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					             Wanna Hit This?


  Georgia Southern University
   Public Safety Department
Rape Aggression Defense System

   Public Relations Campaign Strategies
               Spring 2011
                  An Le
               Megan Long
             Ashley Renfroe
            Lauren Smathers
            Michelle Vegliante
   Wanna Hit This?




Situation
Analysis
       Female faculty, staff, and students of Georgia Southern University are offered the

opportunity to attend a free Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) Women’s Self Defense Course

offered through the GSU Department of Public Safety. Because female faculty, staff, and

students are not aware that this class is offered, attendance for this course is low. The GSU

Department of Public Safety credits this low attendance to their “lack of getting information out

to the GSU female community.” If Public Safety publicized the R.A.D Self Defense Course more

readily, then awareness and registration of this course would increase.

       Based on primary research conducted among female students, faculty, and staff, our

group has developed an on-campus campaign entitled R.A.D.: Wanna Hit This? to assist Public

Safety in distributing information about R.A.D and self defense to the GSU female population.

Integrated into this campaign are strategies developed to motivate potential participants to

register for R.A.D., such as initiating a campus wide visual campaign, partnering with various

Georgia Southern departments to promote the course, as well as enlist the contributions of

Georgia Southern University sponsored media outlets.

       Included within this book is the research conducted as well as the resulting strategies

and tactics that comprise the R.A.D.: Wanna Hit This? campaign. GSU Public Safety is

encouraged to use the information and tactics enclosed in order to reach the GSU female

population in regard to the awareness of and participation in R.A.D.
   Wanna Hit This?




 Goals &
Objectives
Goal:
        To raise awareness and attendance of the Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course
        offered by Georgia Southern University’s Department of Public Safety.

Objectives:
   1. To raise awareness among GSU female students, faculty, and staff of the opportunity to
       attend a free R.A.D. Women’s Self Defense Course by 50% by October 15, 2011.

   2. To increase attendance of GSU female student, faculty, and staff in the R.A.D. Women’s
      Self Defense Course by 50% by October 15, 2011.
   Wanna Hit This?




 Audience
Delineation
Female Students of Georgia Southern University:

Katie is a twenty-year old sophomore pre-nursing major at Georgia Southern University. She is

originally from Alpharetta, GA. During her freshman year of college, Katie lived in Eagle Village.

She rushed Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority and also began her job as a Hostess for Longhorns.

Katie now lives Campus Club Apartment Complex 1538 with three of her Sorority sisters.

Academically, Katie maintains a 3.2 GPA. She has the HOPE Scholarship and works very hard to

maintain it. In her spare time, Katie enjoys working out at the RAC and being a part of the

student organization SAGE (Student Alliance for a Green Earth). She enjoys going out to drink

Thursday night through Saturday night. She frequents College Plaza bars such a Retrievers and

Rumrunners as well as Date Night Socials with her Sorority. Between her schoolwork, sorority,

part-time job, extracurricular activities, and social life, Katie is very busy. She depends on her

friends for advice and influence. Her friends’ opinions weigh heavily on her decisions and she

rarely partakes in activities alone. Katie’s self interest includes pleasing her family, having fun,

and being social. She gains on-campus information mainly from fliers, Facebook groups, and

articles from the George-Anne, which she reads in between classes.



Female Employees of Georgia Southern University

Lori is a 30-year old assistant professor in the College of Business Administration. Lori takes

pride in her work as a professor. She values her contribution to the Business Department, her

family, and community involvement. Lori spends lots of time mentoring students and creating

lesson plans. She even serves as an advisor for an Accounting Club on campus. Lori is very well

educated, especially in matters dealing with business management. She reads the Wall Street
Journal weekly and attends many training sessions to keep her education current. Lori is a

family-oriented woman. She has been married to her Husband Jim, a Professor in the History

Department, for six years. She has two children, a 5-year old boy named Evan and 3-year old

girl named Rose. Her influencers are her husband and co-workers. Lori takes a lot of advice

from her colleagues, especially the other female professors in her department. She frequently

goes to lunch with her colleagues where they talk about trends, their students, and their

families. These lunches and inter-office chats often result in lots of word-of-mouth advice. Lori

relies heavily on the emails she receives from Human Resources as her main source of

information about what is going on at the University.
Key       Self-          Primary           Influentials   Objectives   Strategies        Tactics
Publics   Interests      Messages
Female    1. Feeling     1. RAD can        Family,        1. To        1. Secure         PSA, radio
Employees     safe,          provide a     co-workers        raise        participatio   ad, fliers,
              educate        sense of                        awaren       n through      posters, t-
              d and          empower                         ess of       advertisem     shirts,
              empow          ment                            the          ents           catchy logo
              ered       2. RAD can                          R.A.D.    2. Reinforce      and slogan,
          2. Wants           provide                         course       the            newspaper
              to be          defense                         by 50%       importance     ads, guest
              able to        moves to                     2. To           of self-       speaker on
              take           take care                       raise        defense        radio, lawn
              care of        of self and                     attend                      signs, car
              themsel        family                          ance of                     stickers,
              ves and                                        the                         logoed
              family                                         course                      water
                                                             by 50%                      bottles
Female     1. Feeling    1. An active      Family,        3. To        1. Secure         PSA, radio
Students      safe          lifestyle      peers and         raise        participatio   ad, fliers,
              and           sometimes      friends,          awaren       n through      posters, t-
              having        calls for      authority         ess of       advertisem     shirts,
              fun           knowledge      figures           the          ents           catchy logo
           2. School        of self-                         R.A.D.    2. Reinforce      and slogan,
              work          defense                          course       the            newspaper
           3. Part-      2. Giving up a                      by 50%       importance     ads,
              time job      day to take                   4. To           of self-       Facebook
           4. Social        the course                       raise        defense        page,
              outings       could have                       attend                      Twitter,
                            a positive                       ance of                     guest
                            effect on                        the                         speaker on
                            your life in                     course                      radio, lawn
                            the long                         by 50%                      signs,
                            run                                                          logoed
                            3.                                                           water
                                                                                         bottles, car
                                                                                         stickers
   Wanna Hit This?




Secondary
Research
                    UNCW CARE: Collaboration for Assault Response and Education

       It has been evident through research that women on campuses hold a higher risk of

assault than women in the general population (Fisher, Cullen & Turner, 2000). At the

University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) in Spring 2004, two young women were

murdered by men that they knew. Following the murders, the university started working

diligently to make a resource for the students and community members in the form of a web

site known as Safe-Relate: Help with Violent or Abusive Relationships. This site is for anyone

who was affected by violence or worried for their safety (2009).

       UNCW used many strategies and tactics to continue the efforts in violence prevention.

Bennett-Johnson (1997) stated that schools play an important role in violence prevention,

therefore, students need to learn skills that are essential to resolving issues without resorting to

violence. In order for UNCW to build more awareness for prevention and safety on their

campus they started a program called UNCW CARE: Collaboration for Assault Response and

Education (CARE), which was based on violence prevention and intervention (2009). CARE also

expanded the Safe-Relate site to include topics such as sexual assault, stalking, and harassment.

Lee, Caruso, Goins & Southerland (2003) stated that a university community can benefit from

having a sexual assault awareness program because it would decrease negative attitudes

toward sexual assault. The university used a program during new student orientation to build

awareness among males and females about Safe-Relate and campus resources. Studies have

also found that during orientation many other universities include the same type of awareness

programs (Lee et al, 2003). UNCW went on to create the Student Behavior Intervention Team

comprised of university administrators that identified, investigated, assessed, and monitored
high-risk behaviors that students may have displayed (2009). In 1999, UNCW also initiated peer

educators who worked to reduce and eliminate the risk of sexual assault and sexual harassment

by heading presentations, campaigns, and programs to other students in the university (2009).

CARE was able to bring more awareness to violence prevention through a two-year program

called Weaving the Fabric of a Non-Violent University (2009).

       The many efforts from CARE proved to be beneficial. The introduction of the website,

along with the different programs and teams boosted their traffic and service use. The

program increased the contacts with students, guardians, and staff by 80 percent in the last

year of the project compared to the year before it. UNCW found that request for programs

provided by CARE such as Mixed Messages and Real Relationships were over 60 percent during

Fall 2007 and Fall 2008 (2009). UNCW used data from survey instruments and found that

during the programs students were becoming more aware of CARE services and the goals the

program was trying to convey. Ultimately CARE aimed for students to be aware that the

university had a comprehensive violence prevention and intervention program as well as being

aware of where to direct students who have had any violent encounters. About 60 percent of

students indicated that they acquired violence or safety information from UNCW staff members

stating the success in the programs.
                                         The Red Flag Campaign

       The Red Flag Campaign was a venture of the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence

Action Alliance. Created by college students, personnel, and community victim advocates the

Campaign started around the fall of 2005 with the purpose of educating and bringing awareness

to colleges and universities across the state of Virginia about the dangers of dating violence

among students. According to authors Fisher, Cullen, and Turner (2000), “For women who had

been raped or sexually assaulted, 9 of 10 offenders were known to the victim (boyfriend, ex-

boyfriend, classmate, friend, acquaintance, or co-worker”). Another author, Warshaw (1994)

stated, “In a study surveying more than 6,000 students at 32 colleges and universities in the

U.S….1 in 4 women had been victims of rape or attempted rape, 84% of those raped knew their

attacker, and 57% of the rapes happened on a date.”

       Friends and peers of college students who are victims and perpetrators of dating

violence between the ages of 17 and 22 are the target audience of the Red Flag Campaign. The

Campaign is meant to encourage friends or peers of a victim to ‘say something’ instead of

turning a blind eye to the violence they witness. The Red Flag Campaign’s slogan is, “When you

see a ‘red flag’ say something.” Authors Sellers and Bromley (1996) declared, “In 21% of college

dating relationships, one of the partners is being abused. That’s 1 in 5 relationships.”

       The goal of the Red Flag Campaign was to bring awareness to a serious issue of abuse

and violence, whether it is physical or emotional, in college relationships. The objectives of the

campaign were to educate the target audience about the “red flags” or warning indicators of

dating violence and to encourage them to intercede in the situation.

       The strategy of the Red Flag Campaign was to create interest of the topic before actually
launching and fully introducing the campaign. Researchers wanted to get students thinking and

talking about the issue of dating violence on college campuses. Ten colleges and universities

across Virginia were chosen in March of 2006 as test schools.

       The first tactic was to discuss the issue at hand with current college students by

organizing focus groups. In these focus groups students had an open dialog about subjects

pertaining to the topic. During the focus groups researchers also presented the participants with

a number of posters they were planning to incorporate into the campaign. The effectiveness of

this tactic was measured by the responses and opinions of the participants during the focus

group discussions.

       The second tactic was that prior to the posters being printed and displayed around the

campuses the Campaign distributed between 400 and 500 miniature red flags to four of the 10

chosen schools. Each of the flags had a statement such as, “She doesn’t let me hang out with

my friends. She says she should be enough,” “He makes me think I’m fat and stupid and no one

else would want me,” “I hate it when my boyfriend talks to other guys at parties,” “He said if I

really loved him I’d have sex with him,” and “If I want to get some I just need to get her wasted,”

printed on it. The effectiveness of this tactic was calculated by the reactions from students of

those campuses as well as student surveys created on Survey Monkey.

       After a few more student focus groups were conducted with the participants giving their

opinions some of the texts and graphics on the posters were edited before the final printing.

The production and introduction of the posters was the third and last tactic. Six double-sided

posters were created with three of them focused towards females and the other three focused

towards males. Four of the six posters were aimed at heterosexual relationships while the other
two aimed at same-sex relationships. Each of the posters focused on a different aspect of

unhealthy relationships: emotional abuse, coercion, jealousy, isolation, sexual assault, and

victim blaming. Authors Schwartz and Leggett (1999) stated that, “A survey of 388 female

college seniors showed that 79.3% of those sampled who reported having been raped or

sexually assaulted while intoxicated put all or part of the blame on themselves. 50% of the

women raped by force or threat of force also took on some degree of self-blame.” The

effectiveness of this tactic was measured by the results obtained from the final focus groups.

       In October of 2007 the Red Flag Campaign was officially launched on 18 Virginia college

and university campuses. In addition to being on campuses the Campaign also has a website

that acts as another source for information and support on how to help a friend, yourself, or

find help in your local community.

       The Red Flag Campaign is still continuing to garner attention for its efforts as well as for

its evaluation plans which played a major role throughout the entire creative process. Surveys

were distributed before and after the launch of the Campaign to assess the students’ reactions

and feelings toward the message of the posters and flags. Recently the Red Flag Campaign was

approved by the Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice and has

also been featured in several publications such as the Chronicle of Philanthropy and Designing

for the Greater Good. Presently the Campaign is in place at more than 100 colleges throughout

the country and in more than 27 states.
                                     Voices Against Violence

       According to McCauley et al. (1995) approximately 2 to 4 women are victims of violence

and approximately one of every four U.S. families experience domestic violence (p.737).

Domestic violence and sexual assault are some of the leading causes of injuries for girls and

women. “Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault,

and/or other abusive behavior perpetrated by an intimate partner against another,” (National

Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 2007, p. 1).

       Since 1999 “Voices Against Violence”, a campaign launched by the National Coalition

Against Domestic Violence (NCADV), has been banning together celebrities and other

prominent public figures in the fight to put an end to domestic violence. The list of “voices”

include actors, musicians, athletes, legislators, and political leaders who lend their name to the

cause. For the most part the celebrities lend only their name, but some lend their voice and

image in public service announcements.

       “Voices Against Violence” is a year-round campaign against domestic violence. This

campaign is to increase awareness of the underreported crime and to let your voice be heard

whether you are supporting the cause or are a victim of domestic violence. It gives victims or

people affected by domestic violence the knowledge that it is a problem and that something

should be done to end it. This campaign wants people to lend their “voice” to help put a stop to

domestic violence.

       Findings have indicated that domestic violence is an issue that is so commonplace that it

often goes unreported or prevented. “Responses to domestic violence have focused, to date,

primarily on intervention after the problem has already been indentified and harm has
occurred. There are, however, new domestic violence prevention strategies emerging, and

prevention approaches…” (Wolfe & Jaffe, 1999, p. 133). “Voices Against Violence” is a public-

awareness campaign used to further the fight to end domestic violence. Studies have shown

that public-awareness campaigns have shown decreases in the number of people who said

they: 1) were unsure of what to do about domestic violence; 2) thought no one else should

know when a husband beats his wife; 3) did not think reporting domestic violence happenings

was needed; and 4) thought the media made the problem of domestic violence bigger than it

should be (Wolfe & Jaffe, 1999, p. 140). Domestic violence can lead to many things. Violence

among partners can lead to consequences such as physical, psychological, social, and health

behaviors (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010). By providing awareness and

support, victims are more likely to take a stand and realize that it is a problem and that it

should be reported. “Voices Against Violence” can provide that awareness and support and

help to put an end to domestic violence.

Objectives

            Increase awareness of the underreported crime of domestic violence

            Use celebrities and prominent public figures to further the cause

            Decrease and/or put an end to domestic violence

            Increase participation of celebrities, prominent public figures, and the general public

             to further the cause

Target Audience

            Women in the United States

            Print, broadcast, and online media, both local and national
            Celebrities and prominent public figures willing to lend their voice

            Family members and or friends affected by domestic violence toward another

Strategies

            Provide national support for victims of domestic violence

            Create photos, public service announcements, promotional items, etc. to further the

             cause

            Provide links to any photos, public service announcements, or special items

             prepared by the celebrities and prominent public figures on the website

            Influence celebrities, prominent public figures, and general public to add their name

             to the list of “voices”

       “Voices Against Violence” works with celebrities and prominent public figures to let

victims of domestic violence know that they are there for them. They provide support for them

through their efforts such as providing their name to the list of “voices”, taking photos,

shooting public service announcements, or “other special items like David Wilcox’s song ‘Chain

of Anger’”. With domestic violence being one of the top underreported crimes “Voices Against

Violence” has been trying to raise awareness of this issue and generate support.

       This is a public-awareness campaign. Having these known figures supporting the cause

help others to feel as though this issue is an actual issue that needs to be dealt with. Providing

awareness through the website can help give the support to those in need.

       Celebrities and prominent public figures are constantly in the public eye. By becoming a

“voice” for this campaign can help their appearance by showing that they care. This campaign
can not only help victims but also lead to good publicity for well-known people. Those giving

their name to the cause can positively affect their image and potentially help someone’s life.

       Each objective of the campaign has been achieved or is being achieved, but the

campaign is on-going. There is no limit to how many “voices” needed to raise against domestic

violence. The list is open. The more people added to the list the more awareness and the more

support there will be. Victims of domestic violence should know that they are not alone and

that there should be something done. Voices Against Violence” can raise their awareness of the

problem that they are facing and provide support. Providing awareness had led to results such

as people realizing that domestic violence is an issue, it should be reported, and they can do

something about it. This campaign will continue to raise awareness, provide support, and help

to one day put an end to domestic violence.
                                    Violence Against Women

       Today, one in four college women are sexually assaulted. Many of these incidents go

unreported due to victims not reaching out for help. Many organizations around the world have

been created in order to help women who are assaulted. The United Nations Women

Organization discussed this issue in great detail. They state on their website, www.unifem.org

that “violence against women and girls is one of the most widespread violations of human

rights. It can include physical, sexual, psychological and economic abuse, and it cuts across

boundaries of age, race, culture, wealth and geography” (UN Women, Gender Issues, n.d.).

With more cases being reported each year on college campuses and the surrounding

communities, a large need for building awareness has come to light. According to research

sponsored by the U.S Department of Justice titled Sexual Assault On Campus: What Colleges

and Universities are Doing About It, “Schools are not the safe havens they once appeared to be;

college women are at higher risk for sexual assault than their non college-bound peers”

(Karjane, Fisher, and Cullen, 2005, p.1). Research and education need to take place in order to

raise awareness and thus decrease the number of women who become victims to violence.

       On September 13, 1994, President Bill Clinton signed the Violence Against Women Act.

This bill provided $1.6 billion for research and to prosecute those who act violently against

women. This bill was signed into a law by President George Bush in 2006. Even before the bill

passed in 1994, organizations have worked towards helping women who have been victimized.

(U.S. Department of, 2006). There is a department in the United States Justice Department that

works specifically with violence against women. In September 2009, the Justice Department

began a year long program to make violence against women more known throughout college
campuses. The department decided to partner this campaign with Sexual Assault Awareness

Month, which takes place in April.

       In April 2010, nine member of the Department of Justice leadership team traveled to 11

colleges throughout the United States. The group went to both private and public schools,

producing various events to help raise awareness. According to research produced by the

United States Justice Department named Justice Department Leadership Tour College Campuses

to Raise Awareness about Violence Against Women, written by Tracey Russo, “The program is

intended to develop and strengthen victim services in cases involving domestic violence, dating

violence, sexual assault and stalking on campuses” (Russo, 2010, p. 1).

       Before the year long tour began, researchers decided to focus this campaign towards

college age women. Touring to various campuses, and explaining ways to organize and deliver

the information became the primary goal of raising awareness. Teaching the campuses how to

educate their students and the surround community was the most logical approach.

       The overall objectives for this campaign are to raise awareness, educate and promote

unity on violence against women. The target audience is college age women at colleges and

universities throughout the United States. Joining the campus and surrounding community as a

whole will help to raise awareness and fight against those who assault women.

Strategies include:

   1) Show national support for this campaign and in general on violence against women

   2) Equip the colleges and universities that are visited with the proper tools and

       information to spread the word against violence
   3) Issue grants to various campuses in order to help build programs that fight violence

       against women

   4) Involve the local community in fighting against violence


       National recognition was achieved in the fact that these United States Justice

Department members travelled and conducted the events themselves. Throughout the past

years various government officials have spoken on this issue. Most recently was President

Barack Obama. According to the United States Justice Department, titled Archive for the ‘Office

on Violence Against Women’ Category-Celebrating International Women’s Day President

Obama spoke on the issue in his Presidential Proclamation stating, “I have also called on every

agency in the Federal Government to be part of the solution to ending violence against women,

and they have responded with unprecedented cooperation to protect victims of domestic and

sexual violence and enable survivors to break the cycle of abuse” (Russo, 2011, p. 1).

       Information and various forms of ways to prevent and protect women against violence

were gathered. Throughout the tour on each college campus, examples of violence in university

settings were given. Tables with pamphlets of information were set up in mainstream areas of

the 11 colleges. Arrangements for self-defense courses were organized. Different organizations

on the various campuses joined with the United Justice Department leadership team to help

inform the campus and community about violence and assaults against women.

       Grants were given to help different colleges raise awareness and offer information on

the effects violence has on women and the overall community. Before this campaign began,

over 30 schools had received grants from the United States Justice Department. Chris

Anastasia, a writer for The Signal, the College of New Jersey newspaper stated in an article that
the college received the grant twice, totaling in $181, 575.00 in funding for violence against

women on its campus. (Anastasia, 2005). Throughout this campaign schools applied and

received grants to fund programs and teach the community, especially women about violence.

       Community partners, organizations and law enforcement were also involved in the

events that took place on the tour. Author Tracey Russo in Justice Department Leadership Tour

College Campuses to Raise Awareness about Violence Against Women stated that they were

taught “about the various strategies being implemented by campuses to address sexual assault,

relationship violence and stalking, and to talk about the department’s commitment to working

with institutions of higher education to promote innovative ways of responding to violence

against women on campus” (Russo, 2010, p. 1). This helped raise awareness to the local

community as well as give them ideas of how to join with the college campus to fight against

violence.

       Hundreds of thousands of students were reached through this campaign. All objectives

were exceeded. Information was passed to various colleges throughout the United States. The

United States Justice Department continues to further research and support on violence against

women. Various campaigns and self defense course began based on inspiration from this

campaign.

       March 8 is marked as International Women’s Day. Tracy Russo, author of an article

written on the United States Justice Department website, Celebrating International Women’s

Day stated, “It is a fitting opportunity to reflect critically on how far we have come for equality,

and the great strides we have made in ending violence against women internationally” (Russo,

2010, p. 1).
       The issue of on campus crime against women is an ongoing concern. Objectives from

this campaign were exceeded, yet concerns still continue on this topic.
                                           Yale Fraternity Chant

        The issue of sexual victimization of women is an ongoing concern for colleges and universities

across the nation. According to research sponsored by the U.S Department of Justice titled Sexual

Assault On Campus: What Colleges and Universities are Doing About It, “Sexual assault on the Nation’s

college campuses has been receiving more attention lately. Schools are not the safe havens they once

appeared to be; college women are at higher risk for sexual assault” (Karjane, Fisher, and Cullen, 2005,

p.1). Key areas of concern in terms of on campus sexual victimization of women include whether

schools have a written sexual assault response policy, whether and how they define sexual misconduct,

and how students can report sexual victimization (Karjane et al., 2005, p. 3). The question then arises

over the definition of what is considered sexual victimization and if that definition differs according to

gender perceptions.

        On the night of October 13, 2011, the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity (DKE) led its pledges to the

Yale freshman dormitories located on Yale's Old Campus. As part of the pledge process, the pledges

proceeded to march through the dormitories chanting, “No means YES! Yes means ANAL!" under the

windows of the dormitories.

        A Yale student captured the pledge chant on video and uploaded the video to YouTube. Within

hours, the YouTube video was watched all over the Yale campus. It then went viral, garnering over

130,000 hits with the general public (Student Footage, 2010).

        That same night, members of the Yale Women's Center sent emails all throughout campus

recollecting the chant and calling the incident “hate speech” and “a call to sexual violence.”

        According to the Yale Daily News, after capturing wind of the campus outrage over his

fraternity's chant, DKE President Jordan Forney made a public statement calling the pledge chants

“inappropriate, disrespectful, and very hurtful to others.” He also said, “It was a serious lapse in

judgment by the fraternity and in very poor taste” (Gasso and Greenberg, 2010).
        However, DKE”s apology was not enough for the Yale Women's Center and the general public.

Since the chant, Yale University and the DKE fraternity have become the poster children for on campus

sexual victimization of women.

Objectives
    Understand the differences in gender perceptions of sexual victimization

       Uncover the differences of opinion in defining sexual victimization


Publics
    Yale University Student Body

       General Public

       Yale Daily News


        The Yale Student Body had mixed feeling about the DKE chant. According to a poll taken by the

Yale Daily News, 74% of the student body was offended by the chant while 26% were not. The article

also cited how many students were not surprised by the incident, with the opinion of one female

student being that, “sexist incidents have happened before at Yale... these types of incidents tend to

repeat themselves every year or two since there is not enough education about sexism and other

prejudices at Yale” (Gasso and Greenberg, 2010).

        The general public, on the other hand, is enraged. Cosmopolitan Magazine wrote an editorial

calling the chant “disgusting” (Ruderman, 2010). A blogger for the Huffington Post referred to the chant

as “aggressive misogynist behavior” (Lebresco, 2010). The comments section under the YouTube Video

include such comments as “Joking about rape is turning rape into a joke” and “This is frightening”, along

with 148 “dislikes” for the video ( Student Footage, 2010).

        Since the posting of the chant on YouTube, The Yale Daily News has been the dominant source

of information regarding the incident for both Yale students and the general public. However, The Yale

Daily News has taken a lot of criticism for their initial response to the incident. In an editorial overview
of the incident, the newspaper acknowledged that the chant was idiotic and should not be repeated.

However, the newspaper then went on to blame the Women’s Center for the public’s outrage, stating,

“And yet, as groups rushed to condemn the foolhardy DKE bros, they threw overwrought epithets, some

almost as absurd as the chants themselves... As the Center responded with histrionics, what could have

been an opportunity for our campus to maturely and gracefully reprove public stupidity and affirm

mutual respect turned into a daylong, private spat”(Lebresco, 2010).

        The sexual victimization of women on campus is a complicated issue that requires looking more

broadly into the sexual culture and gender relations of individual colleges and universities. An article

published one year prior to this incident in the Yale Daily News titled Making Our Campus Safer explains

that sexual victimization of women happens “because we live in a culture that creates and sustains

violence against women. Effectively preventing sexual violence requires a focus on its root causes, the

hetero-sexist expectations of male aggression and female passivity” (Saverin and Walstrom, 2009).

         DKE chant showcases the fact that sexual victimization and sexism is still very much prevalent in

today's college campuses. Even more prevalent is the uncertainty regarding what is considered sexual

victimization. This is no more prevalent than in the differing opinions of the student body, the general

public, and the Yale Daily Newspaper. The differing of opinions by such key publics shows that the

understanding of gender relations and sexual victimization is still in its infancy.

        In essence, the DKE chant proves that students need to be more educated on sexual

victimization and how to prevent it. The sexual culture between students needs to be assessed along

with an understanding of how customary sexism is within individual campuses. Finally, a common

definition of sexual victimization needs to be reached across both genders on order to begin to combat

sexual victimization of women on college campuses.
                                          REFERENCES

(2009). Self-relate and collaboration for assault response and education (CARE).Unpublished

       manuscript, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina.

Anastasia, C. (2005). Grant to help stop violence against women. The Signal, p. A3.

Bennett-Johnson, E. (1997). The emergence of American crime and violence on the college and

       university campus. College Student Journal, 31(1), 129-137.

Carmondy, D., Ekhomu, J., & Payne, B.K. (2009). Needs of sexual assault advocates in campus-

       based assault centers. College Student Journal, 43(2), 507-513.

Cascone, L., & McCord, K. (2011). The Red Flag Campaign. Retrieved from

       http://www.theredflagcampaign.org

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Intimate partner violence: consequences.

       Retrieved March 9, 2011 from

       http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/intimatepartnerviolence/ consequences.html

Fisher, B.S., Cullen, F.T., & Turner, M.G. (2000). The sexual victimization of college women.

       National Institute of Justice, 1-33. Retrieved from

       http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles1/nij/182369.txt.

Fisher, S., Cullen, F., & Turner, M., (2000). The Sexual Victimization of College Women.

       Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Justice.

Gasso, J., Greenberg, S. (2010, October 15). DKE apologizes for pledge chants. The Yale Daily

       News. Retrieved from http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/2010/oct/15/dke-

       apologizes-for-pledge-chants/
Karjane, H.M., Fisher, B.S., & Cullen, F.T. U.S. Department of Justice , National Institute of

        Justice . (2005). Sexual assault on campus: what colleges and universities are doing

        about it (NCJ Publication No. 205521). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Karjane, H.M., Fisher, B.S., & Cullen, F.T. U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of

        Justice. (2005). Sexual assault on campus: what colleges and universities are doing about

        it (NCJ Publication No. 205521). Washington, DC.

Leah Anthony Lebresco. (2010, October 19). Yale daily news wrong to condemn outrage in

        response to sexism [Web blog post]. Retrieved from

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leah-anthony-libresco/yale-daily-news-wrong-

        to_b_768336.html

Lee, R.W., Caruso, M.E., Goins, S.E., & Southerland, J.P. (2003). Addressing sexual assault on

        college campuses: guidelines for a prevention/awareness week. Journal of College

        Counseling, 6, 14-24.

McCauley, J., Kern, D. E., Kolodner, K., Dill, L., Schroeder, A. F., DeChant, H. K., et al. (1995). The

        “battering syndrome”: Prevalence and clinical characteristics of domestic violence in

        primary care internal medicine practices. Annals of Internal Medicine, 123, 737-746.

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. (2007). Domestic violence facts. Retrieved March

        4, 2011 from http://www.ncadv.org/files/DomesticViolenceFactSheet(National).pdf

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. (2007). Voices against violence. Retrieved March

        4, 2011 from http://www.ncadv.org/takeaction/VoicesAgainstViolence.php
Ruderman, Z. (2010, October 18). Yale fraternity chants “no means yes”. Cosmopolitan.

       Retrieved from http://www.cosmopolitan.com/celebrity/news/yale-fraternity-dke-rape-

       chant/

Russo, T. U. S. Department of Justice. (2010, April 16). Justice department leadership tour

       college campuses to raise awareness about violence against women. Message posted to

       http://blogs.usdoj.gov/blog/archives/689.

Russo, T. U. S. Department of Justice. (2011, March 8). Celebrating international women’s day

       Message posted to http://blogs.usdoj.gov/blog/archives/category/ovaw.

Saverin, D., Walstrom, S. (2009, September 29). Making our campus safer. The Yale Daily News.

       Retrieved from http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/2010/sep/29/saverin-and-

       walstrom-making-our-campus-safer/

Schwartz, M.D., & Leggett, M.S., (1999). Bad Dates or Emotional Trauma? The Aftermath of

       Campus Sexual Assault. Violence Against Women: 2, 134-147.

Sellers, C., & Bromley, M. (1996). Violent Behavior in College Student Dating Relationships.

       Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Violence Against Women. (2006). President signs h.r. 3402,

       the "violence against women and department of justice reauthorization act of 2005"

       (20060105-3). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office. Retrieved from

       http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2006/01/20060105-

       3.html.

UN Women, Gender Issues (n.d.) Violence against women. Retrieved from

       http://www.unifem.org/gender_issues/violence_against_women/.
Warshaw, R. (1994). I Never Called it Rape: The Ms. Report on Recognizing, Fighting, and

       Surviving Date and Acquaintance Rape. New York: Harper Perennial.

Wolfe, D. A., & Jaffe, P. G. (1999). Emerging strategies in the prevention of domestic violence.

       The Future of Children, 9, 133-144.

YaleDailyNews. (2010, October 13). Student footage of frat pledge on old campus [Video file]

       Retrieved from http://youtube.com/watch?v=CLh0RMpit1k&feature=player_embedded
  Wanna Hit This?




 Primary
Research
                                         Survey Analysis

       A survey was conducted about self-defense and R.A.D. with a purpose to assess the

attitudes of female employees and students. The researchers surveyed 113 participants. These

surveys were conducted throughout various locations at the Georgia Southern University

campus and voluntarily online at the participants’ convenience. The surveys were distributed

during the dates of March 30 to April 10. At the beginning of each survey and before taking the

survey online, a consent form was used summarizing the purpose of the study and an

approximate time the survey would take. The consent form stated that participant’s identities

would remain anonymous. An online survey software tool, www.Zoomerang.com, was used to

conduct the online surveys and to quantify the results for the online and distributed surveys.

       The survey consisted of 11 questions. The questions focused on self-defense education

and opinions. Researchers wanted to know how many participants knew of the R.A.D. course.

Surveys began with the question asking if participants were aware of the R.A.D. self-defense

course that was being offered on campus by the Department of Public Safety. The survey

showed that 75% of the participants did not know about the self-defense course that was being

offered.

       The survey showed that only 19% of students had attended a self-defense class,

program, course or training. Although the numbers of participants in self-defense courses were

low researchers wanted to know what other outlets students were using to educate themselves

in self-defense. Participants were asked to state the class, program, course, or training that

they received and researchers found that participants learned from martial arts such as karate
and taekwondo, previous colleges and universities, and the self-defense kinesiology course

offered on campus for students.

       To get a better understanding of why participants were not learning and utilizing self-

defense courses, researchers listed reason asked a question listing reasons for having not taken

any self-defense training. Participants were given eight reasons and was asked to rate each

reason with one being most likely and eight being the least likely reason. The results found that

58% of participants felt that not having time was the most likely reason they never attended a

self-defense course. Researchers found that classes’ being too expensive was the second likely

reason why 29% of participants did not attend self-defense courses.

       The survey questioned if participants were ever in a situation where they felt a need for

self-defense and found that 79% of participants have not felt this way before. The following

question asked participants if they knew anyone that has ever been attacked and 58% stated

that they knew someone who was attacked before. The survey went on to ask participants if

they thought self-defense knowledge could have prevented the situation and 29% of

participants felt that self-defense knowledge could have been beneficial in the situation.

       Researchers questioned participants on their confidence in the ability to stop a rape

attempt. Participants answered with 4% feeling very confident, 17% feeling pretty confident,

35% feeling somewhat confident, 19% feeling not confident at all, and 25% feeling that it would

depend on the attack and who the assailant was.

       The survey asked participants about what they preferred as a method for taking a self-

defense course rating different options that were given. The survey showed that 34% of
participants preferred a one day workshop, 29% preferred a class as a series, 22% preferred an

ongoing semester class, and 18% preferred a three day workshop.

       Researchers were interested in learning what factors would motivate participants to

sign up for self-defense course listing six reasons using a ranking system. Surveys indicated that

62% of participants felt that having a personal scare would be the most effective motivator.

Nineteen percent of participants felt that a friend’s recommendation would be the second most

likely motivation reason.

       With the emphasis on female employees and students the survey also questioned

whether the participant was an employee or student as well as the age. Fifty-four percent of

the surveys were taken by students and 46% by employees. The ages of the participants in the

survey ranged from 18-65.

       Conducting this survey allowed researchers to gain more information about the target

audience. Surveys showed the majority of participants who took the survey are not aware that

Georgia Southern University offered a R.A.D. course. Some on the most important results show

that participants have not been in any situation where self-defense was needed but having a

personal scare would be the most likely reason participants would engage in a self-defense

course. Few participants felt very confident about stopping a rape attempt also, but more than

half of the participants stated knowing a person who has been attacked before.
                                            Interview Analysis

        In order to gain more insight into the minds of the target audience for R.A.D. the researchers

performed 10 in-depth interviews. These interviews were conducted on a one-on-one basis with a

researcher using a prompt with specific questions and probes. Each of the researchers used the same

prompt. The researchers recorded each interview and began by reading the consent clause to the

participants. The participants were assured their identities and responses would remain anonymous.

        Five of the participants interviewed had never taken a self-defense course, and the other five

had previously participated in a self-defense course of some kind. Two participants stated they had

taken the self-defense course offered at Georgia Southern University for academic credit in the area of

kinesiology, another two participants took the R.A.D. course offered in March of 2011, and one

participant had taken a course in her hometown while she was in high school.

        Researchers began with the question of whether or not Georgia Southern University is a safe

campus. Seven participants stated they believe Georgia Southern University is a safe while three do not

believe so. One participant said, “I like to think that it’s a safe campus, but as of lately we’ve been

having a lot of robberies and theft…and all kinds of misdemeanors. Overall, I feel safe.” Of the

participants that consider Georgia Southern University to be a safe campus, each researcher noted a

sense of hesitancy in their response.

        Because of the general notion that Georgia Southern University is a safe campus researchers

concluded that is one of the primary reasons most females have not participated in a self-defense

course. One participant’s response as to why she has not taken a course was, “I feel like it is a safe

campus. I just haven’t actually even put time into it, to think about taking a self-defense class. It’s one

of those things like it doesn’t happen until it happens, but you probably should be more prepared.”

        When researchers asked the interview participants who had not taken a self-defense course if

anxieties or fears were other possible reasons for not participating all of the five stated they were not
afraid to attend the class alone, but they would feel more at ease with a friend present. The participants

that had previously taken a self-defense course all said something to the effect that the atmosphere of

the class was fun and comfortable.

        Of the five participants that had not taken a self-defense course, they all stated they were

unaware of anything of the sort being offered at Georgia Southern University. When one participant was

asked if she knew about the free R.A.D. course she answered, “Nope. Never heard of it.” All participants

said that in addition to being unaware of the course they also lead very busy lives and would have a

difficult time fitting anything else into their already hectic schedules.

        When asked what type of format (i.e. one Saturday, semester long class, twice weekly, etc.) of a

self-defense class that the participants would be more likely to attend, three out of five stated that a

one day class would be easier for them to take part in. The other two participants stated they would be

interested in taking a class that was held over a number of weeks. One of the participants that stated

she would be more inclined to take a self-defense class over an extended period of type said, “…start

me out at something basic and build me up. I would want to build up and learn so that it’ll stick.”

        Researchers asked the five interview participants who had already taken part in a self-defense

course if they could change or improve anything about the course they had taken, what would it be.

Two participants that had taken the self-defense course for academic credit both stated they would

have liked to practice more realistic moves taught by the instructor. One participant said, “Girls were

teamed up with girls, and guys were teamed up with guys…it’s a lot easier to throw a girl off of you

than a guy. I would’ve like practicing throwing someone heavier than 120 pounds off of me.” While

the other participant suggested, “definitely include more physical activity.”

        Two participants took part in the R.A.D. class that was offered in March of 2011. Both enjoyed

the course and did not have any suggestions or changes. One participant who had taken a self-defense
course while she was in high school had only one recommendation, that the classes be longer than 45

minutes at a time.

        The 10 interview participants were asked what methods of communication would be the most

effective way to inform them of an event, club, group, or class that was happening on campus. The use

of social media sites (i.e. Facebook and Twitter) and e-mail was the overall response from the

participants. Many of the participants said social media and e-mail would be the best way to inform

them of something because notifications go directly to their cell phones. Another popular response was

word-of-mouth. One participant said, “I told you I heard about the class from a girl in one of my

classes, so word-of-mouth is always good.”

        Participants also stated they notice fliers all across campus, but do not pay much attention to

them. “I’m not going to pay attention to a flier because there are millions of them and I’m not going to

stand in front of a bulletin board to read every flier,” said another participant. The majority of the

participants also said they would notice t-shirts with captivating slogans and logos. One participant said,

“Oh yeah, I love t-shirts! Especially if it’s on the back because I always read the back of people’s t-

shirts in class.” Another said, “I always read t-shirts, especially if a lot of people are wearing them

around campus.”

        The results gathered by the researchers while conducting in-depth interviews helped to

conclude a number of things pertaining to the awareness and participation of the target public of the

Rape Aggression Defense course. The first being that advertisements in the Georgia Southern University

campus newspaper, the George-Anne Daily, and fliers are not as effective as mediums such as a

Facebook page, Twitter account, e-mails, lawn signs, and t-shirts. Another is that due to already busy

schedules most potential participants do not have the time to spend taking part in a class such as this.

The feeling that Georgia Southern University is a safe campus is another reason why potential

participants have not taken the course. The last, and perhaps most important, piece of information
gained from the in-depth interviews conducted by the researchers is that a great majority of the target

public are simply unaware that this self-defense course even exists.
   Wanna Hit This?




Promotional
   Items
Logo
Flier
Letterhead
George-Anne Ad
MAIN SIDE OF LAWN SIGN
ALTERNATE SIDES OF LAWN SIGN
Front of T-Shirt




Back of T-Shirt
                                              Press Release




FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                       CONTACT:
                                                            Laura McCullough       912-478-3018

         Georgia Southern University Public Safety Hosts R.A.D. Women’s Self-Defense Course


STATESBORO, Ga., Oct. 01, 2011- Georgia Southern University’s Public Safety Department will be

offering a Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) Women’s self-defense course on Saturday, October 15 from

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. in the Multipurpose Room at the RAC.

    The R.A.D. women’s self-defense course teaches women about awareness, prevention and risk

avoidance to potentially violent situations. This course also helps women learn basic moves in order to

defend themselves in these situations. Assistant Director Administrative of Public Safety, Major Laura

McCullough, stated, “The RAD way of self defense is one of common-sense tactics that are easy to

learn, easy to master and easy to remember long after the class is over.”

    Each woman that attends the course will receive a manual that will outline the entire program and

give instructions for personal growth after the course is completed. Women who complete this course

will able to return and practice any time afterwards in the R.A.D. courses free of charge.

    Captain McCullough said, “RAD provides women the opportunity to identify the self defense tools

they already possess. It then teaches them how to use those tools and use them effectively to protect

and defend themselves.”

       The R.A.D. women’s self-defense course is free of cost to all women on Georgia Southern’s

campus. To register or for more information, please visit, www.georgiasouthern.edu/publicsafety.

                                                   ###
                                          News Article

STATESBORO, Ga. Sept. 22-Safety is not something that should be taken for granted. There are
no limitations on who can be a victim of an attack. Be prepared for those type of situations by
registering for the R.A.D. self-defense course offered by the Public Safety Department.

Women of Georgia Southern, both employees and students, are asked to attend a free self-
defense course that provides them with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and risk
avoidance, while progressing on to the basic hand-on defense training. The class will be held
Saturday October, 15, 2011 in the Multipurpose room at the RAC from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.

“This class is greatly beneficial,” says Officer McCullough, “It teaches women on campus how to
protect themselves in harmful situations, and I’m really proud to be a part of this great course.”

The course is a program of realistic self-defense tactics and techniques for women only. The
course begins with a strong foundation of awareness, risk reduction and avoidance strategies
then moves on to full-physical simulation.

Space is limited so be sure to register at the Public Safety webpage to reserve your spot now.

“The course really increased my self-confidence and my ability to protect myself,” says
graduate of R.A.D., “I definitely recommend that all women take it.”

For more information on the course call the Public Safety Department at 912-478-5234.
                                      Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

After reading the news article about the Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) women’s self-
defense course here on Georgia Southern’s campus, I think all women should attend. This
course seems like a great opportunity for women to learn skills and techniques needed to help
them handle potential situations.

I have heard of numerous situations where girls have been sexually assaulted. Some have been
while walking home at night and others were in the middle of the day. I understand that every
situation is different, but maybe some of them could have been prevented if the girls had taken
a self defense course.

I personally have taken the R.A.D. course here on campus and had a great experience. The class
took place on a Saturday and began at 8 a.m. Although this seems extremely early, it was worth
it. I signed up with a group of my friends to make it more entertaining, but it would have been
just as fun if I had signed up by myself. We learned how to become aware of harmful situations
and were even taught moves on how to physically defend ourselves.

Like news release about this course stated, the R.A.D. women’s self-defense class is free and is
for women only. The fact that we learned a ton of information at no charge made the class
even more worth it. I think all women should take this course because it will help them learn to
protect themselves.

Sincerely,
R.A.D. Addict
                                            Radio Script

       R.A.D. Systems/Sergeant Laugh McCullough of GSU’s Public Safety Department

Key Points:
 Definition of R.A.D.
 Target participants (female GSU students, faculty, and staff)
 Cost of the class (free)
 Date, time and location of class (Saturday; October 15, 2011; 8 a.m.-5p.m.; location
   Multipurpose Room)
 Websites (www.georgiasouthern.edu/publicsafety/rad; www.rad-systems.com)

Radio Script:
Question:     What exactly is the R.A.D.?

Answer:       R.A.D. stands for Rape Aggression Defense System. It’s a non-martial arts course
              that teaches women what to do and how to protect themselves should they ever
              get into a situation that calls for self-defense. The participants are taught
              common sense moves that are meant to help them get away from an attacker.

Question:     How much does the course cost and who is eligible to participate?

Answer:       The R.A.D. course offered by the GSU Public Safety Department is free and is
              open to female Georgia Southern University students, faculty, and staff.

Question:     Where can I find out more information about this R.A.D. course?

Answer:       You can go to www.georgiasouthern.edu/publicsafety/rad as well as www.rad-
              systems.com to find out specifics about the course itself. The R.A.D. course is
              offered internationally and each participant receives a certificate of completion
              at the end of the course. Once you’ve successfully taken the course you can take
              it as many times as you like for free at any location it is offered. Today over
              250,000 women have participated in the R.A.D. course world-wide Also look for
              posters, fliers, and lawn signs on and around campus that have upcoming dates
              and times the course is being offered.

Question:     When and where is the next R.A.D. course being held?

Answer:       The next class will take place on Saturday October 15, 2011 from 8 a.m. until
              5 p.m. in the Multipurpose Room at the RAC. We’re hoping to be able to offer
              this course more than once a semester, but that will all depend on the amount
              of participants interested and registered for the course.
                                       Public Service Announcement




Contact: Laura McCullough, Assistant Director Administrative of Public Safety
Phone: 912-478-3018
                                                                   Begin: September 19, 2011
                                                                         End: October 1, 2011
30 SECONDS: WOMEN’S SELF-DEFENSE
ATTENTION ALL WOMEN. HAVE YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW BEEN A VICTIM
OF SEXUAL ASSAULT? HAVE YOU EVER BEEN IN A SITUATION WHERE YOU
NEEDED TO DEFEND YOURSELF? LEARN TO PROTECT YOURSELF IN VIOLENT
SITUATIONS BY TAKING A RAPE AGGRESTION DEFENSE COURSE. THIS WOMEN-
ONLY COURSE IS FREE AND WILL TEACH YOU DEFENSE MOVES TO HELP YOU
GET OUT OF POTENTIAL VIOLENT SITUATIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO
FIND THE NEAREST R.A.D. CLASS IN YOUR AREA, VISIT WWW.RAD-
SYSTEMS.COM.
                  Photo News Release




Female student shows off the skills she learned in the free
R.A.D. self-defense course offered by GSU Public Safety
                      Department.

                   Photo by: Department of Public Safety
   Wanna Hit This?




Partnership
  Letters
September 1, 2011
Paul Michaud
Georgia Southern University Human Resources Department
P.O. Box 08104
Statesboro, GA 30460

Dear Mr. Michaud,

I am writing to offer the GSU Human Resources Department the opportunity to partake in a potential
partnership with GSU Public Safety in regard to our Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course. R.A.D. is a
certified self-defense course offered to all GSU female faculty and staff free of charge.

Currently, we find ourselves not garnering the participation of as many faculty and staff members as we
have hoped for. Therefore, we would like to offer Human Resources the opportunity to coordinate
private R.A.D. classes for any female faculty and staff member of Georgia Southern. We are willing to
work with your department to choose the best date and times to hold classes as well as assist in the
promotion and registration of the employee participants. In return, we hope the Human Resources
Department will do their part to heavily promote our R.A.D. class to current and future faculty and staff
members.

We at GSU Public Safety believe the safety of our fellow female employees is of the utmost importance.
We also understand that Human Resources strives to create and promote a work environment where
faculty and staff feel comfortable and protected. Therefore, we believe this partnership will be mutually
beneficial. By offering Human Resources the chance to coordinate private faculty and staff R.A.D.
classes, we can work together to create an even safer work environment while also empowering the
female employees we each work to serve.

I hope to hear from you soon in regard to this potential partnership and look forward to the possibility
of working together to raise awareness of R.A.D. while improving the safety of our fellow female
colleagues.

Sincerely,


Major Laura McCullough
Georgia Southern University Public Safety
P.O. Box 08072
Statesboro, GA 30458
912-478-3018
lmccullough@georgiasouthern.edu
September 1, 2011
Dr. Sandra J. Peacock
Georgia Southern University Women and Gender Studies Department
P.O. Box 08054
Statesboro, GA 30460

Dear Dr. Peacock,

I am writing to offer the GSU Women and Gender Studies Department the opportunity to partake in a
potential partnership with GSU Public Safety in regard to our Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.
R.A.D. is a certified self-defense course offered to all GSU female faculty and staff free of charge.

Currently, we find ourselves not garnering the participation of as many student and faculty members
from the Women and Gender Studies Department as we have hoped for. Therefore, we would like to
offer you the opportunity to coordinate a private R.A.D. class for any female student and/or faculty
members of your department. We are willing to work with your department to choose the best date and
time to hold the class. In return, we hope the Women and Gender Studies Department will do their part
to heavily promote our R.A.D. class to current and future female students and faculty members.

We at GSU Public Safety believe the safety of our students and faculty is of the utmost importance. We
also understand that the Women and Gender Studies strive to educate students on the past and present
issues of gender, including the oppression of women in today’s society. Therefore, we believe this
partnership will be mutually beneficial. By offering your department the chance to coordinate a private
department R.A.D. class, we can work together to educate female students and faculty about the issues
of gender imbalance and self-defense while simultaneously creating a safer learning environment for
everyone.

I hope to hear from you soon in regard to this potential partnership and look forward to the possibility
of working together to raise awareness and improve the safety the Women and Gender Studies
Department.

Sincerely,


Major Laura McCullough
Georgia Southern University Public Safety
P.O. Box 08072
Statesboro, GA 30458
912-478-3018
lmccullough@georgiasouthern.edu
September 1, 2011
Alexa Turpin
Georgia Southern University Office of Fraternity and Sorority Relation’s Panhellenic Association
P.O. Box 08097
Statesboro, GA 30460

Dear Ms. Turpin,

I am writing to offer the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Relation’s Panhellenic Association the
opportunity to partake in a potential partnership with GSU Public Safety in regard to our Rape
Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course. R.A.D. is a certified self-defense course offered to all GSU female
students free of charge.

Currently, we find ourselves not garnering the participation of Sororities like we had hoped for.
Therefore, we would like to offer the Panhellenic Association the opportunity to coordinate private
R.A.D. classes for any Panhellenic Sorority at Georgia Southern. We are willing to work with each
individual sorority to choose the best date and time to hold their class. In return, we hope the
Panhellenic Association will do their part to heavily promote our R.A.D. class to all Sororities at Georgia
Southern.

We at GSU Public Safety believe the safety of female students is of the utmost importance. We also
understand that the Panhellenic Association strives to create and promote a Greek environment where
Sorority members feel comfortable and safe. Therefore, we believe this partnership will be mutually
beneficial. By offering the Panhellenic Association the chance to coordinate private Sorority R.A.D.
classes, we can work together to educate and empower the girls we each work to serve.

I hope to hear from you soon in regard to this potential partnership and look forward to the possibility
of working together to raise awareness of R.A.D. and improve the safety of Georgia Southern’s
Panhellenic Sororities.

Sincerely,


Major Laura McCullough
Georgia Southern University Public Safety
P.O. Box 08072
Statesboro, GA 30458
912-478-3018
lmccullough@georgiasouthern.edu
September 1, 2011
Jordan Tompkins
National Organization for Women (NOW)
P.O. Box 8030
Statesboro, GA 30460

Dear Ms. Evans,

I am writing to offer NOW the opportunity to partake in a potential partnership with GSU Public Safety
in regard to our Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course. R.A.D. is a certified self-defense course
offered to all GSU female students, faculty and staff free of charge.

Currently, we find ourselves not garnering the participation of NOW members like we had hoped for.
Therefore, we would like to offer NOW the opportunity to participate in a private R.A.D. class, open to
any of your female members. We are willing to work with your organization to choose the best date and
time to hold the class. In return, we hope the members of NOW will do their part to heavily promote our
R.A.D. class to the Georgia Southern University community.

We at GSU Public Safety believe the safety of our female student population is of the utmost
importance. We also understand that NOW strives to advocate for gender equality as well as promote
the empowerment of women. Therefore, we believe this partnership will be mutually beneficial. By
offering NOW the chance to participate in a private R.A.D. class, we can work together to truly empower
your organization’s members by giving them the tools they need to feel safe and confident.

I hope to hear from you soon in regard to this potential partnership and look forward to the possibility
of working together to raise awareness while improving the safety of our fellow female colleagues.

Sincerely,


Major Laura McCullough
Georgia Southern University Public Safety
P.O. Box 08072
Statesboro, GA 30458
912-478-3018
lmccullough@georgiasouthern.edu
   Wanna Hit This?




 Planning &
Programming
                                 Fall 2011 Calendar: Campaign for R.A.D.
                                            August                September          October
Key        GSU Female Students &    Wk Wk Wk Wk Wk Wk Wk Wk                     Wk   Wk Wk     Wk
Public     Employees                  1     2    3     4     1      2    3  4   1    2    3    4
           Reinforce using on-
Strategy
           campus media outlets
Tactics    Radio Interview
           Newspaper Ad
           Letter to the Editor
           Photo News Release
           Press Release
           News Article
           Public Service
           Announcement

           Increase On-Campus
Strategy
           Presence
Tactics    Lawn Signs
           Brochures
           Fliers
           Business/Service Officer
           Escort Cards

Key
           GSU Departments
Public
Strategy   Secure partnership
Tactics    Partnership Letters
           Business Cards

Key
           R.A.D. Graduates
Public
Strategy   Recognition
Tactics    Certificates
           T-Shirts (additional)
   Wanna Hit This?




 Program
Modification
       We feel confident in our campaign. However, we realize that there may be parts that are not as

effective or work as well as we have planned. With this being said, there are some program

modifications that could be incorporated into the campaign. These things can help to improve certain

aspects of the campaign that did not reach certain expectations. These modifications may bring about

some budget increases or having to cut some things and adding others.

                                        ADDITIONAL LAWN SIGNS

       Lawn signs were created to put out around campus to increase awareness of the R.A.D. course

offered by the Public Safety Department. They also feature statistics relating to campus violence,

violence towards women, or sexual assault. The budget allotted us to have a total of ten signs made to

put out around campus.

       Ten signs may not be enough to reach the maximum number of our target audience. Georgia

Southern University has a large campus and ten signs may not be enough to cover the whole campus

and gain the attention that we want. Adding more lawn signs may help to increase the number of views.

By increasing the number of signs around campus you can increase the number of people that see and

read the signs, which can in turn increase awareness of the R.A.D. course offered.

       Adding more signs can allow for more options of statistics featured on one side of the lawn sign.

The statistics are used as a way to inform our audience that campus crime and violence towards women

is an issue. The following are some additional statistics that can be used:

      In the U.S., a woman is raped every two minutes

      33-54% of female college students revealed some form of sexual victimization

      84% of college men who committed rape said that what they did was definitely not rape

      According to the FBI, less than 10% of rapes are reported to the police

Each of these statistics was found on the Sexual Assault Response Team’s web site on

www.georgiasouthern.edu.
                                             SOCIAL MEDIA

       Many businesses now are relying on social media websites to help promote their business or

organization. These types of sites are ways connect with your audience, increase their awareness of

what is happening, and it is of no cost to you. The two popular sites recommended is Facebook and

Twitter.

       Both sites offer ways to “friend” or “follow” the audience you want to reach. There are options

of posting statuses, photos, videos, and more. They are efficient and effective ways of connecting with

your audience and promoting the R.A.D. course, as well as other things offered by the Public Safety

Department.

       The following are things that can be done with Facebook and/or Twitter:

      Providing additional information about the Public Safety Department and what it does and is

       involved in

      Posting photos of previous R.A.D. courses

      Posting videos of previous R.A.D. courses

      Posting statuses or “tweets” for others to comment on or “like”

      Informing and inviting people to events such as the R.A.D. course

      Sending out reminders of events going on within the department

      Incorporating a weekly/monthly safety tip

      Using the site to announce the Eagle Alerts

All of these options are things that can be done with much ease, little time consumption, and free of

charge. They help to increase awareness and reach out to your audience.

                                       OFFERING MORE CLASSES
       Our campaign is to increase awareness of the R.A.D. course offered and to ultimately increase

attendance of the course. If the campaign is successful in generating attendance, then offering more

classes per semester can be beneficial. You do not want to generate negativity or lack of interest in the

course because of the one-time offering of the course every semester.

       Class space for the R.A.D. course is limited. If the campaign increases interest in the women

wanting to take the course, then it is possible that the interested women may not have a spot in the

class. By offering more classes you can offer more options to the women interested in taking the class.

This way the students and employees of Georgia Southern interested in registering for the course are

not limited to a one-time chance of becoming a R.A.D. graduate during the spring and fall semesters.

       There could be multiple reasons for women not attending the course when offered. They may

not have heard about the course, the scheduled class time does not fit their schedule, or the class has no

more space for other women interested in registering. Each of those reasons could be grounds for

offering more than one R.A.D. class during the semester. Offering more than one class gives interested

women the opportunity to become a R.A.D. graduate.

                                       OFFERING ITEMS FOR SALE

       The average cost for the R.A.D. course for women is about $25. The Georgia Southern Public

Safety Department offers the class at no charge to participants. By offering the course for free, more

women may be more willing to register for the course. However, could the Public Safety Department or

the university be missing out on some sort of revenue from the course? There are other ways of earning

some sort of revenue from the class and still making it free for the students of the course.

       Offering items for sale to the graduates of the course could be a way to bring in some sort of

revenue. Items such as t-shirts, water bottles, or bumper stickers are just a few options that we believe

graduates of the course would be interested in purchasing. Not only would this bring in some revenue,

but it can also increase awareness of the course through free advertisement.
       T-shirts can include the logo on the front left pocket area and the logo and slogan “Wanna Hit

This?” on the back. Also the department’s name can be included on the back. This gives something that

the graduates can take away from the course and can be seen by other women on campus.

       Water bottles with the logo and the departments name can also be offered. This is something

that can be used repeatedly and can still be seen by others. They can feature the R.A.D. logo created for

this campaign along with the slogan.

       Car or bumper stickers can also be created. They can say “I Hit That” or “I Hit It”. It will be for the

graduates to have to show that they completed the course. They can also feature the R.A.D. logo so that

readers of the sticker can get some idea of what the message means.

       The three options of items for sale are not limited to just those particular items. The following

are some other options that can be used:

      Key chains

      Rape whistles

      Calendars

      Buttons, pins, badges

      Drink koozies

      Pepper spray covers

      Pens, pencils

      Cups

      Reusable bags

      Hats, visors

      Mouse pad

      Frisbee
Each of these items will include at least the R.A.D. logo, the R.A.D. slogan, and/or the department name.

                                              CONCLUSION

       These program modifications are offered as other ways to help improve the campaign if there is

a need for them. We feel as though the campaign and the R.A.D. course can benefit from these

modifications if they are necessary. These modifications may call for a budget increase or for cuts of

other portions of the campaign. Additional lawn signs, social media, and offering items for sale can all

help the campaign. They can help to gain more publicity for the course. They can also offer more

incentives to the attendants of the course. Each suggestion is something to consider if the campaign

needs to be modified.
  Wanna Hit This?




Appendix
                  Spring 2011 PRCA 4339 PR Campaigns—Public Safety/R.A.D. Survey


1. Are you aware that the Georgia Southern University’s Department of Public Safety offers a Rape

Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) self-defense course?

   A. Yes


   B. No


2. Have you ever attended a self-defense class, program, course, or training?

   A. Yes


   B. No


   C. If so, what was the class, program, course, or training? ___________________________


3. If you have not taken any self-defense course training, what are your reasons? Please rank the

following in order from 1-8, with 1 being the most likely reason and 8 being the least likely reason.

       _____ I feel safe and don’t think it’s necessary.

       _____ I don’t have time.

       _____ Classes are too expensive.

       _____ I’m a survivor of violence and don’t want to confront my past.

       _____ I cannot seem to find a good class in my geographic area.

       _____ I’m too intimidated.

       _____ I don’t feel I’m capable of protecting myself—not realistic.

       _____ I don’t believe women in general are capable of protecting themselves.

4. Have you ever been in a situation when you needed self-defense?

   A. Yes
   B. No


   C. Not sure


5. Do you know anyone who has been attacked?

   A. Yes


   B. No


   C. Not sure


6. If so, do you think self-defense knowledge could have prevented the situation?

   A. Yes


   B. No


   C. Not sure


7. How confident are you in your ability to stop a rape attempt?

   A. Very confident


   B. Pretty confident


   C. Somewhat confident


   D. Not confident at all


   E. It would depend on the attack and who the assailant was


8. If you were to take a self-defense course, what format would you prefer? Please rank the following in

order from 1-4, with 1 being the most preferred and 4 being the least preferred.

       _____ Workshop—one day only, approximately six hours, full physical participation
       _____ Workshop—three days, three hours, full physical participation

       _____ Class as a series—series of classes, such as 10 classes meeting one day a week,

       full physical participation

       _____ Ongoing class—meets on an ongoing basis, such as the Kinesiology self-defense

       course meeting throughout one semester, full physical participation

9. What factors would motivate you to sign up for self-defense training? Please rank the following in

order from 1-6, 1 being the most effective and 6 being the least effective.

       _____ A friend’s recommendation

       _____ Seeing a media story on TV about self-defense

       _____ Reading about self-defense in a magazine or newspaper

       _____ Seeing a poster or flier advertising a class

       _____ Having a personal scare

       _____ Wanting to find training for someone you care about

10. What is your Georgia Southern classification?

   A. Employee


   B. Student


11. What is your age? _____
                                            Interview Guide

The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and students of Georgia

Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course. This interview is

voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this interview grants the

usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for refusing or failing to

complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’ identities will remain

anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you consent to this interview

please state your name and yes that you consent.

For those who have taken a self-defense course:

   1. What self-defense course have you taken?


              o What was the format of this course?


   2. What was your reasoning for taking the course?


               o Own safety?


               o Went with a friend?


               o For credit/extra credit?


   3. What did you like about the course?


   4. What did you not like about the course?


               o What would you change?


   5. Do you feel that after taking that class you can now defend yourself?


              o     Have you forgotten specific moves?
   6. Do you think Georgia Southern is a safe campus?


              o What makes you feel that it is safe?


   7. What methods of communication would be the most effective way to inform you of an

      event/club/group/class on campus?


              o Flier/poster


              o Bulletin board


              o Website


              o Social media


              o Email


              o T-shirt


              o Newspaper/magazine article


              o Word-of-mouth


Those who have not taken a self-defense course:

   1. What makes you feel GSU is a safe campus or not?


             o If answer “yes”: Is that why you have not taken a self defense course?


             o If answer “no”: Then why have you not taken a self defense course?


   2. Do you think women can defend themselves?


              o Is this realistic?
3. What fears or anxieties do you have about taking a self defense course?


           o Not strong enough?


           o No one to go with?


           o I will be judged.


4. What would motivate you to take a self defense course?


          o If someone you know was attacked?


          o You yourself came close?


          o Credit/ extra credit?


5. What would be a reasonable request, with respect to time, that you could dedicate to learning

   self-defense? Weeks, hours, etc.


6. Are you aware of self-defense course options at Georgia Southern?


           o More specifically, R.A.D?


7. What methods of communication would be the most effective way to inform you of an

   event/club/group/class on campus?


       o Flier/poster


       o Bulletin board


       o Website


       o Social media
           o Email


           o T-shirt


           o Newspaper/magazine article


           o Word-of-mouth




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.
This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant A: My name is (anonymous) and yes I consent.

Moderator: What self-defense course have you taken?

Participant A: I took a course at that was provided by my high school back in Marietta. I don't remember

the name of it though. If I think about the name I’ll let you know.

Moderator: Alright can you tell me about the course? What was the format?

Participant A: It was a girls-only class that taught us different moves and stuff to protect ourselves in

some sort of bad situation. There were a few classes that we went to over like a week I think. It’s been

about two years since I took the class so.

Moderator: Oh ok. What was your reasoning for taking the course? Did you go for yourself or with

friends?

Participant A: Well, I took the course because mainly I wanted to. I mean my friends were going to take

it with me too so that helped a lot and of course my mama thought it was a good idea. I was the one

that told them about the class though. I thought it would be a good way for me to learn some moves

and things to do if I was to ever, God-forbid, be attacked.

Moderator: Yeah that’s good. What about the class did you like?

Participant A: The course did a really good job of keeping the moves simple but effective. The trainer

leading the course was super friendly and knew what she was talking about. She tried to make the class

serious, but wanted us to have fun while we were there, you know? I didn’t get bored or like constantly
look at the clock for when it was time to go.

Moderator: Well that’s good. So was there anything you didn’t like about the course?

Participant A: Well I liked the class and all but I guess there was one thing. The classes, in my opinion

were kind of short. They only lasted 45 minutes each. I would have thought they would’ve at least been

an hour long, at least. That was really my only complaint about the course that I can think of.

Moderator: So you would want the class to be longer?

Participant A: Yeah. I know that sounds kind of odd, but I just thought it seemed like it went by really

fast and we only had a little time to learn. I think that if it was longer we would have had time to like I

don’t know learn more or something. That’s the only thing that I can think of that I didn’t really like.

Moderator: Ok, so longer class time to learn. So after taking that class do you feel like you can defend

yourself now if the situation were to come up?

Participant A: Oh yeah I definitely trusted myself and my ability a lot more after taking the course. I

mean I think that if I had to hurt someone or get away from someone I could probably do it. Like I said if

the class were longer I might could have learned some more things, but I think if I had to defend myself I

could do it, maybe.

Moderator: Have you forgotten specific moves since the class?

Participant A: Well yeah I’ve forgotten some moves but only because I haven’t practiced them any since

I took the class, which has been a while ago. Fortunately I haven’t had to use them so that’s good.

Moderator: Yeah that is good. Are there any moves that you do remember?

Participant A: Yeah I remember some.

Moderator: You think you remember enough that would help you to get away or defend yourself if an

attacker was to approach you?

Participant A: Well yeah I think that I remember enough to at least give me enough time to run away.

Like I remember certain kicks and things that can bring someone to their knees. That could help me you
know?

Moderator: Alright, next question. Do you think Georgia Southern is a safe campus?

Participant A: Well, yeah, I think this is a safe campus. I haven’t ever really felt unsafe here. I think it’s

safe, for the most part.

Moderator: What makes you feel that it is safe?

Participant A: There’s those emergency box things all over campus. Those are neat. I see the university

police all the time riding around campus and stuff. Oh and I heard from a friend that they do this escort

thing. I thought that was really cool. I didn’t know about that at all.

Moderator: That is pretty neat. I just recently heard about that myself. Alright so are there any methods

of communication that are good ways of informing you about something going on campus?

Participant A: Signs. There are signs and posters and fliers and things all over. Especially in Russell Union

on that one big board in the hallway area. But I hate when people pass out fliers. To be honest I really

just throw them away. I have noticed that there is more stuff being advertised closer to Russell Union.

But like this semester I’m only on one side of the campus mostly so I think that like maybe there could

be more things on the other side rather than just around Russell Union. Like in the IT Building, I barely

see stuff down there and I spend a lot of time on that side of campus.

Moderator: What about other ways like Facebook, The George-Anne, shirts, and other things?

Participant A: Oh yeah Facebook can work. Sometimes I get annoyed by the invitations and things. Oh

my gosh I mean I get like at least three a day. But I’m really bad about not really reading the paper. I

usually just get it and like skim through it. Gives me something to do in my boring classes. I like t-shirts,

especially free ones. I guess I read shirts, but if you’re talking about getting the word out about

something before it happens I wouldn’t really think that shirts would do that much help. But I mean they

can work a little.

Moderator: Ok well that wraps it up. Thanks for doing this for me.
Participant A: Oh no problem.




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you
consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant B: (Anonymous). Yes.

Moderator: What self-defense course have you taken?

Participant B: I took the self defense course for women here at school like a month or so ago. It was in

the Bishop Building over there by the football stadium.

Moderator: Oh so you took the R.A.D. class offered by the Public Safety Department?

Participant B: Yeah. That’s what it was. I couldn’t think of the name.

Moderator: So tell me about the class.

Participant B: Ok so we were at the Bishop Building in one of the big meeting rooms in there and all the

tables and stuff were up against the wall. That way we would have plenty of room to you know do the

moves. The instructors showed us the moves and then we would copy everything that they did. They

would watch us and stuff. Then at the end, well we, which was about eight hours total we did this thing

that they called, um, simulation. This was where like we got put in sort of like, um, real life situations

where we would use the moves that they had taught us before. This guy had on a big padded suit and

we like really got to hit him. Everybody did the simulation things and the instructor lady, I forgot her

name, would tell us if we did it right or not.

Moderator: Sounds like a good class.

Participant B: Yeah I liked it. I felt good about it. We were told over and over about how the class was to

help us like get away not be violent. They said, um, running away, if that was possible then definitely do

that first instead of using violence. It was like listening to my mama. You know what they always say,

violence is never the answer.

Moderator: Yeah I’ve heard that before. Ok so why did you take the class? What was your reasoning for

taking it? Own safety? Went with a friend? For credit/extra credit?
Participant B: I took it because I wanted to. I did bring a friend with me though. I um, I liked how I felt

after the class. I actually felt like I learned something. My friend liked it too. We went back to our dorm

and told like all our friends about it. I think we may have even showed them some moves.

Moderator: So it was your idea to take the class?

Participant B: Yeah. I heard about it from some girl in one of my classes and thought I would be cool to

learn some stuff. But like I said I did take someone with me. I didn’t want to go all by myself.

Moderator: What did you like about the course?

Participant B: I liked everything about it. My favorite part was the simulation. It was a little embarrassing

but it was fun. We got the chance to kind of prove to ourselves and the instructors that we really did

learn the moves. It kind of, um, gave me a sense of confidence. That I could actually really defend myself

in a real dangerous situation.

Moderator: So was there anything that you didn’t like about it?

Participant B: It was kind of long. It lasted from um eight in the morning until four that afternoon.

Moderator: Yeah that is an all day event.

Participant B: It was just a lot to take in all at one time in just one day. Maybe if they spread the class

out into sections, maybe like three Saturdays in a row or something.

Moderator: Ok so Saturdays. Would that be the best day to have the class?

Participant B: Yeah just because of class and things. At least on Saturday you know that you really don’t

have anything else that you need to do because it’s the weekend. Maybe night times during the week

could work for some people, but for me Saturdays are definitely better for things like that.

Moderator: Ok so now that you’ve taken the course do you think that you can defend yourself?

Participant B: Yeah, I think if it came up I could put up a good fight. My confidence increase dramatically

after the course. Um, I can’t say for sure that I could get away, but I think I have a better chance now

than I did before I took the class definitely.
Moderator: Are there any moves that you remember that could help you in possible future situations?

Participant B: I remember that using your leg power to kick the attacker is the best option, especially for

women. I know that I don’t really have upper body strength and they said that is usually common for

women. Another thing, which might sound funny, was poking them in the eyes or throat. I kind of

laughed at first when they told me that, but I can definitely see how it can work and hinder the attacker.

Moderator: Seems like you remember some good things. You think there are moves that you have

forgotten or won’t be able to use without the help of the instructor?

Participant B: I have forgotten certain moves simply because I don’t practice them like they

recommended, but they did give us a manual that have them in there I think. I kind of feel like it’s not

really about memorizing all the moves as it is knowing the areas of the attacker that can help you get

away and knowing the quickest way to stop the attacker from actually hurting you.

Moderator: Do you think Georgia Southern is a safe campus?

Participant B: Overall I think that Southern is a safe campus. The police do a good job of patrolling and

making sure everything is running smoothly. Um, I do get a little scared walking in the dark by myself.

Like when I walk to my car from the library at night or something I do get a little scared, but I usually

have someone walking with me. Definitely believe in safety in numbers.

Moderator: What makes you feel that it is safe?

Participant B: Nothing has ever happened to me or to anyone that I know personally, so maybe I’m just

oblivious to what happens. I just feel like as long as I have someone with me, I would feel fine.

Moderator: Well that’s good. Ok so what kinds of methods of communication are the most effective

way to inform you of an event/club/group/class on campus?

Participant B: You mean like posters and things?

Moderator: Yeah things like fliers, emails, t-shirts, newspaper articles, or word-of-mouth.
Participant B: I think all of those are good. I see posters and things all over campus. There are just so

many places to post things. I told you I heard about the class from a girl in one of my classes, so word-of-

mouth is always good.

Moderator: Any others?

Participant B: Yeah email is good. I know I check my email multiple times a day so that is a good way to

let me know about something going on. Oh yeah and Facebook of course. Everyone has a Facebook.

Moderator: Ok well thank you so much for your help.

Participant B: Oh you’re welcome.




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant C: (Anonymous) and yes I consent.
Moderator: First of all, thank you for participating. Let’s get started. Um, what self-defense course have

you taken? Was it here at Georgia Southern or somewhere else?

Participant C: It was the RAD course here on campus. I took it in March on a Saturday.

Moderator: And what format was this course?

Participant C: It was one class that lasted from 8am-4pm. We had a break for lunch but otherwise we

were there all day.

Moderator: Alright. Great. What was your reasoning for taking the course? Like did you go for own

safety or did you go because of a friend or for school extra credit?

Participant C: I mainly went to learn how to defend myself against an attacker, but it made it more fun

that I went with a friend.

Moderator: What did you like about the course?

Participant C: Instead of just learning the moves, we got put in real situations and had to work our way

out of them. It made it seem so real.

Moderator: What did you not like about course? Or what would you change about it to make it better?

Participant C: Nothing, I thought it was taught well and it wasn’t at all boring; like I thought it might be.

Moderator: Do you feel that after taking the class you can now defend yourself?

Participant C: I learned a ton and it was cool that we got to actually practice. I feel like I will for sure

remember some moves if I am ever in a situation that might be dangerous. The moves we learned would

be useful.

Moderator: Have you forgotten specific moves or tactics since taking the course?

Participant C: I have forgotten a few things, but all in all I feel much more confident in being able to

defend myself.

Moderator: Do you think Georgia Southern is a safe campus?
Participant C: For the most part yes. Of course we hear about robberies a good bit but as for attacks and

rapes, I don't think they are very prominent. If they are, I have not heard about them.

Moderator: What methods of communication would be most effective way to inform you of a class on

campus?

Participant C: I would say fliers and emails. But probably the most beneficial would be by just getting the

word out.

Moderator: Ok, thank you for your time.




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant D: (Anonymous). Yes I consent.

Moderator: Okay! So to begin, what self defense course have you taken?
Participant D: I took the self-defense course offered through GSU- The one I got school credit for as a

kinesiology class.

Moderator: Can you explain the format of the class? Such as when you met an-

Participant D: We met three times a week for an hour. Um, I think it was Monday, Wednesday, and um,

Friday from like, ten to eleven in the morning. The instructor would show us moves and then we would

practice them with our partner.

Moderator: Okay. What was your reasoning for taking the course?

Participant D: The reason I took this course was, uh, I didn’t like any of the other kinesiology class

options. (Laughs). I guess this seemed like it would be more fun than weight training or something. I

wound did it with my friend Casey. We thought it would be a fun class to take together. Plus, we were

the partners and hit each other and stuff (laughs).

Moderator: Did you want to take it for your own safety?

Participant D: I mean, yeah that was definitely a plus in taking the class. I was hoping I would learn how

to really defend myself by the time the course was over.

Moderator: Well, do you feel like you were able to defend yourself after taking the course?

Participant D: Nope! Honestly that class was a joke. There were too many people in the class and it was

only for an hour. By the time we got warmed up and he taught us the moves, we would have like, no

time to practice. I guess I couldn’t take it seriously because I would practice the moves on my friend

Casey. We laughed the whole time.

Moderator: So you did not learn anything that could help you defend yourself?

Participant D: I mean, he taught us stuff, but I forgot it all. Like we practiced it like once or twice then I

never used it again. Like If I were walking down the street tonight and was attacked, I would have clue

what to do. Like, I would just be frozen. None of what I learned in that class stuck.

Moderator: So what did you not like about the course?
Participant D: It just wasn’t serious. Most girls just took it because they thought it was a fun elective. It

wasn’t focused in self-defense. I mean, it was obviously. But that wasn’t the main reason the girls took

the class. It was so they could take an easy, fun elective for kinesiology.

Moderator: What suggestions or changes do you have for future classes then?

Participant D: Um, I- I would definitely make it more focused on self defense. I don’t know how. But

make sure the girls in the class really want to be in the class because they want to learn self defense and

will actually take it, uh, seriously. Not just for fun and stuff.

Moderator: Okay, well now moving in a slightly different direction, do you think Georgia Southern is a

safe campus?

Participant D: (Laughs). With all those Eagle Alerts? Umm, well I guess technically it is because all those

robberies and stuff happen off campus in apartment complexes. But nothing actually happened on-

campus. But taking that all into consideration, I would say no. I am always concerned about getting

robbed at gunpoint because of all those Eagle Alerts.

Moderator: What about getting raped?

Participant D: I mean, yeah. But you never hear about rapes on campus. Like, I have never gotten an

Eagle Alert about a rape so it is not in my head as much.

Moderator: Do you think rapes are committed at GSU?

Participant D: Oh, of course. But people don’t like to talk about it. Maybe if I heard more about it, I

would be more aware of it.

Moderator: Okay, one last question. What methods of communication would be the most effective way

to inform you of an event/club/group/class on campus?

Participant D: Um, like a flier?

Moderator: Yes. Are there any others?

Participant D: Well, I always see fliers on campus. Also like, event groups on Facebook.
Moderator: What about a T-shirt?

Participant D: Um, not really…unless it is really flashy or gets my attention.

Moderator: Okay, which of those mediums helps you to remember the most?

Participant D: Uh, the Facebook group because there is always, like, that reminder in the little corner of

your screen (laughs).

Moderator: Okay, Any last comments you would like to say?

Participant D: Um, no, that's it.

Moderator: Okay! Thank you so much for your time.




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant E: (Anonymous). Yes I consent.

Moderator: What self-defense course have you taken?

Participant E: I took a self-defense course as one of my P.E. [physical education] credits here at Georgia

Southern.

Moderator: What was the format of the course? How often did you go?
Participant E: We went every Monday and Wednesday for 50 minutes and we had a book, but we never

actually used the book. I don’t know how you use a book in self-defense (laughs). It was mainly actually

doing stuff and all of our tests were like showing him [the instructor] what we learned.

Moderator: OK, so demonstrating the physical moves that you had learned?

Participant E: Yeah.

Moderator: So what was your reasoning for taking the course? Just to get credit for it or did you want to

know how to protect yourself?

Participant E: Um, well I had already taken all of my P.E.’s, but I was one credit hour short so I decided

I’d take another P.E. I also love to run. I usually run three miles in the morning and three miles at night

and I usually run at Mill Creek so I figured it might be helpful to know how to protect myself if I’m

running in the dark at Mill Creek (laughs).

Moderator: That’s very true. So what did you like about the course?

Participant E: I like that we actually…we weren’t shown stuff, we actually did all of the physical moves

and everything. I like the fact I can break a knee cap with one finger (laughs).

Moderator: So you remember moves from the course? And you could actually defend yourself if you

needed to?

Participant E: Oh yeah! I do it to my sister sometimes just when she makes me mad. Like throw her on

the ground (laughs). I’m just trying to keep up with my training, you know? (Laughs).

Moderator: What was your least favorite thing about the course? If you could change something, what

would it be if anything?

Participant E: Um, probably the fact that it was a co-ed course, but I guess since it was a University

course or whatever they had strict rules. So girls would be teamed up with girls and guys would be

teamed up with guys and, um, it’s a lot easier to throw a girl off of you than to throw a guy off of you,
but I mean, I would’ve liked practicing throwing someone a little heavy than 120 pounds off of me

(laughs.)

Moderator: So you would change the whole guys on guys and girls on girls thing?

Participant E: Yeah. I mean, I get that it could be a little awkward, but at the same time…

Moderator: You’ve got to learn.

Participant E: Right.

Moderator: Do you think that GSU is a safe campus?

Participant E: It has its moments.

Moderator: So…is that a yes or a no?

Participant E: I think overall it’s a safe campus. Um, I despise the fact that if you’re in the library at 3

a.m. and you come out its pitch black dark. They have no lights in the back of the library and the escort

service stops at 1:30 a.m. so you have no one and you have to walk to your car by yourself, but if you

park near the library you get a parking ticket. So it’s a lose-lose situation. I can a parking ticket or I can

get raped (laughs).

Moderator: What methods of communication would be the most effective way to inform you of an

event/club/group/class of campus? Not just a self-defense class, but anything. What do you notice the

most? Do you notice fliers, bulletin boards, websites, or social media?

Participant E: I’m a huge Twitter junkie. If it’s on Twitter I’m going to notice it. I got a Tweet this morning

from GSU about graduating seniors donation $20.11 as their senior gift (laughs). If it’s on Twitter I’m

going to get it. Twitter comes directly to my phone. I’m not going to pay attention to a flier because

there are ten million of them and I’m not going to stand in front of a bulletin board to read every flier.

Moderator: What about emails? I know we [students] get the weekly E-Buzz…

Participant E: If it comes in the weekly E-Buzz or in an EagleGram they’re going to be deleted. I have

those emails going straight to spam. I never even look at them.
Moderator: What about t-shirts? Like if you saw…

Participant E: (Interrupts). Oh my gosh! I love t-shirts! I would so want a t-shirt! (Laughs.)

Moderator: OK. In this self-defense class you get to practice the moves you learn on a fully-padded man

so we’re thinking of having a picture of a padded man and the slogan of “Hey, Wanna Hit This?” because

you get to learn how to hit it and then actually hit it. So if you saw a person with a t-shirt on that said

that, what would you think? Obviously it has a little bit of a sexual innuendo because sex sells, but would

you be interested and what to find out more?

Participant E: Um, personally I think the slogan is hilarious. It’s great! I would totally take notice of that

shirt and probably ask the person wearing it about it.

Moderator: So you would notice a t-shirt with a catchy slogan like that one?

Participant E: Oh yeah, I love t-shirts. Especially if it’s on the back because I always read the back of

people’s t-shirts in class.

Moderator: Do you read the George-Anne?

Participant E: I skim it.

Moderator: If you saw that same slogan and man would you notice it?

Participant E: Probably if it was on the front. Usually I judge the George-Anne by the front. Like this past

one had the cheerleaders up in a stunt on the front, so I grabbed it. The last one had like, SGA on the

front and I passed it up. So if it was on the front, yes I would notice it.

Moderator: Do you have any other comments that you would want to make? Any suggestions for this

women’s self-defense class?

Participant E: I think it would be amazing, but it’s just a random thought. I had a friend who did a

runner’s self-defense class in Atlanta and they not only taught them self-defense against people, but

also self-defense against animals. Like if a dog came up and attacked you while you were out running,

how to safely get away from the animal. I think that would also be helpful to learn. Especially in a college
community because people always let their dogs out or something and I’m terrified of dogs (laughs). So I

think that would be a pretty cool thing to incorporate.

Moderator: OK. Anything else?

Participant E: No, just call me when you get the shirts made because I really want one (laughs).

Moderator: OK I will (laughs). Well thank you for your participation in this interview.

Participant E: You’re welcome.




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant F: (Anonymous). Yes I consent.

Moderator: Okay! Well, let’s get started. Do you think Georgia Southern is a safe campus?

Participant F: Well, yeah. I would say so.

Moderator: What makes it a safe campus?

Participant F: Well, there isn’t a lot of crime. I mean, I haven’t really heard of anything really going on.

Plus, there is like, police escorts you can take. And those emergency buttons all around campus.

Moderator: Because you believe Georgia Southern is a safe campus, does your belief affect your

reasoning for not taking a self-defense course?
Participant F: I mean, I guess if there was crime here, like, all the time then maybe I would be more

inclined to take one. But I feel pretty safe. Plus, I’m it’s not like I’m going to be walking alone on campus

at night or anything.

Moderator: Okay. Do you think women can realistically defend themselves?

Participant F: Honestly, no. Like I hate to say this, but if, like, a guy attacked me, I would have no idea

what to do.

Moderator: But self-defense classes will teach you what to do…

Participant F: Yeah, but when someone gets attacked, they’re not going to remember an exact sequence

to perform to take some guy out. Plus, the majority of the time the guy will be bigger than the girl- and

strength wins every time.

Moderator: Okay. Well back to taking a self-defense course, what fears or anxieties do you have about

taking a self defense course?

Participant F: I don’t have any fears or anxieties per se. I guess it’s more that it has not been a priority

for me to take it. I don’t know. I guess I should. I really just don’t have the time.

Moderator: Well, What would be a reasonable request, with respect to time, that you could dedicate to

learning self-defense?

Participant F: What do you mean?

Moderator: How many hours, days, etc. would you spend to learning self defense?

Participant F: Oh, I don’t know. Maybe I would take a class. Like one of those kinesiology classes at the

RAC. Or like a one day thing. But I don’t know how much you could actually learn in a day.

Moderator: You said maybe a kinesiology class. Why?

Participant F: Well, I would get credit for it (laughs).

Moderator: Besides getting course credit, what else would motivate you to take a self-defense course?
Participant F: Um, I guess if one of my friends were attacked. Or there were suddenly a lot of rapes

reported on campus.

Moderator: Okay. Now you mentioned the kinesiology self-defense class. Are you aware of any other

self-defense options on campus?

Participant F: No.

Moderator: So you did not know that GSU Public Safety has a free class for women?

Participant F: Nope. Never heard of it. They need to publicize that more (laughs).

Moderator: We’re working on that (laughs). It’s called R.A.D. Okay, so switching gears a little, What

methods of communication would be the most effective way to inform you of an event/club/group/class

on campus?

Participant F: I always see fliers around campus.

Moderator: Okay, do you always remember what the fliers say?

Participant F: Well, if the fliers interest me, I usually write it down in my planner as soon as I see it.

Moderator: Okay. What about Facebook? Or maybe t-shirts?

Participant F: Well, Facebook is good too. And I always read t-shirts, especially if a lot of people are

wearing them around campus. Like, I think it was for that Leadershape program, everyone was wearing

those shirts that said “Ask me about Leadershape”. I still remember (laughs).

Moderator: That’s awesome. What about Newspaper articles. Do you read the George-Anne?

Participant F: Uh, not really. Like once in a while if I see it on the stands.

Moderator: Okay. Cool. Any last things you would like to say?

Participant F: Not that I can think of at the moment.

Moderator: Okay. Thank you so much for your time!
Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant G: (Anonymous). Yes.

Moderator: You stated previously that you have not taken a self-defense course, so what makes you feel

as though GSU is a safe campus or not a safe campus?

Participant G: I don’t think any campus is a safe campus. I think there are a walking…mostly I think it

happens at night, but I’m sure it happens all the times of the day. But um, you just have to be aware of

your surroundings. So yeah, I just don’t think it’s just Georgia Southern, I think it’s everywhere because

not everyone takes those things into consideration. They just kind of go out and um, don’t really take

into account the things going on around them.

Moderator: So then if you don’t feel that all campuses including Georgia Southern are not very safe, why

have you not taken a self-defense course?

Participant G: I don’t know of any self-defense courses and I don’t exactly have a lot of free time.
Moderator: OK. Do you think that women can defend themselves realistically if they were attacked in

any way, shape or form?

Participant G: I think so. I’ve had students in the past do informative speeches on self-defense. So you

can put your keys between your fingers and stab at people, use the palm of your hand and break

someone’s nose if you hit at the right angle. Um, so yeah I think that until you’re in that situation I don’t

think you can truly know, but I think you were given the right skills then you would feel a lot better

about protecting yourself.

Moderator: OK. So what anxieties or fears do you have about taking a self-defense course like you’re

not strong enough, you don’t have a friend to go with, or you’ll look stupid or whatever.

Participant G: (Laughs) I am not coordinated so I know I would look stupid, but I don’t really have any

anxieties it’s just that I don’t really have the time and um, it would depend on how much it costs. More

than anything right now it’s just time.

Moderator: What would you be more willing to do if there was a course? Like a one day Saturday

program or would you do maybe like once a week for three or four weeks at night? What would work

best for you and your schedule?

Participant G: I definitely don’t think I could do something like every week for like a whole semester

type thing. Probably more like the one day seminar type thing. It’s easier to block out one afternoon or

one day than it is to block out the same time every week.

Moderator: What would motivate you to take a self-defense course? Like one of your kids was attacked

or you know, had you come across a situation where self-defense would’ve been helpful. Would that

motivate you to maybe be more inclined to actually look for a course?

Participant G: I think if I heard more…’cause I don’t think we hear at Georgia Southern um, about things

that happen to not only women, but the guys on campus. Um, yeah I think if it was more in the news

then I think I would be more apt to want to get into it [the R.A.D. course] immediately.
Moderator: So you had never heard of R.A.D.?

Participant G: Never heard of it before.

Moderator: What methods of communication would be the most effective way to inform you of an

event, club, group, or class on campus like the R.A.D. program? Like a flier, a poster, media…social media

things. What would grab your attention?

Participant G: Um, well here at Georgia Southern if they can send it through the GSNews, because that

goes to every faculty and staff member, um and if it was somebody I was following on Twitter then I

would see those that way. So I think the combination of those two.

Moderator: So mainly, like Internet based stuff works for you, not fliers.

Participant G: Yeah, I don’t really pay much attention to what’s hanging on the walls (laughs).

Moderator: OK, well thank you very much for your participation.

Participant G: You’re very welcome.
Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant H: (Anonymous) and yes I consent.

Mediator: Thank you for participating. I am, uh, just going to ask you a view questions about self-

defense. To begin, what makes you feel that Georgia Southern in a safe campus? Or do you not think it

is?

Participant H: There have been a lot of robberies, but I think that happens on every campus. I would say

that Southern is pretty safe. I think I’ve heard that we were rated as one of the safest schools.

Mediator: Since you believe it is a safe campus, is that why you have not taken a self-defense course?

Participant H: I wouldn’t really say that. I have a very busy schedule and have not really heard of

anything being offered for self-defense. I would probably take a class if I could.

Mediator: Do you think that women can defend themselves?

Participant H: Umm, I think it depends on the situation. I think some women could defend themselves

but I know a lot of girls that probably would not be able to-um, myself included. If someone came after

me I would not really know what to do, I could probably just freak out or something (laughs).

Mediator: Do you have any fears or anxieties about taking a self-defense course?

Participant H: Umm, well, ugh not really. Um, like I said before I just do not really have time to take one.

Mediator: So you would not feel like you were being judged or like you were not strong enough?
Participant H: No, nothing like that.

Mediator: Ok, um, so what would motivate you to take the time to actually take a self-defense course?

Maybe if you knew someone who was attacked or if you yourself were put into that um, situation?

Participant H: I guess hearing about my friend being attacked would make me want to take it. But I

honestly think it all depends on the situation that would make a girl be able to defend themselves or

not. Maybe if I was put in a dangerous situation, I would be more likely to take the time. I, um, know

that sounds bad but…

Mediator: What would be a good time frame for you to take a self-defense course? Like would you want

to take a course in a day’s worth of time or over a course of days or weeks?

Participant H: I would rather just take it in a day. This way I would only have to have one day free. I

student teach so it is hard to plan things outside of school. So um ,yeah I think it would be better if it was

taught in one day.

Mediator: Are you aware that there is a women’s self-defense course, taught in a one day time spam,

here at Georgia Southern?

Participant H: No, I have never even heard of it. It’s offered like to everyone on campus? Or is it a class

that you take in the semester?

Mediator: This course is hosted by Public Safety and it is offered to all women on campus for free.

Participant H: Hmm, I have not heard of it at all. Is it new?

Mediator: No, it is not. What forms of communication would you think would be most effective for

letting women on campus know about this self-defense course?

Participant H: Anything really. I guess fliers, e-mails, a website, maybe a Facebook group, or an article in

the George-Anne.

Mediator: Ok, great. Thank you again for participating. Your information will help to make the women’s

self-defense course a success.
Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for
refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant I: My name is (anonymous) and I consent.

Moderator: Ok. I'm just going to be asking you a couple questions about, uh, Public Safety and self-

defense courses. So, um, what makes you feel that GSU is a safe campus?

Participant I: Um, I like to think that it’s a safe campus, but as of lately we’ve been having a lot of, um,

robberies, and theft [clearing throat], and all kind of um, random misdemeanors as of lately so

um. Overall I feel safe, I’m not really sure why but lately it has been a lot of occurrences so maybe I have

a false sense.

Moderator: So with you feeling that, um, Georgia Southern has somewhat of a safe campus, Why have

you not taken a self-defense course, or do you feel like its’ safe and that’s why you’re not, you haven’t

taken a course yet or um, is there a specific reason?

Participant I: No reasons really, I just never had an interest in participating or at least I didn’t think it was

dangerous where I had to take a course.

Moderator: Ok, Uh, Do you think women can defend themselves?

Participant I: Yeah, to a degree.

Moderator: To a degree. Um, what type of degree?

Participant I: Well obviously in some situation, you know, um, physically, you’re just not capable of, um,

conquering a man’s mass but in general if you’re, um, knowledgeable on how to protect yourself in

some situations then yes, you know, you can outsmart the attacker.

Moderator: Yeah. Uh, what fears or anxieties do you have about taking a self-defense course?

Participant I: None really. Like I said, I guess I just never um, really just took an interest, or maybe the

feelings of anxiety are there to make me not want to take it.
Moderator: So do you feel that if you had someone to go with, or do you feel that you’re not strong

enough, or do you feel like you’ll be judged for taking the self-defense course? Is there a specific

reason?

Participant I: Not necessarily judged but if I had someone to go with I’d probably be more

interested. Like a friend or something.

Moderator: Okay. What would motivate you more to take a self-defense course?

Participant I: Some kind of cool advertisement. I guess you just have really put it in perspective, you

know, to target certain people and I don’t think it’s’ just kind of, you know. It doesn’t target me.

Moderator: Okay, Um, what would you, what would be a reasonable request with respect to time that

you would dedicate to learning a self-defense course?

Participant I: About three hours a week or so.

Moderator: Um, Okay and, are you aware of self-defense course options at Georgia Southern?

Participant I: No I’m not.

Moderator: Have you ever heard of R.A.D., the Rape Aggression Defense System class that Public Safety

offers?

Participant I: No I haven’t.

Moderator: Um, what method of communication would be the most effective way to inform you of an

event or club/class/group on campus?

Participant I: Um, maybe if they played it on the television on campus like in the Union or something.

Um, fliers and posters. Uh, definitely the George-Anne, just because I read it everyday and word of

mouth- through classmates and just some of your peers in general.

Moderator: Okay. Well do you have any suggestions on how to, um, what would make R.A.D. seem like

a more- like a course you would like to take?
Participant I: Just do advertisement. It’s all about awareness and how you just put it out there. Maybe

if a student organization endorsed it or something. It’ll kind of reach people a little bit more. Something

influential to put behind it.

Moderator: Okay. Well thank you for your time. I really appreciate it. Your input is very much needed

so thank you for your time.




Moderator: The purpose of this interview is to determine the attitudes of female employees and

students of Georgia Southern (GSU) in regard Public Safety’s Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) course.

This interview is voluntary and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Participation in this

interview grants the usage of the information gained in reporting opinions. There are no penalties for

refusing or failing to complete this interview. Participants may withdraw at any time. Participants’

identities will remain anonymous when reporting on opinions. This interview will be recorded. If you

consent to this interview please state your name and yes that you consent.

Participant J: (Anonymous). Yes.
Moderator: So, I’m just going to start this interview. Um, what make you feel that GSU is a safe campus,

or not?

Participant J: Um, I’m back and forth on that question. I feel like it is a safe campus, you always, um,

have an officer of Public Safety riding around at all times. Um, I even would feel safe running through

campus at night time because they have the blue boxes spread out around campus, but sometimes the

boxes say “Out of service” or “Out of order” and that would be my only concern because if I were really

in an emergency and I needed to press that box and it’s out of order, what do I do? But of course a few

things have happened here, but that with anywhere. But I feel like it’s a safe campus.

Moderator: Yeah. Um, I meant to ask you first, have you taken a self-defense course before?

Participant J: No, I have not taken a self-defense course.

Moderator: So with you feeling that GSU is a safe campus, um, is that why you have not taken a self-

defense course?

Participant J: Yeah, that probably is a lot of the reason. Um, I just haven’t actually even put time into it,

to think about taking a self-defense class. Um, it’s kind of one of those things like it doesn’t happen until

it happens, but you probably should be more prepared for it but no.

Moderator: Do you think women can defend themselves?

Participant J: I think women can defend themselves. It would be a lot harder especially if the male is a

lot larger, but there still are methods if you’re defending yourself.

Moderator: Do you feel that those methods are realistic?

Participant J: They’re realistic, yeah.

Moderator: Yeah. So you feel that people can, you know, be able to get out of a situation using

different…

Participant J: Well I mean, you need to have some precautionary, like pepper spray would probably be

something that you need to have because if you spray someone real quick and then punch them he’ll
still be out of it for enough time in order for you to move and get away from the situation. Um, but just

having a large male, maybe 200-300 pounds and you a itty bitty girl, um, it would probably harder, yeah.

Moderator: Okay. What kind of fears or anxieties do you have about taking a self-defense course?

Participant J: Um…

Moderator: Like do you feel as if you’re not strong enough to take one, or no one will go with you, or

you may be judged a certain way.

Participant J: Yeah, it would probably help to have someone go with me. Um, I think my biggest fear

would be like forgetting something that I learned, but I guess in the heat of action if you are already

trained to do it you’ll remember it.

Moderator: Okay. What would motivate you to take a self-defense course?

Participant J: Um, probably something happening to somebody close to me, which is not something

good. It’s like I’m waiting for something before I do something about it, but, um, yeah.

Moderator: Okay. But I guess you know, everyone has their own reasons. Um, what would be a

reasonable request with respect to time that you could dedicate to learning a self-defense course?

Participant J: Um, I think if I’m going to do it, like I said I’m probably more scared of forgetting the things

I actually would want to dedicate myself to it.

Moderator: So would you want to do it, um, like for a certain amount of hours, or have to, um…

Participant J: I want it to be an extended amount of time so that I’m building upon, like start me at

something basic and build me up. I know they do like pressure points and flip them over this way, or

something like that, that I would want to build up and learn so that it’ll stick.

Moderator: Are you aware of self-defense course options at Georgia Southern?

Participant J: I’m aware… slightly. Like I know about it, um, I’ve heard about it from a few people and

through MAP organization on campus. A lady came by and told us about it and then an officer came by

and told us about it.
Moderator: Which course?

Participant J: Oh well, I think it was a women’s self-defense course that they were talking about.

Moderator: The R.A.D. course.

Participant J: Yeah the R.A.D. course. But it’s not well advertised or I mean that’s the full extent of it I

didn’t even know the name until you just told me.

Moderator: (Laughs) Okay. Well what methods of communication would be the most effective way to

inform you of an event or club/group or class on campus?

Participant J: Um… social media definitely now-a-days because of technology. Um, Facebook, Twitter,

but even just having a table on campus whether you realize it or not people, if you have a big sign,

they’ll at least read your sign and know something. And have someone out there that’s attentive and

loud and knows people…

Moderator: Word-of-mouth.

Participant J: Yeah word-of-mouth.

Moderator: Okay. Well uh, thank you for your participation in this campaign with your in-depth

interview.

Participant J: You’re welcome. Well can you tell me a more about R.A.D.? What does it stand for?

Moderator: R.A.D. stands for Rape Aggression Defense System course. And it’s basically a course for

women at Georgia Southern which Georgia Southern offers for free. Um, and you can take it and learn

different methods you can use against people.

Participant J: Is it like a one-time thing? Or is it offered over an extended period of time?

Moderator: That’s what’s altered and that’s what’s changed a lot. So, right now I think they have,

they’ve offered it this semester as a Saturday class, but it’s a full Saturday, so yeah. Anything else?

Participant J: No. Thank you!

				
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