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					                                  AJHS 2011-2012


                 Golden Arrow Players

                   GAP Tour 2011-2012

The Frog Prince                                              P. 2
The Three Billy Goats Gruff                                  P. 9
The Three Little Pigs                                        P. 13
Little Red Riding Hood                                       P. 21
The Tortoise and the Hare                                    P. 27
Rapunzel                                                     P. 29


This script is your textbook for the first half of the semester. You are allowed to make marks in it
such as highlighting and blocking notes. Blocking notes should be in pencil. Bring this with you
everyday until November 3, 2011




                                                 1
                                The Frog Prince
                              By the Brothers Grimm
Cast – (6) Narrator 1, Narrator 2, Princess, Frog, King, Heinrich

                                     Narrator 1
One fine evening a young princess put on her bonnet and clogs, and went out to
take a walk by herself in a wood;

                                    Narrator 2
And when she came to a cool spring of water with a rose in the middle of it, she sat
herself down to rest a while.

                                     Narrator 1
Now she had a golden ball in her hand,

                                        Princess
Which was her favorite plaything;

                                      Narrator 2
And she was always tossing it up into the air, and catching it again as it fell.

                                        Narrator 1
After a time she threw it up so high that she missed catching it as it fell;

                                     Narrator 2
And the ball bounded away, and rolled along on the ground, until at last it fell
down into the spring.

                                       Narrator 1
The princess looked into the spring after her ball, but it was very deep, so deep that
she could not see the bottom of it.

                                        Narrator 2
She began to cry, and said,

                                       Princess
Alas! If I could only get my ball again, I would give all my fine clothes and jewels,
and everything that I have in the world.



                                           2
                                       Narrator 1
Whilst she was speaking, a frog put its head out of the water, and said,

                                      Frog
Princess, why do you weep so bitterly?

                                       Princess
Alas!

                                       Narrator 2
Said she,

                                     Princess
What can you do for me, you nasty frog? My golden ball has fallen into the spring.

                                       Narrator 1
The frog said,

                                       Frog
I do not want your pearls, and jewels, and fine clothes; but if you will love me, and
let me live with you and eat from off your golden plate, and sleep on your bed, I
will bring you your ball again.

                                       Princess
What nonsense,

                                       Narrator 2
Thought the princess,

                                        Princess
This silly frog is talking! He can never even get out of the spring to visit me,
though he may be able to get my ball for me, and therefore I will tell him he shall
have what he asks.

                                       Narrator 1
So she said to the frog,

                                       Princess
Well, if you will bring me my ball, I will do all you ask.



                                          3
                                     Narrator 2
Then the frog put his head down, and dived deep under the water;

                                       Narrator 1
And after a little while he came up again, with the ball in his mouth, and threw it
on the edge of the spring.

                                     Narrator 2
As soon as the young princess saw her ball, she ran to pick it up;

                                         Narrator 1
And she was so overjoyed to have it in her hand again, that she never thought of
the frog, but ran home with it as fast as she could.

                                       Narrator 2
The frog called after her,

                                      Frog
Stay, princess, and take me with you as you said,

                                       Narrator 1
But she did not stop to hear a word.

                                        Narrator 2
The next day, just as the princess had sat down to dinner, she heard a strange noise

                                       Frog
Tap, tap - plash, plash –

                                    Princess
As if something was coming up the marble staircase,

                                     Narrator 1
And soon afterwards there was a gentle knock at the door, and a little voice cried
out and said:

                                        Frog
Open the door, my princess dear, Open the door to thy true love here! And mind
the words that thou and I said by the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade.



                                          4
                                       Narrator2
Then the princess ran to the door and opened it, and there she saw the frog, whom
she had quite forgotten.

                                        Narrator 1
At this sight she was sadly frightened, and shutting the door as fast as she could
came back to her seat.

                                       Narrator 2
The king, her father, seeing that something had frightened her, asked her

                                       King
What was the matter.
                                       Princess
There is a nasty frog,

                                       Narrator 1
Said she,

                                        Princess
At the door, that lifted my ball for me out of the spring this morning. I told him
that he should live with me here, thinking that he could never get out of the spring;
but there he is at the door, and he wants to come in.

                                    Narrator 2
While she was speaking the frog knocked again at the door, and said:

                                       Frog
Open the door, my princess dear, Open the door to thy true love here! And mind
the words that thou and I said By the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade.

                                      Narrator 1
Then the king said to the young princess,

                                   King
As you have given your word you must keep it; so go and let him in.




                                          5
                                        Narrator 2
She did so, and the frog hopped into the room, and then straight on from the
bottom of the room to the top, till he came up close to the table where the princess
sat.
                                        Frog
Pray lift me upon chair,

                                        Narrator 1
Said he to the princess,

                                        Frog
And let me sit next to you.

                                       Narrator 2
As soon as she had done this, the frog said,

                                       Frog
Put your plate nearer to me, that I may eat out of it.

                                      Narrator 1
This she did, and when he had eaten as much as he could, he said,

                                       Frog
Now I am tired; carry me upstairs, so I may sleep.

                                      Narrator 2
And the princess, though very unwilling, took him up in her hand, and put him
upon the pillow of her own bed, where he slept all night long.

                                       Narrator 1
As soon as it was light the frog jumped up, hopped downstairs, and went out of the
house.

                                        Princess
Now, then,

                                        Narrator 2
Thought the princess,




                                           6
                                         Princess
At last he is gone, and I shall be troubled with him no more.

                                     Narrator 1
But she was mistaken; for when night came again she heard the same tapping at the
door; and the frog came once more, and said:

                                       Frog
Open the door, my princess dear, Open the door to thy true love here! And mind
the words that thou and I said By the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade.'

                                    Narrator 2
And when the princess opened the door the frog came in, and slept upon her pillow
as before, till the morning broke.

                                       Narrator 1
And the third night he did the same.

                                       Narrator 2
But when the princess awoke on the following morning she was astonished to see,
instead of the frog, a handsome prince, gazing on her with the most beautiful eyes
she had ever seen and standing at the head of her bed.

                                      Narrator 1
He told her that he had been enchanted by a spiteful fairy, who had changed him
into a frog;

                                        Narrator 2
And that he had been fated so to abide till some princess should take him out of the
spring, and let him eat from her plate, and sleep upon her bed for three nights.

                                       Frog
You,

                                       Narrator 1
Said the prince,




                                         7
                                      Frog
Have broken his cruel charm, and now I have nothing to wish for but that you
should go with me into my father's kingdom, where we shall live happily as long as
you live.

                                     Narrator 2
The young princess, you may be sure, was not long in saying

                                       Princess
Yes

                                        Narrator 1
To all this; and as they spoke a brightly colored coach drove up, with eight
beautiful horses, decked with plumes of feathers and a golden harness;

                                      Narrator 2
And behind the coach rode the prince's servant, faithful Heinrich,

                                         Heinrich
Who had bewailed the misfortunes of his dear master during his enchantment so
long and so bitterly, that his heart had well-nigh burst.

                                         Narrator 1
They then took leave of the king, and got into the coach with eight horses, and all
set out, full of joy and merriment, for the prince's kingdom, which they reached
safely;

                                      Narrator 2
And there they lived happily a great many years.




                                          8
                                The Three Billy Goats Gruff
                                         A Folktale from Norway

                                     Adapted by Luke William Hunt

Cast – (6) Narrator 1, Narrator 2, Billy Goat 1, Billy Goat 2, Billy Goat 3, Troll



                               Narrator 1
Once upon a time there were three billy goats, who were to go up to the hillside to
make themselves fat, and the name of all three was

                                              All Billy Goats
Gruff.

                                  Narrator 2
On the way up was a bridge over a cascading stream they had to cross; and under
the bridge lived a great ugly troll,

                                Troll
With eyes as big as saucers, and a nose as long as a poker.

                                 Narrator 1
So first of all came the youngest Billy Goat Gruff to cross the bridge.

                                              First Billy Goat
Trip, trap, trip, trap!

                                              Narrator 2
Went the bridge.

                                Troll
Who's that tripping over my bridge?

                                              Narrator 1
Roared the troll.

                                              First Billy Goat



                                                           9
Oh, it is only I, the tiniest Billy Goat Gruff , and I'm going up to the hillside to
make myself fat.

                                      Narrator 2
Said the billy goat

                                      First Billy Goat
With such a small voice.


                              Troll
Now, I'm coming to gobble you up!


                                 First Billy Goat
Oh, no! pray don't take me. I'm too little, that I am. Wait a bit till the second Billy
Goat Gruff comes. He's much bigger.

                                      Troll
Well, be off with you.

                                      Narrator 1
Said the troll.

                                 Narrator 2
A little while after came the second Billy Goat Gruff to cross the bridge.

                                      First & Second Billy Goats
Trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap!

                                      Narrator 1
Went the bridge.

                                Troll
Who's that tripping over my bridge?

                                      Narrator 2
Roared the troll.

                                      Second Billy Goat


                                              10
Oh, it's the second Billy Goat Gruff , and I'm going up to the hillside to make
myself fat.

                                      Narrator 1
Said the billy goat.

                                      Second Billy Goat
Who hadn't such a small voice.

                             Troll
Now I'm coming to gobble you up.

                                Second Billy Goat
Oh, no! Don't take me. Wait a little till the big Billy Goat Gruff comes. He's much
bigger.

                                      Troll
Very well! Be off with you.

                                      Narrator 2
Said the troll.


                                Narrator 1
But just then up came the big Billy Goat Gruff.

                                      All Three Billy Goats
Trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap!

                                 Narrator 2
Went the bridge, for the billy goat was so heavy that the bridge creaked and
groaned under him.

                              Troll
Who's that tramping over my bridge?

                                      Narrator 1
Roared the troll.

                                      Third Billy Goat


                                              11
It is I! The big Billy Goat Gruff!

                                     Narrator 2
Said the billy goat,

                              Third Billy Goat
Who had an ugly hoarse voice of his own.

                             Troll
Now I'm coming to gobble you up!

                                     Narrator 1
Roared the troll.

                                     Third Billy Goat
                       Well, come along! I've got two stones,
                       And I'll crush you to bits, body and bones.


                                 Narrator 2
That was what the big billy goat said. And then he flew at the troll, and tossed him
out into the river.
                                 Narrator 1
And after that he went up to the hillside. There the billy goats got so fat they were
scarcely able to walk home again.

                                   Narrator 2
And if the fat hasn't fallen off them, why, they're still fat; and so,

                                     All Three Billy Goats
                       Snip, snap, snout.
                       This tale's told out.




                                               12
                    The Story of the Three Little Pigs
                                  An English Folk Tale

Cast (7)– Narrator 1, Narrator 2, First Pig, Salesman, Wolf, Second Pig, Third Pig

                                        Narrator 1
There was an old sow with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep
them, she sent them out to seek their fortune.

                                       Narrator 2
The first that went off met a man with a bundle of straw, and said to him:

                                       First Pig
Please, man, give me that straw to build me a house.

                                            Straw Salesman
Which the man did,

                                            First Pig
And the little pig built a house with it.

                                     Narrator 1
Presently came along a wolf, and knocked at the door, and said:

                                            Wolf
Little pig, little pig, let me come in.

                                            Narrator 2
To which the pig answered:

                                      First Pig
No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin.

                                            Narrator 1
The wolf then answered to that:

                                           Wolf
Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in.




                                              13
                                          Narrator 2
So he huffed,

                                          Narrator 1
And he puffed,

                                          Both Narrators
And he blew his house in,

                                          Narrator 2
And he ate up the little pig.

                                          Wolf
Om nom nom!

                                      Narrator 1
The second little pig met a man with a bundle of furze and said:

                                       Second Pig
Please, man, give me that furze to build a house.

                                          Salesman
Which the man did,

                                          Second Pig
And the pig built his house.

                                          Narrator 2
Then along came the wolf, and said:

                                          Wolf
Little pig, little pig, let me come in.

                                      Second Pig
No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin.

                                           Wolf
Then I'll puff, and I'll huff, and I'll blow your house in.




                                            14
                                          Narrator 1
So he huffed,

                                          Narrator 2
And he puffed,

                                          Both Narrators
And he blew his house in,

                                          Narrator 1
And he ate up the little pig.

                                          Wolf
Om nom nom!

                                        Narrator 2
The third little pig met a man with a load of bricks, and said:

                                      Third Pig
Please, man, give me those bricks to build a house with.

                                          Salesman
So the man gave him the bricks,

                                          Third Pig
And he built his house with them.

                                       Narrator 1
So the wolf came, as he did to the other little pigs, and said:

                                          Wolf
Little pig, little pig, let me come in.

                                      Third Pig
No, no, by the hair on my chiny chin chin.

                                           Wolf
Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in.




                                            15
                                        Narrator 2
Well, he huffed,

                                        Narrator 1
And he puffed,

                                        Narrator 2
And he huffed

                                        Narrator 1
And he puffed,

                                        Narrator 2
And he puffed

                                        Narrator 1
And huffed;

                                        Both Narrators
But he could not get the house down.

                                     Narrator 2
When he found that he could not, with all his huffing and puffing, blow the house
down, he said:


                                        Wolf
Little pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips.

                                        Third Pig
Where?

                                        Narrator 1
Said the little pig.

                                        Wolf
Oh, in Mr. Smith's Home-field, and if you will be ready to-morrow morning I will
call for you, and we will go together, and get some for dinner.




                                           16
                                        Third Pig
Very well,

                                        Narrator 2
Said the little pig,

                                     Third Pig
I will be ready. What time do you mean to go?

                                        Wolf
Oh, at six o'clock.

                                          Narrator 1
Well, the little pig got up at five, and got the turnips before the wolf came

                                        Narrator 2
Which he did about six, who said:

                                        Wolf
Little pig, are you ready?

                                        Narrator 1
The little pig said:

                                    Third Pig
Ready! I have been and come back again, and got a nice potful for dinner.

                                        Narrator 2
The wolf felt very angry at this, but thought that he would be up to the little pig
somehow or other, so he said:

                                        Wolf
Little pig, I know where there is a nice apple-tree.

                                        Third Pig
Where?

                                        Narrator 1
Said the pig.



                                          17
                                         Wolf
Down at Merry-garden,

                                         Narrator 2
Replied the wolf,

                                       Wolf
And if you will not deceive me I will come for you at five o'clock to-morrow and
get some apples.

                                         Narrator 1
Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning at four o'clock, and went off for the
apples, hoping to get back before the wolf came;

                                        Narrator 2
But he had further to go, and had to climb the tree, so that just as he was coming
down from it, he saw the wolf coming which, as you may suppose, frightened him
very much.

                                         Narrator 1
When the wolf came up he said:

                                       Wolf
Little pig, what! are you here before me? Are they nice apples?

                                         Third Pig
Yes, very. I will throw you down one.

                                        Narrator 2
And he threw it so far, that, while the wolf was gone to pick it up, the little pig
jumped down and ran home.

                                     Narrator 1
The next day the wolf came again, and said to the little pig:

                                           Wolf
Little pig, there is a fair at Shanklin this afternoon, will you go?

                                       Third Pig
Oh yes, I will go; what time shall you be ready?


                                           18
                                        Wolf
At three.

                                        Narrator 2
Said the wolf.

                                         Narrator 1
So the little pig went off before the time as usual, and got to the fair, and bought a
butter-churn, which he was going home with, when he saw the wolf coming.

                                        Narrator 2
Then he could not tell what to do. So he got into the churn to hide, and by so doing
turned it round, and it rolled down the hill with the pig in it, which frightened the
wolf so much, that he ran home without going to the fair.

                                        Narrator 1
He went to the little pig's house,

                                    Wolf
And told him how frightened he had been by a great round thing which came down
the hill past him.

                                        Narrator 2
Then the little pig said:

                                        Third Pig
Hah, I frightened you, then. I had been to the fair and bought a butter-churn, and
when I saw you, I got into it, and rolled down the hill.

                                     Narrator 1
Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he would eat up the little pig,
and that he would get down the chimney after him.

                                        Narrator 2
When the little pig saw what he was about, he hung on the pot full of water, and
made up a blazing fire, and, just as the wolf was coming down, took off the cover,
and in fell the wolf;



                                          19
                                         Narrator 1
So the little pig put on the cover again in an instant, boiled him up, and ate him for
supper,

                                        Third Pig
Om nom nom

                                        Both Narrators
And lived happy ever afterwards.




                                          20
Little Red Riding Hood
                              By the Brothers Grimm
Cast – (7) Narrator 1, Narrator 2, Mother, Red, Wolf, Grandma, Huntsman

                                   Narrator 1
Once upon a time there was a sweet little girl.

                                  Narrator 2
Everyone who saw her liked her, but most of all her grandmother, who did not
know what to give the child next.

                                    Narrator 1
Once she gave her a little cap made of red velvet.

                                     Narrator 2
Because it suited her so well, and she wanted to wear it all the time, she came to
be known as Little Red Riding Hood.

                                     Narrator 1
One day her mother said to her,

                                      Mother
 Come Little Red Riding Hood. Here is some cake. Take it to your grandmother.
She is sick and weak, and it will do her well. Mind your manners and give her my
greetings. Behave yourself on the way, and do not leave the path, or you might fall
      down and smash the cake, and then there will be nothing for your sick
                                   grandmother.

                                     Red
Little Red Riding Hood promised to obey her mother.

                                   Narrator 2
The grandmother lived out in the woods, a half hour from the village.

                                 Narrator 1
When Little Red Riding Hood entered the woods a wolf came up to her.

                                  Narrator 2
She did not know what a wicked animal he was, and was not afraid of him.



                                        21
                                     Wolf
Good day to you, Little Red Riding Hood.

                                       Red
Thank you, wolf.

                                       Wolf
Where are you going so early, Little Red Riding Hood?


                                       Red
To grandmother's.

                                     Wolf
And what are you carrying under your apron?

                                       Red
Grandmother is sick and weak, and I am taking her some cake and wine. We
baked yesterday, and they should give her strength.

                                     Wolf
Little Red Riding Hood, just where does your grandmother live?

                                        Red
Her house is a good quarter hour from here in the woods, under the three large oak
trees. There's a hedge of hazel bushes there. You must know the place,

                                    Narrator 1
Said Little Red Riding Hood.

                                    Narrator 2
The wolf thought to himself,

                                        Wolf
Now there is a tasty bite for me. Just how are you going to catch her?

                                    Narrator 1
Then he said,

                                       Wolf


                                        22
Listen, Little Red Riding Hood, haven't you seen the beautiful flowers that are
blossoming in the woods? Why don't you go and take a look? And I don't believe
you can hear how beautifully the birds are singing. You are walking along as
though you were on your way to school in the village. It is very beautiful in the
woods.

                                   Narrator 2
Little Red Riding Hood opened her eyes and saw the sunlight breaking through
the trees and how the ground was covered with beautiful flowers. She thought,

                                        Red
If a take a bouquet to grandmother, she will be very pleased. Anyway, it is still
early, and I'll be home on time.

                                   Narrator 1
And she ran off into the woods looking for flowers.

                                      Narrator 2
Each time she picked one she thought that she could see an even more beautiful
one a little way off, and she ran after it, going further and further into the woods.

                                     Narrator 1
But the wolf ran straight to the grandmother's house and knocked on the door.

                                      Grandma
Who's there?

                                      Wolf
Little Red Riding Hood. I'm bringing you some cake and wine. Open the door for
me.

                                      Grandma
Just press the latch,

                                      Narrator 2
Called out the grandmother.

                                      Grandma
I'm too weak to get up.



                                          23
                                     Narrator 1
The wolf pressed the latch, and the door opened.

                                     Narrator 2
He stepped inside, went straight to the grandmother's bed, and ate her up.

                                    Narrator 1
Then he took her clothes, put them on, and put her cap on his head.

                                    Narrator 2
He got into her bed and pulled the curtains shut.

                                    Narrator 1
Little Red Riding Hood had run after flowers, and did not continue on her way to
grandmother's until she had gathered all that she could carry.

                                    Narrator 2
When she arrived, she found, to her surprise, that the door was open.

                                    Narrator 1
She walked into the parlor, and everything looked so strange that she thought,

                                        Red
Oh, why am I so afraid? I usually like it at grandmother's.

                                   Narrator 2
Then she went to the bed and pulled back the curtains.

                                  Narrator 1
Grandmother was lying there with her cap pulled down over her face and looking
very strange.

                                     Red
Oh, grandmother, what big ears you have!

                                       Wolf
All the better to hear you with.

                                     Red
Oh, grandmother, what big eyes you have!


                                        24
                                        Wolf
All the better to see you with.

                                     Red
Oh, grandmother, what big hands you have!

                                        Wolf
All the better to grab you with!

                                      Red
Oh, grandmother, what a horribly big mouth you have!

                                        Wolf
All the better to eat you with!

                                   Narrator 2
And with that he jumped out of bed, jumped on top of poor Little Red Riding
Hood, and ate her up.

                                    Narrator 1
As soon as the wolf had finished this tasty bite, he climbed back into bed, fell
asleep, and began to snore very loudly.

                                     Narrator 2
A huntsman was just passing by.

                                     Narrator 1
He thought it strange that the old woman was snoring so loudly, so he decided to
take a look.

                                    Narrator 2
He stepped inside, and in the bed there lay the wolf that he had been hunting for
such a long time.

                                   Huntsman
"He has eaten the grandmother, but perhaps she still can be saved.

                                  Narrator 1
Thought the huntsman. So he took a pair of scissors and cut open his belly.


                                         25
                                   Narrator 2
He had cut only a few strokes when he saw the red cap shining through.

                                      Narrator 1
He cut a little more, and the girl jumped out and cried,

                                        Red
Oh, I was so frightened! It was so dark inside the wolf's belly!

                                 Narrator 1
And then the grandmother came out alive as well.

                                  Narrator 2
Then Little Red Riding Hood fetched some large heavy stones.

                                    Narrator 1
They filled the wolf's body with them, and when he woke up and tried to run
away, he couldn’t

                                     Narrator 2
The three of them were happy.

                                    Narrator 1
They ate the cake that Little Red Riding Hood had brought.

                                 Narrator 2
And Little Red Riding Hood thought to herself,

                                          Red
As long as I live, I will never leave the path and run off into the woods by myself
if mother tells me not to.




                                         26
                                 The Tortoise and the Hare
                                       From Aesop’s Fables

Cast – (4) Narrator 1, Narrator 2, Hare, Tortoise, (3-5 extras)

                              Narrator 1
The Hare was once boasting of his speed before the other animals.

                                      Hare
I have never yet been beaten,

                                      Narrator 2
Said he,

                                Hare
When I put forth my full speed, I challenge anyone here to race with me.

                                      Narrator 1
The Tortoise said quietly,

                                      Tortoise
I accept your challenge.

                                      Hare
That is a good joke,

                                      Narrator 2
Said the Hare;

                                Hare
I could dance round you all the way.

                                Tortoise
Keep your boasting till you've won,

                                      Narrator 1
Answered the Tortoise.



                                                 27
                                Tortoise
Shall we race?

                                Narrator 2
So a course was fixed and a start was made.

                                Narrator 1
The Hare darted almost out of sight at once, but soon stopped and, to show his
contempt for the Tortoise, lay down to have a nap.

                                 Narrator 2
The Tortoise plodded on and plodded on, and when the Hare awoke from his nap,
he saw the Tortoise just near the winning-post and could not run up in time to save
the race.

                                Narrator 1
Then said the Tortoise:

                                Tortoise
Plodding wins the race.


                                     The End




                                        28
                                    Rapunzel
                              By the Brothers Grimm

Cast – (7) Narrator 1, Narrator 2, Husband, Wife, Witch, Rapunzel, Prince

                                     Narrator 1
Once upon a time there lived a man and his wife who were very unhappy because
they had no children.

                                         Narrator 2
These good people had a little window at the back of their house, which looked
into the most lovely garden, full of all manner of beautiful flowers and vegetables;

                                      Narrator 1
But the garden was surrounded by a high wall, and no one dared to enter it, for it
belonged to a witch of great power, who was feared by the whole world.

                                    Narrator 2
One day the woman stood at the window overlooking the garden, and saw there a
bed full of the finest lettuce.

                                      Narrator 1
The leaves looked so fresh and green that she longed to eat them.

                                      Narrator 2
The desire grew day by day, and just because she knew she couldn't possibly get
any, she pined away and became quite pale and wretched.

                                   Narrator 1
Then her husband grew alarmed and said:

                                       Husband
What ails you, dear wife?

                                       Wife
Oh,




                                         29
                                        Narrator 2
She answered,

                                          Wife
If I don't get some lettuce to eat out of the garden behind the house, I know I shall
die.

                                    Narrator 1
The man, who loved her dearly, thought to himself,

                                      Husband
Come! Rather than let your wife die you shall fetch her some lettuce, no matter the
cost!

                                       Narrator 2
So at dusk he climbed over the wall into the witch's garden, and, hastily gathering a
handful of lettuce leaves, he returned with them to his wife.

                                      Narrator 1
She made them into a salad, which tasted so good that her longing for the
forbidden food was greater than ever.

                                     Narrator 2
If she were to know any peace of mind, there was nothing for it but that her
husband should climb over the garden wall again, and fetch her some more.

                                       Narrator 1
So at dusk over he got, but when he reached the other side he drew back in terror,
for there, standing before him, was the old witch.

                                        Witch
How dare you,

                                        Narrator 2
She said, with a wrathful glance,

                                     Witch
Climb into my garden and steal my lettuce like a common thief? You shall suffer
for your foolhardiness.



                                          30
                                       Husband
Oh!

                                       Narrator 1
He implored,

                                        Husband
Pardon my presumption; necessity alone drove me to the deed. My wife saw your
lettuce from her window, and had such a desire for it that she would certainly have
died if her wish had not been gratified.

                                       Narrator 2
Then the Witch's anger was a little appeased, and she said:

                                         Witch
If it's as you say, you may take as much lettuce away with you as you like, but on
one condition only -- that you give me the child your wife will shortly bring into
the world. All shall go well with it, and I will look after it like a mother.

                                         Narrator 1
The man in his terror agreed to everything she asked, and as soon as the child was
born the Witch appeared, and having given it the name of Rapunzel, which is the
same as lettuce, she carried it off with her.

                                      Narrator 2
Rapunzel was the most beautiful child under the sun.

                                      Narrator 1
When she was twelve years old the Witch shut her up in a tower in the middle of a
great wood, and the tower had neither stairs or doors, only high up at the very top a
small window.

                                     Narrator 2
When the old Witch wanted to get in she stood underneath and called out:

                                    Witch
Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your golden hair!




                                         31
                                     Narrator 1
For Rapunzel had wonderful long hair, and it was as fine as spun gold.

                                     Rapunzel
Whenever she heard the Witch's voice she unloosed her hair and let it fall down out
of the window about twenty yards below, and the old Witch climbed up by it.

                                        Narrator 2
After they had lived like this for a few years, it happened one day that a Prince was
riding through the wood and passed by the tower.

                                     Narrator 1
As he drew near it he heard someone singing so sweetly that he stood still spell-
bound, and listened.

                                       Prince
It was Rapunzel in her loneliness trying to while away the time by letting her sweet
voice ring out into the wood.

                                      Narrator 2
The Prince longed to see the owner of the voice, but he sought in vain for a door in
the tower.

                                    Narrator 1
He rode home, but he was so haunted by the song he had heard that he returned
every day to the wood and listened.

                                    Narrator 2
One day, when he was standing thus behind a tree, he saw the old Witch approach
and heard her call out:

                                   Witch
Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your golden hair.

                                       Rapunzel
Then Rapunzel let down her plaits,

                                       Witch
And the Witch climbed up by them.



                                         32
                                         Prince
So that's the staircase, is it?

                                         Narrator 1
Said the Prince.

                                       Prince
Then I too will climb it and try my luck.

                                      Narrator 2
So on the following day, at dusk, he went to the foot of the tower and cried:

                                   Prince
Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your golden hair,

                                       Narrator 1
And as soon as she had let it down the Prince climbed up.

                                       Narrator 2
At first Rapunzel was terribly frightened when a man came in,

                                         Rapunzel
For she had never seen one before;

                                         Narrator 1
But the Prince spoke to her so kindly,

                                        Prince
And told her at once that his heart had been so touched by her singing, that he felt
he should know no peace of mind till he had seen her.

                                      Narrator 2
Very soon Rapunzel forgot her fear, and when he asked her to marry him, she
consented at once.

                                         Rapunzel
For,
                                         Narrator 1
She thought,



                                           33
                                      Rapunzel
He is young and handsome, and I'll certainly be happier with him than with the old
witch.

                                       Narrator 2
So she put her hand in his and said:

                                       Rapunzel
Yes, I will gladly go with you, only how am I to get down out of the tower?

                                         Prince
Every time I come to see you I will bring some silk with me, and you can make a
ladder out of it, and when it is finished you can climb down by it. Then I will take
you away on my horse.

                                        Narrator 1
They arranged that till the ladder was ready, he was to come to her every evening,
because the old woman was with her during the day.

                                     Narrator 2
The old Witch, of course, knew nothing of what was going on, till one day
Rapunzel, not thinking of what she was about, turned to the Witch and said:

                                       Rapunzel
How is it, good mother, that you are so much harder to pull up than the young
Prince? He is always with me in a moment.

                                       Witch
Oh! You wicked child!

                                       Narrator 1
Cried the Witch.

                                        Witch
What is this I hear? I thought I had hidden you safely from the whole world and in
spite of it you have managed to deceive me!




                                         34
                                       Narrator 2
In her wrath she seized Rapunzel's beautiful hair, wound it round and round her left
hand and then grasping a pair of scissors in her right, snip snap, off it came, and the
beautiful hair lay on the ground.

                                          Narrator 1
And, worse than this, she was so hard-hearted that she took Rapunzel to a lonely
desert place and there left her to live in loneliness and misery.

                                       Narrator 2
But on the evening of the day in which she had driven poor Rapunzel away, the
Witch fastened the hair on to a hook in the window, and when the Prince came and
called out:

                                   Prince
Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your golden hair,

                                      Narrator 1
She let them down, and the Prince climbed up as usual, but instead of his beloved
Rapunzel he found the old Witch, who fixed her evil, glittering eyes on him, and
cried mockingly:

                                        Witch
Ah, ah! You thought to find your lady love, but the pretty bird has flown and its
song is dumb; the cat caught it, and will scratch out your eyes too. Rapunzel is lost
to you for ever -- you will never see her more.

                                     Narrator 2
The Prince was beside himself with grief, and in his despair he jumped right down
from the tower, and, though he escaped with his life, the thorns among which he
fell pierced his eyes.

                                     Narrator 1
Then he wandered, blind and miserable, through the wood, eating nothing but roots
and berries, and weeping and lamenting the loss of his lovely bride.

                                        Narrator 2
So he wandered about for some years, as wretched and unhappy as he could well
be, and at last he came to the desert place where Rapunzel was living.



                                          35
                                      Prince
All of a sudden he heard a voice which seemed strangely familiar to him.

                                       Narrator 1
He walked eagerly in the direction of the sound, and when he was quite close,
Rapunzel recognized him and fell on his neck and wept.

                                       Narrator 2
Two of her tears fell and touched his eyes, and in a moment they became quite
clear again, and he saw as well as he had ever done.

                                        Narrator 1
Then he led her to his kingdom, where they were received and welcomed with
great joy, and they lived happily ever after.




                                        36

				
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