Lessons Not Learned An Omen for the Future

Document Sample
Lessons Not Learned An Omen for the Future Powered By Docstoc
					     Lessons Not Learned?
Where We Stand A Year After the 
Biggest Policy Mistakes Since the 
        Great Depression

         Bluford H. Putnam
          September 2009


                                     1
Where We Stand A Year After the Biggest Policy 
    Mistakes Since the Great Depression

• The Great Banking Panic of 2007‐2009 will be viewed along 
  side the Great Depression and the Banking Panic of 1907 as a 
  turning point event in economic history.
• The recession of 2007‐2009 probably was going to happen 
  sooner or later, but the sequence of policy errors, investor 
  over‐confidence, and Wall Street excess turned a recession 
  into a depression and  a full‐blown banking panic.
• So many lessons from the past were ignored, and it is not at 
  all clear what will be learned from this catastrophic financial 
  event.

                                                                     2
            We Have Been Changed

• One thing is very clear, though.  In the 
  aftermath of the Great Banking Panic of 2007‐
  2009, governments, investors, and financial 
  markets will never be as they were before.
• We are not going back to the “old” normal, 
  although eventually we will probably invent a 
  “new” normal.
• We have been changed, and probably for a 
  generation.

                                                   3
                        Questions

•   What have the Regulators Learned?
•   What have investors learned?
•   How have investors been changed?
•   How have Governments and Central Banks been changed?
•   Where are we now and where are we going?




                                                           4
Governments




              5
    What Regulators Should Have Known
•   Systematic problems require systematic solutions.  It seems simple and 
    obvious.
•   It was not obvious to US Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke in 
    August‐September 2007 as the Fed downplayed the sub‐prime mortgage 
    debacle and all it systematic implications.
•   It was not obvious to US Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson as he let 
    Freddie Mac and Fannie may slide for months upon months, then 
    obtained the authority to act, but did not act in timely fashion.
•   It was not obvious to then New York Federal Reserve Bank President 
    Timothy Giethner who along with Treasury Secretary Paulson orchestrated 
    to saving of AIG and very messy take‐down of Lehman Brothers during the 
    two days in mid‐September 2008 that arguably were the catalyst that 
    turned the recession into an all‐out banking panic and depression.
•   At every step, from July 2007 through September 2008, US policy makers 
    failed to understand they had a systematic problem on their hands, not an 
    independent set of mismanaged financial institutions.


                                                                             6
7
   What Happened Immediately After
         16 September 2008?
• When the global banking system froze with the intentional 
  and very messy take‐down of Lehman Brothers, a massive 
  chain reaction was set‐off.
• Consumers stopped spending, dead in their tracks.
• Investors bailed‐out of everything risky, from equities, to 
  credit, to commodities, to hedge funds, etc.
• Investors bought flight‐to‐quality assets, namely Treasury 
  securities and some gold.
• The Federal Reserve became a convert to Quantitative 
  Easing, as did many other central banks.
• The new US President orchestrated an effort to throw 
  trillions upon trillions of dollars at the problem, and many 
  other Governments followed suit to varying degrees.

                                                                  8
          Year over Year Percent Change in Retail Sales




                         ‐5.00%
                                           0.00%
                                                   5.00%
                                                           10.00%




‐15.00%
              ‐10.00%
                                  Jan‐06

                                  Apr‐06

                                  Jul‐06

                                  Oct‐06

                                  Jan‐07

                                  Apr‐07

                                  Jul‐07

                                  Oct‐07

                                  Jan‐08

                                  Apr‐08

                                  Jul‐08

                                  Oct‐08

                                  Jan‐09

                                  Apr‐09
                                                                    US Retail Sales Hit a Brick Wall in September 2008




                                  Jul‐09

                                  Oct‐09
9
                        Change in Jobs Per Month, 1000s




                                              0




               ‐800
                      ‐600
                               ‐400
                                      ‐200
                                                      200
                                                            400

     Jan‐06
     Mar‐06
     May‐06
      Jul‐06
     Sep‐06
     Nov‐06
     Jan‐07
     Mar‐07
     May‐07
      Jul‐07
     Sep‐07
     Nov‐07
     Jan‐08
     Mar‐08
     May‐08
      Jul‐08
     Sep‐08
     Nov‐08
     Jan‐09
     Mar‐09
                                                                  When Did You Know the US Was in a Recession?




     May‐09
      Jul‐09
     Sep‐09
10




     Nov‐09
                  USD Millions, Total Credit Provided by the 
                      Federal Reserve (H.4.1 Report)




              0
                        500000
                                 1000000
                                           1500000
                                                     2000000
                                                                2500000


     Jan‐80
     Jan‐81
     Jan‐82
     Jan‐83
     Jan‐84
     Jan‐85
     Jan‐86
     Jan‐87
     Jan‐88
     Jan‐89
     Jan‐90
     Jan‐91
     Jan‐92
     Jan‐93
     Jan‐94
     Jan‐95
     Jan‐96
     Jan‐97
     Jan‐98
     Jan‐99
     Jan‐00
     Jan‐01
                                                                                  the Week Ending 24 September 2008 




     Jan‐02
     Jan‐03
     Jan‐04
     Jan‐05
                                                                          Quantitative Easing by the US Federal Reserve Started 




     Jan‐06
     Jan‐07
     Jan‐08
11




     Jan‐09
                                                            Quantitative Easing as Practiced by the Federal 
                                                          Reserve Meant a Sharp Drop in the Percentage of US 
                                                           Treasury Securities and Corresponding Rise in the 
Percent of US Treasury Securities Held in the Fed's 




                                                                 Percent of "Toxic Waste" Assets Held
                                                       120.00%
          Asset Portfolio (H.4.1 Report)




                                                       100.00%




                                                       80.00%




                                                       60.00%




                                                       40.00%




                                                       20.00%




                                                         0.00%



                                                                                                                12
13
Investors




            14
  What Investors Should Have Known (Part 1)

• Off‐Balance Sheet Leverage and Corporate Transparency
   • Embedded, hidden, or off‐balance sheet leverage implies a 
     lack of transparency that is dangerous to the financial 
     system.  Was nothing learned from Enron or Long‐Term 
     Capital Management, to name just two events?
• Embedded or Hidden Options
   • Embedded or hidden options can lead to massive 
     underestimation of risks.  Did we learn nothing from the 
     S&L high yield bond crisis of 1990‐92 or the Equity Crash of 
     1987 and the portfolio insurance debacle?


                                                                15
  What Investors Should Have Known (Part 2)

• Correlations Rise in a Crisis
   • Correlations between pairs of risky securities rise in a financial crisis, 
     regardless of source of potential returns.   We seemed to have learned 
     nothing about risk management and portfolio theory from the 
     recessions of 1990‐1992, the bond sell‐off of spring 1994, or the LTCM 
     debacle of 1998, among other events.
• Volatility Measurement is not Risk Management
   • Have we not learned that volatility measurement is not risk 
     management?   LTCM, Equity Crash of 1987, Bond Crash of 1994, Tech 
     Wreck of 2000, and on and on.  If the trade is put on before portfolio 
     volatility is measured, then this is NOT risk management.  If portfolios 
     are not viewed in terms of scenario tests, liquidity tests, for possible 
     disruptive environments, then this is not risk management.

                                                                              16
How We Have Changed




                      17
              How Governments Changed

• Governments will be more interventionist in the market place than 
  ever before.
• Fiscal budget deficits have exploded, and over the coming years, 
  after growth returns, a combination of tax rises and expenditure 
  cuts (less likely) becomes highly probable.
• Financial markets will be more highly regulated and, therefore, less 
  innovative.
• Central banks, having discovered the power embodied in 
  Quantitative Easing will never be able to go back to simple interest 
  rate targeting.
• As growth returns, though, when central banks raise rates they will 
  naturally shed many of their assets bought in the QE phase.

                                                                      18
             How Investors Have Changed

• Investors will be more risk averse.  They will still make risky 
  investments, just less of them and expect even higher returns 
  when they do make risky investments.
• Investors will pay more for liquidity and transparency.  This 
  will have the effect of steeping yield curves on average over 
  the long run.
• Absolute return strategies using regular and inverse Exchange 
  Traded Funds will challenge Hedge Funds in terms of pricing, 
  liquidity, transparency for the High Net Worth Investor.
• Consumers will raise their savings rates, even in the US, 
  meaning consumption growth will be slower but on a more 
  solid foundation.
                                                                 19
Where Do We Stand Now?




                         20
  Watch The Indicators Not the Policy Makers

• For the most part, investors spent 2008 and early 2009 
  watching to see what policy makers would do.  Well, they 
  have now done almost all they can do with rates near zero, 
  quantitative easing in action, and fiscal budget deficits 
  ballooning.
• Investors have shifted gears, the panic is over, and the period 
  of reassessment is here.
• To figure out where we go from here, investors are now 
  watching the indicators.




                                                                 21
              Where Do We Stand Now?

• Worst of the recession is over, yet we are still in a recession.
   – US monthly payroll job losses have peaked,
   – Weekly new unemployment claims are not as high as their 
     peaks,
   – But the unemployment rate will keep rising into 2010, to 
     over 10%
• Year over year price changes are still negative.
• Consumption is still weak, if bouncing off the bottom.




                                                                22
    Productivity Data – Be Careful
• Typically when workers are laid off, the remaining workers 
  take up some of the slack and productivity data can even 
  show a rise some times.
• Pay little attention to productivity data.
• Of note, however, is that recessions often wash‐out inefficient 
  companies and practices, so the level of productivity in the 
  next economic expansion may set all‐time records.  This 
  means corporate profits will rise much faster than top‐line 
  revenues.  Do not let slow growth in consumer spending lull 
  you into thinking companies cannot post excellent year‐on‐
  year earnings comparisons.

                                                                23
                   Watch Yield Curves

• A steep yield curve, can be a very healthy sign.
• Some analysts will interpret higher bond yields interpret as a 
  signal of rising inflation expectations, but they might be 
  wrong, at least in the underlying concept.
• Right now, real returns in the economy are negative or very 
  low.  A more optimistic view of future corporate profits will 
  lead to more equity buying, a higher expected real return on 
  all long‐term assets, and higher bond yields.  This is a good 
  thing, and it signals a real turning point toward an economic 
  recovery.



                                                                24
       Watch Retail Sales, Cars, and Housing

• First, watch retail sales, around the world.  There should be a 
  bounce, since consumers stopped dead in their tracks.  More 
  importantly, after the bounce, one needs to see consistent growth.  
  This could happen in the US in the second half of 2009.
• Second, focus on cars.  Cars are a durable good, and purchases are 
  easy to postpone.  When car sales turn upward and post several 
  months of growth, this will be a hugely positive sign.  Sure the 
  clunker program messed up the timing, but car sales are moving up.
• Finally, watch the housing sector.  House prices around the world 
  need to find a bottom to signal the end of the recession; they do 
  not need to rise and probably will not.  As house prices establish a 
  bottom, pent‐up supply will re‐enter the market as will more 
  bottom‐fishers on the demand side.
                                                                     25
       Asset Allocation in the Post‐Panic Era

• Retail and institutional investors will think hard about 
  acceptable levels of volatility and the liquidity risk with 
  which they are comfortable.
• Long‐term percentage allocations to risky asset classes, 
  such as equities or hedge funds, will be lower than in the 
  1993‐2006 period, but investors will expect superior 
  returns for the risky investments they choose to make.
• Credit risk will regain some favor, as equities stabilize or rise 
  and investors become increasingly uncomfortable with 
  their allocations to longer‐term Government bonds and 
  their potentially higher yields and lower prices.
• Moderate volatility and truly diversifying products will gain 
  favor with investors, but these may be hard to find.

                                                                  26
           And What About The US Dollar

• As the crisis worsened in late 2008, the global deleveraging 
  meant that the world’s funding currencies, the US dollar and 
  Japanese yen were the strong currencies versus the Euro and 
  other currencies.  As risky trades and leverage was unwound, 
  investors had to payback yen and dollars.
• In the current stage, where new policies are in place and yet 
  economic data remains highly depressed around the world, 
  currencies investors will focus on (1) which countries will 
  recover first, and (2) as the recovery becomes clearly in 
  evidence, which Government will keep policies lax and which 
  ones will try to rein in the expansive policies.


                                                               27
 US Federal Reserve Will be the Last to Tighten

• While solid evidence of a sustainable economic recovery 
  probably awaits 2010, the US Federal Reserve will be much 
  too nervous to tighten policy early in the recovery.
• There were false starts in the 1930s, and the Fed will not want 
  to be blamed for choking off any recovery.  They will err to 
  side of caution, and rates will probably be kept near zero, all 
  through the first year of the economic recovery.
• This suggests some bias toward a weaker US dollar in the 
  middle stages of the economic recovery.




                                                                28
  Demographics Will Be Important in 
              Europe
• Europe, especially northern and eastern Europe, 
  are old.  Jobs are not the issue.  Social safety nets 
  are typically more robust.  The political issue is 
  long‐term asset preservation, including the 
  international purchasing power of the currency.
• The European Central Bank (ECB) is well aware of 
  this political reality, as well as the relative 
  strength of France and Germany, and thus, this 
  gives the Euro a moderate upward bias once the 
  global recovery begins.

                                                       29
     China Has Multiple Objectives
• China is providing tremendous domestic stimulus to soften 
  the impact of declining exports.
• China is also flexing its political muscle in the global arena, 
  and pointedly challenging the role of the US dollar.
• China cannot be assumed to be a stable buyer of US 
  Treasury securities, regardless of whatever the diplomatic 
  rhetoric.
• A shrinking trade surplus will make less funds available for 
  buying US Treasuries, and political ambitions may make 
  diversification of Chinese foreign reserve a Government 
  priority.  These tendencies favor the Euro over the US 
  dollar, as well as bode poorly for US Treasuries as the 
  economic recovery takes hold.

                                                                 30
                                                     The Fate of the US Treasury Market Depends in part 
                                                      on Continued Buying by Governments and Central 
                                                                     Banks, such as China
                                                     100000
by Foreign Governments in Cuostody at the Federal 
USD Millions, 4‐Week Change in US Treasuires Held 




                                                      80000



                                                      60000
               Reserve (H.4.1 report)




                                                      40000



                                                      20000



                                                          0



                                                     ‐20000



                                                     ‐40000




                                                                                                           31
            Generational Change 
• We must respect our elders and lessons they have taught 
  us.  Yet, financial markets do not abide by those rules and 
  seem to have short memories.
• Our Grandfathers’ generation brought us the Great 
  Depression of the 1930s, and our Fathers’ generation 
  worked hard to make sure it did not happen again on their 
  watch.  It did not.
• Instead, our Fathers’ generation brought us the inflationary 
  1970s, and our generation has made sure it did not re‐
  occur, even risking deflation.
• Can the next generation learn to respect both it fathers, 
  grandfathers, and great grandfathers, or are we destined to 
  have to re‐learn the lessons we did not learn before?

                                                             32
             Bluford H. Putnam
•   Bayesian Edge Technology & Solutions, Ltd.
•   48409 Smith Drive
•   Ridge, MD  20680  USA
•   BLU@BAYES1.COM
•   +1.240.431.1552




                                                 33