terminal, and providing
                            Melbourne-Sydney to shift freight from road to rail and will, in   improved accessibility to
                            the main, benefit the Hume Highway.                                Port Botany for port freight
                            The SSFL interfaces with the Chullora intermodal terminal,         from Southern NSW
                            which handles domestic freight (around 300,000 TEU per             through a dedicated
                            annum) and the existing intermodal terminal at Villawood,          freight line from Macarthur
                            which handles Port Botany freight (around 40,000 TEU per           to Port Botany, bypassing
                            annum). The existing intermodal terminal at Minto which            the RailCorp network.
                            services Port Botany will not have access to the SSFL. The         Over the medium term,
                            SSFL will provide access to potential new intermodal               the SSFL offers the
                            terminals in south west Sydney. This includes a future             potential to enable new




80 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 4: Problem Analysis
                        connection to proposed intermodal terminals at Moorebank          rail terminals at
                        and possibly Minto.                                               Moorebank which would
                                                                                          have a significant benefit
                                                                                          in achieving the NSW
                                                                                          Government’s target of
                                                                                          doubling the proportion of
                                                                                          freight moved by rail
                                                                                          through NSW Ports by
                                                                                          2020.
 Enfield Intermodal     The Enfield Intermodal Terminal (IMT) is due to be                The Enfield Intermodal
 Terminal               operational by mid-2013. It will have capacity to handle          Terminal will provide the
 (Under Construction)   300,000 TEU of containers, although it is likely to take some     potential to move more
                        time for the operation to reach capacity. In 2009-10 around       than double the current
                        210,000 TEUs were moved by rail through Sydney                    railed throughput between
                        intermodal terminals (65% of the total 320,000 moved by rail      Port Botany and
                        in NSW, with the remaining 35% moved through regional             metropolitan intermodal
                        terminals).                                                       terminals. It will play a
                        The opening of Enfield IMT will almost double the current         significant short term role
                        supply of intermodal capacity in Sydney in the short term. It     in moving toward the
                        will increase current metropolitan intermodal capacity in         NSW Government’s target
                        Sydney from the current estimated 370,000 TEU to 670,000          of doubling the proportion
                        TEU.                                                              of freight moved by rail
                                                                                          through NSW Ports by
                                                                                          2020.
 Port Botany            The Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy (PBLIS)             PBLIS has both rail and
 Landside               aims to improve the competitive access and service                road improvement
 Improvement            arrangements of container movements between stevedores            components. The rail
 Strategy               and transport carriers at Port Botany. Governing the PBLIS        components assist in
 (Ongoing)              reform is The Ports and Maritime Administration Amendment         moving toward the target
                        (Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy) Regulation            to double the proportion of
                        2010.                                                             container freight
                        The objective of this Regulation is to provide for:               movements by rail through
                                                                                          NSW Ports. The road
                         The setting of and compliance with access and                   component, which has
                            performance standards relating to access by road              already resulted in more
                            carriers to the Port Botany Container Terminals, the          efficient processing of
                            performance of road carriers at those terminals and the       truck turnaround times at
                            performance of stevedores in providing services to road       the Port, could increase
                            carriers at those terminals; and                              the competitive advantage
                         The regulation by the Portfolio Minister of the charges         of road to rail. The
                            imposed by stevedores and service providers for or in         implications of the PBLIS
                            connection with the operation or provision of facilities or   Reform will be considered
                            services of the port-related supply chain at Port Botany,     as part of the Plan.
                            including truck servicing and rail servicing charges.
                        The objective of the PBLIS plan is to maximise the amount
                        of trade passing through Port Botany by making the landside
                        supply chain more efficient, transparent, consistent and
                        transitioning to 24/7 operations.
 M5 West Widening       The proposed widening of the M5 South West Motorway               The proposed M5 West
 (Under negotiation     provides for three lanes in each direction between King           Widening would add
 with Interlink)        Georges Road, Beverly Hills and Camden Valley Way,                capacity to the central part
                        Prestons. At King Georges Road, where the M5 West                 of the F5/M5/M5 East
                        widening interfaces with the M5 East Freeway, the                 Corridor. This will benefit
                        eastbound third lane will function as a "trap" lane which         freight, commercial and
                        essentially acts as the eastbound on-load ramp to King            passenger markets. The
                        Georges Road.                                                     M5 West Widening is
                        This will primarily remove one lane of eastbound traffic from     compatible with a future
                        the corridor, with two lanes progressing beneath King             possible M5 East
                        Georges Road onto the M5 East Freeway. In the westbound           Duplication, including the
                        direction the third lane will operate in a similar manner, but    interface at King Georges




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 81
 Stage 4: Problem Analysis
                          as the westbound on-load ramp from King Georges Road.               Road.
                          With proposed expansion of the M5 East Freeway, three               Work by the Australian
                          lanes will be provided in each direction beneath King               Government on the
                          Georges Road. On completion of the expansion the King               proposed Moorebank IMT
                          Georges Road on-load and off-load ramps will revert to a            has highlighted the need
                          conventional merge/diverge lane with from/to the third lane.        to consider capacity over
                          Accordingly, the design of the M5 West Widening is                  the Georges River
                          compatible with a future possible M5 East Duplication.              crossing and traffic
                                                                                              weaving issues between
                                                                                              Moorebank Avenue and
                                                                                              the Hume Highway. These
                                                                                              issues will form part of
                                                                                              considerations for the
                                                                                              Plan.
   National Managed       To improve traffic flows, journey times and relieve                 The managed motorway
   Motorways              congestion, the NSW Government, in collaboration with               proposal for the Sydney
   (IA “Ready to          Queensland, Victoria, South Australia and Western                   Orbital and M4 has the
   Proceed Status”)       Australia, is working towards developing a Managed                  potential to offer
                          Motorway system that uses technology based                          significant benefits,
                          enhancements to improve efficiency and safety for the               relative to cost, for traffic
                          Australian motorway network.                                        flows in peak conditions.
                          The Managed Motorway system involves the optimisation of            The Plan is likely to
                          existing traffic management technologies such as automatic          include the Managed
                          vehicle and incident detection systems, electronic variable         Motorway as an option
                          speed limits, closed circuit television cameras and systems         element to address
                          to manage the operation of Motorway on-load ramps, to               identified problems and
                          enhance the operational efficiency and safety of motorways          causes in the Study Area.
                          and to get more out of the motorway network.                        Implementation of
                                                                                              Managed Motorway
                          In NSW, the system is intended to encompass the entire              systems is considered a
                          motorway network including the Sydney Orbital, the M4               key element in making
                          Motorway, the F3 Freeway to Newcastle, the F5 Freeway to            better use of the existing
                          Campbelltown and the F6 Freeway to Wollongong.                      road infrastructure which
                                                                                              is a key objective of the
                                                                                              Plan.
   Integrated Ticketing   The new electronic ticketing system will make travelling on         The Plan will consider
   (Under development)    public transport easier and simpler for people living and           demand side options to
                          working in or visiting the greater Sydney area. For                 manage road demand and
                          customers it means only one smartcard to travel on ferries,         to shift discretionary road
                          trains, buses and light rail. The new Opal card will begin to       users onto public
                          be rolled out in late 2012.                                         transport. The
                          The Opal smart card will be available on Sydney Ferries,            implementation of
                          CityRail, private and public bus networks and light rail. It will   Integrating Ticketing for
                          be available for all types of fares – adult, child, concession,     public transport will
                          PET and school students. Customers will enjoy capped fares          support this aspect of the
                          and discounts to reward frequent and multimodal travellers.         Plan.

   South West Rail Link   The South West Rail Link (SWRL) will operate as an                  The Plan will consider
   (Under construction)   extension of the Airport and East Hills Line. It will extend        options to manage road
                          from Glenfield with new stations at Edmondson Park and              demand and shift
                          Leppington and is due for completion in 2016. The SWRL is           discretionary road users
                          intended to support population growth by providing                  onto public transport. This
                          additional services to the East Hills Line from Leppington to       may include options which
                          the City and additional stabling for Sector 2 of the Sydney         could incentivise use of
                          metropolitan rail network (the AEHL, Main South Line via            the SWRL for some trips.
                          Granville, Bankstown Line and the Inner West Line).                 Use of the SWRL is likely
                          The train stabling facilities proposed as part of the SWRL          to include, in the main,
                          west of Leppington will support rail patronage growth               trips to major centres
                          associated with the South West Growth Centre and                    including Parramatta,
                          additional passengers on Cityrail’s south-western services          CBD-Redfern-North Shore
                          as a whole. The stabling is required to store trains when they      Corridor and Sydney




82 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 4: Problem Analysis
                         are not in operational use. The junction of the South and       Airport. The
                         East Hills Line, Glenfield Junction, will be grade separated    implementation of the
                         as part of the proposal. Currently, Glenfield Junction          SWRL will support this
                         presents a significant timetabling and capacity constraint on   aspect of the Plan by
                         the existing network.                                           expanding accessibility to
                                                                                         the Cityrail network to
                                                                                         further incentivise shifting
                                                                                         of discretionary road
                                                                                         users.
 Kingsgrove to           The Kingsgrove to Revesby Quadruplification Project builds      The Plan will consider
 Revesby                 on the Revesby Turnback Project which opened in 2008. It        options to manage road
 Quadruplification       forms part of the Railway Clearways Programme and relates       demand and shift
 Project (Airport and    to Clearway 3 – Campbelltown Express and Clearway 4 –           discretionary road users
 East Hills Rail Line)   Airport and South.                                              onto public transport. This
 (Under construction)    Reliability would be improved as delays to local services are   may include options which
                         not likely to affect express services and vice versa after      could incentivise use of
                         completion of the quadruplification. The project would also     the Airport and East Hills
                         enable scope to increase service frequency over the             Rail Line (AEHL) for some
                         medium to long term if necessary to meet future demand.         trips. Use of the AEHL is
                         The project is currently under construction and due for         likely to continue to be
                         completion in 2013.                                             dominated by travel to
                                                                                         major centres including,
                                                                                         the CBD-Redfern-North
                                                                                         Shore Corridor and
                                                                                         Sydney Airport. The
                                                                                         implementation of the
                                                                                         AEHL project will support
                                                                                         this aspect of the Plan by
                                                                                         improving rail reliability
                                                                                         and service to further
                                                                                         incentivise shifting of
                                                                                         discretionary road users.
 Commuter Car Park       Construction is underway on the following commuter car          The Plan will consider
 and Interchange         park and interchange projects which are all located within      options to manage road
 Program                 the strategic context area of the Plan (see Figure 1):          demand and shift
                                                                                         discretionary road users
 (Under construction      Blacktown Commuter Car Park;
 and in the                                                                              onto public transport. This
 planning/design
                          Macarthur Commuter Car Park – Stage 2;                        may include options for
 component)               Mount Druitt Commuter Car Park; and                           road pricing which could
                                                                                         incentivise use of the
                          Kingswood – Upgrade of Transport Interchange Facilities       Cityrail network for some
                            and Commuter Car Park.                                       trips.
                         A number of other projects are in the planning and design       The implementation of the
                         Component, including:                                           Commuter Car Park and
                          Cabramatta Commuter Car Park;                                 Interchange plan will
                                                                                         support this aspect of the
                          Fairfield Transport Interchange Upgrade; and                  Plan by improving park
                          Granville - Transport Interchange Upgrade.                    and ride facilities to further
                                                                                         incentivise shifting of
                                                                                         discretionary road users.
 2.   Medium/Long Term Initiatives
 Moorebank               The Australian Government is currently undertaking a            The proposed Moorebank
 Intermodal              Feasibility Program which is due to be completed in early       IMT has the potential to
                         2012. The Moorebank Intermodal Terminal (IMT) site offers       offer very significant
 Terminal                some key strategic advantages:                                  benefits in moving toward
                                                                                         the target to double the
 (Feasibility stage)      Large consolidated site of approximately 220 hectares;
                                                                                         proportion of container
                          Located adjacent to the Southern Sydney Freight Line          freight movements by rail
                            and the main inter-state line;                               through NSW Ports.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 83
 Stage 4: Problem Analysis
                           Located in close proximity to the M5 and M7 Motorways;
                           Located in close proximity to the growing industrial
                              centres to Sydney’s south west and west; and
                           Potential to serve both the Port Botany container freight
                              market and the interstate freight market.
                          These advantages provide an opportunity to facilitate
                          increased movements by freight rail in the Sydney basin. It is
                          a key infrastructure supply side proposal to achieve the
                          Australian and NSW Government’s joint strategic priority of
                          increasing the movement of freight by rail in Sydney.
                          Delivery of a Moorebank IMT is dependent on a rail line
                          extension to/from the South Sydney Freight Line and road
                          enhancements to address issues on the M5 Motorway
                          between Moorebank Avenue and the Hume Highway.
                          Capacity over the Georges River crossing and traffic
                          weaving issues between Moorebank Avenue and the Hume
                          Highway are issues under consideration. The costs of these
                          rail and road network upgrades are being considered jointly
                          by the Australian and NSW Governments in the feasibility of
                          the proposal.
                          Further, to support the Moorebank IMT proposal
                          consideration of demand side stimulus for freight rail is likely
                          to be required to encourage a sustainable shift away from
                          road to rail. Delivering a fully operational demand and supply
                          side package at Moorebank is likely to take some years to
                          resolve, making it a medium term proposition.
   SIMTA Moorebank        The Sydney Intermodal Terminal Alliance (SIMTA), a private         SIMTA’s proposal for a
   Intermodal Terminal    sector consortium comprising QR, Qube and Stocklands,              Moorebank IMT focuses
   (Proposal at the       has submitted a Concept Plan Application and a Preliminary         on servicing the Port
   Preliminary            Environmental Assessment to the Department of Planning             Botany container task. It
   Environmental          and Infrastructure for an intermodal terminal at Moorebank.        has the potential to offer
   Assessment Stage)      The site is adjacent to the site proposed by the Australian        very significant benefits in
                          Government.                                                        moving toward the target
                          The concept plan includes four components (1) Rail link            to double the proportion of
                          connecting the site to the Southern Sydney Freight Line; (2)       container freight
                          Intermodal terminal with a capacity to handle up to 1M TEUs        movements by rail through
                          per annum of primarily port related freight operating 24/7; (3)    NSW Ports.
                          Warehousing and distribution facilities and (4) Freight village
                          of support services.
                          Like the Australian Government’s proposed Moorebank
                          Intermodal Terminal, it too is dependent on a rail line
                          extension to/from the South Sydney Freight Line and road
                          enhancements to address issues on the M5 Motorway
                          between Moorebank Avenue and the Hume Highway.
   North Sydney           The NSW and Australian Governments are currently                   The North Sydney Freight
   Freight Access         negotiating an agreement to expand rail freight access to the      Access project will benefit
   (Under development)    north of Sydney. The precise scope is still subject to             interstate rail freight
                          agreement but may include a rail grade separation in the           services and allow for
                          vicinity of north Strathfield to allow improved access to the      additional train
                          metropolitan freight network, completion of a full                 movements between Port
                          quadruplication between North Strathfield and West Ryde            Botany and freight
                          and dedicated freight access between Sydney and                    distribution activities in the
                          Newcastle.                                                         north of Sydney.




84 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 4: Problem Analysis
 Road pricing          A number of recent national initiatives have raised the need        The Plan will consider
 reform at the         for both national and state governments in Australia to             options for demand
                       further consider road pricing reforms with the broader              management, including:
 national level        community.
                                                                                            Reviewing specific
 (Early                The final report of the Australia’s Future Tax System Review           transport pricing
                       (the Henry Tax Review) made eight recommendations in                   policies to influence
 consideration)
                       relation to road transport pricing in 2010. It recommends that         travel decisions around
                       the revenue raised from fuel taxes for general purposes be             time of travel, mode
                       replaced with road user charges linked to the cost of                  choice and alternatives
                       congestion and the cost of efficient financing the road                to travel in Port
                       network. It raised the introduction of variable congestion             Botany/Sydney Airport
                       pricing and possibly wider road pricing in Australian cities if        precinct; and
                       cost effective.
                                                                                            Providing appropriate
                       The COAG Road Reform Plan (CRRP), initiated in 2007,                   priority and facilities for
                       was created by the Council of Australian Governments                   high value freight and
                       (COAG) in response to the Productivity Commission Report               commercial travel on
                       Road and Rail Freight Infrastructure Pricing. It has found             Sydney’s transport
                       that it is feasible to develop a platform of direct road user          system, which may be
                       charging for heavy vehicles. Further, the work on heavy                linked to a direct road
                       vehicle charging reform has found that there will be                   user charge.
                       significant benefits from such reform if it is tied to funding
                       reforms for the delivery of heavy vehicle related
                       infrastructure and associated access arrangements.
                       More recently, in 2011, the Australian Government released
                       a discussion paper to inform public debate on priorities and
                       directions for continuing tax reform in the lead-up to the Tax
                       Forum in October 2011. Tax Reform: Next Steps for
                       Australia, outlines a range of issues and proposals that were
                       raised in the Henry Tax Review.
 Container Freight     The Container Freight Improvement Strategy, submitted to            The options considered in
 Improvement           IA in 2010, identified four rail freight proposals for Sydney:      the Plan will include the
 Strategy                                                                                  removal of the General
                        Removal of General Holmes Drive Rail Level Crossing;
 (Proposed)                                                                                Holmes Drive Rail Level
                        Duplication of Port Botany to Mascot Rail Freight Line            Crossing recognising the
                            (last 3km to be duplicated);                                   constraint it places on the
                        Protection of Western Freight Line Corridor; and                  transport network in the
                                                                                           Port/Airport Precinct.
                        Construction of Western Freight Line.
                                                                                           Planning for a Western
                       The need for these proposals is premised on additional              Freight Line is a long term
                       capacity being required to accommodate increased rail               contribution to sustaining
                       volumes to/from Port Botany to support progress toward the          a significant shift of
                       NSW Government’s rail mode share target and to get the              container freight
                       most out of the seaside infrastructure by considering a             movements to rail through
                       significant increase in the planning cap of 3.2M TEU per            Port Botany.
                       annum at Port Botany. These are considered medium and
                       long term rail freight proposals, with the exception of the         The Plan will focus on
                       General Holmes Drive Level Crossing and potentially the             addressing issues related
                       duplication of the remaining single track (which is a               to the SSFL and the
                       complementary project to the level crossing closure).               Moorebank IMTs as more
                                                                                           immediate priorities, but
                       The Port Botany to Mascot Rail Freight Line Upgrade –               may involve some pre-
                       Stage 2 will significantly increase capacity of the line prior to   feasibility assessment of
                       the opening of the Enfield Intermodal Terminal. It involves         the potential to construct
                       signal control separation and the Enfield staging facility. The     the Western Sydney
                       project is funded through the Nation Building Plan. It is due       Freight Line and develop
                       to be completed in 2012 in anticipation of the Enfield              the Eastern Creek
                       Intermodal Terminal serviced by the line becoming                   intermodal Terminal.
                       operational in 2013.




        Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 85
 Stage 4: Problem Analysis
   Joint Program on        The Australian and NSW Governments are currently working            The Plan will assume that
   Aviation Capacity for   together on a Joint Program on aviation capacity for the            Sydney Airport will
   the Sydney Region       Sydney region.                                                      continue to operate as
   (Under development)     The Joint Program will consider the short and long term             Sydney’s international and
                           aviation infrastructure and supporting surface transport            domestic airport as guided
                           requirements of the Sydney region, and identify strategies          by the Sydney Airport
                           and locations to meet future needs. It will also consider           Master Plan 2009 – 2029
                           options for the use of Commonwealth land at Badgerys                until 2029.
                           Creek, which the Australian Government indicated is no              While the findings of the
                           longer an option for an airport.                                    Joint Program on Aviation
                           The Joint Program will facilitate the development of an             Capacity for the Sydney
                           Aviation Strategic Plan which will inform future infrastructure     Region are not yet known,
                           planning and investment by government and industry, and             this assumption is based
                           enable the proper integration of future airport operations with     on the likely lead time it
                           surrounding state land use planning and surface transport           would take to deliver and
                           networks. It is anticipated that the Aviation Strategic Plan will   commence operations of a
                           be completed in the latter part of 2011.                            second major airport in
                                                                                               Sydney.

 Problem Prioritisation
 The proposed Port Botany/ Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Plan has been identified as one three
 top priorities for NSW. The other two being the North West Rail Link and the Pacific Highway Upgrade,
 both of which are the subject of separate IA Submissions.

 Development of an appropriate landside transport plan for the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct is
 a top priority for NSW and Australia as land side transport issues have been identified as a potential
 constraint on growth and development of these two important international gateways. Addressing these
 issues will be important to both the State and national economies and future productivity and investment.




86 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 5: Option Generation
Recognising the specific challenges that will face the Port/Airport precinct, the methodology for the Plan
has been consolidated into the following four phases:
    Phase 1 –      Determine a Preferred Direction for land side transport supporting Port Botany and
                   Sydney Airport over the next 25-30 years, including establishing an integrated
                   evidence base that brings together data on all transport modes in this precinct,
                   undertakes detailed modelling to develop a strategic plan that will enable a range of
                   options to be developed and tested and concept analysis to be undertaken.

    Phase 2 –      Develop a delivery strategy including sequencing of infrastructure and policy initiatives
                   to support delivery of the Preferred Direction. Identify short, medium and long term
                   options.

    Phase 3 –      Identify possible funding sources and the role of the NSW and Australian
                   Governments in implementing the delivery strategy.

    Phase 4 –      Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and concept design
                   for initial road and rail infrastructure initiatives.

Given this process, this Stage 5 Template will not report on options generated but rather provide the
methodology to undertake this exercise within the framework described above.

It is intended that NSW Government’s plan will incorporate guidance from the following overarching plans
and strategies, together with other relevant material:

    National Ports Strategy
    National Land Freight Strategy Discussion Paper
    Our Cities, Our Future – A National Urban Policy for a productive, sustainable and liveable future
    NSW 2021 – A Plan to Make NSW Number One
    Sydney Airport and Port Botany Precinct Strategy Statement (under development by INSW)
    Port Freight Logistics Strategy
    Airport Master Plan 2009
    Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy
    Metropolitan Road Freight Hierarchy on the State Road Network
    NSW Transport Master Plan (Under development)
    NSW Freight Strategy (Under development)
    NSW Rail Strategy (Under development)
    Sydney Roads Modal Plan (Under development)
    NSW Bus Strategy (Under development)
    Sydney City Centre Access Plan (Under development)
    Botany Road Corridor Action Plan (Under development)
    Joint Study on Aviation Capacity for the Sydney Region (Under development)




          Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 87
 Stage 5: Option Generation
 Further, the process will be structured to ensure coordination with the extensive body of work undertaken
 or underway on complementary road, freight rail, public transport, policy and reform proposals and
 projects including:

    Southern Sydney Freight Line (Under construction)
    Enfield Intermodal Terminal (Under construction)
    Port Botany Landside Improvement Strategy (Ongoing)
    M5 West Widening (Under negotiation with Interlink)
    National Managed Motorways (IA “Ready to Proceed Status”)
    Integrated ticketing (Under development)
    South West Rail Link (Under construction)
    Kingsgrove to Revesby Quadruplification Project - Airport and East Hills Rail Line (Under
     Construction)
    Commuter Car Park and Interchange Program (Under construction and in the planning/design phase)
    Australian Government’s Moorebank Intermodal Terminal (Feasibility Program)
    SIMTA Moorebank Intermodal Terminal (Proposal at the Preliminary Environmental Assessment
     Stage)
    Road pricing reform at the national level (Early consideration)
    Container Freight Improvement Strategy (Proposed)
 The NSW Government recognises that its approach to infrastructure planning and investment in the Port
 Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct must involve both supply and demand side solutions. Given the
 potential for demand side reform to mitigate some problems in the corridor these must be considered as
 part of a package of delivering infrastructure improvements.

 The four phases of the methodology are discussed in further detail below.

 Phase 1: Determine a Preferred Direction
 The first phase is a planning phase that seeks to establish a Preferred Direction for land side transport
 supporting Port Botany and Sydney Airport over the next 25 years. This first phase will involve
 identification and evaluation of a series of multi-modal infrastructure and policy initiatives designed to
 address the future transport needs of the precinct and surrounding regions.

 The proposed process for Phase 1 will include the following steps:

    Create a full data set and evidence base of traffic and freight movements to, from and within the Port
     Botany and Sydney Airport precinct;
    Create a Strategic Transport Model for transport movements in the precinct and link to the broader
     Sydney Transport Model;
    Model different scenarios for freight and other transport movements for Port Botany and Sydney
     Airport. Variables to be included:
     - Various land use scenarios for adjacent precincts

     - Various land side transport systems supporting the forecast traffic movements (road and rail)

     - Different port development scenarios

     - Different Sydney Airport development scenarios




88 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 5: Option Generation

   Determine the alternative infrastructure and policy options to address future transport needs and to
    support the Port Botany and Sydney Airport precinct over the next 25 years;
   Undertake a full assessment of the options, including the future role of road and rail in supporting the
    transport needs of the precinct. The assessment of options is to include:
    - Demand analysis and assessment of future needs

    - Broad identification of infrastructure needed

    - Broad identification of supporting policy

    - Strategic cost estimation and engineering risk assessment

    - Sustainability assessment

    - Economic assessment and multi-criteria analysis
   Determine Preferred Direction including setting of key policy directions in consultation with
    the community.
   For the Preferred Direction, identify short, medium and long term initiatives.
It is expected that the outputs of the study will provide input to the State Freight Plan and other relevant
plans.

The development of alternative infrastructure and policy options to address the transport challenges of
the precinct will build on previous work undertaken by the NSW and Australian Governments, Sydney
Ports Corporation and Sydney Airport Corporation Limited. Previous work has identified a broad set of
improvement initiatives that will be incorporated into the planning process. Examples include:

Demand side initiatives

   Transport pricing – Road, rail and port pricing to influence travel decisions around time of travel,
    mode choice and alternatives to travel.
   Regulatory reform – Changes to port, airport and rail regulations, particularly flight and freight
    movement restrictions.
   Supply chain – Decisions made on value of goods and location and utilisation of other supply chain
    infrastructure (truck and train cycle times, warehouse opening hours and capacity, value and time
    sensitivity of goods).
Supply side initiatives
   Increased capacity at Port Botany through the completion and opening of the third stevedoring
    terminal.
   Metropolitan Freight Network Improvements – Including General Holmes Drive Level Crossing,
    Duplication of the last 3km of the Port Botany Good Line (Port to Mascot), shared passenger/freight
    line works.
   Proposed Moorebank and Eastern Creek Intermodal Terminals: Planned intermodal terminals and
    associated freight precinct to address Sydney’s medium to long term port import/export terminal (and
    potentially domestic freight) needs.
   Eastern Creek Intermodal Terminal – Dependent on construction of the Western Sydney Freight Line
    for servicing.
   Road Based Public Transport – Complementary bus transport network improvements that result from
    opportunities presented by major infrastructure improvements.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 89
 Stage 5: Option Generation
    Managed Motorways – Provide infrastructure and intelligent transport systems on the Motorway
     network which will provide priority to vehicles on the Motorways, improving movement of all vehicles,
     including freight and commercial vehicles and access to all key centres around the Motorway
     network.
    Port Botany and Sydney Airport Precinct Transport Improvements – Network improvements in the
     Port/Airport Precinct that would both complement and enable major infrastructure elements.
    Road Freight Network Improvements – Freight network improvements beyond the Port/Airport
     Precinct that support access to Western Sydney and complement major infrastructure improvements.
    High Value Vehicle Infrastructure – Dedicated infrastructure including high value vehicle lanes and
     intersection priority where appropriate.
    M5 East enhancement options – Duplication of the M5 East between King Georges Road and Marsh
     Street, and connections to Sydney Airport, Port Botany and surrounding precincts.
    M4 Extension options – Extension and improvement of the M4 with connections to Sydney CBD,
     Sydney Airport and Port Botany.

 Key Outcomes
    The Preferred Direction for the land side transport system servicing the Port Botany/Sydney Airport
     precinct, including:
     - A clear articulation of the future role of road and rail in addressing the transport needs of the
       precinct

     - Identification of the infrastructure needed

     - The setting of key complementary policy directions

 Phase 2: Develop a delivery strategy
 The objective of Phase 2 is to develop an appropriate delivery strategy, including sequencing of
 infrastructure and policy initiatives to support delivery of the Preferred Direction. The outcome will be a
 set of short, medium and long term initiatives.

 The process proposed for Phase 2 will be to:

    Undertake further community and stakeholder consultation regarding the refinement of the initiatives
     and confirming the outcomes of Phase 1;
    Analyse the optimum timing for the individual infrastructure and policy initiatives, taking into
     consideration potential project benefits, community feedback, project interdependencies and the
     broad funding envelope; and
    Assess options to advance medium and longer term projects towards implementation, with a view to
     accelerating the delivery of components of the final set of improvement initiatives when funding
     becomes available.

 Key Outcomes
 The primary outcome of Phase 2 will be a delivery strategy for the Preferred Direction, including:

    A timeline which sets out short, medium and long term initiatives; and
    A planning program to advance the development of medium and longer term improvement initiatives.




90 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program
Stage 5: Option Generation

Phase 3: Identify funding sources
The objective of Phase 3 is to identify possible funding sources and to establish the role of the NSW and
Australian Governments in implementing the delivery strategy.

The analysis will include an assessment of the potential for private financing of specific improvement
initiatives and options for user contributions to the cost of meeting future transport needs. The potential
role of Government financing to de-risk major projects and potential for risk sharing with the private sector
will be addressed.

The funding commitments of both the NSW and Australian Governments to specific initiatives will also be
established in this phase.

Key Outcomes
The primary outcome of Phase 3 will be a funding plan for the Preferred Direction, including the role of
the NSW and Australian governments in funding the various improvement initiatives.

Phase 4: Undertake detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and concept design
The objective of Phase 4 is to undertake a detailed project scoping, environmental assessment and
concept design for the initial road and rail infrastructure initiatives. The work includes preparation of an
Environmental Impact Statement(s) for the preferred improvement initiatives, including all approvals.

The process proposed for Phase 4 will cover:

   Preparation and submission of a project application to NSW Department of Planning and
    Infrastructure (D&PI);
   Finalise concept design for the preferred initiatives to a stage where an environmental assessment
    can be undertaken including the following tasks:
    - Engineering concept design refinement;

    - Detailed traffic modelling;
    - Tunnel design and ventilation;

    - Geotechnical investigations; and

    - Construction methodology.
   Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) including necessary investigations and community
    engagement. The extent of these investigations will be determined by the NSW Minister for Planning.
    Nevertheless, it is anticipated that the EIS will consider key social and environmental issues arising
    from the project and the identification of measures to mitigate and manage these impacts such:
    - Traffic flows in and around the precinct;

    - Air quality;

    - Noise and vibration;

    - Energy use;

    - Greenhouse gas generation;

    - Contaminated soil and spoil removal; and

    - Visual amenity and urban design.




         Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | 91
 Stage 5: Option Generation
    The community engagement process would need to be confirmed at the appropriate time but based
     on recent experience is anticipated to cover the following:
     - Distribution of postcards and information brochures to residents and local businesses across
       Sydney;

     - Meetings between the project team and local councils, various industry stakeholders, and
       community groups, to brief them on the proposal, answer queries and provide feedback;

     - A dedicated website and free call information line;

     - Advertisements in Sydney metropolitan papers, local papers, community language papers and
       industry publications, as well as on radio and on websites;

     - Posters in local council offices, community centres and libraries within the local government areas;

     - Community information days throughout the subject area to raise awareness of the project and
       provide the community with an opportunity to speak with project managers about any concerns or
       issues; and

     - Customer engagement with freight forwarders, transport companies and the owners of the import
       and export goods.
    Submit EIS for determination by the NSW Minister for Planning and Infrastructure; and
    Receive planning approval noting any conditions of consent to take forward during the project delivery
     phase (not considered as part of this submission).

 Key Outcomes
 The primary outcome of Phase 4 is to progress the set of infrastructure initiatives as far as possible
 towards a position where detailed design and construction could commence. This may be achieved and
 documented through the following main deliverables:

    Completed Environmental Impact Statement;
    Planning Approval;
    Final Concept Design for the preferred proposals, including necessary features for connection to the
     existing road/rail network and possible future stages; and
    Final cost estimate and completed procurement strategy.




92 | Submission to Infrastructure Australia | Port Botany and Sydney Airport Transport Improvement Program

				
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