Corruption at Strathmore University Sports Department

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Corruption at Strathmore University  Sports Department Powered By Docstoc
					                                         May 25th
Strathmore
Leos
Report
                                         2012
This report focuses on two critical areas. The scholarship program and
finances of the rugby team. The report looks at what a fair and transparent
scholarship program should have, dissects the process in Strathmore and
gives recommendations. For the finances, the report highlights irregular
financial management and asks for some form of investigation. The report
finally asks several unanswered questions, which could not be                 A report on the
satisfactorily dealt with because of a lack of transparency and
                                                                              finances and
accountability.
                                                                              Scholarship
                                                                              program of the
                                                                              rugby team.

Submitted By Paul Odera
LEOS RUGBY COACH
IRB LEVEL 3
IRB COACH EDUCATOR
                                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of contents …………………………………………………………………………..................2

List of Tables ……………………………………………………………………………… …………4

List of figures ……………………………………………………………………………………........4

List of Photographs…………………………………………………………………………………...4

Abbreviations and Acronyms ……………………………………………………………...................4

Strathmore Leos ……………………………………………………………………………………....5

CHAPTER 1: Scholarships………………………………………………………………………….6

   1.1     Cost of scholarships …………………………………………………………………….6

   1.2     Strathmore scholarship process (outlined by Mr. Isaac Mwangi)………………………6

   1.3     Action taken by the coach……………………………………………………….……...7

   1.4     Ranking of Scholarship Applicants ………………………………………………….....7

   1.5     Dean’s response on scholarships……………………………………………………......9

CHAPTER 2: FINANCES …………………………………………………………………………11

   2.1     Strathmore process ……………………………………………………………………..11

   2.2     The current process outlined by Mr. Mwangi ……………………………………….....11

   2.3     Gate Collection ………………………………………………………………………...13

   2.4     Action taken by the coach……. ................... ……………………………… ……… 15

   2.4.1   Agreement with the Dean on finances .......................................................................                18

   2.4.2   Agreement with the Dean on gate collection .............................................................                   19

   2.5     Deans Response .........................................................................................................   19


                                                                          2
     2.5.1    Deans response on finances .......................................................................................               19

     2.5.2    Dean’s response on gate collection ....................................................................... …. 20

     2.5.3    Action by the coach on gate collections.....................................................................                     20

CHAPTER 3: RECOMMENDATIONS.........................................................................................22

     3.1      Scholarship program .............................................................................................. … 22

     3.2      Finances .....................................................................................................................   22

CHAPTER 4: UNANSWERED QUESTIONS...............................................................................23

     Appendix




                                                                                3
List of Tables:

Table 1.1 – Ranking of Scholarship Applicants.

Table 1.2- Grading sheet for rugby scholarships.




List of Figures:

Fig 1.0- 2011 Leos expenditure from the accounts department.

List of Photos

Photo 1.0 – Photograph of Torn and Worn out training balls.

Photo 1.1 – Photograph of player using shoes as cones.

Photo 1.2 – Photograph of 2nd Row using his own shorts for a match

Photo 1.3 – Photograph of the team warming up wearing different socks.




Abbreviations and Acronyms:

KRU- Kenya Rugby Union

KSSA- Kenya Secondary Sports Association

KUSA- Kenya Universities Sports Association

SC – Sports Committee




                                                   4
                                           Strathmore Leos

The University Rugby team, known as the Leos has had its most successful season in the premier rugby
league in the country, The Kenya Cup. Leos were in with a very good chance of winning the title, and
were league leaders on two occasions, up until the last four games. After coming from battling
relegation in 2011, fourth place was a great achievement. Further to this, Leos also won the Kenya
Universities Sports Association (K.U.S.A) rugby trophy for the first time. Many firsts were achieved this
year. A comprehensive technical report with greater detailed information on the season is available in a
separate document. This report focuses on two critical areas; The scholarship program and the financial
management of resources. If the issues outlined in the report are not addressed exhaustively, the
performance of the rugby team will be greatly distorted.




                                                   5
CHAPTER 1:

SCHOLARSHIPS

1.1 Cost of Scholarships

The scholarship program at the university is an excellent asset and if managed properly has the potential
to produce outstanding student athletes. This very generous offer should give the university dominance
in whichever sport it chooses. Sadly, this is not the case. There are 45 sports scholarships on offer this
academic year. Degree courses at the university cost 134,000 to 176,000/= per semester. Scholarships
are offered between 15%-75% of tuition. If we assume not all students will get the full scholarship, and
not all will get the minimum, we can work out that a majority may get an average of 50% awarded. It
means that the university is investing between 67,000/= to 88,000/= per student per semester. This is
between 3,015,000/= to 3,960,000/= per semester, and between 6,000,000/= to 7,000,000/= million
shillings a year. Over a four year period it will translate to between 24,000,000/= to 28,000,000/=
million shillings. It is a huge investment by the university in its sports program.

1.2 The process as outlined by the administrator Mr. Mwangi

For such a significant investment, the process to select successful scholars in sports does not match the
huge amount the university is spending on the students. Currently, the administrator requires the coaches
to first indicate what their needs are in terms of numbers of scholarships they want. This in itself is not
such an unreasonable request. However, it becomes baffling that the coach then sends a list to the
administrator of players who in the coach’s opinion deserve a scholarship. No written evidence of
assessment of their sporting ability is required. The university therefore does not have a clear picture on
what value it is getting for the significant investment in the students.

My alarm bells began ringing when I received a list of scholars for the K.U.S.A games in December last
year. Two of the players on my list (Oscar Otindo and Kennedy Onganga), have question marks about
their rugby ability. Oscar’s ability is average at best. Kennedy has such low rugby ability, that he is
unable to make even the second team regularly. Yet a third (Teddy Murithi) only attended a few sessions




                                                      6
in November last year and has not attended any training session since then. There is no written evidence
on the process that led to the selection of the above players as rugby scholars.

I am a supporter of the student athlete through scholarship programs, however, only through a process
that is strictly graded, fair and transparent. This is so that the young athletes can be given a fair chance
through a credible process, and secondly, gives the university value for investing close to 30,000,000
million shillings. I have differed very sharply with the administrator Mr. Isaac Mwangi. He has declined
to approve a standardized process, which gives clear assessment grades, and separates weak applicants
from strong applicants similar to that for candidates applying for academic scholarships. His method
involves sending lists and names, without any written evidence on the ability of the applicants. One
must wonder how the university has invested so much in the sports teams, and left such a haphazard
process to continue. It is very disturbing indeed.

1.3 ACTION TAKEN BY COACH

After months of frustration trying to get a credible process in the scholarship program adopted, I
resolved to seek answers from a higher authority. I met the Dean of Students, Mr. Paul Ochieng on the
2nd of April 2012. Excerpts from Appendix 1 (Minutes of meeting with Dean, Min 1.0):

“1.0 Scholarships

Paul Ochieng began the meeting at 2:15 pm, by agreeing with what he had been reading on email. He
said he fully supported the setting up of structures to ensure success. He used the example of the
Archery qualifiers he had attended, and how structures contributed to success of those who qualified.
Paul Odera said the current situation was not ideal. This is because there were no clear criteria to
measure applicants and give proper feedback. He referred Mr. Ochieng to the report he had sent the
week before. Paul Odera then said that an investment of over 30 million shillings over four years was
only matched by South African universities on this continent. That is the reason a very rigorous process,
with clear structures needed to be set up. Paul Ochieng agreed with this and indicated that he would put
pressure on structures to be set up. Mr. Ochieng asked Paul Odera to attend the meeting tomorrow
afternoon (3rd April) of the Sports committee, since Mr. Odera was now on school holidays.”




                                                     7
1.4 RANKING OF APPLICANTS FOR RUGBY SCHOLARSHIPS

I proceeded to assess and rank the applicants for the 2012 scholarships. I would have liked an even more
rigorous process, however, for the interim, this process would do. I submitted my recommendations to
Mr. Paul Ochieng through a report “Strathmore Scholarship ranking.” Below is the ranking sheet for the
applicants, and a sample of how the grades were arrived at. The full report can be accessed from the
Dean of Students.

Table 1.0

RANKING OF SCHOLARSHIP APPLICANTS

RANK         Name                                          Grade         Status

ORDER

1            Cyprian Kuto                                   A- 80%       Top ranked applicant

2            Jacob Owaa                                     A- 77%       QUALIFIED

3            Michael Gitau                                  A- 75%       Qualified

4            Billy Otieno                                   A- 75%       Qualified

5            Elton Isiayo                                   A- 74%       Qualified

6            Peter Misango                                  B- 69%       Qualified

7            Nelson Nyandat                                 B- 69%       Qualified

8            Humphrey Otieno                              B-68%          Qualified

9            Jeffery Olwande                                 B-67%       Qualified




                                                   8
10          Sikukuu AEN                                             B-65%           Qualified

11          Alex Ndichu                                            C-54%            No

12          Moses Khamatiya                                        C-46%            No

13          James Lidonde                                          D-40%            No




Table 1.2

Name            Michael Gitau                Position                 2nd Row
Age             19                           Date                     March 2012

Weight          106KG                        Height                   6ft 2”


PASSING                         Pop pass left                        1     2    3   4    5
                                Pop pass right                       1     2    3   4    5
                                Spin pass left                       1     2    3   4    5
                                Spin pass right                      1     2    3   4    5
MENTAL                          Uncompromising                       1     2    3   4    5
                                Punctuality                          1     2    3   4    5
                                Able to read play                    1     2    3   4    5
                                Attitude to training                 1     2    3   4    5
                                Reaction to stress                   1     2    3   4    5
                                Positive attitude                    1     2    3   4    5
                                Innovative                           1     2    3   4    5
TACTICAL/DECISION MAKING        Speed                                1     2    3   4    5
                                Accuracy                             1     2    3   4    5
                                Leadership                           1     2    3   4    5
                                Plays to pattern                     1     2    3   4    5
                                Option Taking                        1     2    3   4    5
                                Communication                        1     2    3   4    5


SKILL                           Contest Possession- Set Pieces       1     2    3   4    5
                                Contest possession- General Play     1     2    3   4    5




                                                        9
                                     Attack                                1   2   3   4   5
                                     Defence                               1   2   3   4   5
                                     Support Play                          1   2   3   4   5
                                     Phase Play                            1   2   3   4   5
                                     Positional Individual Skills          1   2   3   4   5
                                     Specialist skills e.g. goal-kicking   1   2   3   4   5
NON-RUGBY SPECIFIC                   Level of Intelligence                 1   2   3   4   5
                                     Reliability                           1   2   3   4   5
                                     Discipline                            1   2   3   4   5
                                     Focus                                 1   2   3   4   5
                                     Camaraderie                           1   2   3   4   5
                                     Rapport                               1   2   3   4   5


TOTAL                                116                  %         75%
Summary Comment
Gitau is an “A” scholarship candidate. He qualifies for the maximum award for the sports
scholarship.




1.5 DEAN’S RESPONSE ON THE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAML

Mr. Paul Ochieng seemed to agree with many of the recommendations I made. I impressed upon him the
need to have to a transparent and fair process, which benefits the students and the university. Sadly the
copious notes taken, did not translate into substantive action. Three weeks later, Mr. Ochieng approved
expenditure for recruitment of rugby players, for the scholarship program, without any reference to the
above criteria.

This only came to light on the 28th of April 2012. I received a complaint from the headmaster of
Chekalini High school, Mr. Paul Weloba. He is a former referee and now coaches Kakamega High
School. He has also been a board member at the Kenya Rugby Union (K.R.U). Mr. Weloba was not
pleased by the conduct of Mr. Levi Onkoba during the Kenya Secondary Sports Association (K.S.S.A),
National Sevens rugby competition on the 18th and 19th of April 2012. He said that Mr. Onkoba “Was
walking around with a pen and paper, saying that he has Strathmore University Scholarships available.”
Mr. Weloba said the conduct of the Strathmore representative was unprofessional.



                                                              10
I was deflated and disappointed that Mr. Ochieng went back on his word, and approved funds to
continue with a process, that was flawed and fraught with irregularities. Secondly during our meeting I
had expressed serious concerns about the credibility and integrity of Mr. Onkoba, and asked for his
removal pending an investigation into certain financial dealings mentioned later in this report. These
actions were inconsistent with what Mr. Ochieng had said, and went against the professionalism and
integrity which the dean had said he wanted to institute.




                                                    11
CHAPTER 2

FINANCES

2.1 The Strathmore process

Strathmore prides itself on following best practice in how it conducts its affairs. According to the
finance department, the financial year of the university begins in January. They require that departments
submit their budgets by the 3rd of December each year. This enables the departments to be operational
by the beginning of the year.

Having a background in Business Administration, sports and teaching has given me an invaluable ability
to appreciate due process, accountability and transparency. Money is one of the most important
resources in any institution. It is not about the quantity of money, but the management of finances that
determines success or failure. Strathmore University prides itself as being one of the leading business
schools on this continent. The university is even associated with world renowned universities such as
Harvard.

2.2 The current process outlined by Mr. Mwangi

On the 5th of January 2012, Mr. Isaac Mwangi sent the email below to all sports coaches.

“As I informed you during the last SC meeting, it is a University requirement that we submit our annual
departmental budgets at the beginning of the year. So that we can consolidate the budgets, send me your
budgetary requirements for the year 2012. It is important that you do not omit any item on your
program for 2012 because only items approved on the budget will be taken care of. Where you may not
be sure of the costings you can use last years projections. In case you may need help or any clarification
I will be available. Please send me this by 12th January 2012. Thanks.”

I was pleased to see this, because I had been operating without clear guidelines on what to prioritise and
without knowledge of how much I was able to spend. I then sent the email below:




                                                   12
“Dear Isaac, I am concerned at the moment that the team has been operating without a budget. On
January 13th 2012, I sent you an email asking for projections from the last year. I am yet to receive a
response. Please do let me know the university’s position on this matter.”

I stood my ground and insisted that I would like to see the budget from previous years, so as to have a
guideline to prepare a budget that would be as accurate as possible. I received two emails from Mr.
Mwangi in response:

Email 1

“In regard to the budget the university has a budget allocated to all sports and then the global budget is
shared among all teams. At the beginning of every season we ask all coaches to give their yearly
requirements and then the monies are prorated according to the different fixtures among other needs.”

Email 2

“Let me clarify what I expect in terms of the requirements. You obviously require certain equipment for
training as well as the matches for both teams. You should therefore prepare a list of the requirements
for the whole season such items will include and not limited to balls, training cones, kits, pool sessions,
gym, physiotherapy services pitch preparation among other things that enable you work in a conducive
environment that will ensure success of the team. These items do not require any monetary tag and the
best guideline would be to look at the year's competitive calendar so that it can guide you on what you
require for the season. We do not have an approved budget specifically meant for rugby, budgets are
normally approved upon the presentation of the team requirements. The requirements come from the
individual coaches based on their program.”

The above statement baffled me even more, and elicited more questions. How do items such as kit, balls
training cones, physiotherapy services, pitch preparation etc not have a monetary value? How is the
rugby team allowed to operate without an approved budget? How does the university keep a check and
balance on the finances of the rugby team? Is this the practice with other teams? Is this sound financial
management?




                                                    13
 I then sent the email below:

“Hello Isaac,

Please do send me the figures from the last budget for me to work with. If budgets are approved on
presentation of team requirements, and the financial year starts in January, it means budgets were
approved by the end of last year. So how was approval given for expenditure for rugby without a
budget? Then which budget are we operating on at the moment?”

Mr. Mwangi then sent his final communication on the matter of the budgets copied below:

“In regard to the budget I already indicted that there are no previous figures, come up with your own in
relation with the team requirements and your overall program. Thanks.”

I then sent an email expressing my bewilderment at this statement. I also indicated that this was a highly
irregular practice in terms of financial management.

“So you have had no previous budget for Rugby? I find this highly irregular to say the least. So in the
existence of Leos as sport at the university there has been no budget at all! Fascinating. I may quote you
on this if it is no problem with you.”

Mr. Mwangi has not replied to my email at the time of writing this report.

2.3 GATE COLLECTION AT MATCHES

The other matter of grave concern for me around finances was gate collection. At this time I noticed the
volunteer coach, Mr. Levi Onkoba, who is not on a contract, was charging gate fees with the knowledge
and approval of somebody in authority at the university. Mr. Onkoba provided ticket stubs, and
ingeniously enlisted students to collect the gate charges. He was charging 200/= for adults and 300/= for
vehicles. The matches I am aware of are as follows:

      Nakuru on 4th February 2012 at Impala club

      Mwamba on 11th February 2012 at RFUEA




                                                   14
      KCB on 25th February 2012 at Impala

      Nondies on 31st March 2012 at Impala

 A conservative estimate of revenue from these matches would be around 500 fans for all the games.
This would be 150,000/= for fans. For the cars, we can estimate about 100 cars for all the games, which
is 30,000/=. A total of 180,000/= at the very least.

2.4 ACTION TAKEN BY THE COACH

I signed my contract in November last year. I had been operating without a budget for five months and
was facing very difficult working conditions. Some of the challenges I was facing were:

      No balls at training, or if available old and completely worn out.

                                                       Photo 1.0




                           Torn and worn out balls being used in March 2012




                                                       15
   No cones (we resorted to using shoes). Photo 1.1




                  Player going through training using shoes as cones in February 2012

   Torn and worn out kit (The boys resorted to wearing their own shorts and socks)

    Photo 1.2




    2nd Row who had to wear his own shorts on 14th April 2012 in Nakuru



                                               16
                                                   Photo 1.3




       Warm up before the final game of the season in Nakuru on 14th April 2012. Note the different
       socks worn by the players.

      No ambulance at matches. (This was only approved after 4 months and a serious head injury)

      Insufficient drinking water for players.

It became simply unworkable for anyone who wishes to conduct a professional job. Although some of
these items did come after months of begging, it was simply not acceptable to be operating under such
circumstances.

As mentioned earlier in the report, I faced months of frustration trying to get any financial figures from
Mr. Mwangi. I also indicated to the Dean, that I would not continue as the Coach of Leos, because I
would not be part of irregular financial dealings. After listening to Mr. Ochieng, I gave him the benefit
of doubt.




                                                   17
2.4.1 AGREEMENT WITH THE DEAN ON FINANCES

The dean during our meeting on the 2nd of April indicated that it was not difficult to get a budget from
the previous year. This gave me fresh impetus to forge ahead and begin proper planning for the future.
Sadly, as in the case with the scholarship program, Mr. Ocheing proved to be a big let down.

Excerpts from the minutes of the meeting are given below:

       1.1 “Finances –

              1.1.1   Budgets. Paul Odera gave the background behind what had been happening over
                      the last three months. He said the Administrator Mr. Isaac Mwangi had asked for
                      a budget on the 5th of January. Yet deadlines to submit budgets were on the 3rd of
                      December the previous year. So he had requested for the figures to be able to
                      check off expenditure and the budget. In the absence of that, Paul Odera had
                      asked for projections from the previous year to be able to prepare estimates. With
                      only one game left in the Kenya Cup season, the rugby team had been running on
                      a budget that the head coach had no access to. Mr. Ochieng than said that he had
                      set up the system to ensure that every team had a coach who was looked after, kit
                      was provided, and teams were able to travel for every match. He added that teams
                      were required to submit their budgets to enable the department to apportion
                      monies to each team. He also admitted that cash flows had been tight over the last
                      two years. Paul Odera said he understood this, however, what he wanted was to
                      see figures from the previous year to be able to see where to prioritize and where
                      to cut costs. Mr. Odera said the kit the rugby team was using was torn and
                      embarrassing to see. Players lacked basic equipment. Shoes were used for cones
                      for half the season. We did not have enough balls to run a session for two teams.
                      At this point Mr. Ochieng registered his displeasure and called his secretary to
                      find out about the order for balls that had been ordered. The dean said getting the
                      financial figures from the previous year from Mr. Mwangi should be a simple
                      matter.



                                                   18
2.4.2     AGREEMENT WITH THE DEAN ON GATE COLLECTION

          1.1.2 Gate Takings.

Paul Odera expressed concern at how the revenue from gate charges was being managed. He said he had
only found out about gate charges halfway through the season. The assistant coach Mr. Onkoba, with the
authority and knowledge of someone at the University as you shall see below has been charging
entrance fees of 200/= for adults and 300/= for cars for the following Strathmore home matches:
Mwamba at Quins, Nakuru at Impala, KCB at Impala, Nondies at Impala. Paul Odera said he was still
in the dark at how gate revenue was collected, used and distributed. Mr. Ochieng expressed surprise
about the gate collections. He promised to get the complete picture on the finances from the gate
collections.

2.5 DEAN’S RESPONSE TO THE FINANCES

Budgets

After four weeks, I got a response on the 4th of May from the Dean of Students. I was eager to see how
detailed the financial figures would be, since it had taken four weeks to prepare. The Dean said they had
come straight from the accounts department. They are given below:

Fig 1.0

Total funds spent by Leos in 2011 season was - K.shs. 1,500,000

Matches and tournaments outside Nairobi- K.shs. 980,000

Pitch hire and match logistics in Nairobi - K.shs. 150,000

Meals while in Nairobi                  - K.shs. 200,000

First aid                             - K.shs. 100,000

Miscellaneous                         - K.shs. 70,000

No kits were bought in 2011 and no international trips were done.


                                                   19
I then queried whether the salaries for rugby coaches and staff was not included in this budget, yet
during our meeting the Dean had indicated that it was part of the budget. I told the Dean that the
accounts were incomplete, and he said that this is what the accounts department could come up with.

There are various questions that need to be answered from the above figures sent by Mr. Ochieng.

   1) Mr. Isaac Mwangi was adamant that the rugby team had no budget since inception. Where then
       did Mr. Ochieng obtain the above figures?

   2) Mr. Mwangi indicated that items like physiotherapy and medical kit did not have any monetary
       value. How did the Accounts arrive at the above figures for items the administrator had said had
       no monetary value?

   3) The Dean indicated during the meeting on the 2nd of April, that salaries for staff in the rugby
       section fell under the budget. Why are they not reflected above?

   4) According to the administrator’s emails “budgets must have include all detail, any items omitted
       will not be approved” How did the Accounts come up with a budget (which the Dean sent to me)
       that only has four items?

2.5.2 Dean’s response to gate collections

I received a phone call from Mr. Ochieng on the 11th of April 2012. He said the administrator, Mr.
Mwangi, admitted having knowledge of gate collections, however, Mr. Mwangi denied any knowledge
of how the money was collected or disbursed, even though he was present at the matches. In fact he told
the Dean that the whole scheme was being orchestrated by the students.

2.5.3 Action by the Coach on gate collections

I challenged Mr. Geoffrey Githaiga, the treasurer of the rugby team, about the money on the 10th of May
2012. He admitted that Mr. Onkoba had given him money on two occasions.

1) After the match vs. Nakuru at Impala club on the 4th of February, amounting to 3,700 kshs

2) After the match vs. KCB at Impala club on the 25th of February amounting to 3,500 Kshs


                                                   20
I then asked him if he knew if the ticket sales were consistent with the money given to him, and said
there was no way for him to know how much was collected from the gate, since he was playing for the
1st team between 4:30pm and 6:30pm.




CHAPTER 3

RECCOMMENDATIONS


                                                 21
3.1 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

As written earlier in the report the process needs to be streamlined. A standardized testing sheet, close
to academic testing parameters should be used. It would then be possible to know an A, B or C
candidate. This would then be attached to the applicant’s name and is similar to what an academic
scholar would give in a results sheet. The scholarship committee would then be in a much better position
to tell a strong candidate from a weak one and judge each case on merit. A successful applicant would
then be able to see where they performed well and what areas they need to improve on. An unsuccessful
applicant will also be able to see where they fell short and apply the next year, or see why they were
only given a certain percentage as opposed to what another candidate was given. I have attached the
report on those who applied for scholarships this year based on my recommendations.

3.2 FINANCES

A thorough and complete investigation into the financial dealings of the rugby team. I suspect this may
be just a tip of the ice berg in the sports department. Certain pertinent questions need to be asked to
establish if the finances of the University are being spent transparently. Gate collections need to be
accounted for. There needs to be a deeper inquiry into, how experienced accountants in the finance
department, allowed such irregular financial management to take place without asking questions? It
would be prudent to put the financial management of the rugby team under a microscope.




CHAPTER 4

UNANSWERED QUESTIONS



                                                   22
   1. Why did the administrator ask for a budget almost one month after the deadline for budget
       submissions had passed?

   2. Why did Mr. Mwangi claim the rugby team had never had a budget since it was formed?

   3. Why did the Dean Mr. Paul Ochieng contradict his administrator and send an incomplete set of
       accounts as a budget for the rugby team?

   4. How are scholarships awarded without any criteria or guideline for grading scholars? How does
       the university get value for its investment? How do parents and students know that the process is
       free and fair?

   5. Who approved the collection of money from the Gate? Where did the money go?

   6. How does an individual not contracted by the university collect money on behalf of the
       university?

   7. How does an individual not contracted by the university get approval and funding to go and
       recruit players, without the approval or knowledge of the head coach?

If these questions can be answered satisfactorily, then Leos will be on a sure footing to be a successful
rugby team. However, if they are ignored, the performance of the team will be distorted and the effect
will be a steady deterioration in performance and a slide ignominy.




APPENDIX 1. Minutes of meeting with the dean on 2nd April 2012.




                                                   23
Present

Paul Ochieng- Dean of Students

Paul Odera – Leos Head Coach




Agenda

    1. Scholarships

    2. Finances

    3. AOB

3    Scholarships

3.4 Paul Ochieng began the meeting at 2:15 pm, by agreeing with what he had
     been reading on email. He said he fully supported the setting up of
     structures to ensure success. He used the example of the Archery qualifiers
     he had attended, and how structures contributed to success of those who The Dean
     qualified. Paul Odera said the current situation was not ideal. This is
     because there were no clear criteria to measure applicants and give proper
     feedback. He referred Mr. Ochieng to the report he had sent the week
     before. Paul Odera then said that an investment of over 30 million shillings
     over four years was only matched by South African universities on this
     continent. That is the reason a very rigorous process, with clear structures
     needed to be set up. Paul Ochieng agreed with this and indicated that he
     would put pressure on structures to be set up. Mr. Ochieng asked Paul to
     attend the meeting tomorrow afternoon (3rd April) of the Sports committee,
     since Mr. Odera was now on school holidays.




                                                   24
3.5 Finances –

3.5.2   Budgets. Paul Odera gave the background behind what had been
        happening over the last three months. He said the Administrator Mr.
        Isaac Mwangi had asked for a budget on the 5th of January. Yet deadlines
        to submit budgets were on the 3rd of December the previous year. So he
        had requested for the figures to be able to check off expenditure and the
                                                                                       The Dean
        budget. In the absence of that, Paul had asked for projections from the
        previous year to be able to prepare estimates. With only one game left in
        the Kenya Cup season, the rugby team had been running on a budget that
        the head coach had no access to. Mr. Ochieng than said that he had set up
        the system to ensure that every team had a coach who was looked after,
        kit was provided, and teams were able to travel for every match. He
        added that teams were required to submit their budgets to enable the
        department to apportion monies to each team. He also admitted that cash
        flows had been tight over the last two years. Paul Odera said he
        understood this, however, what he wanted was to see figures from the
        previous year to be able to see where to prioritize, where to cut costs. Mr.
        Odera said the kit the rugby team was using was torn and embarrassing to
        see. Players lacked basic equipment. Shoes were used for cones for half
        the season. We did not have enough balls to run a session for two teams.
        At this point Mr. Ochieng registered his displeasure and called his
        secretary to find out about the order for balls that had been ordered. The
        dean said getting the financial figures from the previous year from Mr.
        Mwangi should be a simple matter.

3.5.3   Gate Takings.

               Paul Odera expressed concern at how the revenue from gate
               charges was being managed. He said he had only found out about




                                                    25
               gate charges halfway through the season. The assistant coach Mr.
               Onkoba, with the authority and knowledge of the administrator
                                                                                      The Dean
               Mr. Mwangi has been charging entrance fees of 200/= for adults
               and 300/= for cars for the following Strathmore home matches:
               Homeboyz at Quins, Mwamba at Quins, Nakuru at Impala, Mean
               Machine at Impala, KCB at Impala, Nondies at Impala. Paul
               Odera said he was still in the dark at how gate revenue was
               collected, used and distributed. Mr. Ochieng expressed surprise
               about gate collections. He promised to get the complete picture on
               the finances from the gate. Mr. Odera did mention the
               disagreement they had about sharing the gate with Quins, and the
               dean had called him on the Friday evening before to mention that
               they could not agree on sharing the gate.




3.6 AOB:                                                                              The Dean

3.6.2   Medical Equipment. Paul Odera mentioned how the Physiotherapist Mr.
        Mogire was very frustrated at the moment because of a lack of medical
        supplies. Mr. Ochieng also wondered why they were not buying the
        medical supplies in bulk as they used to. He asked about the Ice bath that
        had been specifically purchased for rugby and hockey. Mr. Odera said he
        had never seen the ice bath.

3.6.3   The ambulance: Paul Odera said the ambulance had only appeared
        halfway through the season. This is only after a near fatal experience with
        Samuel Motari. Mr. Ochieng said he had been approving ambulance
        services and was not aware of such occurrences.

3.6.4   Training sessions: Mr. Ochieng asked if Paul had been missing sessions




                                                    26
        without informing the administrator. Mr. Odera said he sent notice of any
        sessions or matches he was missing. He then sent the sessions on soft
        copy to the captains, senior players and assistant coach. If he was not
        available he would copy the administrator. Mr. Odera said he started all
        sessions with both teams, and then separated them. The difficulty was the
        assistant coach Mr. Onkoba had chosen to ignore most if not all
        instructions from the head coach. Mr. Odera also expressed his concern,
        that his salary had been reduced not to include the Eric Shirley matches,
        yet had planned, and organized all the sessions for both teams.

3.6.5   Coaching position: Paul Odera said he was unable to work under the
        current conditions of irregular financial management, unclear scholarship
        structures and being undermined by his assistant. He offered to resign
        after the final Kenya Cup match versus Nakuru on the 14th of April 2012.
        Mr. Ochieng asked that he reconsider his decision as the issues were just
        reaching him, and he be given time to act. He said the team had come
        from being almost relegated to almost winning the Kenya Cup under Mr.
        Odera. This was a remarkable turnaround. He said there was still six
        months to go on the contract as well. Paul Odera mentioned his trip to
        have some interviews in New Zealand in mid July to August, 2012. Mr.
        Ochieng wished him the best of luck.

Meeting ended at 4pm. Next meeting: Date not set.




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