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Institutional Internationalization Review

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               Park University Institutional Internationalization Review
                           Internationalization Task Force 2005

I. Articulated Commitment: Mission, Goals, and Vision
To what extent is internationalization integral to the institution’s identity and vision?

Internationalization is a vital part of Park University’s identity. In 2004-05, Park hosted
447 students from 91 countries. Park is also home to 19 international faculty, and boasts
three Fulbright scholars in the last four years. Many of Park’s administration, faculty,
staff and students are demonstrating the importance of internationalization by
participating in the ACE Internationalization Laboratory and Internationalization Task
Force (ITF). The ITF is charged with leading a campus-wide discussion about
internationalization, then using that information (contained in two reports) to produce an
internationalization action plan that supplements and supports internationalization efforts
spelled out in the strategic action plan.

Is global/international learning articulated as part of the institution’s vision, mission, or
goals? Where (for example, in the mission statement, strategic plan, or recruiting
materials)?

Internationalization is prominently addressed in Park University’s mission and vision
statements.

Mission statement:
The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide
access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically,
communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global
community.

Vision statement:
Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative
educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Internationalization also has a strong presence in the strategic plan. International
education was one of five major subcommittees that laid the groundwork for the strategic
plan. (See Part III for more detail on internationalization and the strategic plan).

What are the goals for the internationalization (for example, preparing students for work
in a global society or connecting international and multicultural agendas)? Where are
they articulated?

         The goals for Internationalization at Park University work mutually with Park
University’s mission and vision statement. The goal of internalization at Park University
is providing learner access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think
critically, communicate effectively, and engage in lifelong learning while serving a
global community.
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Park University’s Internationalization Task Force is one tool being used to assist in
meeting these goals. The ITF’s self-created charge is:

“The Internationalization Task Force is an instrument of the faculty, staff, and students at
Park University. The task force, will, with crucial input from the faculty senate, faculty
within academic schools and departments, individual professors, all student services
departments, and various student groups, launch a campus-wide discussion of
internationalization. These discussions could include:

     What is Internationalization?
     In what ways are you currently internationalized?
     What does Internationalization mean to our faculty, curriculum, co-curricular
      programs and student support services, and graduates?

The task force will also collect information about the status of internationalization at Park
University.”

The ITF planned out the first two years of its activities. In year one, 04-05, the ITF lead
the discussion about internationalization, and produced two reports (including this one)
that address Park and internationalization. In year two, 05-06, the ITF will develop an
action plan that supports and supplements internationalization efforts currently outlined
in the strategic plan. Specific goals will be developed in year two. These goals must be
consistent with those already articulated in the mission and vision statements; that is, to
serve a global community and to facilitate lifelong learning in a global society.

To what extent has the institution developed student learning goals associated with the
global and international dimension of undergraduate education? What are they?

The ITF will be reviewing international competencies for student learning during the 05-
06 academic year. The ITF will be lobbying for the adoption of competencies like those
below that are articulated in ACE’s “Internationalizing the Campus”.

Knowledge
         Political Knowledge includes knowledge of one's own political system, players, and events as well
     as international systems, leaders, and events. It also includes a knowledge of geography, institutions
     and their processes, and economics (Caprini and Keeter).

        "State of the Planet" Awareness is understanding of prevailing world conditions, developments,
     and trends associated with world issues such as population growth, economic conditions, inter-nation
     conflicts, and so forth (Hanvey). The Knowledge Dimension in the ETS study includes awareness of
     such topics as trade arrangements, energy, human rights, and population issues (ETS).

        Foreign Language Acquisition refers to knowledge of another language as a way to increase one's
     understanding of another culture (Bonham).
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        Knowledge of International Etiquette is understanding of appropriate international etiquette in
    situations with colleagues, to cover greetings, thanking, leave taking, gift-giving, and paying and
    receiving compliments (Stanley).

        Knowledge of Global Dynamics means comprehension of the hidden complexity that can alter the
    interpretation of world events (systems thinking) (Hanvey). It is linked to critical-thinking skills
    (Mestenhauser).

        Knowledge of Global and National Interdependence is knowledge of key elements of
    interdependency (Bonham).

        Awareness of Human Choices is an awareness of the problems of choice confronting individuals,
    nations, and the world (Hanvey).

       Perspective Consciousness is an awareness that one has a view of the world that is not universally
    shared, that there is a distinction between opinion and perspective (worldview) (Hanvey).

       Knowledge of Self refers to understanding one's own culture and place. Also known as Personal
    Autonomy.

       Personal Autonomy is an awareness of identity and includes taking responsibility for one's actions
    and understanding one's own beliefs and values (Kelley and Meyers).
       Cross-Cultural Awareness is an awareness of the diversity of ideas and practices found in the
    world (Hanvey).

        Knowledge Acquisition from a Multiple Perspective refers to knowledge selected to represent the
    variety of cultural, ideological, historical, and gender perspectives present in the world (Lamy).

       Exploration of Worldviews is a review of the values, assumptions, priorities, and policy
    orientations that are used to interpret both public and private issues (Lamy).


Attitudes
        Movement Toward Empathy is seeing others as they see themselves, given their conditions,
    values, and so forth (Hanvey). It goes beyond sympathy (ethnocentric thinking to ethnorelativist
    thinking) to a fuller view that focuses on the other instead of the self (Bennett). Also reflected in the
    Concern Scale which is described as feelings of empathy and kinship with people from other nations
    and cultures (ETS, p. 136).

        EmicThinking(Mestenhauser) , Intercultural Perspective Taking, or Allocentrism is the ability to
    take a multiplicity of perspectives.

       Reflective Attitude is a reflection on the impact of decisions, choices, and behavior of self and
    others (Fantini).

       Learning Attitude is a willingness to learn from others and engage others (Fantini). Also termed
    Flexibility Openness on Kelley and Meyers CCAI Scale (Kelley and Meyers), and is similar to Positive
    Orientation to Opportunities (Brislin) or Dynamic Learning (Dinges).

       Tolerance for Ambiguity and Respect for Others (Fantini).

       Personality Strength refers to well-developed self-esteem and positive self-concept (Brislin),
    similar to the idea ofIntegration, that is, a growing coherence and increased synthesis of personality.
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        Global Understanding aims to measure attitudes, such as interest about international
    developments, expression of empathy, feelings of kinship about others, and degree of comfort in
    foreign situations (ETS).

Skills
       Technological Skills mean an enhanced capacity as consumers of information; also, using
    technology to gain a better understanding of the world.

       Second Language Proficiency Skills refer to the ability to use another language to accomplish
    basic communication tasks (ETS). The BBCAl notes language skills to include the ability to
    understand a newspaper, technical reports, and everyday instructions (Stanley).


       Critical Thinking Skills refer to the ability to expand thinking to recognize issues, solutions, and
    consequences not ordinarily considered, that is, holistic thinking. It includes the ability to synthesize
    and integrate knowledge, rather than uncritical acceptance of knowledge, or meta-learning
    (Mestenhauser).

       Comparative Thinking Skills are similar to Critical Thinking Skills, in the ability to compare and
    contrast critically (Mestenhauser).

     Skills for Understanding are skills that enable students to analyze and evaluate information from
    diverse sources critically (Lamy).

     Manage Stress When Dealing with Difference (Hammer), also termed Emotional Resilience, is the
    ability to maintain a positive state, self-esteem, and confidence when coping with ambiguity and the
    unfamiliar (Kelley and Meyers). The BCCIE terms this Resiliency and Coping Skills and includes
    psychological preparedness and leaderships skills in diverse situations (Stanley).


     Strategies for Participation and Involvement are strategies to allow students to connect global issues
    with local concerns and take action in the context of their own lives (Lamy).

     Self-monitoring Techniques relate to the ability to self-monitor behaviors and communication and
    take responsibility for one's self (Spitzberg). This is similar to Autonomy, that is, autonomous self-
    regulation of actions.

     Effective Cross-Cultural Communication Skills are the ability to alter one's communication and
    responses to reflect another's communication style and thus build relationships (Hammer). Also termed
    Perceptual Acuity, which is attentiveness to verbal and nonverbal behaviors and interpersonal
    relationships, understanding the context of communication (Kelley and Meyers). This could also
    include the concept of Potential for Benefit, which includes an openness to change and the ability to
    perceive and use feedback as well as motivation to learn about others (Brislin).

     Enhanced Accurate Communication Skills refers to the ability to communicate with a minimal loss
    or distortion of the meaning (Fantini).
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II. The Environment for Internationalization
How does the local, state, and broader environment affect current internationalization
efforts? What impact will the environment have on future internationalization efforts?
Does the immediate environment from which the institution draws its students suggest a
special approach to internationalization (for example, immigrant populations, local
cultural ties to other countries and regions)?

Park University is a very unique institution. The Parkville campus, founded in 1875,
hosts the diverse international student population already mentioned as well as students
from the Kansas City area and across the nation. The institutional profile is below:

 Founded:
     1875 as an independent, liberal arts, four-year coeducational, residential Christian
     institution.

 Present:
      An independent, private institution, accredited by the
      North Central Association of Colleges and Universities. Park University currently
      enjoys a distinguished position in higher education as a growing entrepreneurial
      institution with 42 campus centers in 21 states in addition to our extensive Online
      program.

       Park University has 22,617 students enrolled in degree programs at 42 campus
       centers and Online.

 Location:
     The “main” flagship campus of Park is located on its historic site in Parkville,
     Missouri (founded 1875) high on the bluff above the scenic Missouri River. Our
     Parkville campus is ten minutes from downtown Kansas City, fifteen minutes
     from the Kansas City International Airport, and part of the KCI Business
     Corridor.

       The School for Extended Learning has established campus centers on military
       installations across the United States and Online. The School for Extended
       Learning has served the non-traditional, working adult student since 1972 by
       offering undergraduate programs in an accelerated format.

       Our Graduate School is located in Downtown Kansas City. We also have a
       campus in Independence, Missouri and a new stand-alone Park University Austin
       campus center in Austin, Texas.

 Student Profile:

       Approximately 60% of our students are active duty military, active duty
       dependents, retired military, or Department of Defense.
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         53% of our undergraduate students are upper division; 4% of our students are
         graduate students in six growing graduate programs (with major growth Online.)

         Over 50% of our total student population took at least one Online course in
         AY’04. The students in Online and extended campuses study in an accelerated
         eight-week format throughout the year (5 terms).

         During AY’04, we had over 42,000 separate Online enrollments and we serve
         students in all military branches (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy)
         throughout the world.

         Park’s traditional campus in Parkville is host to two-thirds of our over 450
         international students from 91 countries and our substantial and growing
         globalization program. Internationalization counts for much of our Online growth
         and our focus on global education. We are happy to report that we are an
         institution selected by ACE to participate in its Internationalization Collaboration
         during 2004-2005. Through local partnerships: Kansas City World Trade Center,
         International Relation Council, People to People International, UNA-USA, and
         International Visitors Council; Park University’s multi-cultural and international
         programs grow and impact all of our student learners throughout the world.

 Parkville Campus Profile:

        Founded 1875
        Location: Parkville, Missouri. An historic town on the Missouri River, 15 minutes
           to downtown Kansas City, Missouri, 20 minutes from Kansas City International
           Airport.
        Tuition: Our fiscal initiatives provide varying revenue streams which allow Park
           to maintain our tuition at approximately the same level as students attending
           state universities in Missouri (our tuition benchmark).
        Students: Over 1200 undergraduate students.
        Freshman Class Average: GPA 3.09, ACT 19.3, 80% in top half of their senior
           class.
        Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1
        Diverse Population: Students represent 30 states and over 90 foreign countries.
        Financial Aid: More than 85% of undergraduate students who qualify receive
           some form of financial aid. These include loans, grants, and work-study
           positions.

Given Park’s profile, then, some unique opportunities exist for internationalization.
Park’s international and military students are an invaluable resource, given their inherent
international interest and experience. Leveraging that experience, and making
internationalization meaningful across 42 campuses, is the challenge faced by the ITF.
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Does the institution’s location facilitate certain kinds of international interactions with a
particular region or regions? What local organizations or businesses have strong
international ties? Are they focused on particular parts of the globe?

Kansas City has a strong line-up of international organizations, including the World
Trade Center-Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, the International Visitor’s
Council, the International Relations Council, various honorary consulates, and the world
headquarters of People to People International. A number of international corporations
also have a strong presence in the Kansas City area. These include Bayer (U.S.
headquarters), Hallmark, Cerner, Sprint, Garmin International, AMC Theaters, H&R
Block, Farmland Industries, etc. According to the Greater Kansas City Chamber of
Commerce, the top destinations for Kansas City area exports are Mexico, Japan, and
Canada.

Park has a strong relationship with these organizations. Park students and faculty
participate in various World Trade Center programs including a global leadership
program (GLOBE) and its student counterpart, Global Future. Park has the world’s only
university chapter of People to People, and our student participants have won awards for
their innovative programming. Park works with the International Relations Council in the
International Classroom Partnership program, the Model UN program, and WorldQuest.
Park works with the International Visitors Council on a global citizenship program, and
the hosting of foreign visitors, with the United Nations Association on the high school
regional model UN program, and with 4-H on their regional conference.

What opportunities exist in the local environment to enhance the institution’s
internationalization efforts? To what extent has the institution taken the advantage of
them?

Kansas City is an increasingly international city, as reflected in the 2000 census.

“The city's population is growing more diverse. Like most Midwestern cities, Kansas
City's population remains predominantly white and black. The city lost white population
in the 1990s, but gained residents of other races and ethnicities. International immigrants
have contributed to the changing profile of the city and region. The number of foreign-
born living in Kansas City more than doubled in the 1990s, and more than twice as many
settled in the suburbs over the same period. What is more, the city's immigrant population
itself is quite diverse; Mexico is the most common country of birth, but half come from
countries in Asia, Europe, and Africa.” (Brookings Institution. Kansas City in Focus: A
Profile from Census 2000.)

Park University has had several collaborations with international communities. The most
recent collaboration was a Pakistani cultural program, “Cultural Sharing”, presented in
April, 2005. The event was planned in conjunction with the Pakistani community, and
played to a packed house of 300 and rave reviews. Park American and international
students were performers in the program, which was attended by students, faculty,
administration, staff, and the public. Future similar events are in the works, and will
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feature the culture of Brazil, Russia, and other countries. Certainly, Park should
increasingly avail itself of these valuable community assets.

As part of the New Student Orientation in the fall semester 2004/05 and 2005/06, Park
students attended the annual Ethnic Enrichment Festival held at Swope Park in Kansas
City, Missouri, and since the 2003/04 year, Park University staff and faculty were co-
founders and participants in the first two Northland Ethnic Festivals in Kansas City,
Missouri.

In June 2005, Park University established an International Center for Civic Engagement
to advance the University’s global mission, establish linkages among international efforts
across campus, and provide innovative educational opportunities for learners within the
global society. The center is also establishing an outlet for channeling community
outreach efforts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Part III. Strategy

To what extent does the institution have a clear strategy to accomplish the goals it has
articulated?
Does the institution have a strategic plan? Where does internationalization fit into the
plan? If internationalization is not part of the strategic plan, where else is it outlined?

Internationalization is an integral part of Park University’s strategic action plan, called
Explorations and Transformations 2012. This includes:

1.3.2 Survey alumni of record. (Work on International Alumni Association.)
2.1.4 Review admission and graduation requirements for academic programs. (Work
      with international competencies graduation requirements.)
2.1.7 Provide the library resources needed for academic excellence at all Campus
      Centers and for online programs. (International Resource Center.)
2.1.8 Provide academic enrichment initiatives. (Work with International programs.)
2.2.1 Develop and implement a Faculty Recruitment Plan. (Work with international
      faculty.)
2.2.8 Increase the number of faculty who participate in student study abroad programs.
2.3.1 Increase the academic preparedness of first-time freshmen. (Work with
      internationalization of curriculum.)
2.3.4 Document that students achieve program competencies prior to graduation. (Work
      with international competencies.)
2.4.3 Create a Center for International Business and Management.
2.4.4 Create a Center for Global Understanding.
2.5.1 Increase the number of majors and minors with an international focus.
2.5.2 Integrate globalization into the curriculum and into course requirements for
       graduation.
2.5.3 Create a Visiting Global Scholars Program to bring international
       teachers/researchers/artists to teach face-to-face and online and to collaborate
       with resident faculty.
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2.5.4     Become a leader in innovative delivery models of international/global education.
2.5.5     Conduct annually a Conference on Global Solutions.
2.5.6     Increase student international/global experience via co-curricular programs on
          campus.
2.6.1    Grow existing and new programs through strategic planning and curricular
         development. (Work with International programs.)
2.7.3    Develop the Park University Lecture Series and Concert Series to draw regional
         as well as national attendance. (Work with International recognized scholars.)
2.7.4    Enhance the University’s Honors Program. (Work in combining honors and study
         abroad programs.)
2.7.5    Provide funding for Graduate Assistantships. (Work with international students.)
3.1.1    Conduct a benchmark analysis to identify best practices. (Work with International
         programs.)
3.2      Student recruitment and retention will be strategic and market driven. (Work with
         international students.)
4.6.2    Complete redesign and reorganization of the website. (Work with international
         admissions and programs website.)

International elements in the strategic plan are divided into five categories:
1. Internationalization of Curriculum; 2. International students and faculty and student
exchanges; 3. Study abroad; 4. Outreach programs; 5. Program development and
partnerships.

The following are accomplishments during the last three years consistent with the
strategic plan. They are divided into the five categories listed above.

      1. Internationalization of Curriculum

At Park University, internationalization of the curriculum means not only adding more
internationally-themes courses and programs, but also infusing international principles
and themes into every course the university offers.

The main goal of the Internalization of Curriculum program is to continue Park
University’s commitment to internationalization of the curriculum and faculty
development activities. This includes offering more internationally-themed majors and
minors, integrating international courses into graduation requirements, sponsoring
international faculty exchanges, and supporting the English as an International Language
(EIL) program.

 During FY04, Park was selected by the American Council on Education (ACE) to
  participate as one of eight institutions nationally in the ACE Internationalization of
  Higher Education Program for FY05. As a part of the program, Park is developing a
  plan for internationalizing the university’s curriculum, and that model will be shared
  with other institutions.
 The Associate Dean of the School for Natural and Applied Sciences drafted a new
  core curriculum in collaboration with the other associate deans. That draft was
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    submitted to the faculty and will continue to be reviewed by the Faculty Senate and the
    administration in 05-06. The ITF is reviewing international competencies with the
    general education revision committee.
   A new course, The United Nations, will be offered in the fall of 2005. The United
    Nations course, and its Model UN component, will allow students to role play as
    ambassadors from UN member states to debate current issues on the organization's
    vast agenda, prepare draft resolutions, plot strategies, negotiate with supporters and
    adversaries, resolve conflicts, and navigate the UN’s procedures, all in the interest of
    mobilizing international cooperation to resolve global problems.
   Park’s EIL Program was developed and successfully launched during 04-05 under the
    direction a new, full-time coordinator.
   A new Global Studies minor was approved in the fall, 2004.
   The International Center for Music was launched at Park University. Its purpose is to
    foster the exchange of master teacher/performers, renowned young musicians, and
    programs from countries across the globe.

    2. International students and faculty and student exchanges

In 2004-5, Park hosted 447 students from 91 countries. Park is also home to 16
international faculty, and boasts three Fulbright scholars in the last four years. Many of
Park’s administration, faculty, staff and students are demonstrating the importance of
internationalization by participating in the ACE Internationalization Laboratory and
Internationalization Task Force (ITF).

Park University’s international programs have a worldwide focus, and seek a
simultaneous presence on all continents. These examples listed below are sorted by
continent:

Asia
 Because of a new partnership formed with Ming Chuan University during FY04, a
  criminal justice professor taught at Ming Chuan University and Tamkang University in
  Taipei during the fall 05 term.
 Professors Steve Youngblood and Carol Getty traveled to China for three weeks in
  June and July, 2005. Their mission, consistent with Park University's
  internationalization efforts, was to teach, and to make sustainable contacts with
  Chinese professors, students, and universities.
 Park University is forming a partnership with Pacific Resource for Educational
  Learning (PREL) in 2005 that will serve as the bridge for the future. This partnership
  will offer Park University access to PREL’s satellite coverage of Asia and the Pacific;
  assistance to PREL staff in their distance learning; providing Park University credits
  for teachers and others in the PREL region as they pursue credit, programs and
  certificates; and collaborating on institutes (e.g. the institute that Park has held this
  summer and in previous years). PREL’s goals include developing “High-performing
  Learning Communities” consisting of partnerships with schools, districts,
  Ministries/Departments of Education, Institutions of Higher Education. Their second
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  goal is to improve the quality of teaching and education administration, increase the
  number of professionals and increase the number of teachers and administrators.

Africa
 A business professor was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship for FY05 in Benin. He was
  Park’s third Fulbright professor since 2001.

Europe
 Park University has had a partnership with The American College of Thessaloniki
  (ACT) since 2001. ACT was a program provider for short term faculty lead trips to
  Greece in the summers of 2001- 2004. One Park University student also attended the
  American College of Thessaloniki during the summer semester of 2001, two students
  attended during the summer semester of 2002 and one during the fall semester of
  2004.
 Park University has had a partnership with Denmark’s International Study Abroad
  Program (DIS) in Copenhagen, Demark since 2003. This cooperation between schools
  was developed in order to enhance international student exchange of high academic
  quality. This partnership allows for Park University students to study in Copenhagen
  for a semester or year-long term. In 2006, 20 students are planning to attend DIS.
 The ITF has been has planned and launched the Visiting International Scholars/Artists
  program. The first visiting scholar from Aristotle University in Greece taught at Park
  University in May, 2005.
 Park University is forming a partnership with The Istituzione di Alta Cultura in Lucca,
  Italy to establish university cooperation to facilitate the exchange of students majoring
  in music in 2005.

South America
 In September of 2004, Olga Ganzen and Michael Fitzmorris visited universities (FBV,
  and FAFIRE), and English schools in Recife and Sao Paulo, Brazil. They also worked
  with social programs with the Ana Prado NGO in Recife. In March 2005, Steven
  Youngblood, Sapna Gupta, and Laura Lane visited Recife to study the possibilities of
  further programs with local universities and the Ana Prado NGO in Recife. As result,
  in March, 2006, 30 students and faculty from Park University will participate in a
  service learning project in Brazil.

Misc.
 In March 2005, Park University received a grant from the American Council on
  Education (ACE). The grant was jointly given to Park and St. Mary’s University,
  Kapi’olani Community College, and The University of Kansas for a “Global Solutions
  Service Project” that will result in a consortium for future service leaning exchange
  programs for students and faculty.
 Oregon State University System representatives presented study abroad opportunities
  to Park University students on April 14th during its International Career Day.
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   3. Study abroad

Park is working to increase dramatically both the number of students who incorporate study
abroad into their degree programs and the number of faculty who seek international
opportunities for teaching and research.

Park students are now able to choose from two international courses taught abroad each
summer by Park faculty and numerous study abroad courses in foreign languages. Park is
actively seeking scholarship funding through national and private foundations to make study
abroad possible for more students and currently offers financial, sabbatical, and flexible leave
incentives for faculty to participate in the Fulbright program.

 Six full-time faculty (communication arts, theater, history) participated in study abroad
  activities during FY04.
 Short–term study abroad programs were developed for Spain, Italy, Greece, Denmark,
  and Brazil.
 Park University has had a partnership with The American College of Thessaloniki
  (ACT) since 2001. ACT was a program provider for short term faculty led trips
  Greece in the summers of 2001- 2004. These trips were lead by professors of
  International Business, Theatre, History, and Communications.
 Park University has had a partnership with Oregon State University Consortia since
  2003 which allows students to study abroad for a semester or year in France,
  Germany, Mexico, Denmark, Japan, South Korea, China, Thailand, or Ecuador.
 In the summer 2005, two faculty members from different disciplines (Art and History)
  and 16 students studied abroad in Italy through an arrangement made possible by a
  partnership with the Center for Academic Programs Abroad (CAPA).
 The International Education and Study Abroad office is planning a “Park University
  Greece Preview” program in summer 2006, In this program, 2006 high school
  graduates will experience four weeks classes of at Park University’s home campus,
  followed by three weeks in Greece, and one week at Park after the trip.

   4. Community outreach

Park University’s outreach program educates the community on international businesses,
cultures, customs, languages, and globalization. Outreach partners include People to
People International, The Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce and World Trade
Center, International Relation Council, UNA-USA, International Visitors Council, and
National 4-H Council. Park University outreach programs are responsible for increasing
community awareness on international issues, developing critical thinking, and
preparing its audience to make informed decisions.

 In FY04 and FY05, the university funded four faculty and staff members to participate
  in the GLOBE Program. Global Leadership Opportunities for Business Executives, or
  GLOBE, is a unique program designed to train a select group of business executives
  and educators in the methods and practices of conducting international business.
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 Global Future, a cooperative international business education program featuring
  participants from six universities/colleges (Park University, Johnson County
  Community College, Benedictine College, William Jewell College, University of
  Kansas, and University of Kansas City Missouri) and the Kansas City World Trade
  Center, is also offered for credit at Park University. This program is designed to
  provide an understanding of international business and international business
  leadership skills through interaction with international business leaders and class
  projects and discussions. Sessions also discuss educational opportunities, business
  culture, and the role of equality in economic globalization. Global Future offers
  outstanding networking opportunities for students.
 A World Trade Center Partnership has been established, and Park hosts a World Trade
  Center Satellite office on the Park University Parkville Campus. World Trade Center
  Satellite is an organization dedicated to the education of students and faculty about
  international culture and business operations. It also aims to establishing networking
  opportunities that lead to mutually beneficial relationships between students and the
  business community.
 Park University agreed on future cooperation with Greater Kansas City People to
  People International. The Greater Kansas City Chapter of People to People
  International (GKCPTP) is a volunteer organization formed to promote fun,
  understanding and friendship among the peoples of the world through fellowship,
  goodwill, tolerance, and mutual respect through direct person-to-person contacts. This
  agreement will allow visitors to Park University to benefit from PTPI Homestay
  programs. Park University is the first and only university to have a student chapter of
  People to People. The purpose of Park University chapter is to foster educational
  processes that will promote understanding and goodwill among people of all nations.
  The Park University Chapter of People to People International sponsors other outreach
  programs such as the International Classroom Partnership, Coming to America Series,
  and Model UN.
 The Model UN Program, an authentic simulation of the UN General Assembly and
  other multilateral bodies, involves students in the world of diplomacy and negotiation,
  and has sent students to Chicago, St. Louis, and New York during the 03-04 and 04-05
  academic years.
 Park hosted a successful high school Model UN conference in April, 2005. Over 60
  student delegates participated. Park will host a second, larger high school Model UN
  in November, 2005, and Park’s Model UN sponsor is working with the United Nations
  Association and other university Model UN advisers to establish a regional Model UN
  conference.
 In the Coming to America Series, international students present their countries to Park
  University students, faculty and staff. The speakers generally discuss their countries’
  politics, cultures, traditions, geography, religions, and current conditions. The goal is
  to increase cultural awareness on campus. The Coming to America Series, in its six
  sessions in 2005, featured 19 International speakers, and an audience of 147 students
  and faculty.
 In the International Classroom Partnership, a group of international students volunteer
  to speak at local elementary schools. This program, run in conjunction with the
  International Relations Council, connects our international university students with
                                                                                           14


  Kansas City-area elementary-school students, providing them with insights into the
  cultures, traditions, languages, geography, and conditions of the presenters’ home
  countries. Both sets of students gain from the experience. During this academic year,
  35 Park University International Speakers presented information about their countries
  to 650 elementary students from North Kansas City School District. Seven
  international students presented 2 workshops at the Kansas City 4-H Youth
  Conference, attended by 75 high school students from all over the United States.
 The International Center for Music sponsored a 2005 Grand Piano Festival. It featured
  world class performers like Dmitri Bashkirov as well as budding young talents. In all,
  seven free concerts were presented.
 Each year, during November, the University sponsors International Education Week,
  which allows the faculty, staff and students, as well as the Kansas City community, to
  learn about other cultures in an educational setting. This week also includes the
  annual International Dinner and Program, a long-time tradition of the University.
 During the 2005-6 academic year, Park's International Center for Civic Engagement
  will host a monthly brown bag lunch series that will allow faculty, students and staff
  and the general public to consider and discuss timely topics.

   5. Program Development

Program Development is a continuing task for the International Education and Study
Abroad Office. The objectives of program development are making international
education a major campus commitment, establishing financial foundations, and creating a
strong marketing program.

These efforts are also sorted by continent:

Asia
  Park University exchanged letters of intention, and is working on a formal agreement,
   with Ming Chuan University in Taipei, Taiwan for a student and faculty exchange
   program that is to be supplemented by online education. Ming Chuan University and
   Tamkang University are also eager to collaborate with Park University in bringing
   more online education to China, including the People’s Republic of China. The
   Provost, the distance education vice president, and the director of International
   Education and Study Abroad visited the university to arrange the partnership.
  Park University is forming a partnership with Pacific Resource for Educational
   Learning (PREL) in 2005 that will serve as the bridge for the future. This partnership
   will offer Park University access to PREL’s satellite coverage of Asia and the Pacific;
   assistance to PREL staff in their distance learning; providing Park University credits
   for teachers and others in the PREL region as they pursue credit, programs and
   certificates; and collaborating on institutes (e.g. the institute that Park has held this
   summer and in previous years.) PREL’s goals include developing “High-performing
   Learning Communities” consisting of partnerships with schools, districts,
   Ministries/Departments of Education, Institutions of Higher Education. Their second
   goal is to improve the quality of teaching and education administration, increase the
   number of professionals and increase the number of teachers and administrators.
                                                                                      15




Europe
  In FY04, a partnership was formed with the Centers of Academic Programs Abroad
   (CAPA). This partnership enables Park University students to participate on short-
   term faculty led programs, and/or long-term study-abroad in Italy.
  Park University is negotiating a partnership with St. Petersburg University of
   Humanities and Social Sciences in Russia. Park University is exploring the option of
   working with the St. Petersburg University through online programs, faculty and
   student exchanges, and study abroad programs. Park University also is reviewing the
   potential of creating an executive MBA summer program for Russian executives with
   English as an International Language, Business Administration, and American
   Civilization and Culture courses.
South America
  In September of 2004, Olga Ganzen and Michael Fitzmorris visited universities (FBV,
   and FAFIRE), and English schools in Recife and Sao Paulo, Brazil. They also worked
   with social programs with the Ana Prado NGO in Recife. In March of 2005, Steven
   Youngblood, Sapna Gupta, and Laura Lane visited Recife to study the possibility of
   further programs with local universities and Ana Prado NGO in Recife. All five
   faculty members offered training for the community and universities. Through a
   partnership with Transformational Journeys, a program provider, Park University is
   studying the possibility of future short-term academic exchange programs with a
   service component.
  In July of 2005, Janaina Sa Peres and Renato Santos, Ana Prado NGO’s coordinators,
   visited Park University home campus in Parkville, Missouri to further the discussions
   on service projects and curriculum with the Ana Prado NGO in Recife.

Misc.
 Meetings between Park University faculty members and foreign institutions’ faculty
  members took place in order to establish an endowed chair. Olga Ganzen and Ronald
  Miriani met with Phillip Kargopolis from Anatolia College in Greece. Olga Ganzen
  met with Valeria Magistrelli from Italy, and Carol Getty and Olga Ganzen are working
  with Ming Chuan University in Taiwan.
 Olga Ganzen has contacted faculty members from Aristotle University in Greece, Tam
  Kang University in Taiwan, and Georgetown University in the U.S. for the purpose of
  establishing the groundwork for an annual conference on Global Solutions.
 In March 2005, Park University received a grant from the American Council on
  Education (ACE), along with St. Mary’s University, Kapi’olani Community College,
  and The University of Kansas, to create a “Global Solutions Service Project” that will
  result in a consortium for future service leaning exchange programs for students and
  faculty.
                                                                                              16


What are the main components of the institution’s internationalization strategy?

The direction for internationalization comes from the strategic plan, which spells out a
specific course of action for internationalization. The ITF is a tool for
internationalization. Its charge is to facilitate a dialogue about internationalization, collect
data, publish a report, and produce an action plan that will both complement and
supplement the strategic plan.

These strategies, consistent with the strategic plan, include pursing five areas of
international activity: 1. Internationalization of Curriculum; 2. International students and
faculty and student exchanges; 3. Study abroad; 4. Outreach programs; 5. Program
development and partnerships.

Park’s strategy includes a commitment to simultaneously reach out to all continents. This
strategy also includes system-wide internationalization on all of Park’s 42 campus sites.

How does this strategy take into account the institution’s mission, history, and students?

Park University’s history in intertwined with internationalization. Park College accepted
its first international student in 1881, and has had an international flavor ever since.
Founded on the motto of “Faith and Labor”, Park has also offered opportunities to
underserved domestic and worldwide communities. This includes the college’s decision
during World War II to courageously host Japanese students, despite the vehement
objections of the community.

The strategic plan was produced after a lengthy, inclusive process of collaboration and
consultation with staff, students, faculty, administration, alumni, and members of the
community. It reflects their collective will and wisdom, and is reflective of Park
University as an institution.

The ITF is facilitating a conversation about internationalization as a way of continuing
the work done on the strategic plan. It is hoped that by creating an inclusive process, that
internationalization becomes a concept that will be embraced by all Park’s stakeholders.

How does the institution assess its progress in achieving its goals?

In each of the five areas (1. Internationalization of Curriculum; 2. International students
and faculty and student exchanges; 3. Study abroad; 4. Outreach programs; 5. Program
development and partnerships.), the office of International Education and Study Abroad
has an assessment plan.

Also, at the conclusion of each program, the Global Future program, for example, an
extensive assessment, including surveys, meetings, etc., occurs. These suggestions from
the assessments are then used to improve the program offerings. For study abroad,
students engage in daily written reflections and take a comprehensive survey at the end of
the experience.
                                                                                                                  17




As for international coursework, these are subject to the standard departmental and
university evaluation of courses.

Part IV. Structure, Policies, and Practices
To what extent are institutional structure, policies, practices, and resources aligned with
the institution’s goals? Which ones promote internationalization? Which ones impede it?

Organizational Structure and Personnel
What governance and administrative structures support internationalization? How well
are they working?

The key players are the director of international education and study abroad, the director
of international student services and programs, the EIL coordinator, and director of the
International Center for Civic Engagement. They report to the provost, vice-president of
student services, the Modern Language Department, and the president.

In addition, a new assistant director of international education and study abroad and a
new coordinator of international student services were hired in the summer of 2005. Two
graduate students, one in the international education office and two in the international
student services office, also provide assistance.

    The current structure of international education is shown below:



           Director of The                          Director of                  Director of                  English as an
     International Center For             International Education        International Student           International Language
         Civic Engagement                     and Study Abroad               Services/Programs              (EIL) Coordinator



                                                                                                         * Curriculum and
          Internationalization                 Internationalization          International Student       Instruction
                                                                                                         * Testing/Academic
             of Curriculum                          of Curriculum            Services Coordinator        Support


*   Development of internationalization   *   Development of majors      *        Admissions
across the curriculum (MPA)               and minors with global focus   *        Recruitment
                                          *   Development of EIL         * Transcript Evaluation
      International Information           *   Development of Japanese    * SEVIS Requirements
            Clearinghouse                 studies
                                          *   Development of Global          Graduate Assistant
* International Publications              studies
* Online international resource           * Development of
center                                    Language                       *    Support
*   Coordination with international       Across Curriculum              *    Co-Curricular activities
civic engagement/public administration    * Faculty Exchange             *    World Student Union
                                          * Cooperation with
organizations                             consortia
*   Coordination with internationally -
focused organizations in the Greater          Program Development
                                                                                          18


 Kansas City area
                                 *         Advisory Board for
                                 International education
                                 *       Marketing/ PR
                                 *      Support for
                                 International
                                 faculty


                                     International Education/
                                        Student Program/
                                       Outreach Programs

                                 * Coordination of
                                 international
                                 programs on and off campus
                                 * Cooperation with
                                 International
                                 non-profit organizations


                                       Graduate Assistant


                                 *         Support




An ITF subcommittee, in its final report, suggested that the current structure is not
conducive to meeting the continually growing needs of internationalization at Park
University.

The committee also addressed the advisability of having the international education
director teach regular courses. “The university probably should not require the director to
teach a course every semester. One option is to include the director’s teaching during a
study abroad trips as part of her teaching load. For instance, the director could teach one
course during the fall semester and a second course during the summer. She would not
be required to teach during the spring semester,” according the report.

The structural subcommittee of the ITF is examining structures from other universities,
and is reviewing possible recommendations to change Park’s current organizational
structure on international programs.

Where does primary responsibility for internationalization lie? What other structures or
bodies share responsibilities? How effective are these arrangements?

The current responsibility for internationalization lies with the director of international
education and with her supervisors, the provost and the president. The ITF is attempting
to disperse this responsibility to the faculty, staff, and students. Ideally, if
internationalization is not compartmentalized, but is instead seen as part of everyone’s
job, the internationalization effort itself will be much more successful.

The new International Center for Civic Engagement will coordinate its activities in
conjunction with the director of international education.
                                                                                              19




Policies and Practices
How does the institution promote faculty engagement in internationalization? To what
extent does the institution reward or penalize faculty for international activities and
internationalization of their courses, especially in the hiring, promotion, and tenure
processes? What are the barriers to engagement? To what extent is the institution
succeeding in removing them? What is the evidence?

The ITF is working to enhance and coordinate efforts to engage faculty internationally.
Faculty members are encouraged to participate in international initiatives. Examples
include:
    A. Two $500 grants are given annually to faculty members contributing to the
       university’s international mission.
    B. Faculty are encouraged to participate in study abroad by having all their trip
       expenses paid for by the university.
    C. Faculty members have been sent abroad (Taiwan, Brazil) to develop service
       learning projects.
    D. Park has sponsored faculty members in the GLOBE (Kansas City Chamber of
       Commerce global business and leadership) program.
    E. Park’s faculty development endowed fund helps to sponsor international
       participation by faculty. The fund has helped pay for trips to Moldova and to
       China, among other places, during the last two years.

Administration and individual members of the personnel panel and tenure committee
undoubtedly take international activities into consideration during their deliberations, but
there is no formal framework for rewarding those activities. The same can be said of the
hiring process. While the provost and search committees undoubtedly take international
activities into account, international activity is not a formal prerequisite for being hired.
The ITF plans to address this issue in the 05-06 academic year.

There are no structural barriers to internationalization at Park. The fact that Park has 42
campuses in 21 states offers a logistical challenge, but this is an area and a concern that
has already been a major focus of the ITF.

As to faculty attitudes about internationalization, the findings of a May, 2005 survey are
revealing. See Appendix A.

To what extent are students encouraged to take courses with international content? To
take language courses? To study abroad? Who provides such encouragement? How do
advisors encourage or discourage students in this arena? How do departmental
requirements and practices encourage or discourage international learning?

Although there is no formal effort to encourage students to take internationally-themed
courses, Park’s large number of internationally-active faculty advisors undoubtedly steer
students toward these courses as students are advised.
                                                                                           20


Efforts to encourage students to engage in other international activities are more formal.
The office of international education and study abroad has a marketing plan that includes
activities fairs, informational sessions in the freshman seminar course, working with
individual faculty in developing study abroad programs, and securing scholarships for
study abroad courses. In 2005, Park offered 18 study abroad scholarships, valued, in total,
at $60,000.

Park students on the Parkville campus are required to take 8 hours of modern language,
currently French or Spanish. Students at campus centers have no modern language
requirement.

Some professors help recruit students for study abroad programs.

As for departmental practices, again, there is no formal mechanism in place for
departments to encourage international engagement. (Of course, some departments, like
International Business or Geography, have built-in international components). In the
humanities department, there are a number of internationally-active faculty, and thus,
more international offerings and greater student participation in things like study abroad
programs. The same can be said of the business department. In the other departments,
generally, there is less awareness of the benefits of internationalization.

How effective are the administrative policies and procedures for financial aid
transferability and the articulation and transfer policies? Do differential costing
structures exist?

Students can apply for financial aid for study abroad trips. A formal articulation
agreement has been signed with the American College of Thessaloniki (ACT) in Greece
and the Denmark’s International Study Abroad (DIS) in Denmark, and several similar
agreements are also under negotiation. Park had several students study for a semester at
ACT, and all their credits transferred without incident.

What policies or practices hinder internationalization efforts at this institution?

There are no formal policies that hinder internationalization. Certainly, the fact that Park
University has 42 campus spread around the U.S. offers a challenge, though not an
insurmountable one.

However, there are some practices, and attitudes, that do present some challenges.

   A. Resistance among a minority of faculty. (The majority, according to a recent
      survey, are supportive of internationalization. See Appendix A). This can be
      overcome, but it will take time. The first steps are to inculcate international values
      in the hiring, promotion, and tenure process. The second step is to develop new
      international courses, and retool existing courses to add a global flavor. It’s
      important that faculty see how internationalization is relevant to their subject
      matter.
                                                                                             21


   B. Student resistance. Some American students, particularly first-generation college
      students on the Parkville campus, don’t understand how internationalization can
      benefit them. The ITF must educate them about the intellectual and financial
      benefits of global awareness. The ITF must strive to make American students
      more active and engaged in international events on campus.
   C. General education curriculum. The current general education curriculum
      accidentally contains many international elements, but it is very much a hit-and-
      miss proposition. There is no guarantee that students graduating from Park
      University show some sort of global competence. A committee is working on
      revamping the university’s general education curriculum, and the ITF will be
      working closely with them to ensure that international elements are embedded in
      the university’s curriculum.

What policies or practices facilitate internationalization beyond those already
mentioned?

Administrative support of internationalization has been instrumental in facilitating
internationalization. The administration was supportive of the inclusion of
internationalization in the strategic plan, and has been supportive in implementing the
international elements of the plan. Generous budgetary resources have been allocated for
international activities. The administration has encouraged the university’s involvement
in the ACE internationalization laboratory and collaborative, and worked to form the ITF.
The administration and the board of trustees have been consistently supportive of the
office of International Education and Study Abroad, and its director.

Resources
What financial resources does the institution provide for internationalization? What
resources are available to support the following: Curriculum development; faculty
international travel and research; students’ study- or work- abroad opportunities;
infrastructure (such as library holdings, technology, or language labs); and co-
curricular programs?

Park University’s support for international programs has been growing exponentially,
largely thanks to funding of international initiatives spelled out in the strategic action
plan. In fact, the budget increased 2,650 % between 2003 and 2005 (from $5,515 to
$146,185).

The proposed 2006 budget lists several goals:
   1. Increasing students, faculty, and staff participating in travel abroad experiences,
       including service projects and faculty exchanges;
   2. Hosting global scholars and international visitors at the Parkville campus;

As previously mentioned, this budget also includes thee new, full time professional staff
members, one each for the international student office, one for the office of international
education, and one for the new International Center for Civic Engagement’s director. The
2006 budget also includes an impressive $83,000 for study abroad scholarships.
                                                                                              22




What is the balance between internal and external funding sources for
internationalization? Has this funding increased, decreased, or remained the same
during the last five years? 10 years?
How well do institutional resources align with the institutional goals? What are the most
important targets for future investment?

The vast majority of funding is internal. One area of concern is to increase outside
funding sources.


In the last five years, internal funding has increased dramatically, and will continue to
increase as the strategic plan is implemented.

The budgeting process is driven by the strategic action plan. Indeed, each budget request
must reference the appropriate section of the strategic plan is it is to be funded.

Institutional resources are strongly aligned with institutional goals spelled out in the
strategic plan. Targets for future investments are in the five areas of international activity
previously mentioned. (See page 9).

The targets for funding are spelled out in the strategic plan itself. (See section III.)

V. The Curriculum and Co-Curriculum
To what extent is international learning an integral part of the institution’s educational
offerings? What elements of the curriculum and co-curriculum foster international
learning?

The Curriculum
To what extent does the institution’s general-education curriculum include international
or global content, perspectives, and different ways of knowing? What is the evidence?

International learning is certainly present at Park, and there are many classes with an
international perspective. A complete list of these classes is below. However, there is no
coordinated effort within the current general education structure that mandates that
students take any “international” credits. (Some of the required credits are multicultural,
but these aren’t necessarily international). So, it is possible that Park graduates students
who, aside from the required foreign language classes, are not exposed to internationally-
themed coursework. (As was mentioned previously, Park’s general education
requirements are currently being overhauled, and the ITF is working to integrate global
competencies into these requirements.)

GE/MGE (Lower level general education and multicultural general education) Courses that
Extensively Incorporate International Perspective

AN 100: General Anthropology; AN 221: Urban Anthropology; AN 241: Culture and Globalization
                                                                                                       23


AR 215: Art History I; AR 216: Art History II

BI 111: Environmental Biology; BI 214: Personal and Community Health

CH 101: Chemistry in the World

CJ 100: Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration

EC 101: Economic Thinking

EDU 210: The School as a Social System

GG 110: Cultural Geography; GG 130: Human Geography; GG 140 Economic Geography; GG 210:
Geography of Terrorism

GO 125: Natural Disasters; GO 141: Introduction to Physical Geography; GO 151: History of the Earth;
GO 200: Oceanography; GO 205: Introduction to Meteorology

HI 101: Western Civilization I; HI 102: Western Civilization II; HI 201: Europe 1789-1914; HI 202:
Europe, 1914-1950s; HI 205: Themes in American History 1492-1865; HI 206: Themes in American
History, 1865-1945.

MG 110: Introduction to Business; MG 280: Students in Free Enterprise

MU 205: Music Appreciation; MU 210: Music and Society; MU 260: Introduction to Music I; MU 261:
Introduction to Music II: Music of the World.

NS 215G: History of Biological and Chemical Warfare; NS 241: Cultural and Historical Aspects of the
Scientific Endeavor.

PC 200: Introduction to Peace Studies

PH 101: Introduction to Philosophical Thinking; PH 201: Choosing and Using Values; PH 205: The
Meaning of Life; PH 217: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy; PH 220: History of Political Philosophy; PH
223: Modern Philosophy

PO 100: American Politics and Citizenship; PO 200: American National Government; PO 202:
Introduction to Law; PO 220: Introduction to Political Philosophy

PS 101: Introduction to Psychology; PS 222: Adult Development and Aging

RE 103: Introduction to Religion; RE 109: World Religions; RE 223: Ancient Christianity; RE 224:
Ancient Israel

SO 141: Introduction to Sociology

SW 205: Introduction to Social Work

LL/MLL (Upper level liberal learnings or multicultural liberal learnings) Courses that Extensively
Incorporate International Perspective

AN 301: Cultural Anthropology; AN 410: American Theoretical Culture

AR 317: World Art

BI 300: Evolution; BI 301: Human Ecology; BI 380: Issues in Biodiversity
                                                                                                    24



CA 321: Interpersonal Conflict Solution; CA 322: Theory and History of Mass Media

CH 300: Chemistry Seminar ;CH 301: Chemistry and Society

CJ 302: Media and Criminal Justice; CJ 310: Leadership and Team-Building; CJ 365: Financial
Investigations; CJ 425: Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

CS 300: Computers and Society

EC 308: Transition to a Market Economy; EC 401: History of Economic Thought

ED 330: Issues in Diversity

EN 315: Earlier American Literature; EN 316: Later American Literature; EN 319: Modern Literature; EN
341: Literature and Film; EN 351: Foundations of Literature; EN 355: American Ethnic Literature; EN
356: Women’s Literature; EN 359: Mythology and Science Fiction;

GG 351: World Physical Geography; GG 365: Geography of Disease

GO 300: Introduction to Dinosaurs

HI 307: Europe in the Middle Ages; HI 313: America and the World in the 1920’s; HI 314: American
Civilization Since 1945; HI 315: Contemporary Europe; HI 319: Russia in the 20 th Century; HI 320:
Ancient Greeks and the Classical Tradition; 19th Century Romantics and the Romantic Tradition; HI 322:
Modernism in the 20th Century; HI 335: US Military History: The African American Experience; HI 340:
Japan: Modernization of a Traditional People; The American Civil War: 1854-1865; HI 350: American
Environmental History; HI 353: American Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century; HI 365: Kansas City:
The City of the Heartland; HI 367: The European City in History; HI 370: The American Indian; HI 373:
History of Early Africa to the 18th Century; HI 378: The American Frontier

HS 315: Minority Group Relations

HU 350: World War II

IB 315: International Business Perspectives

LS 301: Contemporary Issues

MA 350: History of Mathematics

MG 352: Principles of Management

MU 345: Music History: Medieval; Renaissance and Baroque; MU 346: Classical; Romantic and Modern.
MU 359: Folk Music in America.

NS 304: Science, Technology and Society; NS 319: International Health Issues

PC 300: Nations at War: People of Peace; PC 315: Global Peace Issues; PC 320: The Practice of
Peacemaking; PC 385: The History of Peace.

PH 302: Ethical Issues in Public Policy; PC 305: Great Ideas; PH 308: Business Ethics; PH 316:
Philosophy and Skepticism; PH 321: Eastern Philosophy;

PO 330: Public Administration
                                                                                                 25


PS 301: Social Psychology; PS 309: Human Sexuality

RE 303: Life, Death and the Hereafter; RE 305: Traditional Religions of Africa; RE 307: Religion in
Today’s World; RE 324: The Hebrew Bible; RE 325: The New Testament; RE 328: Supportive Therapies

SO 302: Study of the Family; SO 303: Urban Sociology

TH 302: Creative Drama; TH 306: Acting Beyond Prejudice; TH 307: History and Literature of Theatre
I; TH 308: History and Literature of Theatre II.

Regarding co-curriculum activities, International Education Week has become a fixture at
the university, with numbers of activities that promote interaction among all faculty, staff
and students. All multi-cultural activities promote attendance by both international and
American students, allowing them more intimate opportunities for sharing and learning
about differences. The interaction this past academic year resulted in, we believe, the
first ever American elected to serve as President of the World Student Union for the
2005/06 year.

Many others elements in the co-curricular programs also foster international learning.
These programs include Model UN, Coming to America Series, Global Future, Cultural
Sharing, and so on.

To what extent do the academic departments attempt to internationalize the major? To
what extent do they promote or impede study abroad for students? What is the evidence?

There is no current formula for academic departments that wish to internationalize their
majors. The ITF hopes to encourage this, and to make itself a resource for professors who
wish to internationalize their courses and programs.

The strategic action plan lists as one of its goals (2.5.2) adding more international majors
and minors. A global studies minor and Geography major have recently been added, and
several departments, including social work, communications, education, are working on
including international service learning components into their curriculum.

As a rule, the departments neither impede nor promote study abroad. Study abroad has
been promoted directly to students by the international education office or by professors.

Several majors
How rich are the opportunities for students to take courses with an international or
global focus? What international majors, minors, concentrations, certificates, and
courses are offered? What do enrollment patterns in these courses over time say about
student interest?

Students who are interested in international issues have many internationally-themed
courses from which to choose (see previous list).

There are a number of programs and departments that extensively incorporate an
international perspective, including majors and minors. These include:
                                                                                           26




Business Administration: International Business (BA); Business Economics (BA);
Economics (BA/minor); Geography (BA/BS/minor); Geoscience (minor); Global Studies
(minor); History (BA/minor); Peace Studies (minor); Philosophy and Religion (minor);
Political Science (BA/minor); Social Studies (BA); Spanish (BA/minor).

We have enrollment data on individual courses. However, these courses are almost all
general education courses, and the data do not indicate why students took these classes. It
may be that spikes in enrollment are simply due to a general influx of students seeking
general education credit. Or, it may be that the international themes are increasingly
attractive for students. We need to generate data that show why students take
internationally-themed classes.

Does the institution have a language requirement (for some or for all students)? Why or
why not? Is this requirement articulated in seat time or proficiency? What do enrollment
patterns in language courses reveal? What qualitative data exists about language
learning at this institution? What quantitative data?

The A.A., B.Sc. and B.PA degrees do not have any language requirement. The B.A. and
B.SW degrees do have a language requirement. They require 8 credits of Modern
Languages in the same language. All new F1 visa students, whether freshmen or
transfers, for whom English is not their first language must take their Modern Language
credits in EIL, or test out.

The requirement is in seat time. Since the requirement was just increased from 6 to 8
hours, data about the efficacy of that change are still being collected.

Has the institution gathered information about alumni use of language skills after
graduation?

Park University does not have data on alumni use of language after graduation. However,
the international education office has been working to develop international initiatives
with alumni, so the possibility of gathering such data certainly exists.

Co-Curriculum and Campus Life
How is internationalization manifested in the co-curriculum (e.g., international events
festivals, lectures, films?) To what extent do students, faculty, and staff attend these
events?

Internationalization is apparent in a number of co-curricular programs.

    1. Global Culture and Understanding and civic engagement
In the Coming to America Series, international students present information about their
countries to Park University students, faculty and staff. Its first six sessions involved 19
International speakers and an audience of 147 students and faculty.
                                                                                         27


Park University hosted a program called “Cultural Sharing” in March, 2005 that featured
music, dancing, and even a wedding ceremony from Pakistan. Several faculty members,
and a number of students, participated. The audience, a full house, included students and
faculty.

Park’s international music program held a number of concerts during the 04-05 academic
year, capped by an International Piano Festival held in April. The performers included an
internationally renowned pianist from Russia as well as Park music conservatory
students. This festival, and all of Park’s musical events, are well attended by the
community, and also draw some faculty and staff as well.

The Model UN program, which was documented earlier, is a key component in Park’s
international co-curricular programs.

    2. Global economics and understanding
These co-curricular programs include the Global Future program, a cooperative program
with the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, and the GLOBE program for
professors and staff. GLOBE is a global business leadership program.

    3. International Education Week and multi-cultural programming
As previously mentioned, International Education Week has become a fixture at the
university, with numbers of activities that promote interaction among all faculty, staff and
students.

What are the enrollment trends of international students? How are they distributed
among schools and colleges? Between undergraduate and graduate programs?

As mentioned previously, Park University has a long history of accepting and educating
international students, primarily at the Parkville Campus, but not exclusively. More
recently and since fall 1998, the university has seen a substantial growth in its
international student population. In fall 1998, the University hosted 60 international
students from a handful of countries. During the 2004/05 year, the university hosted 447
international students from 91 countries, up from 403 international students from the
2003/04 year.

Of the 447 international students nationwide during 2004/05, 312 attended classes in the
Kansas City, Missouri area and 135 attended at various campus centers. 404 were in the
undergraduate program and 43 were in the graduate program.

Relative to visa’s held, 228 had F-1 visas; 207 had Resident Alien visas; 5 were under the
Micronesia Compact; 2 had K-2 visas; 2 had H-1-B visa’s; one had a L-1 visa; one had a
J-1 visa; one had a BBC visa.

The top 10 foreign countries represented at the university are: Kenya-47; Mexico-35;
Brazil-23; Philippines-15; Ghana-14; Nigeria-13; Bosnia-11; Trinidad-11; Nepal-10;
Jamaica-10.
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With the addition of staff to the Office of International Student Services, targeted training
in the admissions office, and increased presence of staff and faculty from the offices of
International Education and Study Abroad making trips abroad, the expected number of
international students enrolling for fall 2005 is expected to reach a record high.

How are international students and scholars integrated into campus life? What strategies
are in place to help U.S. students learn from them? How well are they working?

From the “Welcome to the Park family” letter sent with the student’s I-20, to the personal
pick-up at the airport by a staff member, to the assignment of a “International Friendship
Partner” to act as a “host family”, to the full week of international student orientation and
sightseeing program prior to the start of classes, the Office of International Student
Services is committed to assuring that international students are made to feel welcome
they moment they chose Park University. In addition, the office provides full support to
the World Student Union and ongoing advising services to both international students and
scholars.

A student-led group, World Student Union, sponsors activities on campus for
international and American students. Their highest profile activity is International
Education Week held in the fall. This week includes the annual International Dinner and
Program, a Park University tradition, which features ethnic food and music and dancing
performed by Park international students. The event, open to all, is an annual sell-out.

International students have traditionally taken leadership roles on campus. Two of the
recent presidents of the Student Senate have been international students, and international
students regularly serve as student senators.

The Coming to America series is one strategy used to help American students learn from
international students, as is the International Night, and the Cultural Sharing events. As
they teach, individual professors certainly utilize the unique expertise of international
students. However, there is no systemized way of using international students in this
manner.

As a result of the efforts described, retention of international students is very high, with
few students transferring to other institutions, and a significant increase in the number of
international students participating in commencement.

What opportunities exist in the local environment to enhance internationalization efforts?
To what extent has this institution taken advantage of them? To what extents are the co-
curricular activities open to and attended by members of the local communities?

The local environment in Kansas City is highly conducive to internationalization efforts.
Indeed, the Kansas City area has an abundant supply of organizations with an
international focus, and Park University has partnerships with several of them.
                                                                                          29


People to People International headquarters is located in Kansas City. Park University
has agreed on future cooperation with Greater Kansas City People to People International
so that visitors to Park University will be able to benefit from PTPI Homestay program.
Park also has the world’s only university chapter of PTPI.

Park also cooperates closely with the World Trade Center-Kansas City on the Global
Future program (see page 13). Also, a Park professor is the editor of an online
publication, The Global Prospector, which is published by the World Trade Center and
delivered to hundreds of community and business leaders in the Kansas City area.

Park University teamed up with the International Relation Council of Kansas City to
offer elementary schools from the North Kansas City school district the International
Classroom Partnership Program (ICPP). Park University international students speak for
North Kansas City elementary schools about differences on school systems, cultures,
customs, and languages. The program is open to SAGE classes and students’ parents as
well.

Park University international students present “Coming to America” workshops for the
Kansas City 4-H Youth Conference through a partnership with the National 4-H Council.
In these workshops, Park University international students share their personal cultural
shocks, stories, cultures and languages with high-school students from the Midwest.

Park University students participate in the International Relation Council (IRC)
WorldQuest. In the WorldQuest competition, participants gather each spring to test their
knowledge (as a team) about international current events, history, geography, languages
and culture. Park University has always been one of the top ten institution-participants in
this challenging competition.

Individual professors have hosted international visitors for the International Visitors
Council. In recent years, these visitors include professionals from Belarus, Syria,
Moldova, Ukraine, Russia, Uzbekistan, etc.

The recent Cultural Sharing program was largely made possible through a partnership
between the university and the Pakistani community, which supported the program with
costumes, dance instruction, and strong attendance. Clearly, the Cultural Sharing idea of
tapping into local international communities has nearly unlimited potential.

The Cultural Sharing and international music programs are all free, and all open to the
public. The piano festival and Cultural Sharing program both played to full houses which
largely consisted of those from the community.

VI. Study and Internships Abroad
What opportunities exist for education abroad? What are the trends for student
participation in these programs during the past five to 10 years?
     How many students participate? What are their destinations? How much time do
        they spend abroad –two weeks? A summer? A semester? A year?
                                                                                            30


   A number of excellent study abroad opportunities exist for Park University students.
   A brief history of study abroad at Park:

      In 2000, when the program started, Park sent one American student to Berlin for
       six weeks for a language program, then one Brazilian student to Greece for six
       weeks on a summer program.
      2 students participated in Summer Abroad Program in Greece during the summer
       of 2001. Park University students studied the summer semester (five weeks) at
       The American College of Thessaloniki (ACT).
      2 full-time faculty, Michael Fitzmorris, and Olga Ganzen, and 8 students
       participated in Summer Abroad Program in Greece (three weeks) during the
       summer of 2002 through a partnership established with The American College of
       Thessaloniki (ACT).
      3 full-time faculty, Steve Youngblood, Olga Ganzen, and marsha morgan, and 12
       students participated in Summer Abroad Program in Greece (three weeks) during
       the summer of 2003 through a partnership established with The American College
       of Thessaloniki (ACT).
      3 full-time faculty, Steve Youngblood, Olga Ganzen, and Ron Miriani, and 6
       students participated in Summer Abroad Program in Greece (three weeks) during
       the summer of 2004 through a partnership established with The American College
       of Thessaloniki (ACT).
      1 student studied at the American College of Thessaloniki (ACT) in Greece
       during the Fall 2004 semester for 12 weeks. This was the first long-term study
       abroad program under the established partnership with ACT.
      2 full-time faculty; Olga Ganzen and Donna Bachmann, and 16 students
       participated in Summer Abroad Program in Italy (five weeks) during the summer
       of 2005 through a partnership established with the Centers of Academic Programs
       Abroad (CAPA).


      What is the distribution of students by gender and race/ethnicity who travel
       abroad?

By gender, participation is equally divided. We have both international and American
students studying abroad, with representation from many ethnic groups. However, more
efforts need to be undertaken to encourage participation by African-American students.

      How are students financing their study of internships abroad? Is financial aid
       portable? Can students tap into additional sources of aid?

Financial aid and scholarships are available for study abroad students. Regular student
financial aid is portable, and can be used for study abroad programs.

The International Education and Study Abroad Office includes in its annual budget
scholarships for study abroad students ($83,000 for the 05/06 year). Students also can
apply for financial aid or additional scholarships through Park University or the federal
                                                                                          31


government. Many students from past study abroad program have taken advantage of the
John Patton scholarship offered at Park University in order to fund their trips. Dr. John
Patton, an Albright scholar and Park University Professor emeritus, established this
scholarship fund. It was decided to use this endowed fund initially to promote study
abroad, giving students access to cultural experience of international programs. Some
criteria for this scholarship include: a 3.6 G.P.A, completion of two semesters at Park
University after their study abroad (or graduating from Park if they are seniors at the time
they study abroad), and submission of a minimum of two letters of recommendations.
Country-designated scholarships are also available for short-term programs.

      How are students prepared for education abroad experiences – a pre-departure
       orientation? A specific orientation course?

Normally, study abroad students will have seven orientation classes prior to the trip. In
the future, the office of International Education and Study Abroad is planning to have
elements of orientation courses integrated into courses with international service-learning
components.

      To what extent does the institute sufficiently integrate students into the host
       country or in ‘island’ programs?

Several programs have home-stay components, like the 2005 Italy study abroad program,
for example. Other programs include instruction by local professors, and special sessions
involving local specialists who teach students some of the local language and culture.

      What issues, if any, surround the recognition of credit for study abroad?

Park students who take Park study abroad programs have their credits integrated into
their transcript the same as they would for other classes. As for study abroad programs
taken through other universities, once articulated agreements between partner universities
have been signed, credits are transferred without difficulty.

      What impact do education abroad student create on the home campus upon their
       return? On residence life? On teaching/learning styles? On curriculum demands?

Study abroad students are integrated into international programs on campus after their
study abroad experience. These programs include People to People International, Model
UN, Coming to America speaker series, Global Future, World Quest, and International
Education Week. There is no statistical information on these activities, but, anecdotally,
returning study abroad students do tend to be more active and vocal in their support of
international programs, initiatives, and students.

Park has no specific data relating to how returning study abroad students change, or
attempt to change, the campus climate with regard to teaching/learning styles or
curriculum demands.
                                                                                           32




VII. Engagement with Institution in Other Countries
What linkages does the campus have with institutions in other countries for instruction,
research, service learning, and development cooperation? How well are they working?

A complete list of Park University’s extensive international partnerships is below. These
are sorted by continent:

   Europe
    Park University has had a partnership with The American College of Thessaloniki
      (ACT) since 2001. ACT was a program provider for short term faculty led trips
      Greece in the summers of 2001- 2004. These trips were lead by professors of
      International Business, Theatre, History, and Communications.
    Park University has had a partnership with Denmark’s International Study Abroad
      Program (DIS) in Copenhagen, Demark since 2003. This cooperation between
      schools was developed in order to enhance international student exchange of high
      academic quality. This partnership is ready for semester or year long terms for
      Park University students to study in Copenhagen.
    Park University has formed a partnership with Centers for Academic Programs
      Abroad (CAPA) in 2005 that allowed 16 Park University students to travel to
      Italy for 5 weeks last summer. Coursework included Drawing on the Renaissance
      and European Cities in History. Through People to People International, students
      spent their first week with an Italian family in Milan. The remaining 4 weeks
      were spent living in Florence and going on expeditions to Pisa, Siena, Rome, and
      Venice.
    Park University is forming a partnership with The Istituzione di Alta Cultura in
      Lucca, Italy in 2005 to establish a university cooperation to facilitate the
      exchange of students. Park University will be sending a minimum of 2 qualified
      music students to study in Italy each year in May for 2 semesters. This agreement
      is currently being developed, but will be very promising for Park University’s
      strong music department.
    Park University is negotiating a partnership with St. Petersburg University of
      Humanities and Social Sciences in Russia. Park University is exploring the
      options for working with the St. Petersburg University through Online programs,
      faculty and student exchanges, and study abroad programs. (see pg 15 for details)



   South America
    Park University has been developing a partnership with Faculdade de BoaViagem
      (FBV) in Recife, Brazil since 2003. They are in the process of generating further
      agreements after two visits to Brazil by faculty and administrators. This
      agreement would allow students to take courses in the areas of social sciences and
      education would benefit from the “hands on” approach following the lectures at
                                                                                     33


   Park University home campus. Students will have the opportunity to help others
   putting in practice the material learned in classes, and at the same time earning
   credits towards their degrees.

Asia
 Park University has been developing a partnership with Japanese American
   Society and People to People, Japan, Nagaya University, Oregon State University
   Consortium, and Association for International Practical Training (AIPT) since
   2004. Park is in the process of forming a Global Education Program in Japanese
   Studies at Park University. The four year program at Park will provide broad
   understanding of the world and America’s and Japan’s place in the global
   community. This program will provide students to participate in a learning
   experience that emulates Language Across the Curriculum-type programs.
   Students will spend 1-2 years studying Japanese and their subject of choice and 1
   year or semester studying abroad in Japan. The last year is spent at an internship
   in Japan. Students will learn about the peoples, language, customs and cultures of
   Japan.
 Park University is forming a partnership with Ming Chuan University in 2005
   that will allow students the opportunity to attend the International College (IC) at
   Ming Chuan University. Ming Chuan University students will be offered the
   opportunity to learn English in the EIL (English as an International Language)
   program at Park University for one semester and/or one year. The partnership
   will also allow for faculty exchanges anywhere from 3 weeks to one year. This
   agreement was possible after two separate trips to Taiwan by Park University’s
   faculty and administration, including the provost, distance learning vice
   president, and director of international education.
 Park University is forming a partnership with Pacific Resource for Educational
   Learning (PREL) in 2005 that will serve as the bridge for the future. (See pg. 10)

North America
 Park University is working on forming a partnership with Guanajuato University
   in Mexico. Guanajuato University students will be offered the opportunity to
   learn English in the EIL (English as an International Language) program at Park
   University for one semester and/or one year. The partnership will also allow for
   short term (3 weeks) and long term (1 year) faculty and students exchanges.

Misc.
 Park University has had a partnership with the American Council of Education
   (ACE) since 2003. Park is a current member of the ACE internationalization
   laboratory and international collaborative. The ITF is using ACE as a resource as
   it develops its plans to internationalize Park University.
 Park University is forming a partnership with University of Kansas, UMKC,
   Johnson County Community College to form a regional Model United National
   for high schools in the Greater Kansas City area. (See pg. 13).
                                                                                         34


       Park has contacted faculty members from Aristotle University in Greece,
       Tamkang University in Taiwan, and Georgetown University in the U.S. to lay the
       groundwork for an annual conference on Global Solutions.

To what extent does the institution engage in student, faculty, and staff exchange? Do the
institution’s study-abroad programs facilitate such exchanges?

The institution is engaged in student, faculty, and staff exchanges. The facilitation,
planning, and funding of these exchanges is centralized through the office of
International Education and Study Abroad.

A Park student recently completed our first student exchange to the American College of
Thessaloniki (ACT) in Greece during Fall of 2004. A Park faculty member taught at
Ming Chuan and Tamkang University in Taiwan for part of the fall, 2004 semester. A
visiting scholar from Aristotle University in Greece taught at Park University in May,
2005.

Plans are in place to expand and continue these programs.

Park has also had three Fulbright scholars since 2001.

To what extent do faculty members engage in collaborative research and development
cooperation with faculty at institutions in other countries?

There are several examples of collaboration between Park faculty and their international
counterparts.

A Park committee is working collaboratively with a Moldovan professor to explore the
possibility of launching a Park campus in Moldova. Steven Youngblood met with
Professor Viorel Cibotaru and the president of a Moldovan university (Academie
Economie) to discuss a possible partnership in this program.

Plans are in place to team-teach online courses with faculty from Park and Faculdade Boa
Viagem (FBV) and FACHO in Brazil.

Park is the leader of a group of four universities that received a grant from ACE on
service learning. (See pg. 11).

Park education professors are collaborating with overseas colleagues on the PREL
project. (See pg. 10).

A Park University professor, Dr. Dennis Kerkman, is working collaboratively with
colleagues in Mexico in social science research and projects.

What impact do these linkages create upon student international learning on campus?
                                                                                              35


These collaborations are just beginning, so it’s too early yet to assess their impact.

The goal, of course, is to expand these partnerships so that more students can benefit
directly by going abroad or working with international professors here in the U.S.

Students can also indirectly benefit through their professors or their peers. Professors
returning from their international experiences share these experiences with their students
directly and through websites. They also have involved students in joint research projects
undertaken overseas.

A major expansion of students going abroad will occur in spring, 2006, when education
students, service learning students, tutoring students, and international reporting students
travel together to Brazil for a joint service learning project.

How does the institution fund such linkages?

These linkages are funded through the office of international education. These initiatives
are funded because they are spelled out in the strategic action plan.

VIII. Campus Culture
To what extent is internationalization part of the institution’s culture? What is the
evidence?

Before the ITF existed, internationalization was already clearly a part of the institution’s
culture, as evidenced by the strategic action plan, the large number of internationally-
themed courses and programs, the size and diversity of the international student
population, and the numerous successful co-curricular programs. Further evidence of
internationalization as part of the culture can be seen in the mission and vision
statements, in Park’s participation in the ACE international laboratory and collaborative,
and in the growing budget for international education.

The ITF is working to help make internationalization an even more integral part of the
university’s culture. This is being accomplished through the ITF’s ongoing, campus and
system wide discussion about internationalization with all stakeholders.

The clearest evidence of internationalization as part of the culture can be seen in the
mission and vision statements, in the strategic action plan, in Park’s participation in the
ACE international laboratory and collaborative, and in the growing budget for
international education.

Do many internationally oriented administrators, faculty, and staff work on campus?
What are their areas of expertise or interest? What is the evidence?

Park University has a number of international faculty and staff. These include:

Silvia Byers (Italy)-Professor, Modern Languages
                                                                                           36


Olga Ganzen (Estonian citizen born in Russia)-Director of International Education
Sapna Gupta (India)-Professor, Chemistry
Wen Hsin (Taiwan)-Professor, Computer Science
Stanislav Ioudenitch (Uzbekistan)-Professor, music faculty
Tatiana Ioudenitch (Uzbekistan) - Music
Mathew J. Kanjirathinkal (Benin) - Graduate and Professional Studies
Dimitri Karakitsos (Greece )- Professor, Metropark Program
Masoom Khawaja (Pakistan)-Professor, Graphic Arts
Nicholas Koudou (Ivory Coast)-Professor, Business—Fulbright professor, Benin
Michael Korolev (Russia) – Political Sciences
David Monchusie (South Africa)-Information Technology Department
Deborah Osborne (Canada) – English as an International Language (EIL) and Liguistics
Nicholas Poligeorges –Greece – Business
Gregory Sandomirsky (Russia) – Music
Martin Storey (England) - Music
Marina Sultanova (Uzbekistan) – Music
Ping Wu (China) – Computer Science
Thimios Zaharopoulos (Greece) – Dean, College of Arts and Humanities

Several American faculty have also had meaningful international experience, including
teaching and research abroad. These professors are:

Steven Youngblood--Communications professor--Fulbright professor, Moldova; Greece,
Brazil, China, Russia, South Africa; Chairman of Internationalization Task Force
Pete Soule—Associate Dean, School of Business--Fulbright professor, Ukraine
Carol Getty—Criminal justice professor--exchange professor, Taiwan; China
Michael Fitzmorris—International Business professor--Brazil, Central America, Greece
Dennis Kirkman—Psychology professor—Mexico, Central America
Ann Wentz—Education professor—China

What are the attitudes of students, faculty, and staff toward international learning? What
is the evidence?

There is no comprehensive survey of student attitudes about internationalization,
although students who have participated in programs through the international education
office have been surveyed about their experiences. A thorough study of overall student
attitudes needs to be undertaken.

Anecdotally, some students perceive internationalization as basically adding more
international students. One professor discussed internationalization in four of his classes,
and the feedback was not negative, but it did indicate a clear misunderstanding of
international programs. For example, the students thought programs like Model UN or
Coming to America were for only international students. The students also hadn’t given
much (or any) thought to internationalization in the curriculum. It’s important that
students understand the scope of internationalization, and how they can and will benefit
from an internationalized curriculum and more international programs.
                                                                                          37




As for faculty, several of the schools have had discussions about internationalization. As
an example, the School of Education’s discussion mentioned that many of their classes
have an international flavor. (See Appendix B) Examples of this include having field
experiences in diverse settings, teaching about differential learning and special needs for
diverse learners, teaching about experiences of immigrants and refugees, and the use of
books from different cultures. The educators also defined internationalism in a number of
ways that include eliminating cultural barriers, increasing respect of others, and a deeper
understanding of commonalities and differences. The educators said they can use
internationalism when making comparative studies, to help recognize the roots and
influences of educational ideas and practices, and to foster curiosity among their students.

In May, 2005, Park University conducted two surveys of faculty about their attitudes on
internationalization. The complete results of the first survey can be found in Appendix A.

The International Mission faculty survey was taken by 55 full-time faculty members from the
Parkville and other campus centers. Some conclusions from the report:

   1. Park faculty members are supportive of the university’s international mission and
      focus. 33 agree or strongly agree that the international mission has enhanced
      students’ education; only 4 disagree or strongly disagree. (10 are neutral). 33 also
      believe the international mission should be expanded, while only 7 disagree or
      strongly disagree. Overall, 44 believe the international mission is an asset to Park
      University. None disagreed.
   2. Faculty believe in the efficacy of study abroad programs to learn a foreign
      language (43 agree or strongly agree), learn another culture (47 agree or strongly
      agree), and help students gain a competitive advantage in their careers (41 agree
      or strongly agree).
   3. Park faculty think students should be required to take courses covering
      international topics (41 agree or strongly agree; only 3 disagree or strongly
      disagree) and that international educational topics are an important facet of the
      college experience (42 agree or strongly agree; only 2 disagree).
   4. Most faculty are aware of international travel grants offered to students (35 agree
      or strongly agree), of sponsorship of study abroad programs (36 agree or strongly
      agree), and of future international symposiums at Park University (30 agree or
      strongly agree, 11 disagree).
   5. Park’s faculty is a well-traveled group. 28 have current passports, 12 said they
      didn’t. 25 have visited four or more countries, and 10 of those have visited more
      than 10 countries.
   6. Park faculty have at least some knowledge of 74 languages, ranging from Korean
      to Punjabi. (Some faculty have proficiency in more than one language). Of these,
      26 were listed by faculty as intermediate, advanced, or superior language
      proficiency.
   7. There were many helpful suggestions given for getting more faculty involved in
      implementing the international mission. These include demonstrating the need for
      internationalization, more training for faculty, using brown bag lunches to discuss
                                                                                          38


      issues faculty experience and approaches, giving more time and money to
      participating faculty, providing more opportunities and financial resources for
      study teaching and more grant writing help for applicants for Fulbright
      Scholarships, hosting an International Science Symposium, and giving more
      support in dollars for faculty research in the sciences. Other suggestions included
      establishing a mentoring program for faculty-to-faculty and for students-to-
      faculty, opening lines of communication, encouragement of team teaching across
      disciplines, and expanding the international curriculum.
   8. There were also a number of suggestions made on how faculty would like to see
      the international mission enhanced. These include cheaper study abroad
      opportunities, more institution-to-institution relationships, more travel abroad
      with residence time, adding an international dimension to all major courses,
      giving departments more input in the process, institute at all campus centers a 5 +
      5 requirements in a modern language as a graduation requirement, more financial
      aid to students for study abroad opportunities, more partnerships with foreign
      institutions, more faculty and student exchanges, and getting working adults and
      online students involved in internationalization. Other suggestions included
      visiting students in their home countries, sending ambassadors to important world
      events as observers, bringing interesting global people to campuses like
      politicians, theologians, and economists, and having a study abroad program to
      Peru and Chile.

As for staff, no comprehensive survey has been undertaken to gauge their attitudes.

To what extent does the campus community perceive international learning as an
important element of the educational process at the institution?

As a group, the faculty is very international, and strongly believes in Park’s international
mission and in the value of international education and experiences, according to the
survey. This belief in the value of international learning is shared by the president and
provost, who have time and again demonstrated their commitment to internationalization
through act and deed (the budget).

IX. Synergy and Connections among Discrete Activities
To what extent does synergy exist among the international components on campus? What
communication channels exist, and how week are they working?

As the organizational chart on page 17 shows, there are many international activities on
campus, and responsibility for these programs is diffuse. Many of the activities are
coordinated through the director of office of International Education and Study Abroad,
but other key components (particularly those dealing with curriculum, international
student services, general education requirements, and so on) are scattered among the
schools, the faculty senate curriculum committee, the general education study committee,
etc.
                                                                                             39


All international programs eventually fall under the jurisdiction of the president, or
provost/VPAA, or the vice president for student services.

How well are these communication channels working?

The communication channels are working well, according to the three key players in the
process, despite the fact that these key players all report to different supervisors. The ITF
structure subcommittee recommended uniting all three, the director of international
education and study abroad, the director of international student services and programs,
and the EIL coordinator, under one supervisor.

Though efforts are underway to coordinate efforts through the strategic action plan, there
has not been a single clearinghouse for disseminating international program information
until now. The new Center for Civic Engagement is working on establishing itself as a
clearinghouse on information about all of Park University’s international activities. In
part, this will be done on the center’s new website.

What are the most important targets for future collaboration and connection between
international programs and activities on campus?

The ITF itself is a tool for collaboration and connection among faculty, staff, students,
and administration on all of Park Univeristy’s 42 campus sites. The collaboration and
connection will be targeted to the five areas previously mentioned (See pg. 9).

The Center for Civic Engagement will provide a clearinghouse for information about
international programs and initiatives. The ITF can provide overall guidance on the
direction and scope of international programs, consistent with the strategic action plan.

X. Conclusions and Recommendations
What are the major strengths and weaknesses of the institution’s current efforts to
internationalize? What opportunities exist? What are the threats to future progress?
What are the most important conclusions emerging from this review?

The strength of the internationalization effort is clearly in the international foundation
that already exists are Park University. Park possesses a number of strong co-curricular
programs, as well as many courses with international themes. Internationalization has
broad, strong, general support among the faculty, according to the survey. Park has a
number of dedicated, internationally-oriented faculty, both those listed earlier in the
report as well as members of the ITF. Finally, our diverse student population, including
international students from 90-plus countries, is a tremendous asset for the university.

The weaknesses of the effort include the lack of student input and participation. Some
students were surveyed last year as part of the NCA self-study, and others took part in
informal classroom discussions, but still, we lack substantive data on student attitudes
about internationalization. We must do more to involve students in this process during the
                                                                                             40


05-06 academic year, and to inform them about how they can benefit from an
internationalized Park University.

Also, although it’s not a weakness, Park’s 42-campus size makes internationalization
system-wide a more difficult challenge.

The very formation of the ITF presents an outstanding opportunity to make Park a leader
in international education. It seems that right now offers a serendipitous confluence of
positive forces for internationalization—a supportive administration, a pro-international
strategic action plan, adequate budgetary resources, an ongoing revision of the general
education requirements, and a valuable collaboration with ACE.

As for conclusions, in an informal report about internationalization completed in May
2005, the ITF suggested some areas it might address during the 05-06 academic year.
These include:

           1. What is the optimal staffing and organization for our international
              programs?
           2. How can international elements be imbedded in the general education
              curriculum? In other coursework? In minors and majors?
           3. How can internationalization become more meaningful for students and
              faculty at campus centers outside of Parkville? For Internet students?
           4. How can staff be included in the internationalization process?
           5. How will international programs be assessed?
           6. What can be done to enhance American student interest and involvement
              in international co-curricular activities? What new programs might this
              include?
           7. What should be the focus of international partnerships? What should Park
              look for when it partners with an international institution?
           8. What can the ITF do to entrench itself, and to ensure a continuing
              discussion about, and positive momentum for, internationalization.

XI. Strategic Action Plan
What are the implications of this review process on the institution’s strategic priorities
for the next year and for the next three to five years?

Internationalization is already included extensively in Park University’s Explorations and
Transformations 2012 strategic action plan (See pg. 8). The internationalization process
will not change these priorities, but will supplement and strengthen the priorities laid out
in the plan.
                                                                                             41


Appendix A
Survey Results

                                            Park University
                                         International Mission
                                         Faculty Survey Results


Results of Park University International Mission Faculty Survey.
The Survey was conducted amongst faculty and 55 participants responded.
The results are as follows as indicated by the key.
The number total indicates the number of responses to a specific question.
SD= Strongly Disagree
D=Disagree
N=Neutral
A=Agree
SA=Strongly Agree

1. Park University’s international mission has enriched student’s education.

   SD 1            D3                N 10            A 22             SA 21

 2. I am aware of international travel grants offered to Park University students.

 SD       4             D 10             N 6               A 27          SA    8

 3. I am aware of sponsorship of study abroad programs for Park University students.

 SD       5        D     8           N 6              A 23             SA 13

 4. I am aware of future international symposiums at Park University.

 SD       3         D        11       N 9              A 29             SA 1

 5. I am aware of international cultural events at Park University.

 SD       2         D        5       N      6         A     22         SA 21

6. The international mission is an asset to Park University.

 SD       -          D       -       N      7         A     13         SA 31

7. The international mission should be expanded.

 SD       2         D            5   N          10     A    11          SA 23

8. The international mission has affected the types of classes offered at Park University.

 SD -              D     4           N 22                 A 20          SA     8

9. The international mission has been reflected in the content of the classes I teach.
                                                                                                           42


 SD 3              D        8           N 10                A 22        SA        12

10. Students’ career choices have been influenced by their international experiences at Park University.

 SD     3           D           6       N 27                A 11        SA        6

11. Study Abroad programs are the best way for students to develop second language proficiency

 SD 2               D           6       N 8                 A 20        SA        23

12. Study abroad programs are the best way for students to experience another culture.

 SD     1           D           2       N 10             A 16           SA        26

13. Students can understand their own culture more fully if they have studied another culture.

 SD     1           D           1       N           3       A 18        SA            29

14. Studying and living in another country makes students more mature people.

 SD         3       D           3       N        4          A 13        SA            33

15. Students can learn in another country things that they would never learn in their own country.

 SD -                 D 2               N 4                 A 15    SA            31

16. International experience will give students a competitive advantage in their career.

 SD -                 D 1               N 11                A 20    SA                21

17. Successful people will have to work effectively with people from other cultures.

 SD -             D     1           N       3           A    2     SA        27

18. Living in another country makes students more well-rounded people.

 SD 1              D    3           N       4           A 16       SA        28

 19. Knowing a foreign language will help students find a better job.

 SD 1              D    3           N       12          A 12       SA        25

 20. Knowledge of international issues is important for me.

 SD -               D   -           N       3           A 16       SA        31

21. Knowledge of international issues is important for younger generations.

 SD -               D       -       N       2           A 18       SA        33

22. College educated adults should be required to know a second language.

 SD 2               D       5       N           5       A 20       SA        19

23. Students should have a study abroad experience at some time during their college career.
                                                                                                                           43


  SD 2                 D 3              N 13                  A 20         SA           13

24. Students should be required to take courses covering international topics in college.

  SD 1                 D 2              N 7                   A     20     SA           21

25. International education opportunities are an important facet of the college experience.

  SD 1                D    1            N 10                  A    20      SA       22

Responses to Questions 26 – 34.

26. I was teaching at Park University before 2003, when the international mission was first established.
Yes 33 No 18

If yes, please skip # 27. If no, please check the box of all items below which apply to you:
 __5___ I was aware of Park University’s international mission before I applied for a faculty position at
Park University.
___5__ Park University’s international mission influenced my decision to apply for a faculty position at
Park University
__6__ Park University’s international mission influenced my decision to accept a faculty position at Park
University.


27. Pleas indicate the number of countries you have visited and the total amount of time you have spent
outside the U.S. during the following periods of time.

Before being hired to teach at Park University:
Number of countries visited as per individual responses:
 12, 5, 2, 2, 4, 10, 1, 8, 5, 1, 5, 6, 70, 3, 14, 5, 3, 5, 8, 9, 2, 3, 1, 4, 1, 13, 2, 1, 5, 2, 13, 1, 1, 6, 1, 8, 3, 4, 40,
9, 14, 30, 20.

Total period of time:
3 w,3 w,12 yrs,2 d,7 yrs,1 yr,3 yrs,7 yrs,40 yrs,22 yrs, 3 yrs, 2,5 yrs, 5 yrs, 2 yrs, 1 w,3 w, 3 yrs,5 yrs,10
yrs, 1 m, 6-8 m, 10 m, 1 m, 1o yrs, 2 w, 2 m, 3 w, 1 yr, 1 w, 5 yrs, 8 yrs, 24 hrs, 3 w, 2 d, 6,5 m,

 Between 1995-2003: number of countries visited:
2, 5, 4, 3, 1, 4, 1, 6, 25, 3, 3, 2, 6, 1, 1, 4, 3, 1, 5, 2, 1, 3, 1, 7, 1, 7, 5, 10.

 Total period of time:
1 m, 2,5 yrs, 8 w, 4 yrs, 3 w, 1 yr 3d, 10 m, 4 m, 2yrs, 1yr, 48 d, 1 yr, 6 w, 3 m, 30 d, 3 w, 3 m, 3 w, 1 yr, 3
yrs, 1 m, 1 m, 4 yrs, 3 yrs,

After 2003: Number of countries:
1, 2, 4, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 10, 2, 2, 3, 4, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 4, 2, 2,

Total period of time:
3 m, 3 w, 8 w, 12 m, 3 w, 3 w, 3 m, 20 d, 5 w, 30 d, 2 m, 3 m, 1, 5 m,


28. I have a current passport. Yes 28                No    12

29. Please use the following definitions to determine your own foreign language proficiency. Then, indicate
the languages you have studied below.
                                                                                                           44


         Novice- The Novice level is characterized by the ability to communicate minimally in highly
          predictable common daily situation with previously learned words and phrases. The Novice-level
          speaker has difficulty communicating with even those accustomed to interacting with nonnative
          speakers.
         Intermediate –The Intermediate level is characterized by the ability to combine learned elements
          of language creatively, though primarily in a reactive mode. The Intermediate level speaker can
          initiate, minimally sustain, and close basic communicative tasks. The speaker can ask and answer
          questions and can speak in discrete sentences and strings of sentence on topics that are either
          autobiographical or related primarily to his or her immediate environment.
         Advanced – The Advanced level is characterized by the ability to converse fluently and in a
          clearly participatory fashion. The speaker can accomplish a wide variety of communication tasks
          and can describe and narrate events in the present, past, and future organizing thoughts, then
          appropriate, into paragraph-like discourse. At this level, the speaker can discuss concrete and
          factual topics of personal and public interest in most informal and formal conversions and can be
          easily understood by listeners unaccustomed to nonnative speakers.
         Superior- The Superior level is characterized by the ability to participate effectively in most
          formal and informal conversations on practical, social, professional, and abstract topics. Using
          extended discourse, the speaker can explain in detail, hypothesize on concrete and abstract topics,
          and support or defend opinions on controversial matters.

The foreign languages I have studied and my level of proficiency are:
Language      Arabic       novice 1 intermediate 0 advanced 1            superior 0
Language      Chinese      novice 0 intermediate 0 advanced 0            superior 0
Language      Fortran      novice 0 intermediate 0 advanced 0            superior 0
Language      French       novice 10 intermediate 2     advanced 1       superior 1

Language      German        novice 6     intermediate 2    advanced 1 superior 1
Language      Italian       novice 4    intermediate 0     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Japanese      novice 1    intermediate 1     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Korean        novice 1     intermediate 0     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Latin         novice 2    intermediate 0     advanced 1  superior 1
Language      Polish        novice 1     intermediate 0     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Portuguese    novice 0     intermediate 2     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Punjabi       novice 0    intermediate 0      advanced 1 superior 1
Language      Russian       novice 1    intermediate 0     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Spanish       novice 18   intermediate 5     advanced 1 superior 2
Language      Taiwanese     novice 1     intermediate 0     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Tok Pisan     novice 1     intermediate 0     advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Swedish       novice 1      intermediate 1   advanced 0 superior 0
Language      Vietnamese    novice 1      intermediate 0    advanced 0 superior 0


30. I have administrative control over other faculty members.

   Yes 14         No 21




31. Please indicate the major category of your academic discipline, regardless of where you work.

Results
                                                                                                         45


Arts and Humanities, including History                  18

Business                                                 6

Life and Health Sciences, including Nursing,
Dental Technology, Kinesiology.                          5


Social and Behavioral Sciences,                          9
Including Criminal Justice.

Teacher Education                                                  7

Technology, including Computer Science                    2
Other                                                              8


32. Please check all that apply: While teaching at Park University, I


      RESULTS:

        13 revised an existing course to have a significant international component
       11 proposed a new course that has a significant international component
        7 participated in the 2003-2005 Global Education or International Task Force
        1 traveled with Park University’s students outside the U.S.
        19 traveled outside the U.S. on my own

           7     attended a seminar and/or a conference outside the U.S.
           7     conducted research in my discipline outside the U.S.

           3received funds from the International Education office to enhance courses
           0received funds from the International Education office to travel outside the
           U.S.
         2 attended at least one lecture with an international focus at Park University
       10 attended at least one cultural event with an international focus at Park
           University

       15 increased my foreign language proficiency

       5       Other activities related to the international mission (please describe).

    9.  Visit Ukraine and Austria
    10. U S Conferences with International topics and participants
    11. Wrote articles which have been internationally published
    12. In Austin we have the opportunity to partner across the board- Need to do more
    13. I will travel on my own to France and England in August 2005
    14. I have always included a global dimension in all my classes so I have not had to revise an existing
        course to do same.
    15. On my vacations I have traveled to approximately 48 countries (all the continents) and I have
        visited and stayed with many friends and family overseas.

33. Please describe what you think is necessary to get more faculties involved in
    Implementing the international mission.
                                                                                                           46


    16. Perhaps it would help to have those of us already involved in international affairs and including
        some in our courses, visit and help other non-involved teachers in finding ways to include the
        international mission of Park University.
    17. Have them come up with interesting and innovative courses like Judith Richards and Lyn
        Williams “East-West Dialog “ – we are all intellectuals and must be intellectually stimulated
    18. Demonstration of need
    19. Training and specific opportunities
    20. Educate using “new” or “current” definition of Internalization
    21. Discussion brown bag lunches regarding faculty experience and approaches.
    22. Knowledge and expectations
    23. Time and Money
    24. Use different faculty
    25. More information in e-mail
    26. More opportunities and financial resources for study teaching
    27. More grant writing help for applicants for Fulbright Scholarships
    28. Continued focus on this as part of the overall mission
    29. Continued educational support and resources
    30. Look at the needs of the working adult
    31. Have Park University host an International Science Symposium
    32. Support in dollars for faculty research in the Sciences
    33. Establish mentoring program for faculty to faculty and for students to faculty
    34. More time
    35. Flow of information from Parkville both by e-mails and memo
    36. Faculty exchange with a foreign University organize seminar, present paper in foreign country
    37. Provide opportunities from all disciplines to get involved with faculty student exchanges
    38. Leading a group to Mexico
    39. Study abroad program are the best way for faculty and students to experience another culture
    40. Raise morale over entire campus
    41. Encouragement of the institution for (realistic, practical support) for team teaching across
        disciplines. Target faculty to send to International opportunities even if only recreational – i.e.
        don’t wait for someone who are single, childless, have discretionary and want to attend to decide
        to go, much too self selected.
    42. Expand curriculum.



34. Please describe ways that you would like to see the international mission enhanced, if time or money
were not a constraint.

    43. Cheaper study abroad opportunities; more institution to institution relationships
          Reciprocal arrangements: more links to existing programs – i.e. Spanish,
          French.
    44. More travel abroad with residence time therefore both faculty and students to
           Study material; participate in daily and scholarly life of country, immersion in the language of
           country etcetera
    45. More participating
    46. Recruiting in other countries
    47. Add international dimension to all major courses
    48. More faculty/student exchange programs
    49. I would like departments to have more input into where the opportunities are to be able to initiate
        action in ideas instead of having ideas imposed.
    50. Money provided for study abroad
    51. Institute at all our campus centers, 5 + 5 requirements in a modern language as a graduation
        requirement
    52. More financial aid to students for study abroad opportunities
    53. Partnerships with foreign institutions
                                                                                                     47


54. Faculty and student exchange
55. We need to find a way to bring together working adults and online to get International focus
56. A sense of presence of all countries I perceive this effort as focusing on Non – European countries.
    Maybe it is just a perception
57. Increase faculty student exchange involvement
58. The International mission at Park (students, faculty) should/ must be expanded.
59. Create international internships in various countries.
60. Accompany students home and let them be teachers.
61. Visit student in home country
62. Send ambassadors to important world events as observers
63. Bring interesting people here like, politicians, theologians, economists
64. Mark attendance by students as part of the curriculum
65. Have agreements with several universities and operate exchange programs
66. Have a study abroad to Peru and Chile for one semester.
                                                                                        48


Appendix B
Notes from School of Education discussion on internationalization

                                 School of Education
School of Education discussion on Internationalism, January 19, 2005
What do you do with your classes that is international in nature?
    Discuss cultural differences in literacy classes especially as relates to ESL students
    Field experiences in diverse settings
    Teach about differential learning for diverse learners
    Teach about special needs and how to address in diverse ways
    Discuss family relationships and cultural differences
    Research on language differences
    International student panel
    Child rearing ideas, differences and universal ideas
    Teach about experiences of immigrants and refugees
    Extensive use of Italian educators especial in ECE
    Use books by authors from different cultures
    Centralized vs decentralized education
    Theorists from different countries

Define Internationalism.
     Barriers are diminishing
     Cultural borders are being crossed
     Borders are no longer barriers to understanding
     Global understanding of global societies
     Unfamiliar is being familiar
     Other perspectives of our work encounters the other
     Increasing respect and acceptance of other ways of life and thinking
     Deep understanding of values, commonalities and differences
     Movement toward one
     Learn from one another

How could we use internationalism?
   More comparative study
   Broaden awareness of different practices
   Recognize roots and influences of ideas and practice
   More travel
   Develop dispositions of acceptance
   Foster curiosity

				
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