Business Plan by cuiliqing

VIEWS: 25 PAGES: 42

									Snak Shak +
The School Store Business Plan

By: Sid Brejak, Sujaay Jaganathan, Shavan
Kumar, Adilah Patel, Sukrit Rajpal


January 7th, 2010
Table of Contents
II. BUSINESS DESCRIPTION ..................................................................................................................................... 2
    A.        PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................................................2
    B.        HISTORY.............................................................................................................................................................2
    C.        MISSION AND VALUES ..........................................................................................................................................2
    D.        ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS APPRAISAL ......................................................................................................................2
III. MARKETING ANALYSIS ...................................................................................................................................... 3
    A.        STORE LOCATION .................................................................................................................................................3
    B.        TARGET MARKET .................................................................................................................................................3
    C.        MARKET RESEARCH ..............................................................................................................................................3
    D.        MARKET PREFERENCES .........................................................................................................................................3
    E.        CONSUMER SPENDING POWER...............................................................................................................................3
    F.        COMPETITION .....................................................................................................................................................4
IV. MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................................................................. 4
    A.        MANAGEMENT GOALS..........................................................................................................................................4
    B.        ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE ...............................................................................................................................4
    C.        OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE .......................................................................................................................................5
    D.        LEADERSHIP APPROACH ........................................................................................................................................5
V. OPERATIONS...................................................................................................................................................... 5
    A.        MARKETING PLAN ...............................................................................................................................................5
         a.     Product .......................................................................................................................................................5
         b.     Price ............................................................................................................................................................6
         c.     Place ...........................................................................................................................................................6
         d.     Promotion ..................................................................................................................................................6
    B.        HUMAN RESOURCES PLAN ....................................................................................................................................8
         a.     Recruiting ...................................................................................................................................................8
         b.     Selection .....................................................................................................................................................8
         c.     Orientation and Training ...........................................................................................................................9
         d.     Developing a Positive Employee Environment ..........................................................................................9
         e.     Departures and Dismissals ......................................................................................................................10
         f.     Determining Staff.....................................................................................................................................11
VI. RISK ASSESSMENT .......................................................................................................................................... 11
    A.        CHALLENGES .....................................................................................................................................................11
    B.        COMPETITOR’S REACTION ...................................................................................................................................12
VII. FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS ............................................................................................................................... 12
    A.        START-UP COSTS ...............................................................................................................................................12
    B.        ASSETS.............................................................................................................................................................12
    C.        LIABILITIES ........................................................................................................................................................13
VIII. CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................................................ 13
IX. APPENDIX ....................................................................................................................................................... 15
I. Executive Summary

   The “Snak Shak +” is a proposed for-profit organization that plans to open its first store in

the currently vacant space in the commons corner at North Park Secondary School (NPSS). The

store will market a large variety of brand name, individually packed, snack size chocolates and

candies.

   Our mission is to provide quality snacks at competitive prices to satisfy the needs of the

consumers. Also the ultimate goal is to make sufficient revenue by selling a variety of candies

and chocolates.

    The business is a general partnership in which the five partners will have equal authority

over the goals and actions of the business. The business is proposed to be run as a functional

organization, as members responsible for a separate function.

   The target market consists of 500 of the 1374 students attending NPSS. The target customers

are within the age group of 13 and 18years old. Based on the data gathered, it is evident that

there will be great demand from the target market, as it has sufficient disposable income.

   Overtime, “Snak Shak +” plans to expand the business, and increase the variety offered at the

store, as well as improving the efficiency of the business by acquiring new assets through

internal finance generated by the proposed business. Introducing products that are new to the

market will help increase the value of the business. Also, analyzing the demand periodically will

ensure the business stays current with recent trends, and help achieve the mission objective of

offering “variety” thereby increasing the value of the business.

   Based on projected demand and the proposed prices, the business is expected to earn enough

revenue from sales to cover all expenses and earn a reasonable return on the equity.

   To ensure “Snak Shak +” will have sufficient funds available for essential purposes, it plans

to keep a savings fund. These “essential” purposes will include projects such as expansions,

special events, and for the purchase of new assets.

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II. Business Description

   A. Purpose

          The purpose of this business plan is to establish a for-profit business; Snak Shak +, which

will satisfy the needs of the students by offering varieties of chocolates and candies.

   B. History

          This business idea was conceived due to the target market’s desire for sweet goods since

they are limited to the vending machines, if they wish to purchase candies or chocolates. For this

reason the business plans to address the market demand, and introduce variety, and options to the

market.

   C. Mission and Values

          The mission is to provide a large variety of sweets to the students of NPSS through a

school based store at a competitive price, while generating sufficient revenue for future

expansion. Also “Snak Shak +” will address individuals with specific needs, such as allergies, by

offering alternatives like peanut free chocolate. “Snak Shak +” will also work towards

constantly improving the customer satisfaction by providing quality products at competitive

prices.

      D. Entrepreneurial Skills Appraisal

          We, the five entrepreneurs of the “Snak Shak +” have assumed the risk of planning for a

new business. Our self-confidence is the key to making this business a success. To achieve our

goals, we will input much hard work and dedication. To aid us with our mission, we have set

goals and time lines as well as a created a plan for the succession of the business. Even in case of

error, the persistence of the group won’t allow for us to abandon this project. To tackle

challenges, we will stay attentive to the functions of “Snak Shak +” and act fast to resolve any

issues. We plan to stay current with the consumer and always try to offer the newest product, and

improve our business to suit the customer’s preferences.

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III. Marketing Analysis

    A. Store Location

        The ‘Commons Corner Store’ is located in the Commons Area of NPSS. The store is

available for a monthly rent of $250.00, including the utilities. The store contains shelving and a

storage space. It is a fitting location in a high traffic area.

    B. Target Market

        The target market is comprised of 500 of the 1374 attending NPSS and is within the ages

of 13-18 years old. The business is directed towards students who are willing to purchase a sweet

snack on a regular basis. It is estimated that the business will be able to capture about 500

students as the regular customers. The target market consists of teenagers who have a sufficient

disposable income to make the proposed business successful.

    C. Market Research

        The information about the target customers and the market preferences have been

obtained by conducting primary research through surveys. Questionnaire responses submitted by

the students of NPSS as well as online surveys were used to analyze the market.

    D. Market Preferences

        Based on the primary and secondary research, it is evident that many of the students at

NPSS will be will be able and willing to purchase the goods from “Snak Shak +”. The target

customers need product variety at reasonable prices within their disposable income.

    E. Consumer Spending Power

        The target market, comprised of teenagers, has a reasonable amount of disposable

income. The target is willing and able to purchase a variety of our products that satisfy their

needs and wants.




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    F. Competition

        The proposed business aims to provide a variety of snacks that the competitors fail to

offer. The competition includes the vending machines installed at NPSS and the retailers outside

the school property. The strategic location of the proposed store combined with the variety of

goods it will beat the competition. The target customers will neither be restricted to the limited

choice offered by the vending machine, nor will they have to leave the school’s property during

an unpleasant weather to purchase snacks from businesses outside of the school.



IV. Management

    A. Management Goals

        The management goals are to create a profitable business by offering a large variety of

snacks at competitive prices to its target market. The strategic plans are to expand the school

store and reach out to the customer by methods such as a cart which can carry the products to the

target market. The operational plans are to conduct a systematic/periodic survey and

inventory/sales count to quickly quantity the amount and variety of products to purchase.

    B. Organizational Structure

        The business will use a functional organizational system. Each of the five entrepreneurs

of the business will be in charge of the business functions as follows:

Name                  Title                    Responsibilities

Sukrit Rajpal         Marketing Manager        Purchases, sales, promotion, marketing analysis, competition
                                               analysis, reccomendations

Shavan Kumar          Business Manager         Planning, organizing, directing, controlling and coordinating
Sid Brejak            Human Resources          Recruiting, selecting, training, orientation, development of
                                               employees, maintaining positive employee attitude, managing
                                               staff

Sujaay Jaganathan     Financial Manager        Financial planning, accounting, analysis

Adilah Patel          General Administration   Inventory management, liaison between employee and
                                               administration


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   C. Ownership Structure

       The business will be a general limited liability partnership of five entrepreneurs who will

each have equal authority over the business.

   D. Leadership Approach

       The “Snak Shak +” will conduct administrative activities democratically. The

entrepreneurs will have an equal share and say in the business and therefore the suggestions of

all five entrepreneurs will be considered while making any business decisions. Also, the opinions

of the employees will be taken into consideration for workplace improvement purposes.

       Also, to motivate employees to do quality work, their salary will be determined by

commission. The more that they sell, the more they will earn therefore setting a medium for

internal motivation.



V. Operations

   A. Marketing Plan

          a.   Product

               The products that “Snak Shak +” is planning to sell are candies and chocolates.

       The types of candy or chocolate that will be sold have been determined by the consumer

       demand. They are brand name products such as: Kit Kat, Skittles, Starburst, and many

       more. To always provide the highest level of customer satisfaction, systematic consumer

       surveys as well as a sales analysis will be conducted to understand customer preferences.

       This will allow us to understand which products are in great demand so that the inventory

       is maintained accordingly to maximize the revenue and profits. This procedure will also

       help us maintain our goal of variety, and conserve the many options we will offer.

               The features of the product offerings are: variety, they are snack size, sweet and

       brand name products. The labelling, and packaging by the manufacturers will be used to

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attract the customers by advertising the various brands. To differentiate the products

offered from the competition, a larger variety than the competitors is planned to be made

available.

   b.   Price

        The products we have proposed are various candies and chocolates. Based on the

survey conducted, the potential consumers are willing and able to pay in the range of

$0.10 to $0.30 for candies. The market is also willing and able to pay in the range of

$0.30 to $0.50 for chocolates. Based on the projected demand, the business has proposed

to charge $0.25 for the candies which are snack size packs, and $0.50 for the chocolates.

All of the prices have been kept competitive to ensure profitability and customer

satisfaction.

        On average an amount of $200.00 will be required to cover the cost of goods per

month excluding June and July (the summer vacation months). The business has also

forecasted monthly revenue of $700.00 on average, and a net income of approximately

$150.00 per month.

   c.   Place

        The business will be operating in the Commons Corner Store, located within the

NPSS, which has remained unused for an extended period of time. This location is

surrounded by potential consumers. Occasionally a cart will be utilized to make sales in

the cafeteria. This way the product can be taken to the customer, and there will be a

higher probability for sales.

        The channel of distribution that will exist for “Snak Shak +” is shown below:

Manufacturer  Wholesaler  Retailer  Retailer  Consumer

   d.   Promotion



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       The business wishes to incorporate all four forms of promotion: advertisements,

sales promotion, publicity, and personal selling. It is planned to use posters around the

school that will be placed strategically. Every month, posters will be replaced after

reassessing the best locations for advertising. Initially the posters will be placed near the

entrances of the school and the Commons Corner. By placing the posters at the front of

the school, the chances of the target consumers noticing the posters and learning about

our business’s existence increase. Posters in the “Commons Corner” will reach a large

audience as most of the target customers are present there at the beginning of the day,

during the lunches and at the end of the day. Also by placing the posters around outlets in

the commons, we can target IBT students who charge there due to new charging rules.

       Leaflets have been planned to be distributed occasionally either along with

newsletters, or through employees at the servery disbursing them to their own customers.

This technique is inexpensive as we are able to produce many small leaflets by printing

for cheap prices and can reach a large amount of potential customers.

       Occasionally, personal selling will be conducted by having a cart go around in the

cafeteria and the “Commons Corner” to sell the products. Through this method of

promotion, the business can be introduced to those students who may be unaware about

the store. This method brings the product to the customer rather than the customers

coming to the product in the market. This will also help develop a relationship with the

customers and also receive feedback from the customers, understand the consumer

demand, the reputation of the business, and even help attract future employees or

consumers. The employees will have an incentive to conduct personal selling as it is

planned to pay them on a commission on sales. They no longer have to rely on the

consumer’s willingness to come and purchase the goods as the business will go to the

customer. The more an employee is able to sell, the higher the wage of an employee.

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          As the proposed store is a small business that also has a goal to make a profit by

   selling goods at competitive prices, the financial resources to conduct sales promotion are

   limited. However, some inexpensive means of sales promotion that are planned consist of

   “deals” or “sales” such as five candy packs for a dollar (when normally four would cost a

   dollar), a display of candy that can be made inexpensively, as well as the premium

   charged for the brand names. Fortunately, the premium is not as large as those placed on

   luxury items.

          Publicity is a form of promotion that is not in the hands of any business as the

   message is not controlled. However, since there are daily announcements in the school to

   inform students of any major events, and changes, the opening of the store is predicted to

   be announced. This will help to introduce our business to the customer. Though we do

   not control the message, there is also no negativity presented on the announcements.

   Therefore, there is no damage to the reputation and this form of promotion is free.

   However, word of mouth is another form of publicity. Another method that the store will

   undertake is to participate in school fundraisers or activities to create a positive image of

   the business among the target customers.

B. Human Resources Plan

     a.   Recruiting

          The potential employees for our business will be the students attending NPSS

   who will work as part-time cashiers. To recruit quality employees, it is planned that the

   vacant positions will be advertised through posters and school announcements that will

   provide the information about the available jobs in the store. The applicants will submit

   their resume at the store location and will eligible candidates be contacted for an

   interview.

     b.   Selection

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           After screening of the resumes, the short listed candidates will be interviewed to

assess the potential employee’s personality and other skills such as communication, and

problem solving to ensure that they are suitable for this job and are trustworthy,

hardworking and friendly cashiers. During the interview, it will also be assessed if a

candidate will be able to create and maintain a positive environment that will help getting

repeat business.

   c. Orientation and Training

           After selecting and recruiting quality employees, necessary training will be

provided on how the business will be run on a day to day basis. Firstly, they will be given

a list of all of the products and require them to learn the prices of the products. The work

place will be shown and proper conduct for interacting with customers (eye contact, clear

voice, welcoming and friendly) will be explained. They will be trained on handling

problematic customers by, for example, asking such customers to leave the store and

informing the supervisor on duty if the situation cannot be brought under control. Lastly,

they will also be trained on how to do sell at the cafeteria with a cart.

   d.      Developing a Positive Employee Environment

           Positive employee attitude is the key for business survival. The employee needs to

feel that the workplace is a welcoming environment and meets their needs. To develop

and maintain positive employee attitude, the following is planned:

         i.    Entertainment

                   Employees will be permitted to play school appropriate music of their

           choice with a controlled volume. Through music we wish to create a business

           environment in which the employee feels comfortable and therefore, has a

           positive attitude.

        ii.    Dress Code

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                   No one likes to walk around wearing a pink apron and hat so, the “Snak

           Shak +” will allow casual clothes that are also school appropriate. Since the

           employees are students at NPSS and will attend classes when not working, they

           are expected to follow the same code of conduct for clothing.

     iii.      Reimbursement For Lunches

                   The ‘Snak Shak +’ will give provide employees with $20 at the end of the

           month with their salary. This amount is given to reimburse them for the lunches

           they may have bought while working. This amount will be given regardless of the

           fact that the employee has purchased lunch or not. The employees are expected to

           be more comfortable during lunches with this plan because it will allow them to

           grab a lunch quickly if they are late for their shift.

     iv.       Handling Complaints

                   If an employee has a personal complaint about the business or the

           environment, it is crucial that the complaint is dealt with as fast as possible. The

           human resources department will handle such a situation as a top priority.

      v.       Free Products

                  The business will permit employees to consume a reasonable amount of

        products for free. However, they will be required to be responsible and keep a

        record for an inventory check. If an employee misuses this privilege or fails to

        keep inventory, they will receive a warning, a cut in the commission and lastly

        loss of these privileges or the job.

e.      Departures and Dismissals

                  The departures and dismissals of the employees will be conducted in an

        organized manner. In the case of the employee being fired, the human resources

        will go through a check list to ensure that the decision is just, and the correct

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             response to the issue. The employees will be given two warnings before this step

             is taken. However, in a case in where an employee chooses to leave, the human

             resources manager will conduct an exit interview. In the interview, the reason for

             the employee’s departure will be discussed and attempts will be made to persuade

             the skilled employee to stay. Also attempts will be made to understand how the

             employees view the workplace and the environment to make improvements.

          f. Determining Staff

                      The proposed business believes that it will require two main employees

              and four employees as backups. From the two main employees, one will work

              during the first lunch and the other employee will work during the second lunch

              break. The backups will work when any of the main employees is unavailable and

              receive part of the commission from the main employee. These “backups” will

              also be on the waiting lists to join as the main cashiers in the case of a departure

              or dismissal, or will be scheduled to work in the next month or semester. The

              employees for both semesters will be scheduled as soon as possible and it will be

              a priority to keep the trained employees.



VI. Risk assessment

   A. Challenges

      As with any business the following challenges are anticipated:

   1. Consumer demand is very volatile and is bound to change. The solution to this situation

      would be to assign the employee the responsibility to conduct a systematic customer

      survey. The survey will give us a better understanding of the current trends and demand.

   2. A price increase either by the manufacturer or wholesaler cannot be rules out. The

      solution is to search for other products, manufacturers, wholesalers or retailers to provide

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        the product to our business at a competitive price. Another solution is to raise the retail

        price of the “Snak Shak +”within the consumer’s willingness and ability to purchase.

   3. It is also possible that our target customers may not be aware of the store. Advertisements

        through posters in areas where the largest population of the target market is present will

        help solve the challenge.

   B. Competitor’s Reaction

        As the store establishes itself in the market, competitors may see a decline in their

revenue. As a result, “Snak Shak +” can expect that the competitors will either:

       lower the price of their goods

       introduce new supplementary goods to the market

        This will be a challenge that our business has to face. To keep the revenue stable, “Snak

Shak +” will need to continue to create a variety of products available to the customers.



VII. Financial Projections

   A. Start-up Costs

        The store has five owners, the entrepreneurs who will be investing money from their

personal savings. Every owner will be investing about $ 163.00, a total of $ 815, to cover the

start-up and operating costs of the first month. The capital will be used to cover the expenses of:

advertising, purchasing the goods to be sold, office supplies, equipment, spare money, etc. All

five owners in the partnership will have an equal share in profits and stake in business.

   B. Assets

        The business assets will increase in specific months and years as the business grows. The

assets that will remain throughout the life of the business are: cash, furniture, and office supplies.

Also unsold inventory would be an asset as fewer inventories will need to be purchased for the

next period.

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       In addition, the store will be purchasing equipment to support the projected business

growth. Those assets will be: a small vending cart, a phone, and promotional banners or signs as

promotion. Also assets to create a better working and attractive environment for the consumers

and employees may be purchased. Garbage bins will also be purchased to help promote a cleaner

and hygienic environment within the school and to properly handle the waste generated from the

products’ packaging.

   C. Liabilities

       Very few liabilities have been predicted for the business. Large items such as furniture

and some equipment will be purchased on credit rather than by cash. These liabilities will be

paid off within 30 days, from the revenue generated from the business, and will be incurred for

the purchases of: chair, cash box, a cart, phone and the promotional items. Other than these, the

business is not expected to have any other liabilities.



VIII. Conclusion

       Through market research and careful planning, it is estimated that the revenue will

exceed the expenses from this business. The invested capital is large but through projected sales

and estimated revenue, that capital will quickly be recouped.

       There is a potential risk from our competitors to lower their prices and introduce greater

variety. However, the “Snak Shak +” will have the ability to reassess the demand from different

market segments and will always provide the highest consumer satisfaction through excellent

personal service. By providing that largest variety of candy and chocolates at competitive prices,

the proposed business will be highly successful.

       The “Snak Shak +” plans to grow in the future and purchase more assets as well as make

changes and advancements that will come to the store. As a succession plan, the current owners

(before graduating) will pass on the ownership of this business to other NPSS students. Through

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their creativity and ingenuity, there may be more innovative changes to the service, product or

even to the business.

       It is concluded that the business will be a success as it satisfies the market’s need for

variety, as well as the want for something sweet and light. The proposed store has the potential to

conduct more business than the immediate competition. Also, the “Snak Shak +” has the

potential to contribute to improving the general school environment while being able to sustain

its daily operations, and future expansion.




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IX. Appendix

   A. Marketing


Marketing Fig. 1 – Online Survey

1. What kind of chocolates would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO

    Kit kat
    Aero
    Mars
    Smarties
    Hershey's Chocolates
    Twix
    Other (please specify)

2. What kinds of candy would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO

    Skittles
    Starburst
    Lollipops
    hard Candies
    Soft Candies (sour keys, sour patch, etc.)
    Specifics
    Other (please specify)

3. What kinds of chips would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO

    Regular Potato Chips
    Flavoured Potato Chips
    Doritos
    Hickory Sticks
    Other (please specify)


                                                                                       15
4. How many much CANDY would you buy      5. How much would you pay for candy?
from the store in a week?
                                             $0.10 - $0.25
   1-2
                                             $0.30 - $0.50
   3-4
                                             $0.50 or more
   5-6
   7-8
   9 or more


6. How many CHOCOLATES would you          7. How much would you pay for
buy in a week?                            CHOCOLATES?

   1-2                                        $0.10 - $0.25
   3-4                                        $0.30 - $0.50
   5-6                                        $0.50 or more
   7-8
   9 or more



8. How many bags of CHIPS would you buy   9. How much would you pay for a bag of
in a week?                                chips?

   1                                          $0.50 - $0.75
   2                                          $0.75 - $1.00
   3
   4
   5 or more




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Marketing Fig. 2 – Personal Questioning Survey


What kinds of chocolate would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO
Kit Kat
Aero
Mars
Smarties
Hersey’s chocolates
Twix
Others…Specify




What kinds of candy would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO
Skittles
Starburst
Lollipops
Hard Candies
Soft Candies (sour keys, sour patch etc.)
Specifics

What kinds of chips would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO
Regular potato chips
Flavoured potato chips, specify




Doritos
Hickory Sticks
Others




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How many chocolates would you buy in a week?
           1-2             3-4             5-6               7-8           9 or more
10₵ - 30₵
20₵ - 50₵
50₵ or
more

How much candy would you buy in a week?
           1-3            4-7              8-10             11-14          15 or more
10₵ - 25₵
30₵ - 50₵
50₵ or
more

How many chips would you buy in a week?
           1               2                3                 4             5
50₵ - 75₵
75₵ -
$1.00



Marketing Fig. 3 – Online Survey Results
                                                                                * 100 results

1. What kind of chocolates would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO

                                                Response Percent
Kit Kat                                                             46 %
Aero                                                                38 %
Mars                                                                27 %
Smarties                                                            17 %
Hershey’s Chocolates                                                36 %
Twix                                                                23 %
Others (please specify)                                             24 %

2. What kinds of candy would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO

                                                Response Percent
Skittles                                                            55 %
Starburst                                                           43 %
Lollipops                                                           29 %
Hard Candies                                                        10 %
Soft Candies                                                        60 %
Specifics                                                            9%

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3. What kinds of chips would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO

                                             Response Rate
Regular Potato Chips                                             32 %
Flavoured Potato Chips                                           58 %
Doritos                                                          60 %
Hickory Sticks                                                   32 %
Others (please specify)                                          12 %



4. How many much CANDY would you buy
from the store in a week?                       5. How much would you pay for candy?

                     Response Rate                                  Response Percent
1-2                         43 %                $0.10 – $0.25              49 %
3-4                         38 %                $0.30 – $0.50              24 %
5-6                         12 %                $0.50 or more              17 %
7-8                          2%
9 or more                    5%



6. How many CHOCOLATES would you                7. How much would you pay for
buy in a week?                                  CHOCOLATES?

                     Response Percent                               Response Percent
1–2                         60 %                $0.10 – $0.25              27 %
3–4                         25 %                $0.30 – $0.50              40 %
5–6                          7%                 $0.50 or more              33 %
7–8                          3%
9 or more                    5%


8. How many bags of CHIPS would you buy         9. How much would you pay for a bag of
in a week?                                      chips?

                     Response Percent                               Response Percent
1                           55 %                $0.50 – $0.75              68 %
2                           27 %                $0.75 – $1.00              32 %
3                           12 %
4                            1%
5 or more                    5%




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Marketing Fig. 4 – Personal Questioning Survey Results
                                                                                     * 30 Results

What kinds of chocolate would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO
Kit Kat                                                           13
Aero                                                                  7
Mars                                                                  10
Smarties                                                              7
Hersey’s chocolates                                                   10
Twix                                                                  10
Others…Specify                                                      Coffee crisp
                                                                   Dairy Milk (2)


What kinds of candy would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO
Skittles                                                           22
Starburst                                                             13
Lollipops                                                             8
Hard Candies                                                          1
Soft Candies (sour keys, sour patch etc.)                             16
Specifics                                                             0

What kinds of chips would you like to buy from the Commons Corner Store? Pick TWO
Regular potato chips                                               14
Flavoured potato chips, specify                             All Dressed (10)
                                                             Sour Cream (1)
                                                               Ketchup (1)
                                                              Barbeque (3)

Doritos                                                              14
Hickory Sticks                                                       10
Others                                                          Cheetos (4)
                                                                Jalapeno (3)




                                                                                              20
How many chocolates would you buy in a week?
                1-2             3-4                           5-6              7-8          9 or more
10₵ - 30₵        2              12                             5                4               7
20₵ - 50₵        4              15                             7                3               1
50₵ or          22               5                             3                0               0
more

How much candy would you buy in a week?
               1-3             4-7                           8-10            11-14          15 or more
10₵ - 25₵        2              12                            12               3                 1
30₵ - 50₵        9              19                             2               0                 0
50₵ or          21               9                             0               0                 0
more

How many chips would you buy in a week?
                 1                2                            3                4               5
50₵ - 75₵       18               12                            0                0               0
75₵ -           18                7                            5                0               0
$1.00

Marketing Fig. 5 – Supply and Demand Assessment for Candies


                                  Supply vs. Demand for Candies
             200
             180
             160
             140
             120
  Quantity




             100
                                                                                               Supply
              80
                                                                                               Demand
              60
              40
              20
               0
                   $-   $0.05 $0.10 $0.15 $0.20 $0.25 $0.30 $0.35 $0.40 $0.45 $0.50 $0.55
                                                   Price




                                                                                                         21
Marketing Fig. 6 – Supply and Demand Assessment for Chocolates


                        Supply vs. Demand for Chocolates
             400

             350

             300

             250
  Quantity




             200
                                                                          Supply
             150                                                          Demand

             100

              50

               0
                   $-   $0.20     $0.40           $0.60   $0.80   $1.00
                                          Price




Marketing Fig. 7 – Cafeteria Flyers




                                                                                   22
Marketing Fig. 8 – Poster for Business Advertisement 1

                                                         *Not to Scale




                                                                   23
Marketing Fig. 9 – Poster for Business Advertisement 2
                                                         *Not to Scale




                                                                   24
Marketing Fig. 10 – Poster for Business Advertisement 3
                                                          *Not to Scale




                                                                    25
   B. Human Resources

Human Resources Fig. 1 – Now Hiring Poster
                                             *Not to Scale




                                                       26
Human Resources Fig. 1– Job Application

                             Snak Shak + Cashier Application Form



          Full Name (please print)                                         Homeroom



                 Grade                                              Contact Number

                                                         [ ] Cell     or   [ ] Home (specify)


                                                                    Lunch Period
                 E-mail address
                                                      Semester 1               Semester 2



Skills:




Work or Volunteer Experience:




You are required to submit this form with a copy of your resume or reference letter. You
will be contacted for an interview and the time can be arranged during school hours or
before or after school. Please ensure that the contact information is correct so that we may
reach you for the position.
Remember that you will be required to work during your lunch program. You may eat or
work in the store, but you are required to open the store within 10 to 15 minutes from the
beginning of the lunch period. You must inform the business owner’s at least 3 days before
you are going to be away.




                                                                                                27
Human Resources Fig. 2- Interview Questions

Interview Questions:

   1. Tell me about yourself.

   2. Describe how you work under pressure and how you handle the situation.

   3. Talk about a time when you had to overcome a major obstacle?

   4. What separates you from the other applicants (experience/qualities)?

   5. Why would you climb a mountain?

   6. What interests you about this position?

   7. Describe your strengths and weaknesses?

   8. Do you believe that you are the ideal candidate for this position and why are the other

       applicants not?

   9. What is your opinion on our products?

   10. Do you have any questions that you would like to address?




Human Resources Fig. 3- Exit interview Questions

Exit Interview:

When an employee quits we will ask them to attend an exit interview. We will ask the following
questions.

   1. What is the main reason for you leaving?

   2. What were the issues or concerns that may have triggered your leave?

   3. What would you improve to make this workplace better?

   4. What do you think of the policies and procedures?

   5. Is there something that we can do to allow you to stay as an employee in our business

       again? If not would you ever consider coming back?

                                                                                                28
Human Resources Fig. 4- Interview Rubric

                         Unsatisfactory Satisfactory Admirable
Clarity of               Difficult to follow      Clear and          Used language that
                                                  organized          enhanced clarity
response                                                             and a format that
                                                                     was structured
Focus of                 Some points made in      Points used in     Points were very
                         the response, but they   response were      specific and highly
response                 were not put into        specific to the    organized
                         framework                question
Elaboration of           Little elaboration       There was          There was much
                                                  elaboration in the elaboration in the
points                                            response           response and
                                                                     reference to the
                                                                     resume
Thoughtfulness           Response showed          Response           Response showed
                         little thoughtfulness    showed some        appropriate
                         or reflection            personal           reflection and
                                                  reflection         thoughtfulness
Body Language            Interviewee seems        Interviewee        Interviewee seems
                         uncomfortable            seems              self- confident
                                                  comfortable and throughout the
                                                  prepared           interview
Personality              Shy and not open         Seems willing to Seems really open
                                                  interact to        and willing to
                                                  strangers          interact with
                                                                     strangers




                                                                                  29
Human Resources Fig. 5- Dismissal Checklist

Dismissal check list
Employee name:                                           Date:
Job Title:                                    Manager:
                                               Yes               No
Do I have all the facts recorded?
Is my decision based on fact and
not emotion?
Has the employee understood the
job requirements?
Does the employee understand
where he/she is falling behind on
performance?
Has the employee received at least
one warning indicating that he/she
has fallen behind on performance?
Has the employee had time to
correct the performance drop?
Has the employee try to explain
their point of view?
Have I considered the employees
point of view?
Am I sure that the dismissal will be
of no surprise to the employee?
Is the dismissal consistent with
past dismissals?




                                                                      30
Human Resources Fig. 6- Written Warning


                             WRITTEN WARNING
                   FOR UNSATISFACTORY JOB PERFORMANCE

Dear _______________________:

1. This letter is a Written Warning for unsatisfactory job performance.

Over some time I have been concerned about the adequacy of your job performance.

Specifically:


[Set out the specific performance problems. Names, dates, policies, amounts,
whatever information is necessary so that the person receiving the warning
knows precisely what the performance problems are. If there is more than 1
performance problem, set them out in numerical order.]



When we met to discuss your performance, [whatever occurred during this
discussion.]


You will need to make the following corrections in order to bring your performance to a
satisfactory level:


[Here is where you set out exactly what the employee needs to do to achieve
satisfactory performance. Be as specific as possible.]


During the next [period of time to demonstrate improved performance. Depending
on the performance] you must bring your performance to the satisfactory level. If you
do not make the necessary job performance corrections we will consider further
disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal.


Sincerely,


Sid Brejak
(Human Recourses Manager)
(Manager)

                                                                                      31
     C. Accounting

 Accounting Fig. 1 – Balance Sheets (First Twelve Months)

                                                             Snak Shak +
                                                            Balance Sheets

                     April 30, 2010    May 31, 2010         June 30, 2010    July 31, 2010   August 31, 2010   September 30, 2010
Assets
Cash                    425.78            489.37               705.16           469.15           269.15             445.81
Office Supplies          5.00              5.25                 5.51             5.79             6.08               6.38
Inventory                6.42             13.75                   -                -                -               20.00
Furniture                9.00             22.99                22.99            22.99            22.99              209.97
Equipment               15.86             15.86                15.86            15.86            15.86              25.86
Total Assets            462.06            547.22               749.52           513.78           314.07             708.02


Liabilities
Accounts
Payable                  74.86             63.99                50.00              -                -               246.98
Total Liabilities        74.86             63.99                50.00              -                -               246.98

Owner's Equity
S. Rajpal, Capital       77.44             96.65               139.90           102.76           62.81               92.21
S. Jagannathan,
Capital                  77.44             96.65               139.90           102.76           62.81               92.21
S. Kumar, Capital        77.44             96.65               139.90           102.76           62.81               92.21
S. Brejak, Capital       77.44             96.65               139.90           102.76           62.81               92.21
A. Patel, Capital        77.44             96.65               139.90           102.76           62.81               92.21
Total Liabilities
& Owner's
Equity                  462.06            547.22               749.52           513.78           314.07             708.02


                                                                                                                              32
 Accounting Fig. 1 – Balance Sheets (First Twelve Months) Continued


                                                               Snak Shak +
                                                              Balance Sheets

                     October 31, 2010   November 30, 2010   December 31, 2010   January 31, 2011   February 28, 2011   March 31, 2011
Assets
Cash                     424.11              811.30              868.84             962.89             1,160.66           1,097.93
Office Supplies           6.70                7.04                7.39               7.76                8.14               8.55
Inventory                30.00               12.50               18.75              31.25                  -               12.50
Furniture                209.97              209.97              209.97             209.97              457.17             457.17
Equipment                25.86               25.86               25.86              25.86               25.86              25.86
Total Assets             696.64             1,066.67            1,130.81           1,237.72            1,651.84           1,602.01


Liabilities
Accounts
Payable                   50.00               50.00               50.00              50.00              297.20             50.00
Total Liabilities         50.00               50.00               50.00              50.00              297.20             50.00

Owner's Equity
S. Rajpal, Capital       129.33              203.33              216.16             237.54              270.93            310.40
S. Jagannathan,
Capital                  129.33              203.33              216.16             237.54              270.93            310.40
S. Kumar, Capital        129.33              203.33              216.16             237.54              270.93            310.40
S. Brejak, Capital       129.33              203.33              216.16             237.54              270.93            310.40
A. Patel, Capital        129.33              203.33              216.16             237.54              270.93            310.40
Total Liabilities
& Owner's
Equity                   696.64             1,066.67            1,130.81           1,237.72            1,651.84           1,602.01



                                                                                                                                     33
Accounting Fig. 2 - Balance Sheets (First to Fifth Fiscal Years)


                                                               Snak Shak +
                                                              Balance Sheets

                          March 31, 2011        March 31, 2012          March 31, 2013    March 31, 2014   March 31, 2015
         Assets
          Cash               1,097.93              2,631.86                    3,994.47      5,463.17         6,957.83
    Office Supplies            8.55                  8.98                        9.43          9.90            10.39
       Inventory              12.50                 22.50                       30.00         27.50            12.50
       Furniture              457.17                457.17                      457.17        457.17           457.17
      Equipment               25.86                 25.86                       25.86         25.86            25.86
     Total Assets            1,602.01              3,146.37                    4,516.93      5,983.60         7,463.75

     Liabilities
  Accounts Payable            50.00                  50.00                      50.00         50.00            50.00
   Total Liabilities          50.00                  50.00                      50.00         50.00            50.00

    Owner's Equity
   S. Rajpal, Capital         310.40                619.27                     893.39        1,186.72         1,482.75
    S. Jagannathan,
         Capital              310.40                619.27                     893.39        1,186.72         1,482.75
   S. Kumar, Capital          310.40                619.27                     893.39        1,186.72         1,482.75
   S. Brejak, Capital         310.40                619.27                     893.39        1,186.72         1,482.75
    A. Patel, Capital         310.40                619.27                     893.39        1,186.72         1,482.75
  Total Liabilities &
   Owner's Equity            1,602.01              3,146.37                    4,516.93      5,983.60         7,463.75




                                                                                                                            34
Accounting Fig. 3 – Income Statements (First Twelve Months)

                                                                       Snak Shak +
                                                                   Income Statements
                                                  Month ended       Month ended        Month ended         Month ended         Month ended
                                                  April 30, 2010    May 31, 2010       June 30, 2010       July 31, 2010      August 31, 2010
           Revenue
           Candy Cane Sales                       -                 -                       -                    -                   -
           Candy Gram Sales                       -                 -                     200.00                 -                   -
           Candy Sales                            197.50            207.50                202.50                 -                   -
           Chocolate Sales                        395.00            417.50                335.00                 -                   -
           Total Revenue                          592.50            625.00                737.50                 -                   -

           Cost of Goods Sold
           Cost of Candies Sold                   76.01             79.31                 76.95                  -                   -
           Cost of Chocolates Sold                     94.02                98.72         80.50                  -                   -
           Cost of Candy Grams Sold                      -                    -           39.60                  -                   -
           Cost of Candy Canes Sold                      -                    -             -                    -                   -
           Cost of Packaging and Transportation          -                    -             -                    -                   -
           Total Cost of Goods Sold                    170.03               178.03        197.06                 -                   -

           Gross Profit                                422.47               446.97        540.44                 -                   -

           Expense
           Advertising Expense                         15.00                15.00         35.00                  -                   -
           Employee Lunch Expense                      40.00                40.00         40.00
           Office Supplies Expense                     10.00                10.00         10.00                 -                   -
           Rent Expense                                250.00               250.00        250.00              250.00              250.00
           Salaries and Wages Expense                  31.69                33.52         40.53                 -                   -
           Utilities Expense                             -                    -             -                   -                   -
           Total Expense                               346.69               348.52        375.53              250.00              250.00

                     Net Income/Loss                      75.78             98.45         164.91       -             250.00   -          250.00

                                                                                                                                                  35
Accounting Fig. 3 – Income Statements (First Twelve Months) Continued

                                                                     Snak Shak +
                                                                 Income Statements

                                                 Month ended        Month ended      Month ended    Month ended    Month ended
                                                 September 30,      October 31,      November 30,   December 31,   September 30,
                                                     2010              2010              2010           2010           2010
          Revenue
          Candy Cane Sales                            -                   -               -            25.00            -
          Candy Gram Sales                            -                   -               -              -              -
          Candy Sales                               285.00              307.50          270.00         191.25         285.00
          Chocolate Sales                           455.00              475.00          447.50         345.00         455.00
          Total Revenue                             740.00              782.50          717.50         561.25         740.00

          Cost of Goods Sold
          Cost of Candies Sold                      107.64              118.03          103.86         73.65          107.64
          Cost of Chocolates Sold                   111.65              112.82          99.89          81.68          111.65
          Cost of Candy Grams Sold                    -                   -               -               -             -
          Cost of Candy Canes Sold                    -                   -               -            12.00            -
          Cost of Packaging and Transportation        -                   -               -             2.00            -
          Total Cost of Goods Sold                  219.29              230.85          203.76         169.33         219.29

          Gross Profit                              520.71              551.65          513.74         391.92         520.71

          Expense
          Advertising Expense                       35.00               15.00           15.00          35.00          35.00
          Employee Lunch Expense                    40.00               40.00           40.00          40.00          40.00
          Office Supplies Expense                   10.00               10.00           10.00          10.00          10.00
          Rent Expense                              250.00              250.00          250.00         250.00         250.00
          Salaries and Wages Expense                39.05               41.37           38.53          29.39          39.05
          Utilities Expense                         10.00               10.00           10.00          10.00          10.00
          Total Expense                             384.05              366.37          363.53         374.39         384.05

          Net Income/Loss                           136.66              185.28          150.21         17.53          136.66
                                                                                                                                   36
Accounting Fig. 3 – Income Statements (First Twelve Months) Continued

                                                                  Snak Shak +
                                                              Income Statements

                                                   Month ended September 30,      Month ended October   Month ended November 30,
                                                             2010                      31, 2010                  2010
          Revenue
          Candy Cane Sales                                    -                           -                        -
          Candy Gram Sales                                    -                           -                        -
          Candy Sales                                       285.00                      307.50                   270.00
          Chocolate Sales                                   455.00                      475.00                   447.50
          Total Revenue                                     740.00                      782.50                   717.50

          Cost of Goods Sold
          Cost of Candies Sold                              107.64                      118.03                   103.86
          Cost of Chocolates Sold                           111.65                      112.82                   99.89
          Cost of Candy Grams Sold                            -                           -                        -
          Cost of Candy Canes Sold                            -                           -                        -
          Cost of Packaging and Transportation                -                           -                        -
          Total Cost of Goods Sold                          219.29                      230.85                   203.76

          Gross Profit                                      520.71                      551.65                   513.74

          Expense
          Advertising Expense                               35.00                       15.00                    15.00
          Employee Lunch Expense                            40.00                       40.00                    40.00
          Office Supplies Expense                           10.00                       10.00                    10.00
          Rent Expense                                      250.00                      250.00                   250.00
          Salaries and Wages Expense                        39.05                       41.37                    38.53
          Utilities Expense                                 10.00                       10.00                    10.00
          Total Expense                                     384.05                      366.37                   363.53

          Net Income/Loss                                   136.66                      185.28                   150.21

                                                                                                                                   37
Accounting Fig. 4 – Income Statements (First to Fifth Fiscal Years)
                                                                      Snak Shak +
                                                                  Income Statements

                                                 Year ended            Year ended       Year ended       Year ended       Year ended
                                                March 31, 2011        March 31, 2012   March 31, 2013   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2015
            Revenue
            Candy Cane Sales                         25.00                25.00            25.00            25.00            25.00
            Candy Gram Sales                         200.00               200.00           200.00           200.00           200.00
            Candy Sales                             2,430.00             2,647.50         2,682.50         2,675.00         2,682.50
            Chocolate Sales                         4,122.50             4,265.00         4,337.50         4,485.00         4,485.00
            Total Revenue                           6,777.50             7,137.50         7,245.00         7,385.00         7,392.50

            Cost of Goods Sold
            Cost of Candies Sold                    922.49               1,002.75         1,015.03         1,008.42         1,010.31
            Cost of Chocolates Sold                 974.26               1,003.05         1,020.09         1,054.76         1,030.67
            Cost of Candy Grams Sold                39.60                 40.15            36.30            33.55            35.20
            Cost of Candy Canes Sold                12.00                 12.00            12.00            12.00            12.00
            Cost of Packaging and
            Transportation                            2.00                 2.00             2.00             2.00             2.00
            Total Cost of Goods Sold                1,950.35             2,059.95         2,085.42         2,110.73         2,090.17

            Gross Profit                            4,827.15             5,077.55         5,159.58         5,274.27         5,302.33

            Expense
            Advertising Expense                      210.00               210.00           210.00           210.00           210.00
            Employee Lunch Expense                   400.00               400.00           400.00           400.00           400.00
            Office Supplies Expense                  100.00               100.00           100.00           100.00           100.00
            Rent Expense                            3,000.00             3,000.00         3,000.00         3,000.00         3,000.00
            Salaries and Wages Expense               362.02                  -                -                -                -
            Utilities Expense                        70.00                100.00           100.00           100.00           100.00
            Total Expense                           4,142.02             3,810.00         3,810.00         3,810.00         3,810.00

            Net Income/Loss                         685.13               1,267.55         1,349.58         1,464.27         1,492.33

                                                                                                                                          38
Accounting Fig. 5 – Ratio Analysis (First Twelve Months)
                                                                         Snak Shak +
                                                                        Ratio Analysis

                                   April 30, 2010        May 31, 2010      June 30, 2010       July 31, 2010       August 31, 2010        September 30, 2010
Total Current Assets                  437.20               583.23             774.66              524.93               275.22                   472.19
Total Current Liabilities              74.86                63.99              50.00                 -                    -                     246.98
                                   Month ended           Month ended       Month ended         Month ended          Month ended              Month ended
                                   April 30, 2010        May 31, 2010      June 30, 2010        July 31, 2010     August 31, 2010         September 30, 2010
Gross Profit                          422.47               446.97             540.44                  -                  -                      520.71
Total Net Sales                       592.50               625.00             737.50                  -                  -                      740.00
Net Income/Net Loss                    75.78                98.45             164.91          -         250.00    -        250.00               136.66

Working Capital                       362.34                519.24             724.66               524.93                275.22                  225.21
Current Ratio                         5.84:1                9.11:1             15.49:1               0:1                   0:1                    1.91:1
Gross Profit Margin                    71%                   72%                73%                   -                     -                      70%
Rate of Return on Net Sales            13%                   16%                22%                   -                     -                      18%

                                                                            Snak Shak +
                                                                           Ratio Analysis
                                          October 31,           November 30,         December 31,             January 31,          February 28,      March 31,
                                             2010                   2010                 2010                     2011                 2011            2011
     Total Current Assets                   707.79                 880.84               944.98                  1,051.89             1,218.81        1,416.18
     Total Current Liabilities               50.00                 50.00                50.00                    50.00                297.20           50.00
                                          Month ended           Month ended          Month ended             Month ended           Month ended      Month ended
                                          October 31,           November 30,         December 31,             January 31,          February 28,      March 31,
                                             2010                   2010                 2010                     2011                 2011            2011
     Gross Profit                           551.65                 513.74               391.92                   409.78               521.92          507.53
     Total Net Sales                        782.50                 717.50               561.25                   581.25               720.00          720.00
     Net Income/Net Loss                    185.28                 150.21               17.53                    54.05                157.78          144.46

     Working Capital                           657.79                830.84                894.98              1,001.89               921.61           1,366.18
     Current Ratio                             14.16:1               17.62:1               18.9:1              21.04:1                 4.1:1           28.32:1
     Gross Profit Margin                        70%                   72%                   70%                  70%                   72%               70%
     Rate of Return on Net Sales                24%                   21%                    3%                   9%                   22%               20%
                                                                                                                                                                  39
Accounting Fig. 6 – Ratio Analysis (First to Fifth Fiscal Years)


                                                                         Snak Shak +
                                                                        Ratio Analysis

                                         March 31, 2011       March 31, 2012             March 31, 2013    March 31, 2014      March 31, 2015
     Total Current Assets                  1,416.18             2,713.34                   4,083.90          5,550.57            7,030.72
     Total Current Liabilities               50.00                50.00                      50.00             50.00               50.00
                                          Year ended        Year ended March        Year ended March      Year ended March   Year ended March 31,
                                         March 31, 2011          31, 2012                31, 2013              31, 2014              2015
     Gross Profit                          4,827.15              5,077.55                5,159.58              5,274.27            5,302.33
     Total Net Sales                       6,777.50              7,137.50                7,245.00              7,385.00            7,392.50
     Net Income/Net Loss                    685.13               1,267.55                1,349.58              1,464.27            1,492.33

     Working Capital                         1,366.18              2,663.34                 4,033.90          5,500.57             6,980.72
     Current Ratio                           28.32:1               54.27:1                  81.68:1           111.01:1             140.61:1
     Gross Profit Margin                       71%                   71%                      71%               71%                  72%
     Rate of Return on Net Sales               10%                   18%                      19%               20%                  20%




                                                                                                                                                    40

								
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