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Colonial Connecticut Curricular Unit

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					Colonial Connecticut Curricular
            Unit




                     The First State House
          http://www.ct.gov/ctportal/cwp/view.asp?a=885&q=246524




  A Variety of Lessons for use before
          and after field trips
By the end of the unit students will:

Unit objectives                      NCSS Standards                     CT. Standards
Be familiar with the settlements     Time, Continuity, and Change;      Historical Thinking; Places and
of Roanoke and Plymouth: who,        People, Places, and                Regions; Human and
when, where, why, and what           Environments; Individual           Environmental Interaction;
happened.                            Development and Identity           Human Systems
Understand when, who, where          Time, Continuity, and Change;      Historical Thinking; Places and
and why did colonists settle in      People, Places, and                Regions; Human and
Connecticut?                         Environments; Individual           Environmental Interaction;
                                     Development and Identity           Human Systems
Be familiar with colonial customs    Time, Continuity, and Change;      Historical Thinking; Human
and manners. Topics include          People, Places, and                Systems; Historical Themes
religious beliefs, lodging,          Environments; Culture;
clothing, food, recreation,          Individuals, Groups, and
responsibilities, family life, and   Institutions
health.
Explore Colonial Economy             Time, Continuity, and Change;      Economic Systems, Economic
including currency and trade.        Production, Distribution, and      Interdependence
                                     Consumption.
Recognize methods of                 Science, Technology, and Society   Human systems
transportation.
Understand policies of colonial      Power, Authority, and              Rights and Responsibilities of
government including roles of        Governance                         Citizens, Political Systems
citizens.
Define the relationships and class   Time, Continuity, and Change;      Historical Thinking; Human
structure inside the colony.         People, Places, and                Systems; Historical Themes
                                     Environments; Culture;
                                     Individuals, Groups, and
                                     Institutions
Define the relationships outside     Time, Continuity, and Change;      Historical Thinking; Human
the colony i.e. homeland, Native     People, Places, and                Systems; Historical Themes
Americans, and other colonies.       Environments; Culture;
                                     Individuals, Groups, and
                                     Institutions
Define the relationships with        Time, Continuity, and Change;      Historical Thinking; Human
nature as a resource.                People, Places, and                Systems; Historical Themes
                                     Environments; Culture;
                                     Individuals, Groups, and
                                     Institutions
Unifying Theme:
       The theme, Colonial Connecticut, cooperatively explores the questions who,

when, why and how Connecticut was first settled. Students will research historical

literature resources along with the Internet to experience day-to-day life and unfold the

many relationships inside and outside the colonies. Many lessons build upon each other

culminating students’ knowledge in many forms: publishing a brochure encouraging

colonists to come to Connecticut, building their own colony, and creating a colonial

marketplace complete with wares to be sold. This unit is best begun at the start of the

school year laying the foundation for the further exploration of Connecticut. The

timeline starts in the early 1600’s and follows settlement life up to the Revolutionary

War.
Unit Assessment

     Are students able to listen and follow directions for each lesson?
     Was the teacher presentation organized and precise?
     Are students able to see relationships and recognize the central idea?
     Was the unit flexible enough?
     Are students able to communicate effectively?
     Are students self-assessing their progress?
     Has the teacher captured the students’ attention equally? Are equal opportunities
       being presented?
     Are students connecting ideas to other subjects?
     Was the Internet used effectively?
     Make note of student questions during each lesson and try to incorporate answers
       into future plans.
     Note individual student needs.
     Monitor time for future use.
     Reflect on use of resources and keep running list of current material.
The following scope and sequence is offered as an example.
Scope and Sequence:
   Lessons           Timeframe           Subject            Activities        Assessment
                                       Connections
Introduction to    2-3 days, week 1   Language Arts,      Debate, KWL       Debate and KWL
 Colonization                         Math, and Art            Chart             Rubric
Exploration of     1-2 days, week 1   Language Arts,      Describing an      Writing & Map
    Natural                            Art, Science       Area to Settle,        Rubric
  Resources                                                   Map of
                                                             Resources
 Colonist and      2-3 days, week 1   Language Arts,      Description of      Writing and
    Native            or week 2            Art              Connecticut        Artistic
  Americans                                               Colonist from       Rendering
  Respective                                             Native American       Rubric,
 Perspectives                                            Perspective and
                                                            Vice Versa
Colonial Towns     1-2 days, week 2   Language Arts      Design a Map of     Social Studies
  and Homes                              and Art         a Colonial Town        Journal
                                                             or Village
 Creating a CT        On-going           Art and          Build a Colony    Participation and
    Colony                            Language Arts        in Classroom      Journal Rubric
Class Structure,   2-3 days/week 2    Language Arts          Dramatic       Oral Presentation
 Occupations,                         and Dramatic          Monologue            Rubric
Family Life and                           Arts
   Health of
   Colonists
 Colonial Food     1-2 days, week 2   Language Arts      Class Cookbook     Class Discussion
   and Drink             or 3         and Technology                             Rubric
    Colonial       1 day, week 2 or   Language Arts      Dress Colonists    Class Discussion
  Connecticut             3               and Art                                Rubric
    Clothing
  Eighteenth          On-going         Mathematics        Comparison         Participation,
    Century                                               Shopping for       Cooperation,
   Shopping                                                Essentials         Discussion
                                                                                Rubric
  Education In     1 day, week 2 or   Language Arts,     Simulation of a     Social Studies
    Colonial              3           Dramatic Arts,      Dame School           Journal
  Connecticut                             and Art
    Harvest             2 day         Art and Physical    Colonial Field     Participation
   Celebration      lesson/week 3        Education             Day               Rubric
 Theme project      On-going, due         Art and        Create Brochure    Portfolio Rubric
organizer: Come         week 4         Language Arts        to Entice
 to Connecticut                                            Colonists to
                                                            Come to
                                                           Connecticut
Colonial Market     On-going, use      Art, Language     Create Products     Craft, Writing
     Place           week 4 to           Arts, and           to Sell        and Participation
                      complete         Dramatic Arts                             Rubric
Class Structure, Occupations, Family Life and Health of Connecticut
Colonists.
by Laura Gilbert
Social Studies, level: 3-5 grades

Materials: Reference books, Internet

Time Allotment: 2-3 class periods

National Standards: Culture (a,c,d); Time, Continuity, and Change (b,c,d,e,f); People,
Places, and Environments (a,b,c,g,h,k); Individual Development and Identity (b,d,e,f,g,h);
Individuals, Groups, and Institutions (a,b,d,e); Power, Authority, and Governance
(a,b,c,d,f,h); Production, Distribution, and Consumption (a,b,e,g,h,i); Science,
Technology, and Society (a.b.c); Global Connections (a,b); Civic Ideals and Practices
(b,c,g,h,i,j);

Objectives: Understand history of class structure, occupations, family life and health in
Connecticut colony and its impact on today, read and interpret various resources to create
a dramatic monologue, cooperatively and individually research about colonial
Connecticut. Lesson connects Language Arts and Drama.
          Class Structure, Occupations, Family Life and Health of Connecticut Colonists.
                 Lesson Activities:
                 Initiation:
                 Begin lesson by reading aloud Gary Bowen’s My Village, Sturbridge.
                 Explanation:
                 Divide the students into groups by class structures:
                 Connecticut colony farmer              Enslaved African servant       Connecticut merchant
                 Colonial doctor                        Young boy or girl              Wealthy colonist
                 Woman running a household              Apprenticed young man
                 .
                 Students will research characteristics of assigned class in as much detail as possible with
                 each member of the group writing down the same information. This is a jigsaw activity.
                 Once research is complete, students will create new groups that contain one member of
                 each class structure. Students share knowledge.

                                     Some helpful websites to begin your exploration.
http://earlyamerica.com/series.html
these are movies of famous people
http://hastings.ci.lexington.ma.us/Colonial/Colonial.html
Colonial Lexington, MA
http://www.osv.org/
Old Sturbridge Village
http://www.history.org/
Colonial Williamsburg virtual tour
http://www.uen.org/utahlink/tours/tourFames.cgi?tour_id=16197
virtual tour colonial life
http://library.thinkquest.org/J002611F/
colonial kids website explore
http://www.kyrene.k12.az.us/schools/brisas/sunda/webquest/considersource.htm
wonderful webquest following the story The Witch of Blackbird Pond
        Class Structure, Occupations, Family Life and Health of Connecticut Colonists.


                              Some helpful websites to begin your exploration.
http://www.pilgrimhall.org/pilstory.htm
Pilgrim Hall Museum website with useful biography information
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/features/97/salem/
Cool website to explore Salem witchtrials
Class Structure, Occupations, Family Life and Health of Connecticut Colonists.

  Expansion:
  Have students prepare for their dramatic monologue. They are to develop an identity
  with their character focusing on education, career, daily life, and economics.
  When the work is finished, allow students a day in class to share their monologues.

  Modifications:
  For students with Asperger’s (autism): Discuss optimal communication patterns and
  design communication strategies with special education teachers, parents and peers.
  Create a separate sheet of directions with simple sentences and pictures to demonstrate
  desired social behavior and lesson procedure. Allow for a visual presentation versus oral
  if necessary.
  For students with ADHD: Break up activities, allow sufficient movement during and
  between activities, partner student with a peer, and set up a self-recording strategy to
  complete activity.

  The lesson may be modified to any learning disability by making adjustments to the
  number of criteria that need to be met, allowing students to orally reflect knowledge,
  illustrate concepts with pictures, and allow students more time to complete tasks.

  One adaptation would be to allow various characters to interact with each other. Allow
  students the opportunity to put on a play about life in the Colonial times. Challenge
  students to think of how the characters would interact.
                     Class Structure, Occupations, Family Life and Health of Connecticut Colonists .

Assessment:
Name_______________________________________________
                     Jigsaw Activity and Monologue Rubric
              5                4               3                 2                 0
              Strong           Good            Acceptable        Needs             Unacceptable
              Performance      Performance     Performance       Improvement       Performance
Written Work Demonstrated      Demonstrated    Demonstrated      Demonstrated      Demonstrated
              excellent        good research, acceptable         fair research,    lack of
              research,        creativity &    research,         creativity &      research,
              creativity &     evidence of     creativity &      evidence of       creativity &
              evidence of      writing.        evidence of       writing.          evidence of
              writing                          writing.                            writing.
              process.
Effort and    Demonstrate      Demonstrate     Demonstrate       Demonstrate       Demonstrated
Attitude      excellent        good level.     acceptable        poor level.       unacceptable
              level.                           level.                              level.
Worked        Always listens Almost            Usually listens   Often listens     Rarely listens
Cooperatively to, shares with always listens   to, shares with   to, shares with   to, shares with
as a group    and supports     to, shares with and supports      and supports      and supports
              the efforts of   and supports    the efforts of    the efforts of    the efforts of
              others.          the efforts of  others.           others.           others.
                               others.
Knowledge     Shows            Shows a good Shows a              Shows a fair      Lacks
              complete level level of          moderate level    level of          understanding.
              of               understanding. of                 understanding.
              understanding.                   understanding.
Visual        Demonstrated     Demonstrated    Demonstrated      Demonstrated      Demonstrated
              high level of    good level of   acceptable        fair level of     lack of
              creativity,      creativity,     level of          creativity,       creativity,
              colorfulness & colorfulness & creativity,          colorfulness &    colorfulness &
              excellent        excellent       colorfulness &    excellent         excellent
              attention to     attention to    excellent         attention to      attention to
              audience         audience        attention to      audience          audience
                                               audience
   Eighteenth Century Shopping
   http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/score_lessons/market_to_market/pages/activities.html

Adapted by Laura Gilbert
Social Studies, level: 4-6 grades

Materials: Primary source document John Greenhow's list of "Goods Imported from
England," Chart for itemizing

Time Allotment: One hour

National Standards: Production, Distribution, and Consumption (a,b,e,g,h,i)

Introduction: England's policy of mercantilism deprived colonial landowners of
opportunities to purchase luxury goods. Only bare necessities seemed to make it to the
colonies. This lesson will introduce students to the types of goods that were available for
purchase at a typical colonial store.
                       Eighteenth Century Shopping
Instructional Format:
Objective: Using a primary source document, students will determine which types of
items were available to purchase in the 18th century.
Anticipatory Set: Have students brainstorm items they think were purchased by the
colonists.
Input: Discuss mercantilism, how merchants got their goods, and the British trade laws.

Guided Practice: Divide class into cooperative groups of three to four students.
Distribute copies of John Greenhow's list of Imported Goods. Have students categorize
the items on this list into three groups, '`Necessities," "Inexpensive Luxury Items," and
'Rare or Expensive Luxury Item,' Compile a dass list of categorized items. Compare the
necessities to the luxury items Discuss why some items would be considered a luxury.
Discuss the principals of supply and demand.

Independent Practice: Give students this prompt. You have just arrived in the new
world. You have brought very few belongings with you. You have accommodations at a
local tavern, but you still need some basic supplies; write a list of items you will need to
purchase at John Greenhow's store and the total cost of these items. This exercise
connects math skills.
                                                                                 Eighteenth Century Shopping
Class Discussion Rubric:
                             4                    3                    2                    1
Category
 Participation       Responds            Responds to all      Participates         Does not
                     thoughtfully to     prompts.             minimally in         participate
                     all prompts in a                         activities.
                     timely manner.
 Demonstrates        Shows               Shows                Response             Response
  Knowledge          complete            substantial          shows some           shows a
                     understanding       understanding        understanding        complete lack
                     of the              of the problem,      of the problem,      of
                     questions,          ideas, and           ideas, and           understanding
                     ideas, and          processes.           processes.           for the
                     processes.                                                    problem, ideas,
                                                                                   and processes.
 Explanation         A complete          Good solid           Explanation is       Misses key
                     response with a     response with        unclear.             points.
                     detailed            clear
                     explanation.        explanation.
   Listening         Listens when        Listens when         Does not listen      Does not listen
     Skills          others talk,        others talk,         when others          when others
                     both in groups      both in group        talk, both in        talk, both in
                     and in class.       and in class.        group and in         groups and in
                     Incorporates or                          class.               class. Often
                     builds off of the                                             interrupts when
                     ideas of others.                                              others speak.


Source: “Class Discussion Rubric.” GRITS Great Resources for Integrating Technology In School.
         February 26, 2005.
         http://www.gritsonline.org/docs/discussrubric.doc .
Collaborative Work Skills:                                         Eighteenth Century Shopping
Student Name:
Category            4                      3                      2                      1
Contributions       Routinely provides     Usually provides       Sometimes              Rarely provides
                    useful ideas when      useful ideas when      provides useful        useful ideas when
                    participation in the   participating in the   ideas when             participating in the
                    group and in           group and in           participating in       group and in
                    classroom              classroom              group and              classroom
                    discussions. A         discussions. A         classroom              discussion. May
                    definite leader who    strong member          discussions. A         refuse to
                    contributes a lot of   who tries hard.        satisfactory group     participate.
                    effort.                                       member who does
                                                                  what is required.
Quality of Work     Provides work of       Provides high          Provides work that     Provides work that
                    the highest quality.   quality work.          occasionally needs     usually needs to be
                                                                  to be                  checked/redone by
                                                                  checked/redone by      others
                                                                  other group
                                                                  members
Time management     Routinely uses         Usually uses time      Tends to               Rarely gets things
                    time well              well throughout        procrastinate but      done by the
                    throughout the         the project, but       always gets things     deadline AND
                    project to ensure      may have               done by the            group has to adjust
                    things get done on     procrastination on     deadlines. Group       deadlines or work
                    time. Group does       one thing. Group       does not have to       responsibilities.
                    not have to adjust     does not have to       adjust deadlines or
                    deadlines or work      adjust deadlines or    work
                    responsibilities.      work                   responsibilities.
                                           responsibilities.
Focus on the task   Consistently stays     Focuses on task        Focuses on task        Rarely focuses on
                    focused on the         most of the time.      some of the time.      the task. Lets
                    task. Extremely        Can be counted on      Requires               others do the work.
                    self-directed.         by other members.      reminders by other
                                                                  members.
Working with        Almost always          Usually listens to,    Often listens to,      Rarely listens to,
others              listens to, shares     shares with and        shares with and        shares with and
                    with and supports      supports the efforts   supports the efforts   supports the efforts
                    the efforts of         of others.             of others but          of others. Often
                    others.                                       sometimes is not a     not a good team
                                                                  good team              player.
                                                                  member.
Problem Solving     Actively looks for     Refines solutions      Doesn’t suggest or     Doesn’t try to
                    and suggests           suggested by           refine solutions,      solve problems or
                    solutions.             others                 but willing to try     help others solve
                                                                  solutions.             problems
Attitude            Always has a           Often has a            Sometimes has a        Often has a
                    positive attitude      positive attitude      positive attitude      negative attitude.

Source: “Customizable Rubrics”. Rubistar. February 26, 2005
         http://rubistar.4teachers.org
Class Participation Rubric:                                         Eighteenth Century Shopping
5
Students always take a voluntary, thoughtful, and active role in their own
learning, challenging themselves on a daily basis. Through participation and
inquiry, they consistently demonstrate a genuine desire to learn and share ideas
with the teacher and their classmates. They initiate discussions, ask significant
questions, and act as leaders within the group. They are willing to take risks,
to assert an opinion and support it, and to listen actively to others. These
students are always well prepared to contribute to the class as a result of
having thoughtfully completed assignments, and the thoroughness of their
work demonstrates the high regard they hold for learning.
4
Students consistently take an active role in their own learning. They
participate regularly in class discussions and frequently volunteer their ideas,
ask thoughtful questions, and defend opinions. They listen respectfully to
their classmates and are willing to share ideas as a result of having completed
assignments. Though never causing disruption to the class, these students do
not always demonstrate a consistent commitment to make the most out of our
class time each and every day.
3
Students sometimes take an active role in their own learning, sharing
relevant ideas and asking appropriate questions. Although reluctant to take
risks, they contribute regularly to class discussions. These students listen to
their classmates and respect their opinions. As a result of having completed
assignments, these students are prepared to answer questions when called
upon. They may need occasional reminders to stay on task.
2
Students occasionally take an active role in their own learning. They
participate and ask questions infrequently. They hesitate to share their ideas or
to take risks, and they may not always listen to or respect the opinions of
others. These students usually participate only when called upon. As a result
of assignments being sometimes incomplete or missing, they may not be
prepared to answer thoughtfully with detail or substance. These students need
regular reminders to stay on task.
1
Students rarely take an active role in their own learning. They often do not
participate and rarely share ideas or ask questions. These students display
poor listening skills, and they may be intolerant of the opinions of others. As
a result of being unprepared for or disengaged from class, these students often
refuse to offer ideas even when called upon.
Harvest Celebration
by Laura Gilbert
Social Studies, level: 3 – 5 grades

Materials: sticks, hoola hoops, marbles, string, deck of cards, plastic or wooden 9
bowling pins and ball, ring toss game, dice, hand stitching materials, blind man’s bluff,
hide and seek.

Activity Time: 2 days (one day to make props, second day to play)

National Standards: Culture (a,c,d); Time, Continuity, and Change (b,c,d,e,f); People,
Places, and Environments (a,b,c,g,h,k); Individual Development and Identity (b,d,e,f,g,h).

Objectives: Most often, colonists turned work into fun. Families invited neighbors to
help harvest, sheer sheep, or boil maple sugar. In return the family provided plenty of
food – and maybe a few games, music and some dancing. Students will make and play
traditional games at our pretend harvest festival. Students will discover that many of the
games played during colonial time are still played today. Students will also gain an
appreciation of how little time there was for playing.
                               Harvest Celebration
Lesson Activities:

Initiation:
Begin this activity by reading sections from chapter 5 in Miller’s Growing Up In A New
World to get the students excited and provide some ideas.

Explanation:
Brainstorm together as a class a list of activities they think would be present at a
harvesting. (KWL).
Using classroom resources, Internet websites and classroom materials, create in small
groups an authentic list of activities.
 Group together, as a class, and share information. Make sure to list ideas next to the
previous list and note comparisons and differences.
Allow students to sign up for various activities working individually or in groups of two.
Use the rest of class time to create games for tomorrow’s harvest.

Expansion:
Take students outside to play activities. Give each student a list of activities, from
yesterday’s class, and encourage them to play as many as possible. With the last 10
minutes of class, circle students together, sharing experiences, making comparisons
between now and then, and get feedback on what they thought of this activity. This
activity is a great P.E. extension.

Modifications:
For students with Asperger’s (autism): Discuss optimal communication patterns and
design communication strategies with special education teachers, parents and peers.
Make a point to design behavior plans with the IEP team and implement these plans.
This lesson allows students to participate as much or as little depending on behavior.

For students with ADHD: This harvest activity was designed specifically for the ADHD
student.

There is very little modification needed for students with learning disabilities as the
lesson is designed to be fun and assessment based on participation.
                        Harvest Celebration
Assessment:
                Excellent        Good              Needs           Not Acceptable
                                                   Improvement
Participation   Played most      Played some of Played one         Did not play
                games.           the games.        game.           any games.
Focus on game   Consistently     Focuses on task Focuses on task   Rarely focuses
                stayed on task   most of the       some of the     on task.
                                 time              time
Attitude        Always has a     Often has a       Sometimes has   Often has a
                positive         positive attitude a positive      negative
                attitude.                          attitude        attitude
Theme Project Organizer, Come to
Connecticut!
Adapted by Laura Gilbert
Social Studies, level: 3 – 5 grades

Materials: construction paper, yarn to bind, hole punch, art supplies, and all resources
discovered during unit

Activity Time: 4 weeks

National Standards: Culture (a,c,d); Time, Continuity, and Change (b,c,d,e,f); People,
Places, and Environments (a,b,c,g,h,k); Individual Development and Identity (b,d,e,f,g,h);
Individuals, Groups, and Institutions (a,b,d,e); Power, Authority, and Governance
(a,b,c,d,f,h); Production, Distribution, and Consumption (a,b,e,g,h,i); Science,
Technology, and Society (a.b.c); Global Connections (a,b); and Civic Ideals and Practices
(b,c,g,h,i,j).

Objectives: Understand history of the Connecticut colony, develop appreciation of
physical surroundings of the state, read and interpret various resources to build a creative
portfolio, cooperatively and individually research about colonial Connecticut, make
connections between now and then. Students will tap into their art skills and language
arts.
        Theme Project Organizer, Come to Connecticut!

Initiation:

Theme Project: Create a brochure that would attract settlers to the east coast of North
America in the 1700s.

Explanation:

Name_______________________________________________________
1. Choose a Town Pick one of the four towns below for your brochure. Put a checkmark
in the box of the town you choose.
     Windsor             Hartford             Saybrook              Wethersfield
2. Create a Map Use an outline map to create a map of your town. Make sure to label
each of the major structures in your town. (Ex. Meeting house, blacksmith, doctor)
    Map completed
3. Gather Facts To attract settlers to your town, your brochure will need to include
information about resources, environment, and opportunities there. As you work through
the unit gather facts about the town you chose.
     Theme Project Organizer, Come to Connecticut!
Geography: Some of the important landforms and bodies of water in my town are:
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Climate: The climate in the town is:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Natural Resources: The natural resources found in the town are:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
People: The Native American groups near the town are:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Other people in the town immigrated from these countries or geographic areas:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
           Theme Project Organizer, Come to Connecticut!

Government: The system of government in the town is:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Economy: The different ways in which people in the town make a living are:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Religion: The religious beliefs of the colonists in this town are:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Daily Life: Some interesting aspects of daily life include:
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Expansion:
4. Write Descriptions Write a one-paragraph description for the each of the above
aspects of your town. The purpose of the brochure is to convince people to come to the
town. Therefore, as your describe each aspect of the town, make sure you include how it
is a benefit for the settlers there.
Check off each description as you complete it.
    Description of geography completed
    Description of natural resources completed
    Description of people completed
    Description of government completed
    Description of economy completed
    Description of religion completed
    Description of daily life completed

5. Draw Pictures Create bold, strong images that will make settlers want to come to the
town. Create pictures for each of the descriptions above.
   Images created.

6. Create the Brochure Design a page for each aspect of your town. Give each page a
title, such as "Geography" or "Daily Life." Then arrange and paste in each description of
the town and the images that go with it. You may wish to create a separate page in the
front of the brochure for your map. Create a table of contents and a cover page for your
brochure. Then staple or tie the pages together. Share your brochure with your
classmates.
    Brochure completed
                                                   Theme Project Organizer, Come to Connecticut!
Assessment:
Name_______________________________________________
                    Come to Connecticut Brochure Rubric
             5               4               3                              2                  0
             Strong          Good            Acceptable                     Needs              Unacceptable
             Performance     Performance     Performance                    Improvement        Performance
Written Work Demonstrated Demonstrated Demonstrated                         Demonstrated       Demonstrated
             excellent       good research, acceptable                      fair research,     lack of
             research,       creativity &    research,                      creativity &       research,
             creativity &    evidence of     creativity &                   evidence of        creativity &
             evidence of     writing.        evidence of                    writing.           evidence of
             writing                         writing.                                          writing.
             process.
Descriptions Included all 7  Included all 6  Included 5                     Included 4         Included less
             descriptions.   descriptions    descriptions.                  descriptions.      than 4
                                                                                               descriptions.
Knowledge         Shows              Shows a good       Shows a             Shows a fair       Lacks
                  complete level     level of           moderate level      level of           understanding.
                  of                 understanding.     of                  understanding.
                  understanding.                        understanding.
Visual            Demonstrated       Demonstrated       Demonstrated        Demonstrated       Demonstrated
                  high level of      good level of      acceptable          fair level of      lack of
                  creativity,        creativity,        level of            creativity,        creativity,
                  colorfulness &     colorfulness &     creativity,         colorfulness &     colorfulness &
                  excellent          excellent          colorfulness &      excellent          excellent
                  attention to       attention to       excellent           attention to       attention to
                  detail             detail             attention to        detail             detail
                                                        detail
Lesson Source: http://www.proteacher.com/cgi-
bin/outsidesite.cgi?id=9844&external=http://www.eduplace.com/ss/wtp/level5/unit3/org.html&original=htt
p://www.proteacher.com/090021.shtml&title=Come%20to%20America
                           Colonial Market Place
         http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/score_lessons/market_to_market/pages/activities.html



Adapted by Laura Gilbert
Social Studies, level: 4-6 grades

Time allotment: On-going for one week.

National Standards: Culture (a,c,d); Time, Continuity, and Change (b,c,d,e,f); People,
Places, and Environments (a,b,c,g,h,k); Individual Development and Identity (b,d,e,f,g,h);
Individuals, Groups, and Institutions (a,b,d,e); Production, Distribution, and
Consumption (a,b,e,g,h,i); Science, Technology, and Society (a.b.c); Global Connections
(a,b).
Initiation to Colonial Market Place:
This is an activity that will take a while, but is very rewarding. Your students will create
a Virtual Museum based on a colonial market place. Students will research and create the
merchants shops they think might be found in a colonial town between 1700 and 1775.
Once they have decided on the types of shops, they then need to create the products that
might be found in those shops and how to make them. The following are some
crafts/products that can be made by students:

           Ouilting (paper squares and cloth quilts)        Candle Making
           Quilling                                         Embroidery
           Toys/Games                                       Corn Husk Dolls
           Ladies Fans                                      Crocheting
           Knitting                                         Tri-corn Hats
           Sun Dial                                         Game of Grace
           Silver Smith                                     Mop Caps
           Weather Vane                                     Stenciling
           Weaving (yarn or straw)                          Silhouettes
           Soap Carving                                     Ouill Writing
           Braided Rugs                                     Rope
           Papyrotamia                                      Puppets
           Tin Lanterns                                     Colonial Clothing

The majority of these crafts can be found in COLONIAL AMERICA COOPERATIVE
LEARNING ACTIVITIES and FELICITY books by American Girl. They may also want
to try some of the colonial food recipes in many of the books.
Assessment:
The students need to complete at least four of the crafts. Once the craft is complete, the
students write a short description of the craft, how they made it, and why/how it was used
in colonial times.

Name_______________________________________________

            Colonial Marketplace
             5               4                    3                 2                0
             Strong          Good                 Acceptable        Needs            Unacceptable
             Performance     Performance          Performance       Improvement      Performance
Written Work Demonstrated Demonstrated            Demonstrated      Demonstrated     Demonstrated
             excellent       good research,       acceptable        fair research,   lack of
             research,       shared how           research,         shared how       research, how
             shared how      and why &            shared how        and why &        and why &
             and why &       evidence of          and why &         evidence of      evidence of
             evidence of     writing.             evidence of       writing.         writing.
             writing                              writing.
             process.
Crafts       Completed at    Completed 4          Completed 3       Completed 2      Completed
             least 4 crafts  crafts.              crafts.           crafts.          one craft.
             or more
Knowledge    Shows           Shows a good         Shows a           Shows a fair     Lacks
             complete level level of              moderate level    level of         understanding.
             of              understanding.       of                understanding.
             understanding.                       understanding.
Visual       Demonstrated Demonstrated            Demonstrated      Demonstrated     Demonstrated
             high level of   good level of        acceptable        fair level of    lack of
             creativity,     creativity,          level of          creativity,      creativity,
             colorfulness & colorfulness &        creativity,       colorfulness &   colorfulness &
             excellent       excellent            colorfulness &    excellent        excellent
             attention to    attention to         excellent         attention to     attention to
             detail          detail               attention to      detail           detail
                                                  detail
     Activity to end your unit and move onto later explorations -
Have students make comparisons between colonial exploration and the
                       midwest (Oregon Trail)
Name of Software:    The Oregon Trail 5th edition
The software is published/year: The Learning
Company, 2001
The intended audience for use in educational
setting: 4th grade and up
Software category: Games
Subject matter: Social Studies/survival on the
Oregon Trail
Standard(s) from the CT frameworks: Studies
curriculum framework –
1 –Historical thinking, 2-Local, US and World
History, 3-Theme,
4-Applying History, and 9-Geography

				
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