Macbeth Anticipation Guide by hedongchenchen

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									Name: ________________________________                                    Date: ________________



                   Macbeth Anticipation Guide, Act I
Mark each of the following statements true or false prior to reading Act I of Macbeth. As you read
along and watch, record the answers to the questions that the play gives and the line numbers
where the answers can be found.

Statement                                                 Pre-Reading   Post-Reading     Line #s
1. At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is the king of
Scotland.
Explanation (post-reading)


2. At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is a war hero.
Explanation (post-reading)


3. Banquo is Macbeth’s best friend.
Explanation (post-reading)


4. The witches predict that Banquo will become king
of Scotland.
Explanation (post-reading)


5. Macbeth is dishonored by other nobles.
Explanation (post-reading)


6. Lady Macbeth is more ambitious than her husband.
Explanation (post-reading)


7. In Act I, Macbeth is a virtuous man.
Explanation (post-reading)


8. Macbeth respects the guest-host relationship.
Explanation (post-reading)


9. Macbeth persuades Lady Macbeth to murder
someone.
Explanation (post-reading)


10. Murder is a crime that one can easily forget and
recover from committing.
Explanation (post-reading)



Prior to beginning the play, write a journal entry expanding on your response to statement 10.
Justify your response, consider the other side and refute it as necessary. This response should be
a complete (at least 5 sentence) paragraph. You may write on the back of this page. Afterward,
note if you still agree with your original opinion.
Name: ________________________________                                   Date: ________________



                  Macbeth Anticipation Guide, Act II
Mark each of the following statements true or false prior to reading Act II of Macbeth. As you
read along and watch, record the answers to the questions that the play gives and the line
numbers where the answers can be found.

Statement                                               Pre-Reading    Post-Reading      Line #s
1. Banquo admits to Macbeth that he has been
thinking about the witches’ prophesies.
Explanation (post-reading)


2. Macbeth and Banquo agree to kill Duncan together.
Explanation (post-reading)


3. Macbeth hallucinates a dagger.
Explanation (post-reading)


4. Lady Macbeth commits murder.
Explanation (post-reading)


5. Duncan’s sons find their father’s body.
Explanation (post-reading)


6. Donalbain and Malcolm flee Scotland following
Duncan’s murder.
Explanation (post-reading)


7. Duncan’s guards are arrested and taken to jail to
await trial for the murder.
Explanation (post-reading)


8. Malcolm and Donalbain are suspected of murder.
Explanation (post-reading)


9. Macduff thinks Macbeth will be the next king and a
good one.
Explanation (post-reading)


10. The ends justify the means.
Explanation (post-reading)



Prior to beginning the play, write a journal entry expanding on your response to statement 10.
Justify your response, consider the other side and refute it as necessary. This response should be
a complete (at least 5 sentence) paragraph. You may write on the back of this page. Afterward,
note if you still agree with your original opinion.
Name: ________________________________                                   Date: ________________



                  Macbeth Anticipation Guide, Act III
Mark each of the following statements true or false prior to reading Act III of Macbeth. As you
read along and watch, record the answers to the questions that the play gives and the line
numbers where the answers can be found.

Statement                                                Pre-Reading   Post-Reading      Line #s
1. Banquo is suspicious of Macbeth.
Explanation (post-reading)


2. Macbeth becomes distrustful of Banquo.
Explanation (post-reading)


3. Macbeth plots to personally murder Banquo.
Explanation (post-reading)


4. Macbeth and Lady Macbeth maintain their close
relationship.
Explanation (post-reading)


5. Banquo is murdered, but his son escapes.
Explanation (post-reading)


6. All the nobles see Banquo’s ghost at dinner.
Explanation (post-reading)


7. Macbeth nearly admits to his crimes in a delusional
rant at dinner.
Explanation (post-reading)


8. Lady Macbeth remains strong throughout Act III.
Explanation (post-reading)


9. Macduff has gone to England to convince Malcolm
to fight Macbeth.
Explanation (post-reading)


10. Murder is a crime that one can easily forget and
recover from committing.
Explanation (post-reading)



Prior to beginning the play, write a journal entry expanding on your response to statement 10.
Justify your response, consider the other side and refute it as necessary. This response should be
a complete (at least 5 sentence) paragraph. You may write on the back of this page. Afterward,
note if you still agree with your original opinion.
Name: ________________________________                                     Date: ________________



                  Macbeth Anticipation Guide, Act IV
Mark each of the following statements true or false prior to reading Act IV of Macbeth. As you
read along and watch, record the answers to the questions that the play gives and the line
numbers where the answers can be found.

Statement                                                  Pre-Reading   Post-Reading    Line #s
1. Macbeth seeks out the witches for a new prophesy.
Explanation (post-reading)


2. The witches show Macbeth an armored head.
Explanation (post-reading)


3. Macbeth sees a clean, shiny baby.
Explanation (post-reading)


4. Macbeth hallucinates a child, wearing a crown and
holding a tree.
Explanation (post-reading)


5. Macbeth believes that Banquo’s descendants will
kill him to become kings.
Explanation (post-reading)


6. Lady Macduff tells her son that Macduff is a traitor.
Explanation (post-reading)


7. Macduff’s family is brutally murdered.
Explanation (post-reading)


8. Malcolm accuses himself of hypocrisy.
Explanation (post-reading)


9. Macduff wants Malcolm to be king despite his
sinful nature.
Explanation (post-reading)


10. Murder can be avenged by killing the murderer.
Explanation (post-reading)



Prior to beginning the play, write a journal entry expanding on your response to statement 10.
Justify your response, consider the other side and refute it as necessary. This response should be
a complete (at least 5 sentence) paragraph. You may write on the back of this page. Afterward,
note if you still agree with your original opinion.
Name: ________________________________                                   Date: ________________



                   Macbeth Anticipation Guide, Act V
Mark each of the following statements true or false prior to reading Act V of Macbeth. As you
read along and watch, record the answers to the questions that the play gives and the line
numbers where the answers can be found.

Statement                                              Pre-Reading    Post-Reading      Line #s
1. Lady Macbeth utters the famous line “Out, damned
spot!”
Explanation (post-reading)


2. Lady Macbeth admits her guilt in her sleep.
Explanation (post-reading)


3. Donalbain has returned with his brother, Malcolm.
Explanation (post-reading)


4. Macbeth does not think he can be defeated.
Explanation (post-reading)


5. Malcolm avoids Birnam Wood out of fear.
Explanation (post-reading)


6. Macbeth murders Lady Macbeth.
Explanation (post-reading)


7. Young Siward is killed in battle.
Explanation (post-reading)


8. Macbeth hopes to avoid battle with Macduff.
Explanation (post-reading)


9. Macbeth gives up in his final fight.
Explanation (post-reading)


10. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
Explanation (post-reading)



Prior to beginning the play, write a journal entry expanding on your response to statement 10.
Justify your response, consider the other side and refute it as necessary. This response should be
a complete (at least 5 sentence) paragraph. You may write on the back of this page. Afterward,
note if you still agree with your original opinion.

								
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