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					JOUR 2330.005                               Intro to Visual Communication for News Fall 2011
                                                                 Class Time: M/W 2:30 – 3:50
                                                                                   GAB 101

Instructor: Lisa Parisot
Office: GAB 463
Office Hours: Mon/Wed 10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
                          4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Also by Appointment
E-mail is the best way to make an appointment
Email: lisa.parisot@unt.edu


Course Description:
This class is designed to teach newsgathering and visual reporting skills to journalism students, including
those in Electronic News, News Editorial, Magazine, and Photojournalism and will develop your
understanding of visual storytelling for the journalist. This portion of the class covers how to shoot and edit
news reports for broadcast/web and a discussion of television news standards.

Course Objectives

Students who successfully complete this course should be able to:

           Set up cameras, videotape, ingest video, and edit video for broadcasting and the web
           Shoot/edit video for a TV news voice over, interview
           Understand composition, sequencing and exposure for video
           Understand the fundamentals of visual storytelling
           Understand concepts and apply theories in the use and presentation of images and
            information.
           Work ethically, truthfully, accurately
           Think critically, creatively, and independently.
           Develop a clear sense of "newsworthiness"
           Make all deadlines
           Research and evaluate information based on industry standards

Course Requirements:

Attendance – Attendance is mandatory. Lectures, videos, and class discussions will contain vital
information needed to do well on the exams.

Required Text:
***“The Complete Digital Video Guide: A Step-by-Step Handbook for Making Great Home Movies using
your Digital Camcorder," Bob Brandon, Reader’s Digest, 2005.

***Note – This book is no longer in print, however it is being made available in the campus bookstore as a
special packet in which the book is coil-bound. The cost is approximately $44. When purchasing the book,
you may have to tell the bookstore attendant that it is a special packet and it may be identified by John
Sparks , or the Course name and number, which is JOUR 2330 - Sec. 005.

Required Editing On-Line Tutorial:
http://tv.adobe.com/show/learn-premiere-pro-cs4/

Materials Supplied: Headphones, Mini-DV tapes

Materials Recommended: A 4 GHz computer flash drive

Exams: There will be THREE exams (this includes the final exam), worth a total of 360 points. Exams will
be based on text readings, handouts, class exercises, videos, and class lectures and discussions.
Students are responsible for all text material, regardless of whether we review the text material in class or
not.
Missed Exams: You will be allowed to make up a missed exam only if you have a
documented university excused absence. If you know in advance that you will miss an exam, you MUST
contact me before the scheduled exam. Make-up exams will not contain the same questions and may
contain only essay and short answer questions.
Assignments: In addition to the readings from the text, there will be four shooting assignments and four
editing assignments, each worth 100 points. A separate handout will contain further information. No late
assignments will be accepted. No emailed assignments will be accepted.

Extra credit: There is none.

GRADING FOR VIDEO SECTION:
You may earn up to 1,200 points in this course. Every student starts with zero. You may earn points as
follows:

Shooting Exercise 1                                                         100 Points
Shooting Exercise 2                                                         100 Points
Shooting Exercise 3                                                         100 Points
Editing Exercise 1                                                          100 Points
Editing Exercise 2                                                          100 Points
Editing Exercise 3                                                          100 Points
Homework 1                                                                   10 Points
Homework 2                                                                   10 Points
Homework 3                                                                   10 Points
Quiz 1                                                                       90 Points
Quiz 2                                                                       90 Points
Final Project                                                               300 Points
Final Exam                                                                   90 Points

Total Possible                                                             1,200 Points

GRADING SCALE:
1,080 – 1,200 = A
  960 - 1,079 = B
  840 - 959 = C
  720 - 839 = D
  719 - below = F

                                                           % of Grade
Shooting assignments                                              25.0
Editing Assignments                                               25.0
Homework                                                           2.5
Quizzes + Written Final                                           22.5
Final Project                                                     25.0
                                                                 100.0 %

***Instructor Discretion = 24 points (2% of grade)
The instructor may add up to 24 points (2%) to a student’s total score if he feels the student has
demonstrated significant progress and improvement at the end of the semester. That is completely up to
the discretion of the instructor.

Disabilities Accommodation:
The University of North Texas complies with Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The University of North Texas provides academic adjustments and
auxiliary aids to individuals with disabilities, as defined under the law. Among other things, this legislation
requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for
reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring
accommodation, please see the instructor and/or contact the Office of Disability Accommodation at 940-
565-4323 during the first week of class.

DEADLINES:
This class operates on the same principles as a working newsroom. Deadlines must be met, late work,
tardiness, or an unexplained absence is unacceptable. Deadlines will be strictly adhered to, and many
assignments will be done in class under deadline pressure.
Assignments are due at the beginning of class. Late assignments are not accepted. Arriving late for
class means a ZERO for the assignment due that day.

If an illness or a personal emergency prevents you from completing an assignment on time, advance notice
and written documentation are required.

You must arrive in class on time with the necessary equipment to meet the assignment of the day.

EXPECTATIONS:
I expect you to show up for all classes, turn in all assignments, complete the work and make the deadlines.
This course will require a considerable amount of time outside the class period.

You must watch and listen to radio and TV newscasts, read newspapers and web articles throughout the
semester.

This is; however, more than a class where you will be taught shooting and editing skills.

As aspiring journalists, you are expected to:
     possess intellectual curiosity
     be well-read about the world around you
     be critical thinkers

Accordingly, you are expected to engage in class discussions. This class is not a monologue prepared by
the instructor. To learn, you must exchange ideas and thoughts with the instructor and your peers. You
will be expected to do this. Civility is expected at all times toward the professor and one another.

ATTENDANCE, SICK AND OTHER POLICIES:
I will be in class. I expect you to be here, too.
If you are sick and miss class, you must bring a doctor's excuse to make up the in-class
assignment. If you have a doctor's excuse, we will then arrange a time to make up any in-class
writing. You must immediately get any homework assignment from me or another student and
turn it in on time (when it's due!). If someone in your immediate family dies during the
semester, please provide documentation to me. See me about making up the work you missed.

One absence in the course is the limit without penalty toward your final grade, unless you have
communicated with me from the beginning about an extraordinary problem. Coming to class late or leaving
early may constitute an absence for that day.

Much of the information presented in this class will be hands-on in the lab and requires your presence in each
class meeting to learn the equipment. Demonstrations, guest speakers, and field assignments take place
throughout the semester, and it is your responsibility to know the material presented.

You will be dropped from the class if you miss two classes with an unexcused absence.

FIRST CLASS DAY ATTENDANCE:
Journalism instructors reserve the right to drop any student who does not attend the first class day of the
semester.

CELL PHONE POLICY:
Turn off cell phones and all other electronic devices before class starts.

CLOTHING/APPEARANCE:
You are learning how professional journalists work. Dressing and acting appropriately are an
important part of being professional and believable. Since you may be sent out to cover stories,
you must wear appropriate clothing. Men must wear a shirt with a collar, nice jeans, slacks or
shorts. Women must wear a shirt or blouse with sleeves (no low cut or sleeveless tops), long
pants or a skirt or dress that is not short or revealing.

LAB RULES:
No food or drink is permitted in the lab at any time.

You may not upload video and audio gathered for this course to the Web without permission of
the instructors. Failure to get permission will result in a failing grade for the course.

You may not be on the Internet during lectures and demonstrations. You may not use the Internet to check
your personal e-mail during class time.

Lab hours will be posted on the classroom door.

EQUIPMENT USAGE:
Radio and TV field equipment for this class will be checked out from the Equipment Room in GAB 111 Lab.

You must pass the camera check and the recorder check before you will be allowed to check out equipment.

All editing will be done on the computers in the GAB 101 Lab. All shooting will be done on the
cameras checked out from the Equipment Room in GAB 111. You may not use your own equipment or
equipment belonging to anyone else. The use of equipment not designated for this class will result in a zero
for the project you are working on.

I must approve overnight checkouts before the checkout. Failure to return equipment on time will result in the
loss of use of the equipment for a designated time period.

                                       Mayborn School of Journalism
                                        Equipment Checkout Rules

        • Still Cameras are limited to 3 hours maximum
        • Audio Recorders are limited to 3 hours maximum
        • Video Cameras are limited to 3 hours maximum

Overnight Requests - approval based on need and time of assignment. Email to professor required 24
hours prior to request. Email must include:
        Student’s Name
        Course Number
        Equipment Needed
        Date needed - include return date
        Reason for request
You must bring a printed copy of the approved overnight request with you to checkout the equipment.

Late Equipment Returns and Abuse Checkout Policy

Late return of equipment and/or other violation of procedures relative to the use of the equipment (including
unauthorized checkout) may affect your final course grade (point deductions determined by your instructor).
Offenders will receive stronger penalties and will be denied the use of equipment and/or facilities based on
the following schedule:

1st Infraction: 1-week loss of equipment/facility use
2nd Infraction: 3-week loss of equipment/facility use
3rd Infraction: Loss of all equipment/facility use privileges for the remainder of the semester in all
Journalism classes.

from the Gold Card

The Student agrees to retain sole possession of equipment checked out and not to lend or give the
equipment to any other person for any reason. The student is responsible for returning the equipment by
the date and time specified.

The Student is responsible for any loss or damage to the equipment during the time the
equipment is checked out in his/her name, whether or not such damage is caused by the
student. Any equipment not returned within two weeks from the date checked out will be considered lost.

Damaged equipment will be repaired at the student’s expense. If the equipment is lost or cannot be
repaired, the student will be responsible for replacing the equipment at current market price. In addition, the
student will receive an incomplete in the course until the issue is resolved.

I agree to comply with the above requirements and all other Journalism requirements concerning
equipment checkout and use. I assume full responsibility for any loss or damage to the equipment while it
is checked out in my name.

SAFETY:
Covering the news can be a dangerous job. Be very aware of your surroundings. Take precautions when
working at night. Do not work alone if possible and be alert at all times.

JOURNALISM REQUIREMENTS & GUIDELINES:
For journalism majors, not minors: This is a pre-major class. Enrollment in this class means that you are in
pre-major status, not major status. When you have completed this course and others in your pre-major,
then you must apply to become a major and therefore have access to upper-level journalism courses. If
you have questions about what counts in your pre-major, please see an advisor.

JOURNALISM COURSE REGISTRATION:
1. The Mayborn School of Journalism, in conjunction with the Registrar's Office, has eliminated the need
   for individual class codes for the majority of journalism courses. Registration will begin on the dates
   noted in the schedule of classes each semester. The system is a live, first come/first serve program;
   thus, we are unable to maintain the traditional waiting list as has been done previously.

2. By registering for this course, you are stating that you have taken the required prerequisites according
    to your catalog year and major/minor status. If the instructor later determines that you haven’t taken
    and passed these requirements, then you may be dropped at any point in the semester. If you have
    questions about your prerequisites, please see an advisor.

3. A journalism major enrolled in any restricted 3000 and 4000 level classes must have taken and passed
    the GSP test, all pre-major courses, and Math 1680 and also have applied for major status. Students
    must earn and maintain a 2.5 UNT and/or overall GPA (depending upon catalog year) to be eligible for
    major-level courses. Pre-majors must file a formal application for major status in the final semester of
    pre-major status to be eligible for early registration of major-level classes in the following semester.

COURSE PREREQUISITES:
Each semester, you'll need to print your unofficial transcript, highlighting all of the
journalism courses that you have taken. You'll use this to obtain class codes in the advising office before
registering for classes. By registering for this course, you are stating that you have taken the required pre-
requisites according to your catalog year and major/minor status. If the instructor later determines that you
haven’t taken and passed these requirements, then you may be dropped at any point in the semester. If
you have questions about your pre-requisites, please see an advisor.

RE-TAKING FAILED COURSES:
Students will not be allowed to take automatically a failed journalism course more than two times. Once you
have failed a journalism course twice, you will not be allowed to enroll in that course for 12 months. Once
you have waited 12 months after failing a course twice, you may make an appeal to the professor teaching
the course to be allowed to enroll a third time.

SETE:
The Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness (SETE) is a university-wide online evaluation and a
requirement for all UNT classes. The Mayborn School of Journalism needs your input to improve our
teaching and curriculum. This short survey will be available at the end of the semester, providing you a
chance to comment on how this class is taught. Prompt completion of the SETE will mean earlier access to
final semester grades. You’re a critical part of our growth and success. We look forward to your input
through SETE.

ACADEMIC HONESTY:
When you submit work for this class, that is the same as making a statement that you have produced the
work yourself, in its entirety. Plagiarism, fabrication, copyright infringement, and similar uses of other
people's work are unacceptable.

Plagiarism, in a nutshell, is using other people’s written words as your own. Some people consider the use
of 7-10 words in a row, copied from another source, as plagiarism. Be sure to include citations when using
other people’s writing, because plagiarism is a serious offense in any discipline, especially in journalism. It
is a firing offense in the professional world.
Any situations involving potential academic dishonesty will be handled through procedures established by
the UNT Office of Academic Integrity. The process also includes the opportunity for students to appeal the
outcome. Read specific procedures at http://vpaa.unt.edu/academic-integrity.htm
Extra Help: PLEASE DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE. If you are having trouble with this class,
please come by my office during office hours. I am also available by email at lisa.parisot@unt.edu

ACCEPTABLE STUDENT BEHAVIOR:
Student behavior that interferes with an instructor’s ability to conduct a class or other students' opportunity
to learn is unacceptable and disruptive and will not be tolerated in any instructional forum at UNT. Students
engaging in unacceptable behavior will be directed to leave the classroom and the instructor may refer the
student to the Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities to consider whether the student's conduct
violated the Code of Student Conduct. The university's expectations for student conduct apply to all
instructional forums, including university and electronic classroom, labs, discussion groups, field trips, etc.
The Code of Student Conduct can be found at www.unt.edu/csrr
Mayborn School of Journalism Academic Integrity Policy

The codes of ethics from the Society of Professional Journalists, American Advertising Federation and
Public Relations Society of America address truth and honesty. The Mayborn School of Journalism
embraces these tenets and believes that academic dishonesty of any kind – including plagiarism and
fabrication – is incongruent with all areas of journalism. The school’s policy aligns with UNT Policy 18.1.16
and requires reporting any act of academic dishonesty to the Office for Academic Integrity for investigation.
If the student has a previous confirmed offense (whether the first offense was in the journalism school or
another university department) and the student is found to have committed another offense, the department
will request the additional sanction of removing the student from the Mayborn School of Journalism. The
student may appeal to the Office for Academic Integrity, which ensures due process and allows the student
to remain in class pending the appeal.

HONOR CODE
MAYBORN SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM • MAYBORN GRADUATE INSTITUTE
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

The faculty, staff, and students of the University of North Texas Mayborn School of Journalism and Mayborn
Graduate Institute of Journalism regard honesty and integrity as essential qualities of our Journalism students and
as reflections of the standards of the professions for which journalism educates its students.

Students of The University of North Texas Mayborn School of Journalism and Mayborn Graduate Institute of
Journalism have entered a community of scholarship and journalism where academic integrity is of the highest
importance.

By enrolling in Journalism classes, all students agree to uphold this Honor Code. All students taking Journalism
classes agree that in their course work and interaction with faculty and staff they will not engage in:

       Fabricating information, data, research, quotations or sources.
       Plagiarizing the words or other creative work of another person: Plagiarism consists of intentionally or
        knowingly representing the words or ideas of another person as one’s own. Plagiarism includes, but is not
        limited to, the knowing or intentional failure to attribute language or ideas to their original source, in the
        manner required by the academic discipline (such as by quotation marks, attribution in the text, and
        footnotes citations in an academic exercise) or in the manner required by journalism practice (such as by
        quotation marks and attribution in a journalistic presentation).
       Looking at the exam of another student or using unauthorized notes, study aids or other materials during
        an examination.
       Altering and resubmitting work previously submitted and graded (this does not include rewrites of
        previously graded lab assignments).
       Submitting identical or substantially the same work for credit in more than one course.
       Obtaining unfair advantage, aiding and abetting, and falsifying records.
       Academic sabotage, by intentionally taking any action, which negatively affects the academic work of
        another student.

Professional journalists who fabricate and/or plagiarize violate industry standards and the public trusts greatly
compromising the integrity of their medium. Such journalists are often disciplined or fired. Students in the Mayborn
School of Journalism and Mayborn graduate students, especially those whose work goes out to client news
organizations via the School of Journalism, will be held to the same standards in their work.

At the Mayborn School of Journalism and Mayborn Graduate Institute, all of the activities listed above are grounds
for sanctions ranging from a reprimand to revocation of a degree or expulsion from the University.

Honor Code based on The Medill School of Journalism (2001 pledge) with amendments approved by the faculty of
the Mayborn School of Journalism and the Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism (2004).

I have read and understand this Honor Code.
Signature ______________________________________ Date________________________
Student # ______________________________________
Class Schedule* Video Storytelling Component

*Note: Schedule is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor
1 - Monday, August 29:
              Introduction - Syllabus
              Housekeeping – Gold Cards, Procedures
              Introduction to Sony HVR-A1U

              Assigned Homework:
                               1. Written Homework Assignment #1
                               2. Read Text - Chapters 1, 2 ,3 and 4
                               3. View Camera Tutorials
                               4. Download and save Camera Manual:
                       http://ws.sel.sony.com/PIPWebServices/RetrievePublicAsset/StepID/SEL-
asset-127528/original/HVRA1U_OM.pdf


2 - Wednesday, August 31:
              Written Homework Assignment #1 Due
              Camera Demonstration
              White Balance, Exposure, Audio Levels, Focusing, Tapes, Batteries
              Composition and Shooting Sequences
              Assigned Homework:
                      1. Watch Episodes 1-6 of
                         http://tv.adobe.com/show/learn-premiere-pro-cs4/
                      2. Read Text Chapter 9

Monday, September 5: LABOR DAY – NO CLASS

3 - Wednesday, September 7:
              Capturing in Adobe Premiere Pro
              Editing a Sequence
              Assigned Homework:
                      1. Read Text Chapters 5 and 6
                      2. Watch Episodes 12-13 of
                              http://tv.adobe.com/show/learn-premiere-pro-cs4/


4 - Monday, September 12:
              The basic language of visual storytelling
              Sequencing, composition, and getting the shots
              Review for Quiz #1
              Editing Assignment #1 Due

5 - Wednesday, September 14:
              Quiz # 1
              Shooting Assignment #1 Due
              Assigned Written Homework #2

6 - Monday, September 19:
              Capturing Sound and Pictures
              Microphones, natural sound, interviews, stand-ups, shooting for sound.
              Recording audio track
              Editing Assignment #2 Due
              Written Homework Assignment #2 Due
7 - Wednesday, September 21:
              Shooting Interviews
              How to set up for the interview, framing, & composition
              Shooting an MOS
              Shooting Assignment #2 Due
              Read Text: Chapters 7 and 8

8 - Monday, September 26:
              Personal Profiles
              Editing Assignment #3 Due

9 - Wednesday, September 28:
              Preparing for the Final Project
              Shooting Assignment #3 Due
              Assigned Written Homework #3

10 - Monday, October 3:
              Shooting Standups
              Review for Quiz #2
              Editing Assignment #4 Due
              Written Homework Assignment #3 Due

11 - Wednesday, October 5:
             Quiz # 2
             Shooting Assignment #4 Due

12 - Monday, October 10:
              Looking at the Business and Your Future
              Working on your Final Project
              Assign Written Homework #4

13 - Wednesday, October 12:
             Shooting various types of news
             Live shots, spot news, general news, features, and sports
             How these types of stories differ, yet use the same basic techniques
             Working on your Final Project
             Written Homework Assignment #4 Due

14 - Monday, October 17:
              Final Project Due
              Written Final Exam

15 - Wednesday, October 20:
             Report to GAB 111 for Still Photography
                                          Jour 2330
                          Intro to Visual Communication for News
                           Still Photojournalism Component

COURSE DESCRIPTION*:
Introduction to Visual Communication for News. 3 hours. Introduction to basic video
photography and editing, still photography and editing, audio recording and editing for use in
news and a digital multi-media environment. Instruction in theory, and practice of visual and
audio storytelling for news programming. Instruction may include the operation of digital video
cameras, digital still cameras, voice recorders, video and audio editing software and hardware
including non-linear editing systems. Prerequisite(s) : Grammar/Spelling/Punctuation test; JOUR
pre-major status and consent of department.

*This part of the semester covers STILL PHOTOGRAPHY AND EDITING FOR DIGITAL
MULTI-MEDIA ENVIRONMENT
_____________________________________________________________
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
              See attached sheet
_____________________________________________________________

PROFESSOR:           Lisa Parisot
                     lisa.parisot@unt.edu
                     Office: GAB463
                     Office hours: Mon/Wed 10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
                                   4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
                                   and by Appointment.

TEXT, REQUIRED:
              “Photography,” tenth or ninth edition, London, Stone and Upton
                (Reading assignments will be given during class time. You
                       are responsible for all reading assignments in the text
                       and other readings.)

REQUIRED MATERIALS:
              (Computer) Photo paper
               Computer Flash drive
OPTIONAL:
              (Your own) Camera memory card 2g


RECOMMENDED READING:
                     NPPA Magazine – a monthly publication of the National Press
                     Photographers Association www.nppa.org
http://bop.nppa.org/2006/http://www.poynter.org/content/content_view.asp?id=97829
*DIGITAL/STILL PHOTOJOURNALISM COMPONENT:
COURSE OBJECTIVES: (STILLS)
This portion of the course is designed to introduce students to digital still photography, including
acquiring a thorough knowledge of the nomenclature and operation of a 35mm digital camera, the
capture and downloading of digital files to the computer and the output of images for print and
web usage. It also includes a basic understanding of lighting techniques, both natural and artificial
for use in visual reporting and storytelling.

COURSE OUTLINE: (Specific dates of classes will be announced in class each week.

Class 1.       Introduction to the Camera:
               How to operate the camera on manual Mode.
               Exposure, focusing, and image capture size.

Class 2.       Camera Operation and Practice:
               Learning how to use the software.
               Learning how to size the pictures for the intended media.
               Field practice, first photojournalism shooting assignment
               (Finding the photo and getting caption information)

Class 3.       Lighting and Depth of field

Class 4.       FIRST ASSIGMENT DUE
               Proper exposure in different light situations.
               ISO understanding with relationship to light.
               Depth of field.
               Second shooting assignment requiring use of ISO and depth of field.

Class 5.       Media ready images:
               Preparing images for the web vs. print
               Advanced Photoshop/Photo Mechanic

Class 6.       SECOND ASSIGNMENT DUE
               Review for mid-quarter exam.

Class 7.       MID-QUARTER EXAM/DEPTH OF FIELD (2ND) ASSIGNMENT
               DUE
               Lighting Techniques/Lighting Applications
               Natural (direct, diffused, reflected.)
               Artificial light sources (strobes.) Fill flash and Main source.
               Fourth assignment/lighting assignment

Class 8.       History of Photojournalism

Class 9.       LIGHTING (4RTH) ASSIGNMENT DUE
               Composition and framing of photographs.
               Understanding the assignment and medium it will be used.
               Shooting Wide-Medium-Tight.
               Focal length selection.

Class 10.      Storytelling with Pictures.
               Covering elements of a picture story.
               How to make the story flow.
               Final assignment for this portion of 2330/Photo story assignment
               A 7-9 picture story of their choice.

Class 10 (cont.)Should include the techniques discussed in class to this point, including
               the use of artificial light. To be presented in print and web form.

Class 11.      Photo Editing
               More use of Adobe Photoshop and Photo Mechanic
               Understanding and making visuals relevant

Class 12.      Visual Ethics
               Basic understanding of ethical concepts in photojournalism

Class 13:      Written Final quiz for this portion of 2330

Class 14.      Final class for both sections listed:
M/W            CRITIQUE OF FINAL ASSIGNMENT PHOTO STORIES

________________________________________________________________________
GRADING:
All assignments for this portion of 2330 receive a major grade of A-F. The mid-quarter quiz grade
counts twice. The final photo story grade counts twice.
The grade from this portion of the course will be averaged with the final grade from the
video portion of the class to determine a final grade.
All work must be completed on deadline. All work must be completed in the appropriate style and
format. Written work must be typed.
Your work will be judged for accuracy, clarity, conciseness, newsworthiness, creativity,
timeliness, deadlines, and the initiative you exhibit – in general, on good journalistic techniques
based on industry standards.
                    MAYBORN SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM POLICIES
                       SoJ Statements for All Journalism Syllabi:

JOURNALISM REQUIREMENTS & GUIDELINES

(Statement for JOUR 1210, 2310, 2320, 2420, 2330, 2200, 2010 only)
For journalism majors, not minors: This is a pre-major class. Enrollment in this class means that
you are in pre-major status, not major status. (JOUR 2320 is considered a pre-major course for
students under any catalog year prior to 2009.) When you have completed this course and others
in your pre-major, then you must apply to become a major and therefore have access to upper-
level journalism courses. If you have questions about what counts in your pre-major, please see an
advisor.

(Statements for all JOUR courses)
Journalism Course Registration
4. The Mayborn School of Journalism, in conjunction with the Registrar's Office, has eliminated
    the need for individual class codes for the majority of journalism courses. Registration will
    begin on the dates noted in the schedule of classes each semester. The system is a live, first
    come/first serve program; thus, we are unable to maintain the traditional waiting list as has
    been done previously.
5. By registering for this course, you are stating that you have taken the required prerequisites
   according to your catalog year and major/minor status. If the instructor later determines that
   you haven’t taken and passed these requirements, then you may be dropped at any point in the
   semester. If you have questions about your prerequisites, please see an advisor.
6. A journalism major enrolled in any restricted 3000 and 4000 level classes must have taken and
   passed the GSP test, all pre-major courses, and Math 1680 and also have applied for major
   status. Students must earn and maintain a 2.5 UNT and/or overall GPA (depending upon
   catalog year) to be eligible for major-level courses. Pre-majors must file a formal application
   for major status in the final semester of pre-major status to be eligible for early registration of
   major-level classes in the following semester.

Re-taking Failed Courses
Students will not be allowed to automatically take a failed journalism course more than two times.
Once you have failed a journalism course twice, you will not be allowed to enroll in that course
for 12 months. Once you have waited 12 months after failing a course twice, you may make an
appeal to the professor teaching the course to be allowed to enroll a third time.
Disability Accommodation
The School of Journalism cooperates with the Office of Disability Accommodations to make
reasonable accommodations for qualified students. If you have not registered with ODA, please do
so and present your written accommodation request to me by the 12th day of class.


Textbook policy
The Mayborn School of Journalism doesn’t require students to purchase textbooks from the
University Bookstore. Many are available through other bookstores or online.


SETE
The Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness (SETE) is a university-wide online evaluation
and a requirement for all UNT classes. The Mayborn School of Journalism needs your input to
improve our teaching and curriculum. This short survey will be available at the end of the
semester, providing you a chance to comment on how this class is taught. Prompt completion of
the SETE will mean earlier access to final semester grades. You’re a critical part of our growth
and success. We look forward to your input through SETE.

Academic Honesty
When you submit work for this class, that is the same as making a statement that you have
produced the work yourself, in its entirety. Plagiarism, fabrication, copyright infringement, and
similar uses of other people's work are unacceptable.

Plagiarism, in a nutshell, is using other people’s written words as your own. Some people consider
the use of 7-10 words in a row, copied from another source, as plagiarism. Be sure to include
citations when using other people’s writing, because plagiarism is a serious offense in any
discipline, especially in journalism. It is a firing offense in the professional world.

Any situations involving potential academic dishonesty will be handled through procedures
established by the UNT Office of Academic Integrity. The process also includes the opportunity
for students to appeal the outcome. Read specific procedures at http://vpaa.unt.edu/academic-
integrity.htm


Office Hours
I’ll be in my office from 10:00 to 10:30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, and 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.,
other office hours are available by appointment. My virtual office is always open; just email me,
and I promise to respond within 24 hours, except on weekends. I will check my email 3 times a
day – 7 a.m., approximately 2:00 p.m. and approximately 7:00 p.m.

Attendance
One absence in the course is the limit without penalty toward your final grade, unless you have
communicated with me from the beginning about an extraordinary problem. Coming to class late
or leaving early may constitute an absence for that day. This is a seminar course, and it requires
your attendance and participation each class meeting.
First Class Day Attendance
Journalism instructors reserve the right to drop any student who does not attend the first class day
of the semester.
            Statement of Student Learning Outcomes, UNT Journalism

Since 1969, the UNT Department of Journalism (Mayborn School of Journalism effective
September 1, 2009) has been accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism
and Mass Communication. This national accreditation also extends to the Mayborn Graduate
Institute of Journalism, the only accredited professional master’s program in Texas. About one-
fourth of all journalism and mass communication programs in the United States are accredited by
ACEJMC. National accreditation enhances your education here, because it certifies that the
department and graduate institute adhere to many standards established by the council. Among
these standards are student learning outcomes, covered by journalism courses in all sequences.

This course, JOUR _________, will help to meet the student learning outcomes that have been
checked by your professor, ___________________________ .

Each graduate must:

      Understand and apply First Amendment principles and the law appropriate to
      professional practice.

      Demonstrate an understanding of the history and role of professionals and
      institutions in shaping communications.

      Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of groups in a global society in
      relationship to communications.

      Understand concepts and apply theories in the use and presentation of images
      and information.

      Work ethically in pursuit of truth, accuracy, fairness and diversity.

      Think critically, creatively and independently.

      Conduct research and evaluate information by methods appropriate to the
      communications professions in which they work.

      Write correctly and clearly in forms and styles appropriate for the
      communications professions, audiences and purposes they serve.

      Critically evaluate their own work and that of others for accuracy and fairness,
      clarity, appropriate style and grammatical correctness.

      Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts.

      Apply tools and technologies appropriate for the communications professions in
         which they work.

				
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